History TabletopGame / Warhammer

2nd Feb '18 12:59:10 PM Xtifr
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* TheKingdom: Bretonnia, although they aren't defenseless by any means, and whilst possessing knights in shining armour and damsels in distress there's a lot of oppressed peasants taxed almost to (or sometimes past) starvation (ridiculous 90% taxes!) to pay for armour polish and gowns.
22nd Jan '18 1:07:12 PM Locoman
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* SchizoTech: The Empire's up to rifled firearms supplemented by gigantic cannons and steam-powered tanks. The Dwarfs have gyrocopters, submarines, and ironclad ships. Thanks to {{Magitek}}, the Skaven have jezails, ratling guns, giant hamster wheels that shoot lightning, or really huge death rays, portable nuclear reactors, and what seems to be three different types of nukes. Meanwhile, the High Elves still use chariots and bolt-throwers, while the orcs have just enough know-wotz to slap together a "rock lobber," except for Snotlings, whose steam-powered Pump Wagon is remarkably good engineering from a species that might, with training, eventually rise to be considered dumb as posts. Though elves focus more on magic than technology and a well-trained elf archer tends to be as useful as any fellow with a musket.

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* SchizoTech: The Empire's up to rifled firearms supplemented by gigantic cannons and steam-powered tanks. The Dwarfs have gyrocopters, submarines, and ironclad ships. Thanks to {{Magitek}}, the Skaven have jezails, ratling guns, giant hamster wheels that shoot lightning, or really huge death rays, portable nuclear reactors, and what seems to be three different types of nukes. Meanwhile, the High Elves still use chariots and bolt-throwers, while the orcs have just enough know-wotz to slap together a "rock lobber," except for Snotlings, whose steam-powered Pump Wagon is remarkably good engineering from a species that might, with training, eventually rise to be considered dumb as posts. Though elves focus more on magic than technology and a well-trained elf archer tends to be as useful as any fellow with a musket. The Lizardmen, by contrast, rely on Stone Age weaponry like cudgels and javelins, though this is supplemented by a healthy dose of Old One magic.
20th Jan '18 10:39:28 PM bigbossbalrog
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The setting had a few computer games, among them ''VideoGame/WarhammerShadowOfTheHornedRat'', ''Videogame/WarhammerDarkOmen'', ''VideoGame/WarhammerOnline'' and ''VideoGame/WarhammerMarkOfChaos'' with varying reception, and a large number of novels, such as ''Literature/{{Drachenfels}}'' and the ''Literature/GotrekAndFelix'' series. Recently, the makers of the Total War series have announced that they have entered a partnership with Games Workshop to create more computer games based off this setting. Those sacrifices you made to Khorne seem to have paid off. There is also a FPS shooter game set in the End Times setting appropriately titles VideoGame/TheEndTimesVermintide, and [[BetterThenCanon the beloved]] ''VideoGame/TotalWarWarhammer'' series. It has also given inspiration to non-RPG table games, such as ''Chaos Invasion'' and ''TabletopGame/ChaosMarauders''. It also spawned a relatively long-running (and decently successful) ''CollectibleCardGame'' simply known as Warcry, although the mechanics of the game were very close to the actual miniatures game.

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The setting had a few computer games, among them ''VideoGame/WarhammerShadowOfTheHornedRat'', ''Videogame/WarhammerDarkOmen'', ''VideoGame/WarhammerOnline'' and ''VideoGame/WarhammerMarkOfChaos'' with varying reception, and a large number of novels, such as ''Literature/{{Drachenfels}}'' and the ''Literature/GotrekAndFelix'' series. Recently, the makers of the Total War series have announced that they have entered a partnership with Games Workshop to create more computer games based off this setting. Those sacrifices you made to Khorne seem to have paid off. There is also a FPS shooter game set in the End Times setting appropriately titles VideoGame/TheEndTimesVermintide, and [[BetterThenCanon [[BetterThanCanon the beloved]] ''VideoGame/TotalWarWarhammer'' series. It has also given inspiration to non-RPG table games, such as ''Chaos Invasion'' and ''TabletopGame/ChaosMarauders''. It also spawned a relatively long-running (and decently successful) ''CollectibleCardGame'' simply known as Warcry, although the mechanics of the game were very close to the actual miniatures game.
20th Jan '18 10:38:47 PM bigbossbalrog
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The setting had a few computer games, among them ''VideoGame/WarhammerShadowOfTheHornedRat'', ''Videogame/WarhammerDarkOmen'', ''VideoGame/WarhammerOnline'' and ''VideoGame/WarhammerMarkOfChaos'' with varying reception, and a large number of novels, such as ''Literature/{{Drachenfels}}'' and the ''Literature/GotrekAndFelix'' series. Recently, the makers of the Total War series have announced that they have entered a partnership with Games Workshop to create more computer games based off this setting. Those sacrifices you made to Khorne seem to have paid off. There is also a FPS shooter game set in the End Times setting appropriately titles VideoGame/TheEndTimesVermintide, and an RTS ''VideoGame/TotalWarWarhammer''. It has also given inspiration to non-RPG table games, such as ''Chaos Invasion'' and ''TabletopGame/ChaosMarauders''. It also spawned a relatively long-running (and decently successful) ''CollectibleCardGame'' simply known as Warcry, although the mechanics of the game were very close to the actual miniatures game.

to:

The setting had a few computer games, among them ''VideoGame/WarhammerShadowOfTheHornedRat'', ''Videogame/WarhammerDarkOmen'', ''VideoGame/WarhammerOnline'' and ''VideoGame/WarhammerMarkOfChaos'' with varying reception, and a large number of novels, such as ''Literature/{{Drachenfels}}'' and the ''Literature/GotrekAndFelix'' series. Recently, the makers of the Total War series have announced that they have entered a partnership with Games Workshop to create more computer games based off this setting. Those sacrifices you made to Khorne seem to have paid off. There is also a FPS shooter game set in the End Times setting appropriately titles VideoGame/TheEndTimesVermintide, and an RTS ''VideoGame/TotalWarWarhammer''.[[BetterThenCanon the beloved]] ''VideoGame/TotalWarWarhammer'' series. It has also given inspiration to non-RPG table games, such as ''Chaos Invasion'' and ''TabletopGame/ChaosMarauders''. It also spawned a relatively long-running (and decently successful) ''CollectibleCardGame'' simply known as Warcry, although the mechanics of the game were very close to the actual miniatures game.
20th Jan '18 10:12:06 PM bigbossbalrog
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!!The setting provided examples of the following tropes :

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!!The setting provided examples of !!Tropes for the following tropes :
Tropes God! :

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->''"Glimpse the World that Was..."''
17th Jan '18 9:29:28 PM pocketlint60
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*** Their Hobgoblin servants, as mounted archers and steppe nomads, are Warhammer's equivalent of Mongolians, complete with Khans.

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*** Their Hobgoblin servants, as servants are mounted archers and steppe nomads, are nomads that serve as Warhammer's equivalent of Mongolians, complete with Khans.
17th Jan '18 9:28:35 PM pocketlint60
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** The Dwarfs very obviously take after HornyVikings aesthetically, complete with actual horned helmets. Their [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents Yorkshire accents]] hearken to British stereotypes about [[OopNorth hard working, laborious Northerners.]] Their role in the backstory makes them out to be similar to the Roman Empire: the Karaz Ankor was the greatest empire in the Old World during it's heyday and the Dwarfen language, [[ConLang Khazalid,]] is implied to be the Warhammer world's equivalent of Latin, since it shares so many words in common with English, and the language of the Empire is [[TranslationConvention rendered as English.]] They have some similarities to imperial China: they have a preference for crossbow and are credited with inventing gunpowder. A lot of Dwarfen machines and weapons featuring dragon designs, especially the Flame Cannon, has a bit of a Chinese aesthetic. Lastly, just like Tolkein's Dwarves, it's hard not to see some parallels to the ancient Hebrews, especially since the Dwarfen heartland is about where Israel should be.

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** The Dwarfs very obviously take after HornyVikings aesthetically, complete with actual horned helmets. Their [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents Yorkshire accents]] hearken to British stereotypes about [[OopNorth hard working, laborious Northerners.]] Their role in the backstory makes them out to be similar to the Roman Empire: the Karaz Ankor was the greatest empire in the Old World during it's heyday and the Dwarfen language, [[ConLang Khazalid,]] is implied to be the Warhammer world's equivalent of Latin, since it shares so many words in common with English, and the language of the Empire is [[TranslationConvention rendered as English.]] They have some similarities to imperial China: they have a preference for crossbow and are credited with inventing gunpowder. A lot of Dwarfen machines and weapons featuring dragon designs, especially the Flame Cannon, has have a bit of a Chinese aesthetic. The fact that the High Elves have some parallels to Sengoku Japan helps. Lastly, just like Tolkein's Dwarves, it's hard not to see some parallels to the ancient Hebrews, especially since [[FictionalEarth the Dwarfen heartland is about where Israel should be.]]



** The Chaos Dwarfs are evil and daemonic Babylonians and Assyrians who live in {{Mordor}} who trade with equally evil and daemonic Vikings and Slavic barbarians.
*** Their Hobgoblin servants are mounted archers and steppe nomads in Warhammer's equivalent of Mongolia.

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** The Chaos Dwarfs are evil and daemonic Babylonians and Assyrians who live in {{Mordor}} who trade with equally evil and daemonic Vikings and Slavic barbarians. \n Their religion, centered around fire and lava with a priesthood of magic-users, recalls a twisted version of Zoroastrianism.
*** Their Hobgoblin servants are servants, as mounted archers and steppe nomads in nomads, are Warhammer's equivalent of Mongolia.Mongolians, complete with Khans.
17th Jan '18 9:20:11 PM pocketlint60
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** The Dwarfs very obviously take after HornyVikings aesthetically, complete with actual horned helmets. Their [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents Yorkshire accents]] hearken to British stereotypes about [[OopNorth hard working, laborious Northerners.]] Their role in the backstory makes them out to be similar to the Roman Empire: the Karaz Ankor was the greatest empire in the Old World during it's heyday and the Dwarfen language, [[ConLang Khazalid,]] is implied to be the Warhammer world's equivalent of Latin, since it shares so many words in common with English, and the language of the Empire is [[TranslationConvention rendered as English.]] They have some similarities to imperial China: they have a preference for crossbow and are credited with inventing gunpowder. A lot of Dwarfen machines and weapons featuring dragon designs, especially the Flame Cannon, has a bit of a Chinese aesthetic. Lastly, just like Tolkein's Dwarves, it's hard not to see some parallels to the ancient Hebrews, especially since the Dwarfen heartland is about where Israel should be.



** The Chaos Dwarfs are evil Babylonians and Assyrians who live in {{Mordor}} who trade with equally evil and daemonic Vikings and Slavic barbarians.

to:

** The Chaos Dwarfs are evil and daemonic Babylonians and Assyrians who live in {{Mordor}} who trade with equally evil and daemonic Vikings and Slavic barbarians.barbarians.
*** Their Hobgoblin servants are mounted archers and steppe nomads in Warhammer's equivalent of Mongolia.
8th Dec '17 8:03:00 AM Melancholeric
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** But subverted by the people who you'd think ''would'' be this trope by default; the Warriors of Chaos. The Norse, Hung and Kurgan are ''seen'' as this by the Empire and other southern nations (especially the Norse, as they're the most common Chaos marauders that the Empire fights), and there ''is'' a lot of truth to this idea; these guys are ardent worshipers of the Chaos Gods, after all, but outside of battle, the Northmen trade with their enemies and amongst each other; with the Norse and Kurgan doing it in Marienburg and the Hung do so in Weijin. They have emotional attachments outside the Chaos Gods; they have their own families for God's sake, they love their children in their ways which seem... odd to outsiders, but the Northmen are still regarded as ''humans'' in spite of being the footsoldiers of Chaos, and most fluff concerning them takes pain to emphasize that their cultures are as well developed and nuanced as anyone else's.
1st Nov '17 11:12:01 AM MinisterOfSinister
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* OurMagesAreDifferent: Magic in ''Warhammer'' comes from the Winds of Magic, drifts of PureEnergy, that blow throughout the world. The Lizardmen Slann and all three subraces of Elves are the most adept at it, being able to use Magic in its purest form -- the Slann and High Elves use the Lore of High Magic, while the Dark Elves use the Lore of Dark Magic, and the Wood Elves use both. However, these lores are generally too much for most races to handle. The Empire therefore fields Battle Wizards who break the Winds of Magic down into their composite lores -- the Lores of [[TheBeastmaster Beasts]], [[DarkIsNotEvil Death]], [[PlayingWithFire Fire]], [[StarPower Heavens]], [[GreenThumb Life]], [[LightEmUp Light]], [[ExtraOreDinary Metal]] and [[CastingAShadow Shadows]] -- and specialise in the use of one. They were taught how to do this by some charitable-feeling High Elves The lores used by {{Necromancer}} types -- the Lores of Vampires and Undeath -- are culled from the Lore of Dark Magic, [[PredecessorVillain Nagash]] having tortured the knowledge out of some Dark Elves he came across and wrote several books on the subject which are still in high demand today despite being illegal. The Tomb Kings use their own necromantic arts -- the Lore of Nehekhara -- to maintain their armies on the battlefield. The Orcs & Goblins and Ogre Kingdoms also use their own lores based on their religious beliefs -- the Lore of da Big/Little WAAAGH! and the Lore of the Great Maw, respectively.
* OurOgresAreHungrier: ''Much'' hungrier. Ogres have a society influenced by the Mongols, and wield a strange form of Gut Magic, which depends on what the caster ate. They literally worship the concept of hunger and practice rampant cannibalism, eating both other sentient races and their own kind; a KlingonPromotion generally entails the usurper devouring its predecessor. Some are captured by the Skaven to be turned into Rat Ogres.

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* OurMagesAreDifferent: Magic in ''Warhammer'' comes from the Winds of Magic, drifts of PureEnergy, that blow throughout the world. The Lizardmen Slann and all three subraces of Elves are the most adept at it, being able to use Magic in its purest form -- the Slann and High Elves use the Lore of High Magic, while the Dark Elves use the Lore of Dark Magic, and the Wood Elves use both. However, these lores are generally too much for most races to handle. The Empire therefore fields Battle Wizards who break the Winds of Magic down into their composite lores -- the Lores of [[TheBeastmaster Beasts]], [[DarkIsNotEvil Death]], [[PlayingWithFire Fire]], [[StarPower Heavens]], [[GreenThumb Life]], [[LightEmUp Light]], [[ExtraOreDinary Metal]] and [[CastingAShadow Shadows]] -- and specialise in the use of one. They were taught how to do this by some charitable-feeling High Elves Elves. Bretonnian mages -- Damsels and Prophetesses of the Cult of the Lady -- follow suit with a much more limited pool. The lores used by {{Necromancer}} types -- the Lores of Vampires and Undeath -- are culled from the Lore of Dark Magic, [[PredecessorVillain Nagash]] having tortured the knowledge out of some Dark Elves he came across and wrote several books on the subject which are still in high demand today despite being illegal. The Tomb Kings use their own necromantic arts -- the Lore of Nehekhara -- to maintain their armies on the battlefield. The Orcs & Goblins and Ogre Kingdoms also use their own lores based on their religious beliefs -- the Lore of da Big/Little WAAAGH! and the Lore of the Great Maw, respectively. \n Each Chaos God has a Lore of Magic associated with him too apart from Khorne, who DoesNotLikeMagic; they are, unsurprisingly, the Lores of Tzeentch, Nurgle and Slaanesh, and only Daemons or mortal Chaos worshippers can channel them.
* OurOgresAreHungrier: ''Much'' hungrier. Ogres have a society influenced by the Mongols, and wield a strange form of Gut Magic, which depends on what the caster ate. They literally worship the concept of hunger and practice rampant cannibalism, eating both other sentient races and their own kind; a KlingonPromotion generally entails the usurper devouring its predecessor. They are also well-known as world-wandering mercenaries who will work/fight for any faction willing to pay and/or feed them enough. Some are captured by the Skaven to be turned into Rat Ogres.
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