History TabletopGame / Chess

22nd Jan '18 10:35:57 AM TheLyniezian
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* NeverSayDie[=/=]NobodyCanDie: Despite chess being meant to resemble a battle, pieces removed from the board are always "captured", never "killed". The king can't even be captured (where he would that's checkmate). May make sense if it#s understood as the pieces are only removed until the game is over, and then they play all over again...
21st Jan '18 5:15:25 PM FordPrefect
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* IrrevocableOrder: The touch-move rule. Once you pick up a piece with the intention of moving it, you have to move it. If your move is illegal, you have to take it back but still have to make another with that same piece if possible. However, by first saying "I adjust" (or "J'adoube" in French), you can touch a piece on your turn to adjust it without having to move it.
* MechanicallyUnusualFighter: The knight moves along lines none of the other pieces use allowing it to move between them but allowing them to attack it without being in danger from it.

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* IrrevocableOrder: The touch-move rule. Once you pick up a piece with the intention of moving it, you have to move it. If your move is illegal, you have to take it back but still have to make another with that same piece if possible. However, by first saying "I adjust" (or "J'adoube" in French), you can touch a piece on your turn to adjust it (move it closer to the center of the square) without having to move it.
* MechanicallyUnusualFighter: The knight moves along lines none of the other pieces use use, allowing it to move between them them, but allowing them to attack it without being in danger from it.



* StraightForTheCommander: Because both sides are a KeystoneArmy, your only win condition is to take out the enemy king. Taking out other enemy pieces doesn't matter, although it makes life easier for you.

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* StraightForTheCommander: Because both sides are a KeystoneArmy, your only win condition is to take out the enemy king. Taking out other enemy pieces doesn't directly matter, although it makes life easier for you.



* TookALevelInBadass: The pawns [[FieldPromotion when promoted]] by getting to the opposite side of the board, are exchanged for any other piece (except for a second King).

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* TookALevelInBadass: The pawns pawns, [[FieldPromotion when promoted]] by getting to the opposite side of the board, are exchanged for any other piece (except for a second King).
21st Jan '18 5:08:48 PM FordPrefect
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There are, of course, many other tactics. Others include forks (where a one piece, often a knight, attacks two pieces or more without being attacked himself, [[SadisticChoice so if you save one, you lose the other]])[[labelnote:*]]A particularly devious one involves forking both a valuable piece [[InstantWinCondition and the king]], which removes the choice of who to keep entirely and leaves the victim without a piece with nothing to show for it.[[/labelnote]], pins (when a piece cannot move as if it did a better piece behind it would be captured[[labelnote:*]]Becomes literal when the piece behind it is the king, since moving would put the king in check[[/labelnote]]), skewers (a variation of a pin where a valuable piece is attacked and forced to move out of the way, leaving room for an attack at a less valuable piece behind it) and sacrifices (gambits UpToEleven in where a strong piece, even the Queen, is given away for a decisive advantage, usually for an attack against the enemy King), which generally take advantage of overloading and interference among the opponent's pieces. Chess strategy has a language all of its own.

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There are, of course, many other tactics. Others include forks (where a one piece, often a knight, attacks two pieces or more without being attacked himself, [[SadisticChoice so if you save one, you lose the other]])[[labelnote:*]]A particularly devious one involves forking both a valuable piece [[InstantWinCondition and the king]], which removes the choice of who to keep entirely and leaves the victim without down a piece with nothing to show for it.[[/labelnote]], pins (when a piece cannot move move, as if it did did, a better piece behind it would be captured[[labelnote:*]]Becomes literal when the piece behind it is the king, since moving would put the king in check[[/labelnote]]), skewers (a variation of a pin where a valuable piece is attacked and forced to move out of the way, leaving room for an attack at a less valuable piece behind it) and sacrifices (gambits UpToEleven in where a strong piece, even the Queen, is given away for a decisive advantage, usually for an attack against the enemy King), which generally take advantage of overloading and interference among the opponent's pieces. Chess strategy has a language all of its own.
21st Jan '18 5:02:00 PM FordPrefect
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Chess is a TurnBasedStrategy tabletop board game, and is one of the most influential games in history. It is OlderThanFeudalism at ''very'' least; it has more [[SeriousBusiness scholarship and study]] devoted to it than any other game, with only TabletopGame/{{Go}} coming close; it contains more possible directions for match to go than there are atoms in the entire universe; [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and it has]] [[Theatre/{{Chess}} a play]] named after it.

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Chess is a TurnBasedStrategy tabletop board game, and is one of the most influential games in history. It is OlderThanFeudalism at the ''very'' least; it has more [[SeriousBusiness scholarship and study]] devoted to it than any other game, with only TabletopGame/{{Go}} coming close; it contains more possible directions for match to go than there are atoms in the entire universe; [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and it has]] [[Theatre/{{Chess}} a play]] named after it.
28th Dec '17 2:19:55 AM AkiTendo
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[[caption-width-right:140:A smothered mate ]]* TheMillstone:
[[quoteright:340:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/smothered_mate.png]]
[[caption-width-right:340:some caption text]]** The famous ''smothered mate'' (see illustration) where a single knight attacks a king surrounded by its own "protective" pieces who block out all escape squares, allowing this beautiful (and somewhat embarrassing) checkmate. There are countless other checkmates where the King's only escape(s) are blocked by its own pieces, the most common of which (among relative novices) is that of the King being mated by an opposing Queen or Rook on the back rank because he's hemmed in by the three pawns in front of him.

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[[caption-width-right:140:A smothered mate ]]* * TheMillstone:
[[quoteright:340:http://static.[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/smothered_mate.png]]
[[caption-width-right:340:some caption text]]** ** The famous ''smothered mate'' (see illustration) where a single knight attacks a king surrounded by its own "protective" pieces who block out all escape squares, allowing this beautiful (and somewhat embarrassing) checkmate. There are countless other checkmates where the King's only escape(s) are blocked by its own pieces, the most common of which (among relative novices) is that of the King being mated by an opposing Queen or Rook on the back rank because he's hemmed in by the three pawns in front of him.
28th Dec '17 2:18:27 AM AkiTendo
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* AttackAttackAttack: While gambits in general lead to sharp attacking lines, the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_Gambit Danish Gambit]], [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween_Gambit Halloween Gambit]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_Knights_Defense,_Fried_Liver_Attack Fried Liver Attack]] exemplify this trope as they leave usually white's position hopeless if the attack fails. Then there is the habit of lower rank players to play pointless checks even while leaving their own king exposed.

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* AttackAttackAttack: While gambits in general lead to sharp attacking lines, the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_Gambit Danish Gambit]], [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween_Gambit Halloween Gambit]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_Knights_Defense,_Fried_Liver_Attack Fried Liver Attack]] exemplify this trope as they leave usually leave white's position hopeless if the attack fails. Then there is the habit of lower rank players to play pointless checks even while leaving their own king exposed.



* TheMillstone:
** The famous ''smothered mate'' where a single knight forces a king into a corner, surrounded by its own "protective" pieces who block out all escape squares, allowing this beautiful (and somewhat embarrassing) checkmate. There are countless other checkmates where the King's only escape(s) are blocked by its own pieces, the most common of which (among relative novices) is that of the King being mated by an opposing Queen or Rook on the back rank because he's hemmed in by the three pawns in front of him.

to:

* [[caption-width-right:140:A smothered mate ]]* TheMillstone:
** [[quoteright:340:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/smothered_mate.png]]
[[caption-width-right:340:some caption text]]**
The famous ''smothered mate'' (see illustration) where a single knight forces attacks a king into a corner, surrounded by its own "protective" pieces who block out all escape squares, allowing this beautiful (and somewhat embarrassing) checkmate. There are countless other checkmates where the King's only escape(s) are blocked by its own pieces, the most common of which (among relative novices) is that of the King being mated by an opposing Queen or Rook on the back rank because he's hemmed in by the three pawns in front of him.
28th Dec '17 1:48:40 AM AkiTendo
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For the rules of the game and definitions of the most common terms see ''UsefulNotes/{{Chess}}''



Chess is played on a checkered board with 64 squares in an 8-by-8 arrangement. The initial setup is literally a MirrorMatch; Black's set up is the reverse of White's, so that the respective Kings and Queens appear to be facing one another. (The simple mnemonic is that the Queen is fashionable and "her dress matches her shoes," meaning she should always start on a square of her own color.) Another mnemonic is that Dames are set up on D squares (algebraic notation). The board is orientated so that both players have a white square at the bottom right of the board from their perspective ("white on the right")--getting this wrong indicates a complete beginner in RealLife and a CriticalResearchFailure in fiction (unless depicting complete beginners).

The King is [[InstantWinCondition the heart of the player's force]]. If he is ever in "check," a position in which he can be captured on the next turn, his player ''must'' take action to protect their King; it is literally against the rules to leave the King in check. They must either move the King out of the line of fire, interpose another piece between King and attacker, or capture the attacker. The King is also not allowed to move ''into'' or ''through'' check (the latter of which can only happen while castling). This is how victory is attained: you trap the opponent in a situation where not only is their King in check, but all the (otherwise legal) moves available to them result in them ''still'' being in check at end of turn. This situation is called "Checkmate," and the first player to lock down the opponent's King in this way wins the game.

However, it is possible to reach the opposite of checkmate: a no-win situation where neither side has any way to defeat the other, one can put the other opponent in check but not keep them there, or they set up the board so that the other opponent who is not now in check would have to place their king in check to make any legal move (which itself is an illegal move). This is called a "stalemate" and it means the game is a tie or "draw."

'''The Pieces:'''
* '''Pawns''': Representing infantry, each player starts with eight of these, filling the entire second row forward from each side. They move one square forward at a time, except for an optional two squares when moved for the first time; when capturing another piece, they must move one square diagonally forward to do so. Beginning players tend to write them off as useless and obstructive, but players of skill know they are one of the most critical parts of the game. If a pawn makes it all the way to the farthest row on the board, they're instantly upgraded into any other piece of their player's choosing apart from the king, usually a [[MagikarpPower Queen]]. [[note]]Pawns' ability to become Queens is not their only strength--they are [[StoneWall highly effective defenses as well]], as the other player is very unlikely to sacrifice another piece to take one, almost regardless of context[[/note]]
* '''Rooks''': Two per player; famously shaped like castles. Originally representing war chariots or siege towers. They can move any number of squares forwards, backwards, left, and right.
* '''Knights''': Two per player. The horses; probably the most recognized board game piece in the world. Represent armoured cavalry. They move along the lines bisecting the angles formed by the ordinal and diagonal lines to the first legal square on that line, passing between other pieces as they go (These lines are known as "half-winds" on the compass rose, e.g. "North by Northwest"). These unique attributes give knights peculiar tactical advantages and disadvantages, their in-between the squares move means no piece can block them from reaching a square, and they're the only pieces that can [[TacticalRockPaperScissors threaten a queen without putting themselves in danger]]. Indeed, a knight is never threatened by the pieces it's attacking and can never threaten a piece that is attacking it (unless they're knights).
* '''Bishops''': Two per player. Have a top shaped like a bishop's miter. They originally represented war elephants, but such were unknown in Europe (Hannibal Barca notwithstanding) and the imagery eventually aligned to the environment. Can move any number of squares diagonally.
** In French, they're called ''fou'' (the fool, or jester). In German, they're ''Läufer'' and in Dutch, they're ''loper'' (both meaning runner). In Italian, ''Alfieri'' (Flag bearers). And in Russian, ''slon'' (elephant). In Finnish, ''lähetti'' ([[ShootTheMessenger messenger]]/courier). Go figure. On the other hand, in Spanish, they're called "alfil" (derived from Arabic, derived in turn from old Persian "pil", meaning "elephant"). In Hebrew, they're called "ratz" (runner/messenger), similar to the German, Dutch and Finnish versions (which is understandable, seeing as most of the early Israelis were German born). In Croatian, they are called "lovac" (the hunter). In Romanian, they are called "nebun" (the madman) for some reason.
* '''Queen''': One per player. Usually the second largest piece, and tends to have a small knob on its coronet-shaped top. Can move any number of squares left, right, forwards, backwards, or diagonally, thus [[AllYourPowersCombined combining the powers]] of rook and bishop.
* '''King''': One per player. Traditionally the tallest piece, with a cross on top. Can move a single square forwards, backwards, left, right, or diagonally. Again, your goal as a player is to make it impossible for your opponent to prevent his king from being captured. If neither side can accomplish this, the game is a draw. A weak piece in the beginning and middle of the game, but surprisingly strong in the end game.
21st Dec '17 12:16:34 PM TheGreatConversation
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'''Pieces include:'''

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'''Pieces include:''''''The Pieces:'''
21st Dec '17 12:14:52 PM TheGreatConversation
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Chess is a TurnBasedStrategy tabletop board game, and is one of the most influential games in history. It is OlderThanFeudalism at ''very'' least; it has more [[SeriousBusiness scholarship and study]] devoted to it than any other game, with only TabletopGame/{{Go}} coming close; it contains more possible directions a match can go than there are atoms in the entire universe; [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and it has]] [[Theatre/{{Chess}} a play]] named after it.

The game of chess is thought to have originated in India, possibly as a teaching tool for educating royalty in the practice of leading an army. Its exact origins are ShroudedInMyth; at least one legend attributes the very first game of chess as a reenactment of an actual battle. Whatever its exact origins, the game quickly spread westward into Persia, and from there (with a little help from Islamic invaders) to the Middle East and Europe. The game as it exists now came into being in the 15th century, when the game was overhauled to increase the maneuverability of the pieces and reduce the amount of time it took to play a single game. The most notable changes were the Queen changing from being able only move one square at a time diagonally to being the strongest piece on the board, Pawns being able to move two squares on their first move, and Bishops now able to move any number of squares diagonally rather than being limited to ''exactly'' two (an incredible limitation which restricted it to only 8 squares on the whole board, even if it did leap over an intervening piece of either colour).

Chess is played on a checkered board with 64 squares in an 8-by-8 arrangement. The initial setup is literally a MirrorMatch; Black's set up is the reverse of White's, so that the respective Kings and Queens appear to be facing one another. (The simple mnemonic is that the Queen is fashionable and "her dress matches her shoes", meaning she should always start on a square of her own color.) Another mnemonic is that Dames are set up on D squares (algebraic notation). The board is orientated so that both players have a white square at the bottom right of the board from their perspective ("white on the right") - getting this wrong is indicative of either a complete beginner in RealLife or a CriticalResearchFailure in media (unless depicting complete beginners).

The King is [[InstantWinCondition the heart of the player's force]]. If he is ever in "check," a position in which he can be captured on the next turn, his player ''must'' take action to protect his King; it is literally against the rules to leave the King in check. He must either move the King out of the line of fire, interpose another piece between King and attacker, or capture the attacker. The King is also not allowed to move ''into'' or through check (the latter of which can only happen while castling). This is how victories are accomplished in chess: you trap the opponent in a situation where not only is his King in check, but all the (otherwise legal) moves available to him result in him ''still'' being in check at end of turn. This situation is called "Checkmate" and the first player to lock down the opponent's King in this way wins the game.

Now, however, you can have the opposite of checkmate, a no-win situation where neither side has the power to defeat the other, one can put the other opponent in check but they can keep escaping, or, they set up the board so that the other opponent who is not now in check would have to place their king in check to make any legal move (which itself is an illegal move). This is called a "stalemate" and it means the game is a tie or "draw."

to:

Chess is a TurnBasedStrategy tabletop board game, and is one of the most influential games in history. It is OlderThanFeudalism at ''very'' least; it has more [[SeriousBusiness scholarship and study]] devoted to it than any other game, with only TabletopGame/{{Go}} coming close; it contains more possible directions a for match can to go than there are atoms in the entire universe; [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and it has]] [[Theatre/{{Chess}} a play]] named after it.

The game of chess is thought to have originated in India, possibly as a teaching tool for educating royalty in the practice of leading an army. Its exact origins are ShroudedInMyth; at least one legend attributes the very first game of chess as a reenactment of an actual battle. Whatever its exact origins, the game quickly spread westward into Persia, and from there (with a little help from Islamic invaders) to the Middle East and Europe. The game as it exists now came into being in the 15th century, Century, when the game it was overhauled to increase the maneuverability of the pieces and reduce the amount of time it took to play a single game. The most notable changes were the Queen changing from being able only move one square at a time diagonally to being the strongest piece on the board, Pawns being able to move two squares on their first move, and Bishops now being able to move any number of squares diagonally rather than being limited to ''exactly'' two (an incredible (a debilitating limitation which restricted it to only 8 squares on the whole board, even if it did leap leaped over an intervening piece of either colour).

Chess is played on a checkered board with 64 squares in an 8-by-8 arrangement. The initial setup is literally a MirrorMatch; Black's set up is the reverse of White's, so that the respective Kings and Queens appear to be facing one another. (The simple mnemonic is that the Queen is fashionable and "her dress matches her shoes", shoes," meaning she should always start on a square of her own color.) Another mnemonic is that Dames are set up on D squares (algebraic notation). The board is orientated so that both players have a white square at the bottom right of the board from their perspective ("white on the right") - getting right")--getting this wrong is indicative of either indicates a complete beginner in RealLife or and a CriticalResearchFailure in media fiction (unless depicting complete beginners).

The King is [[InstantWinCondition the heart of the player's force]]. If he is ever in "check," a position in which he can be captured on the next turn, his player ''must'' take action to protect his their King; it is literally against the rules to leave the King in check. He They must either move the King out of the line of fire, interpose another piece between King and attacker, or capture the attacker. The King is also not allowed to move ''into'' or through ''through'' check (the latter of which can only happen while castling). This is how victories are accomplished in chess: victory is attained: you trap the opponent in a situation where not only is his their King in check, but all the (otherwise legal) moves available to him them result in him them ''still'' being in check at end of turn. This situation is called "Checkmate" "Checkmate," and the first player to lock down the opponent's King in this way wins the game.

Now, however, you can have However, it is possible to reach the opposite of checkmate, checkmate: a no-win situation where neither side has the power any way to defeat the other, one can put the other opponent in check but they can not keep escaping, or, them there, or they set up the board so that the other opponent who is not now in check would have to place their king in check to make any legal move (which itself is an illegal move). This is called a "stalemate" and it means the game is a tie or "draw."
30th Nov '17 8:10:52 AM DustSnitch
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Added DiffLines:

* InstantWinCondition: If either King is put in a position of certain doom, the game ends, even if that King's team failed to lose a single piece the entire game.
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