History TabletopGame / Chess

16th Aug '16 2:14:10 AM Chris358
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** In French, they're called ''fou'' (the fool, or jester). In German, they're ''Läufer'' and in Dutch, they're "loper" (both meaning runner). In Italian, ''Alfieri'' (Flag bearers). And in Russian, ''slon'' (elephant). In Finnish, ''lähetti'' ([[ShootTheMessenger messenger]]/courier). Go figure. On the other hand, in Spanish, they're called "alfil" (derived from Arabic, derived in turn from old Persian "pil", meaning "elephant"). In Hebrew, they're called "ratz" (runner/messenger), similar to the German, Dutch and Finnish versions (which is understandable, seeing as most of the early Israelis were German born). In Croatian, they are called "lovac" (the hunter). In Romanian, they are called "nebun" (the madman) for some reason.

to:

** In French, they're called ''fou'' (the fool, or jester). In German, they're ''Läufer'' and in Dutch, they're "loper" ''loper'' (both meaning runner). In Italian, ''Alfieri'' (Flag bearers). And in Russian, ''slon'' (elephant). In Finnish, ''lähetti'' ([[ShootTheMessenger messenger]]/courier). Go figure. On the other hand, in Spanish, they're called "alfil" (derived from Arabic, derived in turn from old Persian "pil", meaning "elephant"). In Hebrew, they're called "ratz" (runner/messenger), similar to the German, Dutch and Finnish versions (which is understandable, seeing as most of the early Israelis were German born). In Croatian, they are called "lovac" (the hunter). In Romanian, they are called "nebun" (the madman) for some reason.
16th Aug '16 2:13:38 AM Chris358
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** In French, they're called ''fou'' (the fool, or jester). In German, they're ''Läufer'' (runner). In Italian, ''Alfieri'' (Flag bearers). And in Russian, ''slon'' (elephant). In Finnish, ''lähetti'' ([[ShootTheMessenger messenger]]/courier). Go figure. On the other hand, in Spanish, they're called "alfil" (derived from Arabic, derived in turn from old Persian "pil", meaning "elephant"). In Hebrew, they're called "ratz" (runner/messenger), similar to the German and Finnish versions (which is understandable, seeing as most of the early Israelis were German born). In Croatian, they are called "lovac" (the hunter). In Romanian, they are called "nebun" (the madman) for some reason.

to:

** In French, they're called ''fou'' (the fool, or jester). In German, they're ''Läufer'' (runner).and in Dutch, they're "loper" (both meaning runner). In Italian, ''Alfieri'' (Flag bearers). And in Russian, ''slon'' (elephant). In Finnish, ''lähetti'' ([[ShootTheMessenger messenger]]/courier). Go figure. On the other hand, in Spanish, they're called "alfil" (derived from Arabic, derived in turn from old Persian "pil", meaning "elephant"). In Hebrew, they're called "ratz" (runner/messenger), similar to the German German, Dutch and Finnish versions (which is understandable, seeing as most of the early Israelis were German born). In Croatian, they are called "lovac" (the hunter). In Romanian, they are called "nebun" (the madman) for some reason.
29th Jul '16 5:42:26 PM ProfessorDetective
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Chess is a TurnBasedStrategy tabletop board game, and is one of the most influential games in history. It is OlderThanFeudalism at very ''least''; it has more [[SeriousBusiness scholarship and study]] devoted to it than any other game, with only TabletopGame/{{Go}} coming close; it contains more possible directions a match can go than there are atoms in the entire universe; [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and it has]] [[Theatre/{{Chess}} a play]] named after it.

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Chess is a TurnBasedStrategy tabletop board game, and is one of the most influential games in history. It is OlderThanFeudalism at very ''least''; ''very'' least; it has more [[SeriousBusiness scholarship and study]] devoted to it than any other game, with only TabletopGame/{{Go}} coming close; it contains more possible directions a match can go than there are atoms in the entire universe; [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and it has]] [[Theatre/{{Chess}} a play]] named after it.



Chess is played on a checkered board with 64 squares in an 8-by-8 arrangement. The initial setup is literally a MirrorMatch; Black's setup is the reverse of White's, so that the respective Kings and Queens appear to be facing one another. (The simple mnemonic is that the Queen is fashionable and "her dress matches her shoes", meaning she should always start on a square of her own color.) Another mnemonic is that Dames are set up on D squares (algebraic notation). The board is orientated so that both players have a white square at the bottom right of the board from their perspective ("white on the right") - getting this wrong is indicative of either a complete beginner in RealLife or a CriticalResearchFailure in media (unless depicting complete beginners).

to:

Chess is played on a checkered board with 64 squares in an 8-by-8 arrangement. The initial setup is literally a MirrorMatch; Black's setup set up is the reverse of White's, so that the respective Kings and Queens appear to be facing one another. (The simple mnemonic is that the Queen is fashionable and "her dress matches her shoes", meaning she should always start on a square of her own color.) Another mnemonic is that Dames Games are set up on D squares (algebraic notation). The board is orientated so that both players have a white square at the bottom right of the board from their perspective ("white on the right") - getting this wrong is indicative of either a complete beginner in RealLife or a CriticalResearchFailure in media (unless depicting complete beginners).
12th Jul '16 4:49:52 AM StFan
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'''''Chess''''' is a TurnBasedStrategy tabletop board game, and is one of the most influential games in history. It is OlderThanFeudalism at very ''least''; it has more [[SeriousBusiness scholarship and study]] devoted to it than any other game, with only ''TabletopGame/{{Go}}'' coming close; it contains more possible directions a match can go than there are atoms in the entire universe; [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and it has]] [[Theatre/{{Chess}} a play]] named after it.

to:

'''''Chess''''' Chess is a TurnBasedStrategy tabletop board game, and is one of the most influential games in history. It is OlderThanFeudalism at very ''least''; it has more [[SeriousBusiness scholarship and study]] devoted to it than any other game, with only ''TabletopGame/{{Go}}'' TabletopGame/{{Go}} coming close; it contains more possible directions a match can go than there are atoms in the entire universe; [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and it has]] [[Theatre/{{Chess}} a play]] named after it.



* GenderBender: For some reason, the pawn's sex is flexible enough for it to promote to a [[AlwaysFemale queen]] or a [[AlwaysMale bishop]]. ([[BellisariosMaxim Or a stone tower]]).
** [[{{Bottom}} "And they let children play this, you say."]]
** If you think about it, the "queen" could actually be a "queen's champion;" the best of the royal knights. Or, as mentioned below, a vizier.
* GenderFlip: The Queen was originally a ''vizier'' or royal advisor in the Eastern version of the game.

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* GenderBender: For some reason, the pawn's sex is flexible enough for it to promote to a [[AlwaysFemale queen]] or a [[AlwaysMale bishop]]. ([[BellisariosMaxim Or a stone tower]]).
** [[{{Bottom}} "And they let children play this, you say."]]
**
tower]]). If you think about it, the "queen" could actually be a "queen's champion;" the best of the royal knights. Or, as mentioned below, a vizier.
* GenderFlip: GenderFlip:
**
The Queen was originally a ''vizier'' or royal advisor in the Eastern version of the game.
1st May '16 2:05:31 PM MisterApple
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* TooDumbToLive: White in the Fool's Mate: 1. g4? e5 2. f4?? Qh4# 0-1

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* TooDumbToLive: White in the Fool's Mate: 1. g4? e5 2. f4?? Qh4# [=Qh4=]# 0-1
24th Apr '16 7:12:24 PM war877
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* FiveManBand: Since it's about perspective, your white chess pieces can be sorted out into one of these.
** TheChick: The Queen is the TokenGirl. But she's the opposite of useless.
** TheLancer: The Knight.
** TheSmartGuy: The Bishop.
** TheLeader: The King. Depending on the player, he could be a type 1 directing from the rear, a Type III leading the battle, or a type 4 figurehead that does nothing. Without him, the band falls apart.
* A second interpretation:
** BigGood: The King
** TheHero: The Queen
** TheLancer: The Bishop
** TheSmartGuy: The Knight
** TheBigGuy: The Rook
** TheHeart: The Pawn
* In a black piece FiveBadBand the roles line up a bit differently:
** BigBad: The King
** TheDragon: The Queen, mixture of Baroness and DragonInChief
** TheBrute: The Rook
** TheEvilGenius: The Bishop
** TheDarkChick: More The Knight than the queen, they move quirkily, they're horses and they have the most different strategy.
** Mooks: The Pawn
* [[FourTemperamentEnsemble Five Temperament Ensemble]]
** The Queen is Sanguine
** The Rook is Choleric
** The Bishop is Melancholic
** The King is Phlegmatic
** The Knight is Supine
23rd Apr '16 2:13:50 PM jamespolk
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* MexicanStandoff: So, your opponent is [[AlwaysSaveTheGirl threatening your queen]] and it is impossible to save her? Respond by threatening ''his'' queen and maybe two or more pieces with it.

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* MexicanStandoff: So, your opponent is [[AlwaysSaveTheGirl threatening your queen]] and it is impossible to save her? Respond by threatening ''his'' ''their'' queen and maybe two or more pieces with it.



* OverlyLongGag: Averted. The entire point of the threefold repetition rule (as well as the fifty-move rule and the [[UnwinnableByDesign insufficient material]] draw rule) is to prevent or at least mitigate this.
** Of course, the players have to ''claim'' the draw for it to count (except in the case of insufficient material, which is automatically a draw), otherwise we get situations like [[http://timkr.home.xs4all.nl/records/recordstxt.htm this]] (go to the Longest unclaimed repetition section).



* ReplacementGoldfish: An actual rule in the past, where you could not promote a pawn to, say, a queen, if you already had one on the board (This is still the rule in TabletopGame/{{Sittuyin}}). Philidor in particular did not like the possibility of a king having 2 queens.



* RulesAreForHumans: Videogame adaptations of Chess are infamous for cheating AI, such as them spontaneously being able to resurrect their own pieces at random. In low-quality adaptations, the computer can perform legal moves that the player is incapable of performing on their own due to poor design, such as the pawn's ability to move two squares on their first movement.



** Some "lateral thinking" puzzles describe a story where a rookie challenges an experienced player to a two-game match, playing as white and black on the two different games, claiming to either win one game or draw both of them. The presented solution was that the less experienced player copies the moves made by the veteran. However, tournament players know how to counter that, claiming the rule about using outside assistance (FIDE rule 12.3), or that the beginner isn't actually playing chess and merely moving pieces around.



* SurpriseCheckmate: They happen to casual players all the time. They do not happen very often to grandmasters--checkmates of any sort are rare in high-level play, as most games end in draws or a player resigning when he sees his position is lost--but they are not unknown. One of the most famous happened in the 2006 match between Vladimir Kramnik and the computer Deep Fritz, in which Kramnik, then the world champion, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blunder_(chess)#Deep_Fritz_vs._Vladimir_Kramnik completely missed a mate-in-one.]]

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* SurpriseCheckmate: They happen to casual players all the time. They do not happen very often to grandmasters--checkmates of any sort are very very rare in high-level play, as most games end in draws or a player resigning when he sees his position is lost--but they are not unknown. One of the most famous happened in the 2006 match between Vladimir Kramnik and the computer Deep Fritz, in which Kramnik, then the world champion, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blunder_(chess)#Deep_Fritz_vs._Vladimir_Kramnik completely missed a mate-in-one.]]



* TooAwesomeToUse: ''Because'' of the extreme power of the Queen compared to the other pieces, losing the Queen in exchange for any piece other than another queen (e.g. losing the Queen but taking a Knight) is a downgrade. Additionally, blundering away your queen hurts you more than blundering away any other non-King piece. As a result, players must be especially careful with their Queens to ensure they do not lose them without a sufficient gain in material or position to make up for the loss.

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* TooAwesomeToUse: ''Because'' of the extreme power of the Queen compared to the other pieces, losing the Queen in exchange for any piece other than another queen (e.g. losing the Queen but taking a Knight) is a downgrade. Additionally, blundering away your queen hurts you more than blundering away any other non-King piece. As a result, players must be especially careful with their Queens to ensure they do not lose them without a sufficient gain in material or position to make up for the loss. This is also why bringing your Queen out too early is a blunder, as your opponent can chase the Queen around with inferior pieces.



* UnsettlingGenderReveal: Since a pawn ''could'' upgrade into a queen upon reaching the other end, it makes one wonder...



* UnwinnableByDesign: Necessarily present, because chess is a two-player game and the objective is to beat the other player. However, it's possible for the game to become unwinnable for both players, if there are no pieces other than kings on the board because the kings can never be in range of one another. If you have no pawns and only a knight or bishop left (but not both; see QuirkyMinibossSquad above) as well as the king versus a lone king, the game is a draw; you can't put the king in check and cover all the escape squares with a king and one of a knight or bishop. These trivial cases are handled by a rule that ends the game, but more complex situations requires both players recognizing the draw situation or waiting for 50 moves to pass.
* UnwinnableJokeGame: [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joke_chess_problem#Self-solving_problems this]] self-solving chess problem as being an un''lose''able joke game. Its goal is to mate the black king in six moves, however all of white's legal moves lead invariably to checkmate after six moves. There are many other joke problems like this.
* WarElephants: In some languages, the bishop is called the elephant.



* XanatosSpeedChess: Literally. The point with the game is to plan several {{plan}}s at time into like [[TimeForPlanB plan F]] or something.
** Especially when you're playing ''actual'' speed chess.
* YetAnotherStupidDeath: No matter how good you are, you ''will'' make some mistakes in a good chunk of your games. Those mistakes could be anything as blatant as letting your queen get captured to something as subtle as a pawn move that weakens your pawn structure. ([[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ynJj21O1tA Even one of the best players in the world isn't immune]].)

to:

* XanatosSpeedChess: Literally. The point with the game is to plan several {{plan}}s at time into like [[TimeForPlanB plan F]] or something.
** Especially when you're playing ''actual'' speed chess.
* YetAnotherStupidDeath: No matter how good you are, you ''will'' make some mistakes in a good chunk of your games. Those mistakes could be anything as blatant as letting your queen get captured to something as subtle as a pawn move that weakens your pawn structure. ([[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ynJj21O1tA Even one of the best players in the world isn't immune]].)
moves ahead.



*** In other languages, the meaning of the equivalent to "stalemate" is closer to the general one - for example, in Spanish it's «ahogado» ("suffocated"), which does convey the power disparity.
23rd Apr '16 12:06:09 PM jamespolk
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* AlternateUniverse: High-level analysis of completed chess games consist entirely of [[WhatCouldHaveBeen explorations of what would have happened]] if different moves had been made in critical positions. In fact, there is a near-universal convention, when games are analyzed in print, that moves in bold are those that actually took place, while those in normal typeface are the alternate possibilities.
** Correspondence chess, in where the players mail letters with their move to their opponent, may take several days, or weeks, to select a single chess move (if you think mail service is bad now, there literally were times when mailing a letter could actually take weeks or months), is all about checking different "timelines", about the alternate possibilities that would appear from the current position, both from oneself and the opponent. And "transpositions", when the same position is reached by a different move order, is like jumping from one AlternateUniverse to another.
* AlwaysSecondBest: The FIDE Rankings often induce this. For example, Vladimir Kramnik was Classical World Champion for seven years (2000-2006), and World Champion for a year afterwards (2006-2007), and yet he wasn't first in the rankings once during that time. Ironically, he only became #1 ''after'' he lost the championship, and even only then by playing more games than the #2 player (Anand), who he lost the World Championship to.
** Former World Champion (and Kramnik's successor) Viswanathan Anand was 8th in the FIDE Rankings when he lost his title to Carlsen in November, 2013.
*** And Carlsen only won the right to challenge Anand by winning more matches in the Candidates' Tournament - compared to Kramnik, [[RunningGag who finished second]].
** The Russian national team at the Chess Olympiad - likely due to how the Soviet Union broke up, with the best Soviet players coming from all of the other Soviet republics.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Keres GM Paul Keres]] even got the "official" nickname ''The Eternal Second''. Mostly because, despite being one of the top players of all time (and over a staggering thirty-year period), he never won the world title - he won the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AVRO_tournament legendary [=AVRO=] tournament]], began negotiations with Alekhine in 1939, but, [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII yeah...]]
*** And then he came second in the Candidates' Tournament ''four'' times afterwards.



* AttackAttackAttack: Some players adopt this as their plan, organizing an attack on enemy king before developing all of their pieces and careless about weaknesses in their position. Games of such players usually last short number of moves, whether they won or lost.



* AwesomeButImpractical: Any fork that threatens three or more pieces, instead of just two; only one can be taken anyway.
** Subverted in the fact that the forked player has a tougher decision, or whenever one of the forked pieces is the King.
** Potentially subverted in the rarer but notable positions where the target for capture is not, between the targets eventually remaining, the one which has the highest material value, or when further forced moves enable the capture of both pieces.
** The queen is the most mobile (and valuable) piece on the board (and can even end the game within 2-4 moves versus a terrible opponent). She usually doesn't join the action until some of the early carnage has settled down or a favorable pawn structure has developed, as having her being chased around by lesser pieces tends to be counter-productive.
** Also see all the ''stunning'' 3D-chess tables like the one above that is found in computer chess games. Everyone still just uses 2D view due to visibility.



* BattleCouple: The King and the Queen.
23rd Apr '16 8:02:18 AM Arivne
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* '''[[RedshirtArmy Pawns]]''': Representing infantry, each player starts with eight of these, filling the entire second row forward from each side. They move one square forwards at a time, except for an optional two squares when moved for the first time; when capturing another piece, they must move one square diagonally forward to do so. Beginning players tend to write them off as useless and obstructive, but players of skill know they are one of the most critical parts of the game. If a pawn makes it all the way to the farthest row on the board, they're instantly upgraded into any other piece of their player's choosing apart from the king, usually a [[MagikarpPower Queen]]. [[note]]Pawns' ability to become Queens is not their only strength--they are [[StoneWall highly effective defenses as well]], as the other player is very unlikely to sacrifice another piece to take one, almost regardless of context[[/note]]

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* '''[[RedshirtArmy Pawns]]''': Representing infantry, each player starts with eight of these, filling the entire second row forward from each side. They move one square forwards forward at a time, except for an optional two squares when moved for the first time; when capturing another piece, they must move one square diagonally forward to do so. Beginning players tend to write them off as useless and obstructive, but players of skill know they are one of the most critical parts of the game. If a pawn makes it all the way to the farthest row on the board, they're instantly upgraded into any other piece of their player's choosing apart from the king, usually a [[MagikarpPower Queen]]. [[note]]Pawns' ability to become Queens is not their only strength--they are [[StoneWall highly effective defenses as well]], as the other player is very unlikely to sacrifice another piece to take one, almost regardless of context[[/note]]
21st Feb '16 8:34:08 AM AriRockefeller
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Added DiffLines:

** There is also a series of highly in-depth video games called ''The Chessmaster'', but it doesn't have its own page yet.
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