History TabletopGame / Chess

5th Jan '17 6:12:29 PM Madrugada
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* '''King''': One per player. Traditionally the tallest piece, with a {{Creepy Cool Cross|es}} on top. Can move a single square forwards, backwards, left, right, or diagonally. Again, your goal as a player is to make it impossible for your opponent to prevent his king from being captured. If neither side can accomplish this, the game is a draw. A weak piece in the beginning and middle of the game, but surprisingly strong in the end game.

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* '''King''': One per player. Traditionally the tallest piece, with a {{Creepy Cool Cross|es}} cross on top. Can move a single square forwards, backwards, left, right, or diagonally. Again, your goal as a player is to make it impossible for your opponent to prevent his king from being captured. If neither side can accomplish this, the game is a draw. A weak piece in the beginning and middle of the game, but surprisingly strong in the end game.



** There is also a series of highly in-depth video games called ''The Chessmaster'', but it doesn't have its own page yet.
* ChildProdigy: Almost a requirement now. The current World Champion, Magnus Carlsen, became a grandmaster at the age of thirteen. Sergey Karjakin, who lost to Carlsen in the most recent World Championship match in 2016, became a grandmaster at ''12''.

to:

** There is also a series of highly in-depth video games called ''The Chessmaster'', but it doesn't have its own page yet.
* ChildProdigy: Almost a requirement now.Not uncommon. The current World Champion, Magnus Carlsen, became a grandmaster at the age of thirteen. Sergey Karjakin, who lost to Carlsen in the most recent World Championship match in 2016, became a grandmaster at ''12''.



* CoolHorse: The Knight.
* CrazyPrepared: At least at Super GM level, it's necessary being this for the opening.
** At master level, still expect your opponent to wade through your previous games on the night before the play, trying to guess your opening...[[IKnowYouKnowIKnow and trying to guess what you play when you guess he's trying to guess.]]
* CripplingOverspecialization: The vulnerability of the rook and bishop to attack diagonally and horizonally, respectively.
* CriticalExistenceFailure: Checkmate in less than ten moves tends to feel like this. (Keep in mind that there are only a few ways to lose in that short a time, and most of them require you to either be GenreBlind, be carrying the IdiotBall, TooDumbToLive, or flat-out playing to lose.)
** Or a very new player against a more experienced one. Even capable rookies can fall for a four or five move mate if they haven't seen it before.
** In a complex game, checkmates can come out of seemingly nowhere, it really is possible to lose a game before the action started. Of course, less complex games can also fall victim to this; see also [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scholar%27s_mate Scholar's Mate]].
*** Quicker (and more humiliating still) is the Fool's mate, ending the game in two moves.[[note]]1. g4 e5 2. f3 [=Qh4#=] or its variants[[/note]] Falling victim to this one is a mistake few players ever make, and only once in a lifetime.

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* CoolHorse: The Knight.
* CrazyPrepared: At least at Super GM level, it's necessary being this for the opening.
**
opening. At master level, still expect your opponent to wade through your previous games on the night before the play, trying to guess your opening...[[IKnowYouKnowIKnow and trying to guess what you play when you guess he's trying to guess.]]
* CripplingOverspecialization: The vulnerability of the rook and bishop to attack diagonally and horizonally, respectively.
* CriticalExistenceFailure: Checkmate in less than ten moves tends to feel like this. (Keep in mind that there are only a few ways to lose in that short a time, and most of them require you to either be GenreBlind, be carrying the IdiotBall, TooDumbToLive, or flat-out playing to lose.)
** Or a very new player against a more experienced one. Even capable rookies can fall for a four or five move mate if they haven't seen it before.
** In a complex game, checkmates can come out of seemingly nowhere, it really is possible to lose a game before the action started. Of course, less complex games can also fall victim to this; see also [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scholar%27s_mate Scholar's Mate]].
*** Quicker (and more humiliating still) is the Fool's mate, ending the game in two moves.[[note]]1. g4 e5 2. f3 [=Qh4#=] or its variants[[/note]] Falling victim to this one is a mistake few players ever make, and only once in a lifetime.
]]



** In tournaments, it can happen over multiple games, if the players' difference in skill levels (and in some cases, mental strength) is great enough, such as Bobby Fischer's consecutive 6-0 sweeps against Mark Taimanov and Bent Larsen in the 1971 Candidates tournament. He would probably have swept "[[StoneWall Iron]]" Tigran Petrosian by the same score too had he not caught a cold before the second game; instead he "only" won 6½-2½.

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** In tournaments, it can happen over multiple games, if the players' difference in skill levels (and in some cases, mental strength) is great enough, such as Bobby Fischer's consecutive 6-0 sweeps against Mark Taimanov and Bent Larsen in the 1971 Candidates tournament. He would probably have swept "[[StoneWall Iron]]" "Iron" Tigran Petrosian by the same score too had he not caught a cold before the second game; instead he "only" won 6½-2½.6½-2½.



* DeliberatelyMonochrome: Most sets are black and white, or just plain dark and light.
* DenialOfDiagonalAttack: Rooks can only attack vertically or horizontally, but they can travel any number of squares in that direction. ''Inverted'' by Bishops and Pawns, who can ''only'' attack diagonally.
* DiagonalSpeedBoost: Averted for the bishop since it can't turn while moving so it takes two turns to get to a position that the rook could reach in one. Played straight for the king and queen.
** Played straight for the bishop since it can reach a position in one move that would take the rook two. Also, for the rook to hit its top speed a file has to be cleared of friendly pawns; it is much easier for a diagonal to be cleared for the bishop.
** The King also has more options when moving diagonally. Richard Reti wrote an endgame study invoking [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A9ti_endgame_study this]].



* TheDragon[=/=]TheLancer: The Queen, depending on which side she's on.
** DragonInChief[=/=]HypercompetentSidekick: The queen is more powerful than the king.
5th Jan '17 5:33:37 PM Madrugada
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** DarkActionGirl: Your opponent's queen.



* AnachronismStew: The correspondence chess championship 1995 was won by the Soviet Union. East Germany finished third. (The tournament started in 1987.)
* AnthropomorphicPersonification: Caïssa, goddess of chess. Yes, chess players have even invented their own goddess. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caïssa Really]].



* BadassNormal: There are some powerful Pawn attacks available, position permitting.



* BigBad: Your opponent's king.



* CallingYourAttacks: What the announcer stereotypically does in tournament play.
** Also, the rule commonly followed at the amateur level where the player who places their opponent in check must announce "check". In tournament play, this isn't a rule though.

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* CallingYourAttacks: What the announcer stereotypically does in tournament play.
** Also,
the rule commonly followed at the amateur level where the player who places their opponent in check must announce "check"."check" as they make the move. In tournament play, this isn't a rule though.



* ChekhovsGunman: Certain pieces inevitably end up this way, especially pawns. Their positioning early on can determine whether a match is a win, loss or draw.
5th Jan '17 6:52:02 AM Adept
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* '''[[RedshirtArmy Pawns]]''': Representing infantry, each player starts with eight of these, filling the entire second row forward from each side. They move one square forward at a time, except for an optional two squares when moved for the first time; when capturing another piece, they must move one square diagonally forward to do so. Beginning players tend to write them off as useless and obstructive, but players of skill know they are one of the most critical parts of the game. If a pawn makes it all the way to the farthest row on the board, they're instantly upgraded into any other piece of their player's choosing apart from the king, usually a [[MagikarpPower Queen]]. [[note]]Pawns' ability to become Queens is not their only strength--they are [[StoneWall highly effective defenses as well]], as the other player is very unlikely to sacrifice another piece to take one, almost regardless of context[[/note]]
* '''[[LightningBruiser Rooks]]''': Two per player; famously shaped like castles. Originally representing war chariots or siege towers. They can move any number of squares forwards, backwards, left, and right.
* '''[[KnightInShiningArmour Knights]]''': Two per player. The horses; probably the most recognized board game piece in the world. Represent armoured cavalry. Their move has several horrid descriptions floating about, but they move in straight lines like all other pieces. The trick is they move along the lines bisecting the ordinal and diagonal lines used by the queens. These lines only cleanly intersect squares on every two squares moved. A knight moves one square along these lines, skipping over the squares immediately adjacent to it. Like the king which only moves one square the knight has up to eight squares to choose from. Another helpful mnemonic for understanding their weird move is that of the 16 squares which lie 2 away from the knight, the 8 the knight can move to are the opposite color from the one he sits on - so if he's on a black square he can move to one of the 8 white squares which are two away from him. They famously ignore other pieces on their move since they are passing between them. Knights are useful since they can [[TacticalRockPaperScissors threaten a queen without putting themselves in danger]] but they are also the most frequently pinned pieces since they can't attack a piece that is pinning them.
* '''[[ChurchMilitant Bishops]]''': Two per player. Have a top shaped like a bishop's miter. They originally represented war elephants, but such were unknown in Europe (Hannibal Barca notwithstanding) and the imagery eventually aligned to the environment. Can move any number of squares diagonally.

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* '''[[RedshirtArmy Pawns]]''': '''Pawns''': Representing infantry, each player starts with eight of these, filling the entire second row forward from each side. They move one square forward at a time, except for an optional two squares when moved for the first time; when capturing another piece, they must move one square diagonally forward to do so. Beginning players tend to write them off as useless and obstructive, but players of skill know they are one of the most critical parts of the game. If a pawn makes it all the way to the farthest row on the board, they're instantly upgraded into any other piece of their player's choosing apart from the king, usually a [[MagikarpPower Queen]]. [[note]]Pawns' ability to become Queens is not their only strength--they are [[StoneWall highly effective defenses as well]], as the other player is very unlikely to sacrifice another piece to take one, almost regardless of context[[/note]]
* '''[[LightningBruiser Rooks]]''': '''Rooks''': Two per player; famously shaped like castles. Originally representing war chariots or siege towers. They can move any number of squares forwards, backwards, left, and right.
* '''[[KnightInShiningArmour Knights]]''': '''Knights''': Two per player. The horses; probably the most recognized board game piece in the world. Represent armoured cavalry. Their move has several horrid descriptions floating about, but they move in straight lines like all other pieces. The trick is they move along the lines bisecting the ordinal and diagonal lines used by the queens. These lines only cleanly intersect squares on every two squares moved. A knight moves one square along these lines, skipping over the squares immediately adjacent to it. Like the king which only moves one square the knight has up to eight squares to choose from. Another helpful mnemonic for understanding their weird move is that of the 16 squares which lie 2 away from the knight, the 8 the knight can move to are the opposite color from the one he sits on - so if he's on a black square he can move to one of the 8 white squares which are two away from him. They famously ignore other pieces on their move since they are passing between them. Knights are useful since they can [[TacticalRockPaperScissors threaten a queen without putting themselves in danger]] but they are also the most frequently pinned pieces since they can't attack a piece that is pinning them.
* '''[[ChurchMilitant Bishops]]''': '''Bishops''': Two per player. Have a top shaped like a bishop's miter. They originally represented war elephants, but such were unknown in Europe (Hannibal Barca notwithstanding) and the imagery eventually aligned to the environment. Can move any number of squares diagonally.



* '''[[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen Queen]]''': One per player. Usually the second largest piece, and tends to have a small knob on its coronet-shaped top. Can move any number of squares left, right, forwards, backwards, or diagonally, thus [[AllYourPowersCombined combining the powers]] of rook and bishop.
* '''[[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething King]]''': One per player. Traditionally the tallest piece, with a {{Creepy Cool Cross|es}} on top. Can move a single square forwards, backwards, left, right, or diagonally. Again, your goal as a player is to make it impossible for your opponent to prevent his king from being captured. If neither side can accomplish this, the game is a draw. A weak piece in the beginning and middle of the game, but surprisingly strong in the end game.

to:

* '''[[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen Queen]]''': '''Queen''': One per player. Usually the second largest piece, and tends to have a small knob on its coronet-shaped top. Can move any number of squares left, right, forwards, backwards, or diagonally, thus [[AllYourPowersCombined combining the powers]] of rook and bishop.
* '''[[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething King]]''': '''King''': One per player. Traditionally the tallest piece, with a {{Creepy Cool Cross|es}} on top. Can move a single square forwards, backwards, left, right, or diagonally. Again, your goal as a player is to make it impossible for your opponent to prevent his king from being captured. If neither side can accomplish this, the game is a draw. A weak piece in the beginning and middle of the game, but surprisingly strong in the end game.
5th Jan '17 1:21:15 AM KYCubbie
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* ChildProdigy: Almost a requirement now. The current World Champion, Magnus Carlsen, became a grandmaster at the age of thirteen. Sergey Karjakin - the runner-up in the Candidates Tournament - became a grandmaster at ''12''.

to:

* ChildProdigy: Almost a requirement now. The current World Champion, Magnus Carlsen, became a grandmaster at the age of thirteen. Sergey Karjakin - the runner-up Karjakin, who lost to Carlsen in the Candidates Tournament - most recent World Championship match in 2016, became a grandmaster at ''12''.
4th Jan '17 5:42:35 AM Fighteer
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* NewMediaAreEvil: There were a number of controversies about it in the Middle Ages. For example, it was believed highly inappropriate that some mere infantryman - and in a commoner's hands, no less - will be able to kill royalty - that's probably the reason the kings aren't killed or captured in the game, but merely surrender. It also allowed a king to have more than one wife (a real problem for Christians).
28th Dec '16 10:54:18 AM Omeganian
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Added DiffLines:

* NewMediaAreEvil: There were a number of controversies about it in the Middle Ages. For example, it was believed highly inappropriate that some mere infantryman - and in a commoner's hands, no less - will be able to kill royalty - that's probably the reason the kings aren't killed or captured in the game, but merely surrender. It also allowed a king to have more than one wife (a real problem for Christians).
28th Dec '16 10:43:32 AM LordGro
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* NewMediaAreEvil: Why do you think the king is captured instead of killed? It's because once, it was believed highly inappropriate that some mere infantryman - and in a commoner's hands, no less - will be able to kill royalty.
28th Dec '16 3:23:51 AM Omeganian
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Added DiffLines:

* NewMediaAreEvil: Why do you think the king is captured instead of killed? It's because once, it was believed highly inappropriate that some mere infantryman - and in a commoner's hands, no less - will be able to kill royalty.
26th Dec '16 11:07:43 AM AkiTendo
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* '''[[KnightInShiningArmour Knights]]''': Two per player. The horses; probably the most recognized board game piece in the world. Represent armoured cavalry. Their move has several horrid descriptions floating about, but they move in straight lines like all other pieces. The trick is they move along the lines bisecting the ordinal and diagonal lines used by the queens. These lines only cleanly intersect squares on every two squares moved. A knight moves one square along these lines, skipping over the squares immediately adjacent to it. Like the king which only moves one square the knight has up to eight squares to choose from. Another helpful mnemonic for understanding their weird move is that of the 16 squares which lie 2 away from the knight, the 8 the knight can move to are the opposite color from the one he sits on - so if he's on a black square he can move to one of the 8 white squares which are two away from him. Knights are useful since they can [[TacticalRockPaperScissors threaten a queen without putting themselves in danger]] but they are also the most frequently pinned pieces since they can't attack a piece that is pinning them.

to:

* '''[[KnightInShiningArmour Knights]]''': Two per player. The horses; probably the most recognized board game piece in the world. Represent armoured cavalry. Their move has several horrid descriptions floating about, but they move in straight lines like all other pieces. The trick is they move along the lines bisecting the ordinal and diagonal lines used by the queens. These lines only cleanly intersect squares on every two squares moved. A knight moves one square along these lines, skipping over the squares immediately adjacent to it. Like the king which only moves one square the knight has up to eight squares to choose from. Another helpful mnemonic for understanding their weird move is that of the 16 squares which lie 2 away from the knight, the 8 the knight can move to are the opposite color from the one he sits on - so if he's on a black square he can move to one of the 8 white squares which are two away from him. They famously ignore other pieces on their move since they are passing between them. Knights are useful since they can [[TacticalRockPaperScissors threaten a queen without putting themselves in danger]] but they are also the most frequently pinned pieces since they can't attack a piece that is pinning them.
26th Dec '16 11:05:09 AM AkiTendo
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* '''[[KnightInShiningArmour Knights]]''': Two per player. The horses; probably the most recognized board game piece in the world. Represent armoured cavalry. They move two squares forwards, backwards, left, or right, and then one square at right angles to that move. They are the only pieces that can jump over others[[note]]or, if you view their move as the shortest possible non-orthogonal, non-primary-diagonal move, pass ''between'' other pieces ... e.g., en route from g1 to f3 the Knight passes over neither g2 nor f2[[/note]], and the only ones that can [[TacticalRockPaperScissors threaten a queen without putting themselves in danger]].

to:

* '''[[KnightInShiningArmour Knights]]''': Two per player. The horses; probably the most recognized board game piece in the world. Represent armoured cavalry. They Their move has several horrid descriptions floating about, but they move in straight lines like all other pieces. The trick is they move along the lines bisecting the ordinal and diagonal lines used by the queens. These lines only cleanly intersect squares on every two squares forwards, backwards, left, or right, and then moved. A knight moves one square at right angles along these lines, skipping over the squares immediately adjacent to it. Like the king which only moves one square the knight has up to eight squares to choose from. Another helpful mnemonic for understanding their weird move is that move. They of the 16 squares which lie 2 away from the knight, the 8 the knight can move to are the only pieces that opposite color from the one he sits on - so if he's on a black square he can jump over others[[note]]or, if you view their move as to one of the shortest possible non-orthogonal, non-primary-diagonal move, pass ''between'' other pieces ... e.g., en route 8 white squares which are two away from g1 to f3 the Knight passes over neither g2 nor f2[[/note]], and the only ones that him. Knights are useful since they can [[TacticalRockPaperScissors threaten a queen without putting themselves in danger]].danger]] but they are also the most frequently pinned pieces since they can't attack a piece that is pinning them.
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