History SugarWiki / GeniusProgramming

21st Sep '16 4:10:47 PM Pr1A
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* Creator/ShinyEntertainment's 1997 third-person shooter VideoGame/{{MDK}} is definitely this. Not only were the graphics very impressive for the time, the game engine allowed huge environments with unlimited draw distance, allowing the player fully utilize the sniper mode with 100x zoom. Loading between areas is [[Main/DynamicLoading cleverly disguised with tunnels connecting them]], the only actual loading screens are between levels and they are very brief. Despite all of this, the game had some really modest system requirements even by the standards of its time. It was designed to consistently with minimum 30FPS with measly 60MHz Pentium and 16MB RAM, without any additional GPU requirements as the graphics ran entirely by software rendering (although patches were released to add support for most hardware-based rendering [=APIs.=]) They utilized some incredibly simple yet elegant optimization tricks to achieve this, such as making the player character a 2D sprite instead of actual 3D model (which worked so well that many players didn't even notice it!) and intentionally leaving some surfaces black with no textures and shading, which also worked as a part of the unique graphical style of the game. The developers also had to ''write their own programming language'' for the game because they were doing things that no one had ever even attempted to do before.

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* Creator/ShinyEntertainment's 1997 third-person shooter VideoGame/{{MDK}} is definitely this. Not only were the graphics very impressive for the time, the game engine allowed huge environments with unlimited draw distance, allowing the player to fully utilize the sniper mode with 100x zoom. Loading between areas is [[Main/DynamicLoading cleverly disguised with tunnels connecting them]], the only actual loading screens are between levels and they are very brief. Despite all of this, the game had some really modest system requirements even by the standards of its time. It was designed to run consistently with minimum 30FPS with measly 60MHz Pentium and 16MB RAM, without any additional GPU requirements as the graphics ran entirely by software rendering (although patches were released to add support for most hardware-based rendering [=APIs.=]) They utilized some incredibly simple yet elegant optimization tricks to achieve this, such as making the player character a 2D sprite instead of actual 3D model (which worked so well that many players didn't even notice it!) and intentionally leaving some surfaces black with no textures and shading, which also worked as a part of the unique graphical style of the game. The developers also had to ''write their own programming language'' for the game because they were doing things that no one had ever even attempted to do before.
21st Sep '16 3:40:00 PM Pr1A
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Added DiffLines:

* Creator/ShinyEntertainment's 1997 third-person shooter VideoGame/{{MDK}} is definitely this. Not only were the graphics very impressive for the time, the game engine allowed huge environments with unlimited draw distance, allowing the player fully utilize the sniper mode with 100x zoom. Loading between areas is [[Main/DynamicLoading cleverly disguised with tunnels connecting them]], the only actual loading screens are between levels and they are very brief. Despite all of this, the game had some really modest system requirements even by the standards of its time. It was designed to consistently with minimum 30FPS with measly 60MHz Pentium and 16MB RAM, without any additional GPU requirements as the graphics ran entirely by software rendering (although patches were released to add support for most hardware-based rendering [=APIs.=]) They utilized some incredibly simple yet elegant optimization tricks to achieve this, such as making the player character a 2D sprite instead of actual 3D model (which worked so well that many players didn't even notice it!) and intentionally leaving some surfaces black with no textures and shading, which also worked as a part of the unique graphical style of the game. The developers also had to ''write their own programming language'' for the game because they were doing things that no one had ever even attempted to do before.
16th Sep '16 9:07:50 PM JudasZala
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* 1995's ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTriad'' ran on a heavily modified version of the ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' engine, allowing it to do things that aren't possible with the vanilla ''Wolf 3D'' engine, like 11-player multiplayer (unheard of at the time; ''Doom'' had four-player multiplayer) with nine different multiplayer modes, destructible environments, moving walls, obstacles, and of course, LudicrousGibs. You can learn more about ''ROTT'''s engine in the 1997 article, "[[http://archive.kontek.net/rott.classicgaming.gamespy.com/hell/ ROTT in Hell]]."
13th Sep '16 1:01:53 PM Dinjoralo
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** Two Wii-based mods: ''VideoGame/NewerSuperMarioBrosWii'' and ''VideoGame/ProjectM''. The former is a highly extensive mod of ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii'' that even manages to surpass the [[VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU official sequel]] in some ways. The latter is a highly extensive mod of ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', intended to both replicate and surpass ''Melee'', and the kicker: it adds 2 additional slots to the character select screen. Most modders only managed to overlay one character over another up until that point.

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** Two Wii-based mods: ''VideoGame/NewerSuperMarioBrosWii'' and ''VideoGame/ProjectM''. The former is a highly extensive mod of ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii'' that even manages to surpass the [[VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU official sequel]] in some ways. The latter is a highly extensive mod of ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', intended to both replicate and surpass ''Melee'', and the kicker: it adds 2 two additional slots to the character select screen. Most Before that was added, modders were only managed able to overlay one character over another up until that point.have custom characters by replacing existing ones.
9th Sep '16 10:57:12 PM Meyers07TheTroper
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Added DiffLines:

* On the same note about the use of Denuvo DRM and its nonexistent negative effect on performance overall, ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' are also known to be well-optimized (even without the dedicated graphics card drivers). Up to Eleven when support for the cutting-edge Vulkan API was patched in, with rigs with supported graphics cards reaching upwards of 200 frames per second at 1080p with the visuals maxed out.
* The Denuvo itself may be considered some praise too, as despite being made by the same team as the infamous Securom, the Denuvo Anti-Tamper, as proven by the two games above, doesn't interfere with games performance and even system stability and durability (barring statements that are known to be false). That, and the DRM itself are known to withstand months before its fully cracked due to its 64-bit signature and every title has its own unique key signature different from one another (so if one game are cracked after several months, the cracker essentially need to start from scratch to crack the other Denuvo protected game)
5th Sep '16 5:55:36 AM Fallingwater
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** Naughty Dog cut their teeth on the first ''CrashBandicoot''. They developed it as a Playstation 1 exclusive, and when it came out it was so much better than anyone had ever managed to accomplish on the console that other developers cried foul, insisting that Naughty Dog had used some secret libraries provided by Sony to them and them alone. The reverse was true: they used as little as possible of Sony's stuff, and essentially hacked as much of the game as possible to run as close to the hardware as they could make it, effectively developing their own development as they went. The result was ''way'' ahead of what anyone had managed on the meagre (even for the times) power of the Playstation 1. You can read about many of the tricks they used in [[http://all-things-andy-gavin.com/2011/02/02/making-crash-bandicoot-part-1/ Andy Gavin's post mortem]] for the game.

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** Naughty Dog cut their teeth on the first ''CrashBandicoot''. They developed it as a Playstation 1 exclusive, and when it came out it was so much better than anyone had ever managed to accomplish on the console that other developers cried foul, insisting that Naughty Dog had used some secret libraries provided by Sony to them and them alone. The reverse opposite was true: they used as little as possible of Sony's stuff, and essentially hacked as much of the game as possible to run as close to the hardware as they could make it, effectively developing their own development as they went. The result was ''way'' ahead of what anyone had managed on the meagre (even for the times) power of the Playstation 1. You can read about many of the tricks they used in [[http://all-things-andy-gavin.com/2011/02/02/making-crash-bandicoot-part-1/ Andy Gavin's post mortem]] for the game.
5th Sep '16 5:35:51 AM Fallingwater
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNRO7lno_DM 8088 MPH]] is a demo that does '''1024''' colors, polygon rendering, and other things that the [[IBMPersonalComputer original IBM PC]] with a CGA card (on a composite monitor) should not be doing.
** Also, 4 channel music with a ''one channel beeper''.

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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNRO7lno_DM 8088 MPH]] is a demo that does '''1024''' colors, polygon rendering, 4 channel music with a ''one channel beeper'' and other things that the [[IBMPersonalComputer original IBM PC]] with a CGA card (on a composite monitor) should not be doing.
** Also, 4 channel music with a ''one channel beeper''.
doing. It's worth noting that it's so ''very'' specifically tailored to the IBM PC's exact hardware and quirks that no emulator exists that can run it without crashing.
5th Sep '16 4:31:14 AM Fallingwater
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* Farbrausch is a widely known crew that attained massive fame for ''[[http://www.pouet.net/prod.php?which=1221 fr-08: .the .product]]'', the first 64k demo with really impressive graphics (for the time).

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* Farbrausch is a widely known crew that attained massive fame for ''[[http://www.pouet.net/prod.php?which=1221 fr-08: .the .product]]'', the first 64k demo with really impressive graphics (for the time). Witness it [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3n3c_8Nn2Y here]].
5th Sep '16 4:29:23 AM Fallingwater
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The Demoscene is Genius Programming pretty much by definition, as it was born in an age where computers were dramatically limited in their capabilities, and its entire goal was to exploit available hardware to the highest degree possible - often way beyond what the original designers had envisaged. Modern hardware obviously doesn't have these limitations, but the Demoscene crowd decided it wasn't fun to do what game developers were already doing (that is, 3D eye candy using gigs and gigs of textures and 3D models), so they enacted self-imposed limits - often harsher than those they originally had to deal with. Hence a division in categories, one of the most famous and prestigious being "64k" - that is, demos whose entire code and resources fit in ''sixty-four kilobytes''. For reference, that's 3.5 ''seconds'' of mp3 music, and you you could fit it ''twenty-two times'' in a floppy disk and more than ''10900'' in a CD-ROM.

to:

The Demoscene is Genius Programming pretty much by definition, as it was born in an age where computers were dramatically limited in their capabilities, and its entire goal was to exploit available hardware to the highest degree possible - often way beyond what the original designers had envisaged. Modern hardware obviously doesn't have these limitations, but the Demoscene crowd decided it wasn't fun to do what game developers were already doing (that is, 3D eye candy using gigs and gigs of textures and 3D models), so they enacted self-imposed limits - often harsher than those they originally had to deal with. Hence a division in categories, one of the most famous and prestigious being "64k" - that is, demos whose entire code and resources fit in ''sixty-four kilobytes''. For reference, that's 3.5 ''seconds'' of mp3 music, and you you could fit it ''twenty-two times'' in a floppy disk and more than ''10900'' almost ''eleven thousand'' times in a CD-ROM.
2nd Sep '16 8:03:19 PM xenol
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->@@[=float Q_rsqrt( float number )=]@@
->@@[={=]@@
->@@[= long i;=]@@
->@@[= float x2, y;=]@@
->@@[= const float threehalfs = 1.5F;=]@@
->@@[= =]@@
->@@[= x2 = number * 0.5F;=]@@
->@@[= y = number;=]@@
->@@[= i = * ( long * ) &y; // evil floating point bit level hacking=]@@
->@@[= i = 0x5f3759df - ( i >> 1 ); // what the fuck? =]@@
->@@[= y = * ( float * ) &i;=]@@
->@@[= y = y * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * y * y ) ); // 1st iteration=]@@
->@@[=// y = y * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * y * y ) ); // 2nd iteration, this can be removed=]@@
->@@[= =]@@
->@@[= return y;=]@@
->@@[=}=]@@
-->-- '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_inverse_square_root Fast inverse square root]]''', ''Quake III Arena'' Source Code

to:

->@@[=float Q_rsqrt( float number )=]@@
->@@[={=]@@
->@@[= long i;=]@@
->@@[= float x2, y;=]@@
->@@[= const float threehalfs = 1.5F;=]@@
->@@[= =]@@
->@@[=
->[= x2 = number * 0.5F;=]@@
->@@[=
5F;=]
->[=
y = number;=]@@
->@@[=
number;=]
->[=
i = * ( long * ) &y; // evil floating point bit level hacking=]@@
->@@[=
hacking=]
->[=
i = 0x5f3759df - ( i >> 1 ); // //=] what the fuck? =]@@
->@@[=
[[PrecisionFStrike fuck?]]
->[=
y = * ( float * ) &i;=]@@
->@@[=
&i;=]
->[=
y = y * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * y * y ) ); // 1st iteration=]@@
->@@[=// y = y * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * y * y ) ); // 2nd iteration, this can be removed=]@@
->@@[= =]@@
->@@[= return y;=]@@
->@@[=}=]@@
iteration=]
-->-- Excerpt from '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_inverse_square_root Fast inverse square root]]''', ''Quake III Arena'' Source Code
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