History SugarWiki / GeniusProgramming

18th Jul '16 6:43:24 PM Pocketim
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* ''Creator/{{Rare}}'' were continuously pulling this off during the N64 era. Even their first and less technically impressive N64 game, [[KillerInstinct Killer Instinct Gold]], was still noteworthy for running at 60FPS on a console where that almost never happened. Following that was the huge size of both ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong64'' and [[BanjoKazooie Banjo Tooie]], the [[LudicrousGibs impressive splatter effects]] in ''VideoGame/JetForceGemini'', and most impressively, ''VideoGame/ConkersBadFurDay'', which had some of the best graphics, most fluid animations and furthest draw distance of any N64 game, all while still managing to cram in full voice acting, of which there's a ton of. The impressive part? All these games had to be crammed into N64 cartridges, which could hold 64MB at the most, and yet some of these games, especially Conker, still look better than some early PS2 or Dreamcast releases.
13th Jul '16 1:39:12 PM madammina
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* ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories'' on the GBA had full FMV opening and closing scenes that MATCHED the quality of the PS2 Opening and Closing for KH1. On a GBA cart. They managed to do the impossible by essentially turning the FMV into one incredibly long GIF sequence. Oh, and to top it off, they had a secret Riku mode too.
25th Jun '16 9:39:59 AM rjd1922
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*** Somebody made a homebrew version of ''Pac-Man'' on the 2600 called ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAYuBcuvIww Pac-Man 4K]]'', which is a much better port that uses the same 4-kilobyte size limit as the official one.

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*** Somebody The 2600 ports of ''Ms. Pac-Man'' and ''Jr. Pac-Man'' are huge improvements from the ''Pac-Man'' port, and somebody made a homebrew version of ''Pac-Man'' on the 2600 called ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAYuBcuvIww Pac-Man 4K]]'', which is a much better port that uses the same 4-kilobyte size limit as the official one.
23rd Jun '16 4:46:45 AM Fallingwater
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* When the Commodore 64 came out it was hopelessly slow at loading programs (which is why it's listed in IdiotProgramming). Fastloader cartridges and chips for floppy drives came out quickly, but though in the US floppy drives were widespread various market/import reasons made them ''hilariously'' expensive in Europe - one could easily spend about as much money on the floppy as they did on the computer itself. As a result most Europeans made do with tapes, which were both inherently slower and much harder to speed up - not only was tape intended for music and therefore not well-optimized for data storage, but the cassette drive lacked the relatively powerful hardware present on the floppy drives (which were effectively secondary computers in and of themselves, with their own CPU and RAM). As a result "turbo tape" loaders were developed, which would be loaded slowly by the original system and would then speed up about fivefold everything loaded after them. Notably, since they couldn't rely on additional hardware to do the job, turbo loaders required some pretty clever programming to intercept the original operating system routines and modify them to accept the new commands and improved functionality - see [here](http://www.atarimagazines.com/compute/issue57/turbotape.html) for a detailed analysis.

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* When the Commodore 64 came out it was hopelessly slow at loading programs (which is why it's listed in IdiotProgramming). Fastloader cartridges and chips for floppy drives came out quickly, but though in the US floppy drives were widespread various market/import reasons made them ''hilariously'' expensive in Europe - one could easily spend about as much money on the floppy as they did on the computer itself. As a result most Europeans made do with tapes, which were both inherently slower and much harder to speed up - not only was tape intended for music and therefore not well-optimized for data storage, but the cassette drive lacked the relatively powerful hardware present on the floppy drives (which were effectively secondary computers in and of themselves, with their own CPU and RAM). As a result "turbo tape" loaders were developed, which would be loaded slowly by the original system and would then speed up about fivefold everything loaded after them. Notably, since they couldn't rely on additional hardware to do the job, turbo loaders required some pretty clever programming to intercept the original operating system routines and modify them to accept the new commands and improved functionality - see [here](http://www.[[http://www.atarimagazines.com/compute/issue57/turbotape.html) html here]] for a detailed analysis.
23rd Jun '16 4:45:44 AM Fallingwater
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* When the Commodore 64 came out it was hopelessly slow at loading programs (which is why it's listed in IdiotProgramming). Fastloader cartridges and chips for floppy drives came out quickly, but though in the US floppy drives were widespread various market/import reasons made them ''hilariously'' expensive in Europe - one could easily spend about as much money on the floppy as they did on the computer itself. As a result most Europeans made do with tapes, which were both inherently slower and much harder to speed up - not only was tape intended for music and therefore not well-optimized for data storage, but the cassette drive lacked the relatively powerful hardware present on the floppy drives (which were effectively secondary computers in and of themselves, with their own CPU and RAM). As a result "turbo tape" loaders were developed, which would be loaded slowly by the original system and would then speed up about fivefold everything loaded after them. Notably, since they couldn't rely on additional hardware to do the job, turbo loaders required some pretty clever programming to intercept the original operating system routines and modify them to accept the new commands and improved functionality - see [here](http://www.atarimagazines.com/compute/issue57/turbotape.html) for a detailed analysis.
11th Jun '16 9:58:48 AM Fallingwater
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* There exists a BASIC code one only one line long that is capable of generating mazes.[[http://10print.org/]]


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* There exists a BASIC code one only one line long that is capable of generating mazes.[[http://10print.org/]]
11th Jun '16 9:54:02 AM Fallingwater
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The Demoscene is Genius Programming pretty much by definition, as it was born in an age where computers were dramatically limited in their capabilities, and its entire goal was to exploit available hardware to the highest degree possible - often way beyond what the original designers had envisaged. Modern hardware obviously doesn't have these limitations, but the Demoscene crowd decided it wasn't fun to do what game developers were already doing (that is, 3D eye candy using gigs and gigs of textures and 3D models), so they enacted self-imposed limits - often harsher than those they originally had to deal with. Hence a division in categories, one of the most famous and prestigious being "64k" - that is, demos whose entire code and resources fit in ''sixty-four kilobytes''. For reference, that's 3.5 ''seconds'' of mp3 music, and you you could fit it ''fourteen times'' in a floppy disk and more than ''10900'' in a CD-ROM.

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The Demoscene is Genius Programming pretty much by definition, as it was born in an age where computers were dramatically limited in their capabilities, and its entire goal was to exploit available hardware to the highest degree possible - often way beyond what the original designers had envisaged. Modern hardware obviously doesn't have these limitations, but the Demoscene crowd decided it wasn't fun to do what game developers were already doing (that is, 3D eye candy using gigs and gigs of textures and 3D models), so they enacted self-imposed limits - often harsher than those they originally had to deal with. Hence a division in categories, one of the most famous and prestigious being "64k" - that is, demos whose entire code and resources fit in ''sixty-four kilobytes''. For reference, that's 3.5 ''seconds'' of mp3 music, and you you could fit it ''fourteen ''twenty-two times'' in a floppy disk and more than ''10900'' in a CD-ROM.
11th Jun '16 9:51:32 AM Fallingwater
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* [[http://hci.stanford.edu/~winograd/shrdlu/ SHRDLU]] is an AI/text parser written by Terry Winograd (MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory) from 1960-1971 that can manipulate blocks and pyramids according to commands entered by the user, and also answer questions about them. ''In plain English''. [[note]]If you're a computer science student, [[http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7095 Winograd's paper on the topic]] is a fascinating read.[[/note]] This is an excerpt from the demo:
-->'''Person:''' FIND A BLOCK WHICH IS TALLER THAN THE ONE YOU ARE HOLDING AND PUT IT INTO THE BOX.\\
'''Computer:''' BY "IT", I ASSUME YOU MEAN THE BLOCK WHICH IS TALLER THAN THE ONE I AM HOLDING.\\
'''Computer:''' OK. (does it)\\
'''Person:''' WHAT DOES THE BOX CONTAIN?\\
'''Computer:''' THE BLUE PYRAMID AND THE BLUE BLOCK.\\
'''Person:''' WHAT IS THE PYRAMID SUPPORTED BY?\\
'''Computer:''' THE BOX.\\
'''Person:''' HOW MANY BLOCKS ARE NOT IN THE BOX?\\
'''Computer:''' FOUR OF THEM.\\
'''Person:''' IS AT LEAST ONE OF THEM NARROWER THAN THE ONE WHICH I TOLD YOU TO PICK UP?\\
'''Computer:''' YES, THE RED CUBE.\\
'''Person:''' IS IT SUPPORTED?\\
'''Computer:''' YES, BY THE TABLE.
** Interestingly, the simple question "What?" acts as a LogicBomb, sending the program into an infinite loop where it will not respond to anything.


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* [[http://hci.stanford.edu/~winograd/shrdlu/ SHRDLU]] is an AI/text parser written by Terry Winograd (MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory) from 1960-1971 that can manipulate blocks and pyramids according to commands entered by the user, and also answer questions about them. ''In plain English''. [[note]]If you're a computer science student, [[http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7095 Winograd's paper on the topic]] is a fascinating read.[[/note]] This is an excerpt from the demo:
-->'''Person:''' FIND A BLOCK WHICH IS TALLER THAN THE ONE YOU ARE HOLDING AND PUT IT INTO THE BOX.\\
'''Computer:''' BY "IT", I ASSUME YOU MEAN THE BLOCK WHICH IS TALLER THAN THE ONE I AM HOLDING.\\
'''Computer:''' OK. (does it)\\
'''Person:''' WHAT DOES THE BOX CONTAIN?\\
'''Computer:''' THE BLUE PYRAMID AND THE BLUE BLOCK.\\
'''Person:''' WHAT IS THE PYRAMID SUPPORTED BY?\\
'''Computer:''' THE BOX.\\
'''Person:''' HOW MANY BLOCKS ARE NOT IN THE BOX?\\
'''Computer:''' FOUR OF THEM.\\
'''Person:''' IS AT LEAST ONE OF THEM NARROWER THAN THE ONE WHICH I TOLD YOU TO PICK UP?\\
'''Computer:''' YES, THE RED CUBE.\\
'''Person:''' IS IT SUPPORTED?\\
'''Computer:''' YES, BY THE TABLE.
** Interestingly, the simple question "What?" acts as a LogicBomb, sending the program into an infinite loop where it will not respond to anything.
11th Jun '16 9:47:28 AM Fallingwater
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** Naughty Dog cut their teeth on the first ''CrashBandicoot''. They developed it as a Playstation 1 exclusive, and when it came out it was so much better than anyone had ever managed to accomplish on the console that other developers cried foul, insisting that Naughty Dog had used some secret libraries provided by Sony to them and them alone. The reverse was true: they used as little as possible of Sony's stuff, and essentially hacked as much of the game as possible to run as close to the hardware as they could make it, effectively developing their own development as they went. The result was ''way'' ahead of what anyone had managed on the meagre (even for the times) power of the Playstation 1. You can read about many of the tricks they used in [[http://all-things-andy-gavin.com/2011/02/02/making-crash-bandicoot-part-1/ Andy Gavin's post mortem]] for the game.
11th Jun '16 9:14:51 AM NightShade96
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** On that note, ''Wine''. It's a project that attempts to ''recreate'' the full Windows [=API=] on Unix-based systems. It's not an emulator, either (it's actually part of the recursive acronym, ''Wine Is Not an Emulator''), but is actually a piecemeal reverse-engineering of Windows one library at a time, which makes Windows-only applications run just fine on Unix and other [=OSs=]. This includes very modern games like ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'', which are fully playable this way.

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** On that note, ''Wine''. It's a project that attempts to ''recreate'' the full Windows [=API=] on Unix-based systems. It's not an emulator, either (it's actually part of the recursive acronym, ''Wine Is Not an Emulator''), but is actually a piecemeal reverse-engineering of Windows one library at a time, which makes Windows-only applications run just fine on Unix and other [=OSs=].[=OSes=]. This includes very modern games like ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'', which are fully playable this way.



** Printing, NTVDM (the layer allowing 16-bit applications to run on 32-bit Windows) and virtualization software (e.g. [=VirtualBox=], Virtual PC) support have finally been implemented in the latest versions of [=ReactOS=], along with NTFS read support.



** SNES Advance and Snezziboy are particularly impressive - fully playable UsefulNotes/{{SNES}} emulators squeezed into a GameBoyAdvance.

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** SNES Advance and Snezziboy are particularly impressive - -- fully playable UsefulNotes/{{SNES}} emulators squeezed into a GameBoyAdvance.
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