History SoYouWantTo / WriteAStory

17th Jan '16 11:36:48 PM vifetoile
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Notice how the time you need to read through that sentence is much longer than the actual actions it describes. A text is linear (you can only read one word at a time) while a motion picture is holistic (you notice or can notice many details at once), therefore, just like with the clothes and appearances, avoid describing in great detail each move that a character makes in your book because it simply won't be as interesting as in the movies.

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Notice how the time you need to read through that sentence is much longer than the actual actions it describes. A text is linear (you can only read one word at a time) while a motion picture is holistic (you notice or can notice many details at once), therefore, just like with the clothes and appearances, avoid describing in great detail each move that a character makes in your book book, because it simply won't be as interesting as it is in the movies.



Just search any Literature Classics section in the bookstore/library, or ask the old man under the bridge who sells second-hand books.

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Just search any Literature Classics section in the bookstore/library, or ask the old man under the bridge who sells second-hand books.
books. Read an awful lot. Read in your chosen genre, of course, but try to sample something from everywhere. Reread the books and stories you love best (or, if you like film, rewatch the films you love best) and spend some time figuring out ''why'' they work so well.
18th Dec '15 9:03:07 PM nombretomado
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Aside from picking up plots at random, you can start with an archetypal plot and go from there. Christopher Booker's ''TheSevenBasicPlots'' outlines, well, seven archetypes, from TheQuest to classic monster-slaying to RagsToRiches to [[StartOfDarkness Tragedy]] and even Rebirth (the Tragedy plus a HeelFaceTurn in time for it to matter). There are others who classify the archetypal plots in [[MasterPlots different ways]] and with different numbers, from two (every story is about Love or Death) to 42 or even more.

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Aside from picking up plots at random, you can start with an archetypal plot and go from there. Christopher Booker's ''TheSevenBasicPlots'' ''Literature/TheSevenBasicPlots'' outlines, well, seven archetypes, from TheQuest to classic monster-slaying to RagsToRiches to [[StartOfDarkness Tragedy]] and even Rebirth (the Tragedy plus a HeelFaceTurn in time for it to matter). There are others who classify the archetypal plots in [[MasterPlots different ways]] and with different numbers, from two (every story is about Love or Death) to 42 or even more.
28th Oct '15 7:25:40 PM Gonzool
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But don't take my word for it: ''ExtraCredits'' has some inspirational thoughts for you right over [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDjrOaoHz9s here]].

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But don't take my our word for it: ''ExtraCredits'' has some inspirational thoughts for you right over [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDjrOaoHz9s here]].
19th Sep '15 4:09:23 PM nombretomado
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* '''[[AnimalStereotypes Animals]]:''' Each major character gets an animal "totem" that shows off the basic feel of the character. ''ElfQuest'' did this with Cutter, Leetah, Skywise, and Rayek: a bantam rooster, a cat, a fox, and a snake. But this was never the be-all and end-all of their characters; even Rayek, despite going fairly dark in many places, was never ''merely'' the "[[SmugSnake snake]]" of the series.

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* '''[[AnimalStereotypes Animals]]:''' Each major character gets an animal "totem" that shows off the basic feel of the character. ''ElfQuest'' ''ComicBook/ElfQuest'' did this with Cutter, Leetah, Skywise, and Rayek: a bantam rooster, a cat, a fox, and a snake. But this was never the be-all and end-all of their characters; even Rayek, despite going fairly dark in many places, was never ''merely'' the "[[SmugSnake snake]]" of the series.
18th May '15 1:26:08 PM ArsThaumaturgis
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The UsefulNotes/WritersResources page collects links to writing communities, articles, market information, resource collections, and so on.

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The UsefulNotes/WritersResources page collects links to writing communities, articles, market information, resource collections, and so on.more.
18th May '15 1:25:25 PM ArsThaumaturgis
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!'''Further Reading'''
The UsefulNotes/WritersResources page collects links to writing communities, articles, market information, resource collections, and so on.
12th Feb '15 1:41:04 PM Morgenthaler
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Another issue is one a lot of writers miss. Even if you supposedly set your story in "our" world, [[RealityIsUnrealistic you often end up bending things]] to suit the narrative. You never truly set your story in reality. The Chicago in Literature/TheDresdenFiles isn't real; neither is the LA in BlackDahlia.

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Another issue is one a lot of writers miss. Even if you supposedly set your story in "our" world, [[RealityIsUnrealistic you often end up bending things]] to suit the narrative. You never truly set your story in reality. The Chicago in Literature/TheDresdenFiles isn't real; neither is the LA in BlackDahlia.
VideoGame/BlackDahlia.
26th Sep '14 11:47:07 AM CyberTiger88
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Whether you want it or not, your story will also have structure, [[{{Aesop}} theme/premise]], mood/tone, and style. These become especially important if your story has no conflict, or if the plot is related in non-chronological order, or if you've otherwise decided to subvert one of the most basic assumptions about how stories work. If you are a beginning writer, you'll want to regard this kind of subversion as a learning exercise, rather than expecting that your character-less novel will be a bestseller and a classic for the ages.

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Whether you want it or not, your story will also have structure, [[{{Aesop}} [[CentralTheme theme/premise]], mood/tone, and style. These become especially important if your story has no conflict, or if the plot is related in non-chronological order, or if you've otherwise decided to subvert one of the most basic assumptions about how stories work. If you are a beginning writer, you'll want to regard this kind of subversion as a learning exercise, rather than expecting that your character-less novel will be a bestseller and a classic for the ages.
8th Feb '14 5:07:55 AM Kilyle
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Added DiffLines:

'''A quick word:''' No story ever springs from the writer's pen fully formed and in perfect condition. '''''Do not let that stop you.''''' You're gonna start with stupid ideas, shallow characters, pointless conversations, and in general the kind of writing you would give your eyeteeth to make sure no one ever sees. But if you keep at it, you're going to work out the kinks until it becomes something worth reading, and then keep going until it becomes something worth telling other people to read. Perseverance is far more important than perfection.

But don't take my word for it: ''ExtraCredits'' has some inspirational thoughts for you right over [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDjrOaoHz9s here]].
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11th Aug '13 4:11:52 AM Viira
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Most of the works listed here as being DarthWiki/SoBadItsHorrible got there for a reason.[[hottip:*:Okay, [[HateDumb two reasons -- that page wasn't moved to the Darth Wiki for nothing.]] Read or watch one to get a good idea of what not to do.

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Most of the works listed here as being DarthWiki/SoBadItsHorrible got there for a reason.[[hottip:*:Okay, [[note]]Okay, [[HateDumb two reasons -- that page wasn't moved to the Darth Wiki for nothing.]] ]][[/note]] Read or watch one to get a good idea of what not to do.
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