History SoYouWantTo / AvoidUnfortunateImplications

26th Jan '17 9:01:16 AM Wyldchyld
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** There are definitely examples of works set in TheDungAges-based fantasy worlds which use the misogyny and racism of their settings to skewer the way these operate in the real world, but there are also definitely examples of these sorts of stories which use oppression as superficial window-dressing [[DarkerAndEdgier to indicate that it's 'gritty']] (or even as FetishFuel). There isn't any reason to automatically assume a world where people can breathe underwater, walk on clouds, shoot fireballs out of their nostrils and use dragon dung as currency would have the exact same sexual and racial politics as 1950s America, and doing this would suggest, at least, a failure of your own imagination.

to:

** There are definitely examples of works set in TheDungAges-based fantasy worlds which use the misogyny and racism of their settings to skewer the way these operate in the real world, but there are also definitely examples of these sorts of stories which use oppression as superficial window-dressing [[DarkerAndEdgier to indicate that it's 'gritty']] (or even as FetishFuel).titillation). There isn't any reason to automatically assume a world where people can breathe underwater, walk on clouds, shoot fireballs out of their nostrils and use dragon dung as currency would have the exact same sexual and racial politics as 1950s America, and doing this would suggest, at least, a failure of your own imagination.
26th Dec '16 10:30:49 AM N.Harmonik
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** Be conscious of geopolitical and social context for political views as well: if you're writing a historical setting and your characters have certain political or philosophical views, make sure to research into how those views were well, viewed at the time: same for specific issues like women's emancipation, racism, homophobia etc. Keep in mind the implications of certain views as well: politics definitely doesn't exist in a vacuum, so some ideals or concepts may meet a completely different reception due to social attitudes or recent events. For example, anarchism in the early 20th century had a bad reputation amongst the wider public, especially due to high-profile assassinations by anarchist groups or individuals. While it's not particularly well-favored today, it's less maligned, and also less active on the ground.

to:

** Be conscious of geopolitical and social context for political views as well: if you're writing a historical setting and your characters have certain political or philosophical views, make sure to research into how those views were were, well, viewed at the time: same for specific issues like women's emancipation, racism, homophobia etc. Keep in mind the implications of certain views as well: politics definitely doesn't exist in a vacuum, so some ideals or concepts may meet a completely different reception due to social attitudes or recent events. For example, anarchism in the early 20th century had a bad reputation amongst the wider public, especially due to high-profile assassinations by anarchist groups or individuals. While it's not particularly well-favored today, it's less maligned, and also less active on the ground.



* There will always be racist people out there [[MisaimedFandom that try to use your work to confirm their (often unfairly biased) beliefs]]. As a writer you can try to make clear that they are clearly part of the MisaimedFandom. If you for instance write about a black character (and aren't black yourself), it is a good thing to look at sites like [[http://www.springhole.net/writing/offensivemistakes.html this one]] or [[http://midnightbreakfast.com/writing-people-of-color this]] to see how NOT to write a black character.

to:

* There will always be racist people out there [[MisaimedFandom that try to use your work to confirm their (often unfairly biased) beliefs]]. As a writer you can try to make clear that they are clearly part of the MisaimedFandom. If you for instance write about a black character (and aren't black yourself), it is a good thing to look at sites like [[http://www.springhole.net/writing/offensivemistakes.html htm this one]] or [[http://midnightbreakfast.com/writing-people-of-color this]] to see how NOT to write a black character.
25th Dec '16 11:43:07 PM N.Harmonik
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** On the other hand, beware of RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil. Do not treat rape as the epitome of heinousness in a story where other villains commit crimes just as bad or worse, such as genocide, harming or killing children, or ColdBloodedTorture. Rape is disgusting, but presenting it as worse than murdering and torturing thousands of people is just as offensive than trying to justify it. It's all about good measure in the end.

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** On the other hand, beware of RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil. Do not treat rape as the epitome of heinousness in a story where other villains commit crimes just as bad or worse, such as genocide, harming or killing children, or ColdBloodedTorture. Rape is disgusting, but presenting it as worse than murdering and torturing thousands of people is just as offensive than as trying to justify it. It's all about good measure in the end.
2nd Dec '16 9:25:31 PM TroperTR8R
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** Be careful how you handle religion in your story. Generally avoid using a real-life religion, beyond having characters who ascribe to a religion, if you don't know much about it, especially if it's a religion you disapprove of or if you disapprove of religion altogether. It's best to go to the source and research the religious texts yourselves since, in some cases, some religious teachings or even texts can be interpreted differently. Similar care should be taken if you make [[CrystalDragonJesus a fictional counterpart to a real religion]]. As with sociopolitical issues, do not assume that two ideologies that seem to be at odds in some issues will be polar opposites in all things. If you are trying to promote a particular religion in your story, keep in mind that not everyone in your audience may have the same views as you and handle other faiths in a respectful manner.

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**
*
Be careful how you handle religion in your story. Generally avoid using a real-life religion, beyond having characters who ascribe to a religion, if you don't know much about it, especially if it's a religion you disapprove of or if you disapprove of religion altogether. It's best to go to the source and research the religious texts yourselves since, in some cases, some religious teachings or even texts can be interpreted differently. Similar care should be taken if you make [[CrystalDragonJesus a fictional counterpart to a real religion]]. As with sociopolitical issues, do not assume that two ideologies that seem to be at odds in some issues will be polar opposites in all things. If you are trying to promote a particular religion in your story, keep in mind that not everyone in your audience may have the same views as you and handle other faiths beliefs in a respectful manner.
manner.
2nd Dec '16 9:18:12 PM TroperTR8R
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** Be conscious of geopolitical and social context for political views as well: if you're writing a historical setting and your characters have certain political or philosophical views, make sure to research into how those views were well, viewed at the time: same for specific issues like women's emancipation, racism, homophobia etc. Keep in mind the implications of certain views as well: politics definitely doesn't exist in a vacuum, so some ideals or concepts may meet a completely different reception due to social attitudes or recent events. For example, anarchism in the early 20th century had a bad reputation amongst the wider public, especially due to high-profile assassinations by anarchist groups or individuals. While it's not particularly well-favoured today, it's less maligned, and also less active on the ground.
* Be aware of what your characters have in common, not just traits, but their roles in the story, their reactions, and the events that involve them. Be careful not to give the same sort of plots to the same type of characters; if you do it often enough, it creates the impression that those events and reactions are inherent to that ''type'' of character, not to the character as a developed individual. For a short example, if a large number of your female characters have episodes of [[HystericalWoman irrational, inconsolable panic]], but your male characters don't, it leads to the impression that in your work, women are just naturally irrational. If your LGBT characters all [[BuryYourGays die]], and especially of AIDS or kinky sex accidents or in a particularly spiteful way for the work, it leads to the impression that you're expressing hatred toward real LGBT people. Consistent, repeated depictions can look like endorsements.

to:

** Be conscious of geopolitical and social context for political views as well: if you're writing a historical setting and your characters have certain political or philosophical views, make sure to research into how those views were well, viewed at the time: same for specific issues like women's emancipation, racism, homophobia etc. Keep in mind the implications of certain views as well: politics definitely doesn't exist in a vacuum, so some ideals or concepts may meet a completely different reception due to social attitudes or recent events. For example, anarchism in the early 20th century had a bad reputation amongst the wider public, especially due to high-profile assassinations by anarchist groups or individuals. While it's not particularly well-favoured well-favored today, it's less maligned, and also less active on the ground.
** Be careful how you handle religion in your story. Generally avoid using a real-life religion, beyond having characters who ascribe to a religion, if you don't know much about it, especially if it's a religion you disapprove of or if you disapprove of religion altogether. It's best to go to the source and research the religious texts yourselves since, in some cases, some religious teachings or even texts can be interpreted differently. Similar care should be taken if you make [[CrystalDragonJesus a fictional counterpart to a real religion]]. As with sociopolitical issues, do not assume that two ideologies that seem to be at odds in some issues will be polar opposites in all things. If you are trying to promote a particular religion in your story, keep in mind that not everyone in your audience may have the same views as you and handle other faiths in a respectful manner.

* Be aware of what your characters have in common, not just traits, but their roles in the story, their reactions, and the events that involve them. Be careful not to give the same sort of plots to the same type of characters; if you do it often enough, it creates the impression that those events and reactions are inherent to that ''type'' of character, not to the character as a developed individual. For a short example, if a large number of your female characters have episodes of [[HystericalWoman irrational, inconsolable panic]], but your male characters don't, it leads to the impression that in your work, women are just naturally irrational. If your LGBT characters all [[BuryYourGays die]], and especially of AIDS or kinky sex accidents or in a particularly spiteful way for the work, it leads to the impression that you're expressing hatred toward real LGBT people. If all your religious characters are portrayed as naive, regressive and/or fanatical while your non-religious characters aren't, and especially if religious beliefs get aggressively refuted [[OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions or disparaged]] within the work itself, it leads to the impression that you're expressing hatred toward real religious people (the reverse is true regarding non-religious people). Consistent, repeated depictions can look like endorsements.
16th Nov '16 7:36:35 PM dlchen145
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** Don't confuse 'strong female character' with 'a female character who is physically strong' - a 'strong female character' is a female character with a strong ''personality'', who has some inner depth and has an existence outside of being a plot device. If that's satisfied, she can be anything on the spectrum between an extreme {{Badass}} and a UselessProtagonist with all sorts of {{Phobia}}s, and still be a great and powerful character. There is a fallacy that a one-dimensional ImpossibleGenius ActionGirl is automatically less sexist than a one-dimensional DamselInDistress ScreamingWoman. The truth is that both characters still come off as sexist because they are both the result of writing women as props or ideas rather than people, and both present worrying implications about the expectations the writer has of women. A common example is the character who is written as brilliant to make her a more appealing TokenRomance for the AuthorAvatar male character, so he can look cooler himself by proving himself 'worthy' of her love - usually characters like this will [[FauxActionGirl end up being useless in the final act, so the hero can take care of it, with their abilities and achievements included only for aesthetic colour]].

to:

** Don't confuse 'strong female character' with 'a female character who is physically strong' - a 'strong female character' is a female character with a strong ''personality'', who has some inner depth and has an existence outside of being a plot device. If that's satisfied, she can be anything on the spectrum between an extreme {{Badass}} badass and a UselessProtagonist with all sorts of {{Phobia}}s, and still be a great and powerful character. There is a fallacy that a one-dimensional ImpossibleGenius ActionGirl is automatically less sexist than a one-dimensional DamselInDistress ScreamingWoman. The truth is that both characters still come off as sexist because they are both the result of writing women as props or ideas rather than people, and both present worrying implications about the expectations the writer has of women. A common example is the character who is written as brilliant to make her a more appealing TokenRomance for the AuthorAvatar male character, so he can look cooler himself by proving himself 'worthy' of her love - usually characters like this will [[FauxActionGirl end up being useless in the final act, so the hero can take care of it, with their abilities and achievements included only for aesthetic colour]].
18th Sep '16 7:49:16 AM pinkdalek
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** Don't confuse 'strong female character' with 'a female character who is physically strong' - a 'strong female character' is a female character with a strong ''personality'', who has some inner depth and has an existence outside of being a plot device. If that's satisfied, she can be anything on the spectrum between an extreme {{Badass}} and a UselessProtagonist with all sorts of {{Phobia}}s, and still be a great and powerful character. There is a fallacy that a one-dimensional ImpossibleGenius ActionGirl is automatically less sexist than a one-dimensional DamselInDistress ScreamingWoman. The truth is that both characters still come off as sexist because they are both the result of writing women as props or ideas rather than people, and both present worrying implications about the expectations the writer has of women. A common example is the character who is written as brilliant to make her a more appealing TokenRomance for the AuthorAvatar male character, so he can look cooler himself by proving himself 'worthy' of her love - usually characters like this will [[FauxActionGirl end up being useless in the final act, so the hero can take care of it, with their abilities and achievements included only for aesthetic colour]].

to:

** ** Don't confuse 'strong female character' with 'a female character who is physically strong' - a 'strong female character' is a female character with a strong ''personality'', who has some inner depth and has an existence outside of being a plot device. If that's satisfied, she can be anything on the spectrum between an extreme {{Badass}} and a UselessProtagonist with all sorts of {{Phobia}}s, and still be a great and powerful character. There is a fallacy that a one-dimensional ImpossibleGenius ActionGirl is automatically less sexist than a one-dimensional DamselInDistress ScreamingWoman. The truth is that both characters still come off as sexist because they are both the result of writing women as props or ideas rather than people, and both present worrying implications about the expectations the writer has of women. A common example is the character who is written as brilliant to make her a more appealing TokenRomance for the AuthorAvatar male character, so he can look cooler himself by proving himself 'worthy' of her love - usually characters like this will [[FauxActionGirl end up being useless in the final act, so the hero can take care of it, with their abilities and achievements included only for aesthetic colour]].



** There are definitely examples of works set in TheDungAges-based fantasy worlds which use the misogyny and racism of their settings to skewer the way these operate in the real world, but there are also definitely examples of these sorts of stories which use oppression as superficial window-dressing [[DarkerAndEdgier to indicate that it's 'gritty']] (or even as FetishFuel). There isn't any reason to automatically assume a world where people can breathe underwater, walk on clouds, shoot fireballs out of their nostrils and use dragon dung as currency would have the exact same sexual and racial politics as 1950s America, and doing this would suggest, at least, a failure of your own imagination.
** If you're going to use historical bigotry, have some idea how bigotry actually operated in those times and places. Many people have written history books from the perspective of their own prejudices, casually erasing things they thought not worthy of paying attention to. Our cultural familiarity with historical settings often defaults to HollywoodHistory TheThemeParkVersion tropes, so what may seem like ridiculous PoliticallyCorrectHistory may actually be more accurate than the stereotype. Even in settings that ''were'' that bad for oppressed groups, it is respectful to the victims to portray something based on the real agonies they faced rather than just coming up with the darkest, most horrible thing you can and playing it for shock value.

to:

** There **There are definitely examples of works set in TheDungAges-based fantasy worlds which use the misogyny and racism of their settings to skewer the way these operate in the real world, but there are also definitely examples of these sorts of stories which use oppression as superficial window-dressing [[DarkerAndEdgier to indicate that it's 'gritty']] (or even as FetishFuel). There isn't any reason to automatically assume a world where people can breathe underwater, walk on clouds, shoot fireballs out of their nostrils and use dragon dung as currency would have the exact same sexual and racial politics as 1950s America, and doing this would suggest, at least, a failure of your own imagination.
** If **If you're going to use historical bigotry, have some idea how bigotry actually operated in those times and places. Many people have written history books from the perspective of their own prejudices, casually erasing things they thought not worthy of paying attention to. Our cultural familiarity with historical settings often defaults to HollywoodHistory TheThemeParkVersion tropes, so what may seem like ridiculous PoliticallyCorrectHistory may actually be more accurate than the stereotype. Even in settings that ''were'' that bad for oppressed groups, it is respectful to the victims to portray something based on the real agonies they faced rather than just coming up with the darkest, most horrible thing you can something generically dark and playing it for shock value.
18th Sep '16 7:47:51 AM pinkdalek
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** Don't confuse 'strong female character' with 'a female character who is physically strong' - a 'strong female character' is a female character with a strong ''personality'', who has some inner depth and has an existence outside of being a plot device. If that's satisfied, she can be anything on the spectrum between an extreme {{Badass}} and a UselessProtagonist with all sorts of {{Phobia}}s, and still be a great and powerful character. There is a fallacy that a one-dimensional ImpossibleGenius ActionGirl is automatically less sexist than a one-dimensional DamselInDistress ScreamingWoman. The truth is that both characters still come off as sexist because they are both the result of writing women as props or ideas rather than people, and both present worrying implications about the expectations the writer has of women. A common example is the character who is written as brilliant to make her a more appealing TokenRomance for the AuthorAvatar male character, so he can look cooler himself by proving himself 'worthy' of her love - usually characters like this will [[FauxActionGirl end up being useless in the final act, so the hero can take care of it, with their abilities and achievements included only for aesthetic colour]].

to:

** ** Don't confuse 'strong female character' with 'a female character who is physically strong' - a 'strong female character' is a female character with a strong ''personality'', who has some inner depth and has an existence outside of being a plot device. If that's satisfied, she can be anything on the spectrum between an extreme {{Badass}} and a UselessProtagonist with all sorts of {{Phobia}}s, and still be a great and powerful character. There is a fallacy that a one-dimensional ImpossibleGenius ActionGirl is automatically less sexist than a one-dimensional DamselInDistress ScreamingWoman. The truth is that both characters still come off as sexist because they are both the result of writing women as props or ideas rather than people, and both present worrying implications about the expectations the writer has of women. A common example is the character who is written as brilliant to make her a more appealing TokenRomance for the AuthorAvatar male character, so he can look cooler himself by proving himself 'worthy' of her love - usually characters like this will [[FauxActionGirl end up being useless in the final act, so the hero can take care of it, with their abilities and achievements included only for aesthetic colour]].



** There are definitely examples of works set in TheDungAges-based fantasy worlds which use the misogyny and racism of their settings to skewer the way these operate in the real world, but there are also definitely examples of these sorts of stories which use oppression as superficial window-dressing [[DarkerAndEdgier to indicate that it's 'gritty']] (or even as FetishFuel). There isn't any reason to automatically assume a world where people can breathe underwater, walk on clouds, shoot fireballs out of their nostrils and use dragon dung as currency would have the exact same sexual and racial politics as 1950s America, and doing this would suggest, at least, a failure of your own imagination.
** If you're going to use historical bigotry, have some idea how bigotry actually operated in those times and places. Many people have written history books from the perspective of their own prejudices, casually erasing things they thought not worthy of paying attention to. Our cultural familiarity with historical settings often defaults to HollywoodHistory TheThemeParkVersion tropes, so what may seem like ridiculous PoliticallyCorrectHistory may actually be more accurate in many cases. Even in settings that ''were'' that bad for oppressed groups, it is respectful to the victims of those oppressions to portray something based in reality rather than just coming up with the darkest, most horrible thing you can and relying on the shock value.

to:

** There **There are definitely examples of works set in TheDungAges-based fantasy worlds which use the misogyny and racism of their settings to skewer the way these operate in the real world, but there are also definitely examples of these sorts of stories which use oppression as superficial window-dressing [[DarkerAndEdgier to indicate that it's 'gritty']] (or even as FetishFuel). There isn't any reason to automatically assume a world where people can breathe underwater, walk on clouds, shoot fireballs out of their nostrils and use dragon dung as currency would have the exact same sexual and racial politics as 1950s America, and doing this would suggest, at least, a failure of your own imagination.
** If **If you're going to use historical bigotry, have some idea how bigotry actually operated in those times and places. Many people have written history books from the perspective of their own prejudices, casually erasing things they thought not worthy of paying attention to. Our cultural familiarity with historical settings often defaults to HollywoodHistory TheThemeParkVersion tropes, so what may seem like ridiculous PoliticallyCorrectHistory may actually be more accurate in many cases. than the stereotype. Even in settings that ''were'' that bad for oppressed groups, it is respectful to the victims of those oppressions to portray something based in reality on the real agonies they faced rather than just coming up with the darkest, most horrible thing you can and relying on the playing it for shock value.
18th Sep '16 7:43:24 AM pinkdalek
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** There is a fallacy that a one-dimensional ImpossibleGenius ActionGirl is automatically less sexist than a one-dimensional DamselInDistress ScreamingWoman. The truth is that both characters still come off as sexist because they are both the result of writing women as props or ideas rather than people, and both present worrying implications about the expectations the writer has of women. A common example is a MarySue only written as brilliant because the author is afraid he will be considered sexist if he makes her anything other than perfect, or if she's only written as brilliant to make her a better TokenRomance for the AuthorAvatar male character (this makes her into a plot device). Don't confuse 'strong female character' with 'a female character who is physically strong' - a 'strong female character' is a female character with a strong ''personality'', who has some inner depth and has an existence outside of being a plot device. If that's satisfied, she can be anything on the spectrum between an extreme {{Badass}} and a UselessProtagonist with all sorts of {{Phobia}}s, and still be a great and powerful character.

to:

** ** Don't confuse 'strong female character' with 'a female character who is physically strong' - a 'strong female character' is a female character with a strong ''personality'', who has some inner depth and has an existence outside of being a plot device. If that's satisfied, she can be anything on the spectrum between an extreme {{Badass}} and a UselessProtagonist with all sorts of {{Phobia}}s, and still be a great and powerful character. There is a fallacy that a one-dimensional ImpossibleGenius ActionGirl is automatically less sexist than a one-dimensional DamselInDistress ScreamingWoman. The truth is that both characters still come off as sexist because they are both the result of writing women as props or ideas rather than people, and both present worrying implications about the expectations the writer has of women. A common example is a MarySue only written as brilliant because the author character who is afraid he will be considered sexist if he makes her anything other than perfect, or if she's only written as brilliant to make her a better more appealing TokenRomance for the AuthorAvatar male character (this makes character, so he can look cooler himself by proving himself 'worthy' of her into a plot device). Don't confuse 'strong female character' with 'a female character who is physically strong' love - a 'strong female character' is a female character with a strong ''personality'', who has some inner depth and has an existence outside of usually characters like this will [[FauxActionGirl end up being a plot device. If that's satisfied, she useless in the final act, so the hero can be anything on the spectrum between an extreme {{Badass}} and a UselessProtagonist take care of it, with all sorts of {{Phobia}}s, their abilities and still be a great and powerful character.achievements included only for aesthetic colour]].



* Finally, do be aware that the attempt to avoid ''some'' UnfortunateImplications can create ''others,'' and occasionally worse ones. For example, if you aren't careful picking a victim character to avoid BlackDudeDiesFirst or DisposableWoman or BuryYourGays, you can end up with one of the ones you ''didn't'' pick if that applies. Trying too severely to avoid the UnfortunateImplications in GetBackInTheCloset and HideYourLesbians and similar tropes can backfire into AllGaysArePromiscuous, and vice versa. Misogynist or sexist toward women unfortunate implications are a huge minefield for this - carelessly trying to avert them without an idea of why they are problematic can make a work seem misandrist and applying DoubleStandards - with racial implications being similar (e.g. having the white guy do the UncleTomfoolery in a case of PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy doesn't instantly make it not-racist).

to:

* Finally, do Do be aware that the attempt to avoid ''some'' UnfortunateImplications can create ''others,'' and occasionally worse ones. For example, if you aren't careful picking a victim character to avoid BlackDudeDiesFirst or DisposableWoman or BuryYourGays, you can end up with one of the ones you ''didn't'' pick if that applies. Trying too severely to avoid the UnfortunateImplications in GetBackInTheCloset and HideYourLesbians and similar tropes can backfire into AllGaysArePromiscuous, and vice versa. Misogynist or sexist toward women unfortunate implications are a huge minefield for this - carelessly trying to avert them without an idea of why they are problematic can make a work seem misandrist and applying DoubleStandards - with racial implications being similar (e.g. having the white guy do the UncleTomfoolery in a case of PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy doesn't instantly make it not-racist).


Added DiffLines:


* Be careful using historical or history-influenced fantasy settings to justify bigotry:
**There are definitely examples of works set in TheDungAges-based fantasy worlds which use the misogyny and racism of their settings to skewer the way these operate in the real world, but there are also definitely examples of these sorts of stories which use oppression as superficial window-dressing [[DarkerAndEdgier to indicate that it's 'gritty']] (or even as FetishFuel). There isn't any reason to automatically assume a world where people can breathe underwater, walk on clouds, shoot fireballs out of their nostrils and use dragon dung as currency would have the exact same sexual and racial politics as 1950s America, and doing this would suggest, at least, a failure of your own imagination.
**If you're going to use historical bigotry, have some idea how bigotry actually operated in those times and places. Many people have written history books from the perspective of their own prejudices, casually erasing things they thought not worthy of paying attention to. Our cultural familiarity with historical settings often defaults to HollywoodHistory TheThemeParkVersion tropes, so what may seem like ridiculous PoliticallyCorrectHistory may actually be more accurate in many cases. Even in settings that ''were'' that bad for oppressed groups, it is respectful to the victims of those oppressions to portray something based in reality rather than just coming up with the darkest, most horrible thing you can and relying on the shock value.
2nd May '16 5:31:19 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* For the straight yaoi and yuri fans, keep in mind that real gay and bisexual people exist, and some of them ''are'' also fans of yaoi and yuri as well. This doesn't mean that all of your stories have to have aesops about LGBT rights or be entirely 100% realistic - in fact, going off on an AuthorFilibuster about this or driving your characters out of character to do it is one of the worst mistakes you can make, because it makes you look like a WhiteKnight as well as showing off privilege. It does mean that having your characters be unexamined stereotypes of LGBT people will be noticed and taken badly, and it does mean you should understand at least a little beyond what you learn from porn or SlashFic or manga or whatever.

to:

* For the straight yaoi and yuri fans, keep in mind that real gay and bisexual people exist, and some of them ''are'' also fans of yaoi and yuri as well. This doesn't mean that all of your stories have to have aesops about LGBT rights or be entirely 100% realistic - in fact, going off on an AuthorFilibuster about this or driving your characters out of character to do it is one of the worst mistakes you can make, because it makes you look like a WhiteKnight white knight as well as showing off privilege. It does mean that having your characters be unexamined stereotypes of LGBT people will be noticed and taken badly, and it does mean you should understand at least a little beyond what you learn from porn or SlashFic or manga or whatever.
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