History Series / WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire

30th Dec '17 9:14:27 AM spiritsunami
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* AllOrNothing: In classic editions, the first two or five questions. In these editions, the questions are generally going from easiest to hardest, and the first question always has one answer that is hilariously wrong. Averted altogether in the shuffle format, where missing any of the first ten questions drops the contestant down to $1,000, and the difficulties are randomized in the first round (hence the universal minimum payout).

to:

* AllOrNothing: In classic editions, the first two or five questions. In these editions, the questions are generally going from easiest to hardest, and the first question almost always has one answer that is hilariously wrong.wrong (and since it's always the last choice that's the joke answer, [[InterfaceSpoiler the lack of such an obvious wrong answer is a dead giveaway that the last choice is]] ''[[InterfaceSpoiler correct]]''). Averted altogether in the shuffle format, where missing any of the first ten questions drops the contestant down to $1,000, and the difficulties are randomized in the first round (hence the universal minimum payout).
26th Dec '17 4:59:14 AM Casaya
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** On Celebrity Millionaire, Kevin Nealon [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HggTboTRrKo getting a question on ''himself'' wrong.]]

to:

** On Celebrity Millionaire, Kevin Nealon In [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HggTboTRrKo getting this memorable event from Celebrity Millionaire]], Kevin Nealon gets a question on ''himself'' wrong.]]
26th Dec '17 4:57:50 AM Casaya
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** August 2009: Ken Basin. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHl-sN2Npvw "It's not your final answer; you just lost a lot of money."]]

to:

** August 2009: Ken Basin. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHl-sN2Npvw "It's "That's not your the final answer; you just lost a lot of money."]]


Added DiffLines:

** On Celebrity Millionaire, Kevin Nealon [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HggTboTRrKo getting a question on ''himself'' wrong.]]
24th Dec '17 5:25:08 PM Gosicrystal
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* "'''Ask The Audience'''": The audience votes for the correct answer. Audiences of the Russian version are infamous for deliberately giving the wrong answer out of spite, especially to certain aggravating celebrities.
** In the Brazilian version, the audience consisted of people waiting for their turns to play.

to:

* "'''Ask The Audience'''": The audience votes for the correct answer. Audiences of the Russian version are infamous for deliberately giving the wrong answer out of spite, especially to certain aggravating celebrities.
**
celebrities. In the Brazilian version, the audience consisted of people waiting for their turns to play.



* "'''Three Wise Men'''": Used only on ''Super Millionaire'', this allowed a panel of three experts (one of whom was a former ''Millionaire'' contestant) to deliberate and provide an answer within 30 seconds. Was a precursor to ''Ask the Expert'', noted above.
** In the Brazilian version, the panel was made of six college students.

to:

* "'''Three Wise Men'''": Used only on ''Super Millionaire'', this allowed a panel of three experts (one of whom was a former ''Millionaire'' contestant) to deliberate and provide an answer within 30 seconds. Was a precursor to ''Ask the Expert'', noted above.
**
above. In the Brazilian version, the panel was made of six college students.
24th Dec '17 5:20:22 PM Gosicrystal
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* TheAnnouncer: Present only in the Japanese version.



* GameShowHost: Chris Tarrant in the original UK version. Silvio Santos in the Brazilian version.



* LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened: Usually done if a contestant decides to walk away. In most cases, the contestant made the correct decision by walking away.
** Potential TearJerker if done on the last question and the guess was right. A notable example was on the Celebrities Week, when everyone was playing for charity. This happened to Creator/NormMacDonald, who was solemnly told that he would've gotten the million for his charity.

to:

* LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened: Usually done if a contestant decides to walk away. In most cases, the contestant made the correct decision by walking away.
** Potential TearJerker
away. On the other hand, if done on the last question and the guess was right.right... A notable example was on the Celebrities Week, when everyone was playing for charity. This happened to Creator/NormMacDonald, who was solemnly told that he would've gotten the million for his charity.



* LosingHorns: Type A, in a sense, whenever you go for a question worth at least $1,000 and miss. The piece played for a $32,000 loss is particularly jarring, and should you be unfortunate enough to miss the $1,000,000 question, the show takes this Trope [[UpToEleven up to about 13]], resulting in an ominous shortened version of the theme song.
** Interestingly, starting in 2010, the US version had to use new music for legal reasons, and now uses the same theme no matter what question in the stack is answered incorrectly. [[spoiler:Even the last question.]]
* Personnel:
** TheAnnouncer: Present only in the Japanese version.
** GameShowHost: Chris Tarrant in the original UK version. Silvio Santos in the Brazilian version.
** Regis Philbin in the ABC version, Meredith Vieira (or substitutes) on the US syndicated run from 2002 to 2013; beginning in 2013, the show became a revolving door, with Viera giving away to Cedric the Entertainer, and then Terry Crews, and for 2015-16, Chris Harrison of ''Series/TheBachelor'' fame.
** StudioAudience: Actively used when a contestant uses Ask The Audience.
* ProductPlacement: Those 15 Capital One checks, Netflix Movie Week, and Ask The Expert's Skype service. AT&T sponsored Phone-A-Friend during the ABC era, and AOL sponsored an secondary Ask the Audience poll conducted through an [=AIM=] bot. There was also a "tax free" week sponsored by H&R Block, where prize values were adjusted so that their advertised winnings would actually be what they win after taxes.
** In the UK, Barclays Bank's logo appeared on the 15 cheques, something which disappeared almost immediately after a rival bank started sponsoring the programme. (For what it's worth, product placement in the UK was entirely forbidden until 2011.)

to:

* LosingHorns: Type A, in a sense, whenever you go for a question worth at least $1,000 and miss. The piece played for a $32,000 loss is particularly jarring, and should you be unfortunate enough to miss the $1,000,000 question, the show takes this Trope [[UpToEleven up to about 13]], resulting in an ominous shortened version of the theme song.
** Interestingly, starting
song. Starting in 2010, the US version had to use new music for legal reasons, and now uses the same theme no matter what question in the stack is answered incorrectly. [[spoiler:Even the last question.]]
* Personnel:
** TheAnnouncer: Present only in the Japanese version.
** GameShowHost: Chris Tarrant in the original UK version. Silvio Santos in the Brazilian version.
** Regis Philbin in the ABC version, Meredith Vieira (or substitutes) on the US syndicated run from 2002 to 2013; beginning in 2013, the show became a revolving door, with Viera giving away to Cedric the Entertainer, and then Terry Crews, and for 2015-16, Chris Harrison of ''Series/TheBachelor'' fame.
** StudioAudience: Actively used when a contestant uses Ask The Audience.
* ProductPlacement: Those 15 Capital One checks, Netflix Movie Week, and Ask The Expert's Skype service. AT&T sponsored Phone-A-Friend during the ABC era, and AOL sponsored an a secondary Ask the Audience poll conducted through an [=AIM=] bot. There was also a "tax free" week sponsored by H&R Block, where prize values were adjusted so that their advertised winnings would actually be what they win after taxes.
**
taxes. In the UK, Barclays Bank's logo appeared on the 15 cheques, something which disappeared almost immediately after a rival bank started sponsoring the programme. (For what it's worth, product placement in the UK was entirely forbidden until 2011.)



* StudioAudience: Actively used when a contestant uses Ask The Audience.



* ADayInTheLimelight: Regis actually played a charity question to wrap-up the 10th-Anniversary specials. Meredith took the hosting duties for this occasion -- the chairs were reversed, Meredith hosting in the usual contestant position. Inverted in the daytime version, when Regis came back to host the week after Thanksgiving 2009.
** Regis won the money by answering which of four answers was NOT a million-dollar winning answer on the US version of Millionaire.
*** This episode was also famous for being the first time on the American show when a contestant attempted the million-dollar answer and missed it.



--> '''Norm''': Well, I'm not gay, so I don't know that much about Broadway musicals... (audience laughs)
* ArtifactTitle: After the switch to the Euro, a few countries in Europe ended up with only six-figure top prize amounts (Greece and Portugal changed their top prizes to 250,000; for example), but the titles weren't always modified to reflect this change.

to:

--> '''Norm''': Well, I'm not gay, so I don't know that much about Broadway musicals... (audience laughs)
''(audience laughs)''
* ArtifactTitle: ArtifactTitle:
**
After the switch to the Euro, a few countries in Europe ended up with only six-figure top prize amounts (Greece and Portugal changed their top prizes to 250,000; for example), but the titles weren't always modified to reflect this change.



** Similarly in France, the original top prize of ''Qui veut gagner des millions? '' ("Who wants to win millions?") was 4 million FRF[[note]]With 1 USD being roughly 5-6 FRF[[/note]]. It was increased to 1 million Euros, i.e. 6,559,570 FRF.

to:

** Similarly in In France, the original top prize of ''Qui veut gagner des millions? '' ("Who wants to win millions?") was 4 million FRF[[note]]With 1 USD being roughly 5-6 FRF[[/note]]. It was increased to 1 million Euros, i.e. 6,559,570 FRF.



* [[AscendedExtra Ascended Contestant]]: A few months before Meredith Vieira became the host of the syndicated US version of ''Millionaire'', [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Smn93Tm5ObE she was a contestant on the primetime version]]. Meredith was one of the last contestants out of the Fastest Finger circle, and made a joke about it when premiering the syndicated version, which nixed the Fastest Finger concept altogether.

to:

* [[AscendedExtra Ascended Contestant]]: AscendedExtra:
**
A few months before Meredith Vieira became the host of the syndicated US version of ''Millionaire'', [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Smn93Tm5ObE she was a contestant on the primetime version]]. Meredith was one of the last contestants out of the Fastest Finger circle, and made a joke about it when premiering the syndicated version, which nixed the Fastest Finger concept altogether.



** Also, from Tarrant, "But we don't want to give you ''that!''"...which managed to mutate itself into the public consciousness.

to:

** Also, from From Tarrant, "But we don't want to give you ''that!''"...which managed to mutate itself into the public consciousness.



* ADayInTheLimelight: Regis actually played a charity question to wrap-up the 10th-Anniversary specials. Meredith took the hosting duties for this occasion -- the chairs were reversed, Meredith hosting in the usual contestant position. Inverted in the daytime version, when Regis came back to host the week after Thanksgiving 2009. Regis won the money by answering which of four answers was NOT a million-dollar winning answer on the US version of Millionaire. This episode was also famous for being the first time on the American show when a contestant attempted the million-dollar answer and missed it.



-->'''Rudy''': Aw, Durst, you dog!

to:

-->'''Rudy''': --->'''Rudy''': Aw, Durst, you dog!



* FauxDocumentary: "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDmmw900LT8 The Audience Experience]]".

to:

* %%* FauxDocumentary: "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDmmw900LT8 The Audience Experience]]".



* HintSystem: In the celebrity versions of the Regis run, if a contestant was stuck on a question valued at $32,000 or below, the remaining contestants in the Fastest Finger seats were allowed to help the player out, usually of the comedic CoughSnarkCough variety. According to the Celebrity Edition rules, any player who made it to the Hot Seat was guaranteed at least $32,000 for his or her charity, so this playful hinting allowed the contestant to play his or her way up to that level while keeping all three lifelines for the final five questions. After that point, the game would be played straight.
** Used to a lesser extent early on in the British version's history - if a contestant got stuck in the first tier of questions, Chris would have the answer on his screen, leading him to give hints along the lines of "I don't know, but B looks good."

to:

* HintSystem: HintSystem:
**
In the celebrity versions of the Regis run, if a contestant was stuck on a question valued at $32,000 or below, the remaining contestants in the Fastest Finger seats were allowed to help the player out, usually of the comedic CoughSnarkCough variety. According to the Celebrity Edition rules, any player who made it to the Hot Seat was guaranteed at least $32,000 for his or her charity, so this playful hinting allowed the contestant to play his or her way up to that level while keeping all three lifelines for the final five questions. After that point, the game would be played straight.
** Used to a lesser extent early on in the British version's history - if a contestant got stuck in the first tier of questions, Chris would have the answer on his screen, leading him to give hints along the lines of "I don't know, but B looks good."



** For a little while, AintNoRule saying you can't phone a friend and have them look up the answer on the internet. This got fixed in an ObviousRulePatch.

to:

** For a little while, AintNoRule ain't no rule saying you can't phone a friend and have them look up the answer on the internet. This got fixed in an ObviousRulePatch.



* ObviousRulePatch:
** The removal of Phone-a-Friend in the US version. It was obvious that these friends were often typing keywords into Google or other search engines to try to find the answer in the 30 seconds allowed. They often didn't even try to hide it. Neither did the show when they invoked said ObviousRulePatch and replaced it with giving the ''Ask the Expert'' lifeline throughout the game.
*** The UK version fixed this problem by changing ''how'' this lifeline worked. Instead of the contestant having all three people on the telephone line, the contestant chose helpers ahead of time, who were brought backstage and isolated in Sound Proof Booths until they were called. Since the audience can see them when this lifeline is used, it pretty much eliminated any chance to Google for an answer. The U.S. version followed suit, except under the name "Plus One".
** The same goes for the substitution of Double Dip for 50/50, which seemed to [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard leave only the answers most contestants were mulling over]], a year and a half before that.

to:

* ObviousRulePatch:
**
ObviousRulePatch: The removal of Phone-a-Friend in the US version. It was obvious that these friends were often typing keywords into Google or other search engines to try to find the answer in the 30 seconds allowed. They often didn't even try to hide it. Neither did the show when they invoked said ObviousRulePatch and replaced it with giving the ''Ask the Expert'' lifeline throughout the game. \n*** The UK version fixed this problem by changing ''how'' this lifeline worked. Instead of the contestant having all three people on the telephone line, the contestant chose helpers ahead of time, who were brought backstage and isolated in Sound Proof Booths until they were called. Since the audience can see them when this lifeline is used, it pretty much eliminated any chance to Google for an answer. The U.S. version followed suit, except under the name "Plus One".
**
One". The same goes for the substitution of Double Dip for 50/50, which seemed to [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard leave only the answers most contestants were mulling over]], a year and a half before that.



* ReversePsychology: One of Meredith's hosting trademarks is trying to psych out contestants who just gave a final answer before telling them they're right. She never does this when the contestant gets a question wrong, however. Cedric the Entertainer puts more effort into it.
** Of course, feigning disappointment before telling a contestant they were right was also a Regis trademark, to the point of parody.

to:

* ReversePsychology: One of Meredith's hosting trademarks is trying to psych out contestants who just gave a final answer before telling them they're right. She never does this when the contestant gets a question wrong, however. Cedric the Entertainer puts more effort into it.
**
it. Of course, feigning disappointment before telling a contestant they were right was also a Regis trademark, to the point of parody.



* RulesSpiel: In most versions.
* ScareChord: The "out of time" chord that chimes if a contestant is still playing when the episode is finished is pretty unsettling-sounding and seems to come out of nowhere.
** In later American seasons, it more closely resembles a buzzer from a sporting arena.

to:

* %%* RulesSpiel: In most versions.
* ScareChord: The "out of time" chord that chimes if a contestant is still playing when the episode is finished is pretty unsettling-sounding and seems to come out of nowhere.
**
nowhere. In later American seasons, it more closely resembles a buzzer from a sporting arena.



* UsefulNotes/{{Sweeps}}:
** In the US syndicated version, many of each season's best and most memorable contestants as well as games that get into the very high-level questions are aired during sweeps periods.
** Before the show became a regular fixture on ABC, the first two two-week network runs were done during August and November (1999) Sweeps periods.
24th Dec '17 5:06:53 PM Gosicrystal
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** Also in the first series, the sound used to lock in an answer on at least the first upper tier question was a different, much more ominous sound effect. By series two, the "three downward tones" used for the final answer in the middle tier were used in the upper tier, too.
** As mentioned below, a HintSystem was in place on the lower tier of questions in the first series. By the next series, any hapless contestant stuck on the first five question was left to burn their lifelines.

to:

** Also in In the first series, the sound used to lock in an answer on at least the first upper tier question was a different, much more ominous sound effect. By series two, the "three downward tones" used for the final answer in the middle tier were used in the upper tier, too.
** As mentioned below, a A HintSystem was in place on the lower tier of questions in the first series. By the next series, any hapless contestant stuck on the first five question was left to burn their lifelines.
24th Dec '17 5:06:25 PM Gosicrystal
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* {{Lifelines}}: [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]].

to:

* %%* {{Lifelines}}: [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]].
13th Nov '17 3:31:17 AM AlexTropesFisher
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The Russian version was originally called "O Schaslivchik!" (Oh, lucky man!), but was renamed to a literal translation of its English name after ChannelHop from NTV to Channel One. For a period of time it was hosted by a Russian parodist Maxim Galkin, but most of the time it was (and still is) Dmitry Dibrov. The Russian version also was notorious in that the prize was one million [[FunnyMoney rubles]], which is, like, 30 times less than one million dollars. Later the prize was increased to the current sum of 6 million rubles, but it's still 5 times less.

to:

The Russian version was originally called "O Schaslivchik!" "''О, Счастливчик!''" (Oh, lucky man!), but was renamed to a literal translation of its English name after ChannelHop from NTV to Channel One. For a period of time One (known as ORT for that time). Since 2001 it was hosted by a Russian parodist Maxim Galkin, but most Dmitry Dibrov - the original host of the time it was (and show - returned in 2008 and still is) Dmitry Dibrov.hosts it ever since. The Russian version also was notorious in that the prize was one million [[FunnyMoney rubles]], which is, like, 30 times less than one million dollars. Later the prize was increased to the current sum of 6 3 million rubles, but it's still 5 10 times less.
1st Nov '17 11:22:35 AM Twentington
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* {{Personnel}}:

to:

* {{Personnel}}:Personnel:
19th Oct '17 2:40:59 PM MetalSmasher86
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* DifficultyByRegion: A question valued at [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drbqHte5GS8 £20,000 on the British version]] later showed up on the American version [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhIh4eH33Tg valued at $500,000]]. Justified, in that the question specifically refers to something pertaining to Britain, something a British contestant is more likely to know than an American one.

to:

* DifficultyByRegion: A question valued at [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drbqHte5GS8 £20,000 on the British version]] later showed up on the American version [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhIh4eH33Tg valued at $500,000]]. Justified, in that the question specifically refers to something pertaining to Britain, something a British contestant is more likely to know than an American one. The inverse also applies with several £1,000,000 questions from the British version dealing with American culture, making them easier for American contestants.
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