History Series / WheelOfFortune

9th Feb '16 2:03:56 PM BuddyBoy600alt
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Added DiffLines:
**During the 80's/Early 90's, Before Round 1 starts and after Pat Sajak interviews the contestant, He would warm up by Spinning the wheel as explains the instruction on how to play the game. This discontinued in 1994.
7th Feb '16 4:43:22 PM Gimere
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* DoubleTheDollars: The Double Play token from Season 13, which could be handed in prior to any spin to double its value if the Wheel landed on a dollar amount. It did not double the value of the regular prize wedges, however, several viewers recall the token being used on the 1/3-width $10,000 prize, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome which was won and doubled to $20,000]].
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* DoubleTheDollars: The Double Play token from Season 13, which could be handed in prior to any spin to double its value if the Wheel landed on a dollar amount. It did not double the value of the regular prize wedges, however, several viewers recall the token being used on the 1/3-width $10,000 prize, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome which was won and doubled to $20,000]].$20,000.

* GameShowWinningsCap: Several variants over time.
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* GameShowWinningsCap: Several variants over time.GameShowWinningsCap:

* AnimatedCreditsOpening: Used on and off since 1992.
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* AnimatedCreditsOpening: Used The show has used these on and off since 1992.1992:

** "I'd like to buy a vowel." and "I'd like to solve the puzzle." In Pat's early years, he'd often follow up the latter with "For [amount], solve this [category]."
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** "I'd like to buy a vowel." and " ** "I'd like to solve the puzzle." In Pat's early years, he'd often follow up the latter this with "For [amount], solve this [category]."

** There were also the Car wedges used for one week in April 2011. Similarly to the above, the contestant had to land on ''two'' one-third-sized wedges with "car" tags on them to win a car it was made easier by 1) not having Car tags get lost to Bankrupts hit in subsequent rounds and 2) putting a new one on the Wheel in the next round if somebody got one. However, the whole week, nearly everyone's spins were about as far from either wedge as you could get...
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** There were also the Car wedges used for one week in April 2011. Similarly to the above, the contestant had to land on ''two'' one-third-sized wedges with "car" tags on them to win a car it was made easier by 1) not having Car tags get lost to Bankrupts hit in subsequent rounds and 2) putting a new one on the Wheel in the next round if somebody got one. However, the whole week, nearly everyone's spins were about as far from either wedge as you could get...get.

* INeedAFreakingDrink: Edd Byrnes stated in his memoir ''Kookie No More'' that he had a few before doing the 1974 pilots. For the first pilot he was "crazy drunk", badgering a contestant who wanted to solve for $1,300 into spinning again; he kind of improved for the second pilot to "happy drunk", saying "Whee!" at some points.
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* INeedAFreakingDrink: INeedAFreakingDrink: ** Edd Byrnes stated in his memoir ''Kookie No More'' that he had a few before doing the 1974 pilots. For the first pilot he was "crazy drunk", badgering a contestant who wanted to solve for $1,300 into spinning again; he kind of improved for the second pilot to "happy drunk", saying "Whee!" at some points.

* NoDamageRun: Any contestant who manages to go through an entire game without ever hitting Bankrupt or Lose a Turn or calling a wrong letter. Alternatively, any contestant who hits Express on their first spin and successfully completes the "ride".
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* NoDamageRun: NoDamageRun: ** Any contestant who manages to go through an entire game without ever hitting Bankrupt or Lose a Turn or calling a wrong letter. Alternatively, any letter. ** Any contestant who hits Express on their first spin and successfully completes the "ride".

* NumerologicalMotif: The week of May 27, 2013 was "Celebrating 30!", with contestants who had a connection to that number, many of whom were 30 years old. Most of the puzzles had to do with the number 30, the 1980s, or age including PEARL BRACELET and GREEN BAY WISCONSIN on the 29th, which ended with Pat and Vanna talking about ''how'' they were themed (30th-Anniversary gift and 30th state admitted to the Union, respectively).
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* NumerologicalMotif: The week of May 27, 2013 was "Celebrating 30!", with contestants who had a connection to that number, many of whom were 30 years old. Most of the puzzles had to do with the number 30, the 1980s, or age including PEARL BRACELET and GREEN BAY WISCONSIN on the 29th, which ended with Pat and Vanna talking about ''how'' how they were themed (30th-Anniversary gift and 30th state admitted to the Union, respectively).
31st Jan '16 1:32:36 PM Gimere
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** He's also fond of snarking at contestants who seem to be playing the WhatAnIdiot card straight...or ones who are really good at playing the game. (Prime example: claiming that a bonus puzzle will be "very difficult" when the contestant picks letters that leave it mostly or completely filled in.)
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** He's also fond of snarking at contestants who seem to be playing the WhatAnIdiot "what an idiot" card straight...or ones who are really good at playing the game. (Prime example: claiming that a bonus puzzle will be "very difficult" when the contestant picks letters that leave it mostly or completely filled in.)

** Averted if the contestant spins with the intention of landing on the top-dollar value, any prize or tag, the Wild Card, or the Million-Dollar Wedge (this includes the Mystery Wedge only if neither one has been flipped over).
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** *** Averted if the contestant spins with the intention of landing on the top-dollar value, any prize or tag, the Wild Card, or the Million-Dollar Wedge (this includes the Mystery Wedge only if neither one has been flipped over).

** February 18, 2004: A contestant managed to call ''four'' of the six letters which are already given in the Bonus Round. Even worse, one of them, R, was already in the puzzle.
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** February 18, 2004: A contestant managed to call ''four'' of the six letters which are already given in the Bonus Round. Even worse, one of them, R, was already ''already in the puzzle.puzzle''.

* GenreSavvy: Some contestants have picked up on the fact that puzzles tend to be themed to the week, particularly around holidays, and used this to their advantage. Prize Puzzles are also pretty limited in their scope, too.
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* GenreSavvy: GenreSavvy: ** Some contestants have picked up on the fact that puzzles tend to be themed to the week, particularly around holidays, and used this to their advantage. Prize Puzzles are also pretty limited in their scope, too.

* InflationNegation: Buying a vowel. The cost was $250 in 1973, and it is still $250 in the syndicated version. As of Season 32, the ''minimum'' cash wedge on the wheel is $500, enough to buy ''two'' vowels.
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* InflationNegation: InflationNegation: ** Buying a vowel. The cost was $250 in 1973, and it is still $250 in the syndicated version. As of Season 32, the ''minimum'' cash wedge on the wheel is $500, enough to buy ''two'' vowels.

* NoIndoorVoice: This show gets its fair share of screaming contestants, particularly on Teen Best Friends Week where it's common to have teams of two teenage girls who scream like banshees at everything. Often lampshaded by Pat, who will jokingly ask such contestants to speak up.
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* NoIndoorVoice: NoIndoorVoice: ** This show gets its fair share of screaming contestants, particularly on Teen Best Friends Week where it's common to have teams of two teenage girls who scream like banshees at everything. Often lampshaded by Pat, who will jokingly ask such contestants to speak up.

* OnceASeason: Many of the theme weeks, such as Big Money, Going Green, College Week, etc. ** Ironically, none of those three themes were done in Season 30, not even College Week, which had been done at least once every nighttime season (usually on-location) since 12.
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* OnceASeason: Many of the theme weeks, such as Big Money, Going Green, College Week, etc. ** etc. Ironically, none of those three themes were done in Season 30, not even College Week, which had been done at least once every nighttime season (usually on-location) since 12.

* RecycledSoundtrack: One of Alan Thicke's prize cues was "Hip Check", the theme of ''Series/BlankCheck''.
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* RecycledSoundtrack: RecycledSoundtrack: ** One of Alan Thicke's prize cues was "Hip Check", the theme of ''Series/BlankCheck''.

** By comparison, Jack Clark and M.G. Kelly were far mellower and lower-key (but by no means phoning it in). Jim Thornton is somewhere in between.
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** By comparison, Jack Clark and M.G. Kelly were far mellower and lower-key (but by no means phoning it in). in), and Jim Thornton is somewhere in between.

* WardrobeMalfunction: Vanna has confirmed that she once [[http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2009/jul/20/vanna-white-wheel-fortune/ split a zipper]] mid-taping, and finished the episode in a different dress.
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* WardrobeMalfunction: WardrobeMalfunction: ** Vanna has confirmed that she once [[http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2009/jul/20/vanna-white-wheel-fortune/ split a zipper]] mid-taping, and finished the episode in a different dress.
31st Jan '16 7:48:48 AM themisterfree
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Added DiffLines:
** Ironically, when [[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy Peter Griffin]] was on the show, the ceramic dalmatian was the ''first'' thing he bought.
30th Jan '16 8:25:31 AM nombretomado
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When ''Wheel'' debuted in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host and Susan Stafford operated the puzzle board. By late 1983, after Woolery left the show in a salary dispute with Merv Griffin and Stafford left to do humanitarian work, Pat Sajak and Vanna White had become the show's full-time hosts in both daytime and {{syndication}}, although there was a ten-month period from 1981-82 in which Pat and Susan worked together. (White became popular out of proportion to the popularity of any other woman in a similar role on a game show.) The syndicated ''Wheel'' dropped the shopping element in 1987, then switched from a mechanical puzzle board to one with touch screens a decade later. Starting in the early 1990s, it has added (and occasionally [[RetiredGameShowElement retired]]) all manner of new wrinkles, including new puzzle categories and a trio of Toss-Up puzzles.
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When ''Wheel'' debuted in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host and Susan Stafford operated the puzzle board. By late 1983, after Woolery left the show in a salary dispute with Merv Griffin and Stafford left to do humanitarian work, Pat Sajak and Vanna White had become the show's full-time hosts in both daytime and {{syndication}}, UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, although there was a ten-month period from 1981-82 in which Pat and Susan worked together. (White became popular out of proportion to the popularity of any other woman in a similar role on a game show.) The syndicated ''Wheel'' dropped the shopping element in 1987, then switched from a mechanical puzzle board to one with touch screens a decade later. Starting in the early 1990s, it has added (and occasionally [[RetiredGameShowElement retired]]) all manner of new wrinkles, including new puzzle categories and a trio of Toss-Up puzzles.
17th Jan '16 11:39:33 PM Gimere
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* CelebrityEdition: Played straight for some time in the 1990s. Later on, they tried variants where each team consisted of a celebrity and a contestant playing together; the contestant got their winnings as usual, while the celebrity had an equal amount donated to charity. These were most often done with CountryMusic singers or sports stars.
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* CelebrityEdition: CelebrityEdition: ** Played straight for some time in the 1990s. Later on, they tried variants where each team consisted of a celebrity and a contestant playing together; the contestant got their winnings as usual, while the celebrity had an equal amount donated to charity. These were most often done with CountryMusic singers or sports stars.

* GoldenSnitch: Sometimes invoked if Pat hits $5,000 in the Final Spin. With a $1,000 bonus in later years, that's $6,000 per consonant in a game that usually averages $15,000-$20,000 for the winner. Also invoked if the Prize Puzzle prize is particularly expensive (most are only $5,000 or so, but some can be upwards of $10,000). In one particularly egregious example, a contestant went into Round 4 with $27,600 but still ended up losing because an opponent benefited greatly from a $6,000 Final Spin.
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* GoldenSnitch: GoldenSnitch: ** Sometimes invoked if Pat hits $5,000 in the Final Spin. With a $1,000 bonus in later years, that's $6,000 per consonant in a game that usually averages $15,000-$20,000 for the winner. Also invoked if the Prize Puzzle prize is particularly expensive (most are only $5,000 or so, but some can be upwards of $10,000). In one particularly egregious example, a contestant went into Round 4 with $27,600 but still ended up losing because an opponent benefited greatly from a $6,000 Final Spin.

* HomeGame: Several board games, video game versions as early as the NES, and several PC versions as well. One of the most recent home-game versions was released on the {{Wii}} and NintendoDS in November 2010, along with a Wii / DS version of sister show ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' as much as a PS3, Macintosh and XBOX 360 version of America's Game.
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* HomeGame: HomeGame: ** Several board games, video game versions as early as the NES, and several PC versions as well. One of the most recent home-game versions was released on the {{Wii}} and NintendoDS in November 2010, along with a Wii / DS version of sister show ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' as much as a PS3, Macintosh and XBOX 360 version of America's Game.

* LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened: If a contestant opts not to flip over a Mystery Wedge and solves immediately afterward, Pat will often ask the contestant if s/he wants to see what was on the other side.
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* LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened: LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened: ** If a contestant opts not to flip over a Mystery Wedge and solves immediately afterward, Pat will often ask the contestant if s/he wants to see what was on the other side.

* ProgressiveJackpot: The Jackpot wedge, of course. It started at $5,000 and had the value of each spin added to it; to win it, the contestant had to hit the Jackpot wedge, call a correct letter, then solve right away. Retired at the end of Season 30.
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* ProgressiveJackpot: ProgressiveJackpot: ** The Jackpot wedge, of course. It started at $5,000 and had the value of each spin added to it; to win it, the contestant had to hit the Jackpot wedge, call a correct letter, then solve right away. Retired at the end of Season 30.

* RulesSpiel: Used during the Shopping era: "Be careful not to hit Bankrupt because if you do, you lose your cash but not your merchandise because once you buy a prize, it's yours to keep."
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* RulesSpiel: RulesSpiel: ** Used during the Shopping era: "Be careful not to hit Bankrupt because if you do, you lose your cash but not your merchandise because once you buy a prize, it's yours to keep."

* SpeedRound: The Speed-Up round (Final Spin). Vowels worth nothing, consonants worth the amount landed on (plus $1,000 since 1999). Unlike most examples of this trope, Speed-Ups have no overall time limit, only the three seconds that a player is given to solve if he/she finds a letter.
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* SpeedRound: SpeedRound: ** The Speed-Up round (Final Spin). Vowels worth nothing, consonants worth the amount landed on (plus $1,000 since 1999). Unlike most examples of this trope, Speed-Ups have no overall time limit, only the three seconds that a player is given to solve if he/she finds a letter.


* [[AbsenteeActor Absentee Wedge]]: The Million Dollar Wedge on May 2, 2011, the first episode of the season's New Orleans remote tapings. Amazingly, this error caused a contestant to win the game, as the $800 wedge it normally sat on remained in play for the whole game and a correct letter was called on it in Round 2. That player won by only $400. The wedge appeared as normal for the rest of the remote.
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\n* [[AbsenteeActor Absentee Wedge]]: Wedge]]: ** The Million Dollar Wedge on May 2, 2011, the first episode of the season's New Orleans remote tapings. Amazingly, this error caused a contestant to win the game, as the $800 wedge it normally sat on remained in play for the whole game and a correct letter was called on it in Round 2. That player won by only $400. The wedge appeared as normal for the rest of the remote.

* AddedAlliterativeAppeal: The "Same Letter" category, in which every word in the puzzle begins with the same letter. ** For reasons unknown, the category took a brief hiatus when the show filmed six weeks of episodes in Las Vegas in 2013, but that didn't stop them from using several puzzles that would normally fit the category, such as the infamous CORNER CURIO CABINET puzzle, which was categorized as "Thing".
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* AddedAlliterativeAppeal: The "Same Letter" category, in which every word in the puzzle begins with the same letter. ** letter. For reasons unknown, the category took a brief hiatus when the show filmed six weeks of episodes in Las Vegas in 2013, but that didn't stop them from using several puzzles that would normally fit the category, such as the infamous CORNER CURIO CABINET puzzle, which was categorized as "Thing".

* CaliforniaDoubling: The show is often themed after a major city or place (e.g., "Salute to New York", "Hawaii Week"), even if they're still filming in Culver City. Not that the show doesn't do, say, a Chicago week in Chicago; the show travels often. Trips to the theme city are often among the prizes during those weeks where they're still in their regular studios.
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* CaliforniaDoubling: CaliforniaDoubling: ** The show is often themed after a major city or place (e.g., "Salute to New York", "Hawaii Week"), even if they're still filming in Culver City. Not that the show doesn't do, say, a Chicago week in Chicago; the show travels often. Trips to the theme city are often among the prizes during those weeks where they're still in their regular studios.

* CatchPhrase: "I'd like to buy a vowel." and "I'd like to solve the puzzle." In Pat's early years, he'd often follow up the latter with "For [amount], solve this [category]."
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* CatchPhrase: CatchPhrase: ** "I'd like to buy a vowel." and "I'd like to solve the puzzle." In Pat's early years, he'd often follow up the latter with "For [amount], solve this [category]."

* DeadpanSnarker: Pat makes a large number of [[SelfDeprecation self-deprecating]] jabs at his career. One notable instance is when a contestant claimed she had the job that paid the most money for the least amount of work, and Pat quipped "That would be 'game show host'."
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* DeadpanSnarker: DeadpanSnarker: ** Pat makes a large number of [[SelfDeprecation self-deprecating]] jabs at his career. One notable instance is when a contestant claimed she had the job that paid the most money for the least amount of work, and Pat quipped "That would be 'game show host'."

*** "I'd like to solve the puzzle!" "I wish you would!"
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*** ** "I'd like to solve the puzzle!" "I wish you would!"

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Several examples.
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Several examples.EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:

* ForegoneConclusion: Before $1,000 was added to the Final Spin, having it land on a lower value could guarantee the current leader a trip to the Bonus Round.
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* ForegoneConclusion: ForegoneConclusion: ** Before $1,000 was added to the Final Spin, having it land on a lower value could guarantee the current leader a trip to the Bonus Round.

** On a 1989 episode, a contestant's attempts to figure out the bonus puzzle FANCY THAT, with the H in THAT hidden, accidentally led to her using [[spoiler:"twat"]] as one of her guesses, which was censored by, of all things, the ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'' cuckoo. Pat didn't even ''try'' to crack a joke at that one.
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** On a 1989 episode, a contestant's attempts to figure out the bonus puzzle FANCY THAT, with the H in THAT hidden, accidentally led to her using [[spoiler:"twat"]] as one of her guesses, which was censored by, of all things, by the ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'' cuckoo. cuckoo of all things, and Pat didn't even ''try'' to crack a joke at that one.it.

* GuestHost: Plenty:
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* GuestHost: Plenty:GuestHost:

* HideYourPregnancy: Averted with Vanna's two pregnancies. As there was simply no way to conceal it due to all the walking around that she does, she just wore maternity clothes throughout. ** A more tragic example when a round with the puzzle VANNA'S PREGNANT had to be edited out of a 1992 episode due to her miscarriage shortly before the episode aired.
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* HideYourPregnancy: HideYourPregnancy: ** Averted with Vanna's two pregnancies. As there was simply no way to conceal it due to all the walking around that she does, she just wore maternity clothes throughout. ** A more tragic straight example occured when a round with the puzzle VANNA'S PREGNANT had to be edited out of a 1992 episode due to her miscarriage shortly before the episode aired.

* LiteralMinded: One contestant, after being told by Pat to "throw to commercial", literally throws the Prize wedge she won...much like Pat in the 1980s-90s, actually.
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* LiteralMinded: One contestant, after being told by Pat to "throw to commercial", literally throws the Prize wedge she won...won, much like Pat in the 1980s-90s, actually.

* MoonLogicPuzzle: Some of the bonus puzzles practically seem set up to be lost. In the 1990s, it wasn't rare to see three- to five-letter answers, often compounded in difficulty by not having any RSTLNE in them. BABY BOY, WIG, WAX, and ZOO all occurred in October 1992 alone (and amazingly, all but WIG were solved; BABY BOY in particular was solved with '''no letters showing'''). YO-YO and I DO (1993 and 1996, respectively) were also solved. ** Since about Season 20, the difficulty is usually ramped up by relying heavily on rarely-called letters (e.g. JAZZ BAND), vowels (e.g. OAK BUREAU), arcane and rarely-used phrases (e.g. WHAT A KICK), completely arbitrary noun-adjective pairings (e.g. FAVORITE MUG, AVID HIKER, WILDLY HAPPY GUY, WACKY NEIGHBOR), or some combination of the above (e.g. JACUZZI BUBBLES).
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* MoonLogicPuzzle: MoonLogicPuzzle: ** Some of the bonus puzzles practically seem set up to be lost. In the 1990s, it wasn't rare to see three- to five-letter answers, often compounded in difficulty by not having any RSTLNE in them. BABY BOY, WIG, WAX, and ZOO all occurred in October 1992 alone (and amazingly, all but WIG were solved; BABY BOY in particular was solved with '''no letters showing'''). YO-YO and I DO (1993 and 1996, respectively) were also solved. ** *** Since about Season 20, the difficulty is usually ramped up by relying heavily on rarely-called letters (e.g. JAZZ BAND), vowels (e.g. OAK BUREAU), arcane and rarely-used phrases (e.g. WHAT A KICK), completely arbitrary noun-adjective pairings (e.g. FAVORITE MUG, AVID HIKER, WILDLY HAPPY GUY, WACKY NEIGHBOR), or some combination of the above (e.g. JACUZZI BUBBLES).

** In rare occurrences, RSTLNE will reveal only the S at the end of a pluralized puzzle (e.g. HIGHWAYS, WHIZ KIDS).
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** *** In rare occurrences, RSTLNE will reveal only the S at the end of a pluralized puzzle (e.g. HIGHWAYS, WHIZ KIDS).

* OpeningNarration: From 1975-89, over a shot of the studio the announcer told the viewer to "Look at this studio, filled with glamorous prizes! Fabulous and exciting merchandise! [[note]](From 1975-77, Charlie would say something along the lines of "Wonderful and inviting items sure to dazzle the imagination." Sometime in 1977, he began naming three prizes at random, and beginning near the end of Woolery's tenure as host in 1981, Jack Clark would give a longer description of some select items.)[[/note]] Over [amount] thousand dollars, just waiting to be won on... ''Wheeeeeel of Fortune''! And now here's your host: [name]!"
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* OpeningNarration: OpeningNarration: ** From 1975-89, over a shot of the studio the announcer told the viewer to "Look at this studio, filled with glamorous prizes! Fabulous and exciting merchandise! [[note]](From 1975-77, Charlie would say something along the lines of "Wonderful and inviting items sure to dazzle the imagination." Sometime in 1977, he began naming three prizes at random, and beginning near the end of Woolery's tenure as host in 1981, Jack Clark would give a longer description of some select items.)[[/note]] Over [amount] thousand dollars, just waiting to be won on... ''Wheeeeeel of Fortune''! And now here's your host: [name]!"

* PlayerNudge: When a contestant is holding a Wild Card and calls a correct letter on the top dollar value, Pat will usually convince them to use the card for another letter at that same value. Notably, contestants only seem to use it when he does this (except for its first season of use where several players used it on three-digit amounts). On some occasions, he forgets; on others, he convinces them to use it on non-top dollar amounts; and on at least one occasion, he was about to convince a player to use it on $3,500, but was cut off by him asking to solve.
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* PlayerNudge: PlayerNudge: ** When a contestant is holding a Wild Card and calls a correct letter on the top dollar value, Pat will usually convince them to use the card for another letter at that same value. Notably, contestants only seem to use it when he does this (except for its first season of use where several players used it on three-digit amounts). On some occasions, he forgets; on others, he convinces them to use it on non-top dollar amounts; and on at least one occasion, he was about to convince a player to use it on $3,500, but was cut off by him asking to solve.

* [[PressXToDie Call X to Lose Your Turn]]: There's a Used Letter Board out of camera view to show contestants which letters have been used already (contestants can often be seen looking to the side to check it before choosing their letter). If, despite this, a contestant calls a letter that's already been picked, they forfeit their turn (unless, of course, the contestant is on Free Play).
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* [[PressXToDie Call X to Lose Your Turn]]: Turn]]: ** There's a Used Letter Board out of camera view to show contestants which letters have been used already (contestants can often be seen looking to the side to check it before choosing their letter). If, despite this, a contestant calls a letter that's already been picked, they forfeit their turn (unless, of course, the contestant is on Free Play).

* ProductPlacement: The Sony Card is ubiquitous, along with the Sony Rewards program, since the show is produced by Sony's television division.
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* ProductPlacement: ProductPlacement: ** The Sony Card is ubiquitous, along with the Sony Rewards program, since the show is produced by Sony's television division.

* RealSongThemeTune: The 1973 pilot used an instrumental version of "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", while the 1974 pilots used "Give It One" by Maynard Ferguson.
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* RealSongThemeTune: RealSongThemeTune: ** The 1973 pilot used an instrumental version of "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", while the 1974 pilots used "Give It One" by Maynard Ferguson.

* SoundEffectBleep: On January 7, 2013, a contestant forgot that Round 3 was a Prize Puzzle; after being told so by Pat, she exclaimed "Oh crap, I forgot!" The word "Crap" was censored out by the "wrong letter" buzzer.
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* SoundEffectBleep: SoundEffectBleep: ** On January 7, 2013, a contestant forgot that Round 3 was a Prize Puzzle; after being told so by Pat, she exclaimed "Oh crap, I forgot!" The word "Crap" was censored out by the "wrong letter" buzzer.

** February 25, 2014: The Speed-Up puzzle is displaying T_____T_______, and Pat jokingly dares the contestant to solve. She randomly says [[spoiler:THOUGHTFULNESS]], which is correct.
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** February 25, 2014: The Speed-Up puzzle is displaying T_____T_______, and Pat jokingly dares the contestant to solve. She randomly says said [[spoiler:THOUGHTFULNESS]], which is was correct.

* TrailersAlwaysSpoil: In recent years, the show uploads a preview of the next week's shows on Sony's website every weekend. Nearly every preview shows contestants landing on or picking up prizes, the $10,000 side of the Mystery Wedge, or the Million-Dollar Wedge...or just outright spoil outcomes. Occasionally, similar previews air on TV.
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* TrailersAlwaysSpoil: TrailersAlwaysSpoil: ** In recent years, the show uploads a preview of the next week's shows on Sony's website every weekend. Nearly every preview shows contestants landing on or picking up prizes, the $10,000 side of the Mystery Wedge, or the Million-Dollar Wedge...or just outright spoil outcomes. Occasionally, similar previews air on TV.

* TwoDecadesBehind: While the show's "Song Title", "Song Lyrics", and "Song/Artist" categories are fairly common, the songs used for their puzzles are almost-always from the 1980s or earlier. This has resulted in some younger contestants struggling with song puzzles that are obviously before their time. Even the teen and college weeks hardly ever use recent songs (or movies or TV shows) that the contestants would likely know (although they sometimes use the ''name'' of a currently-popular celebrity in a Proper Name or Show Biz puzzle). For example, one College Week episode in 2014 had a Toss-Up of REVENGE OF THE NERDS under the category "The 80s" (which was likely before any of the week's contestants were born). Two contestants rang in with incorrect guesses, obviously not being familiar with the movie. It can be painfully obvious during these weeks that MostWritersAreAdults.
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* TwoDecadesBehind: TwoDecadesBehind: ** While the show's "Song Title", "Song Lyrics", and "Song/Artist" categories are fairly common, the songs used for their puzzles are almost-always from the 1980s or earlier. This has resulted in some younger contestants struggling with song puzzles that are obviously before their time. Even the teen and college weeks hardly ever use recent songs (or movies or TV shows) that the contestants would likely know (although they sometimes use the ''name'' of a currently-popular celebrity in a Proper Name or Show Biz puzzle). For example, one College Week episode in 2014 had a Toss-Up of REVENGE OF THE NERDS under the category "The 80s" (which was likely before any of the week's contestants were born). Two contestants rang in with incorrect guesses, obviously not being familiar with the movie. It can be painfully obvious during these weeks that MostWritersAreAdults.
4th Jan '16 5:41:16 AM Gimere
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** The Speed-Up round, thanks to both the electronic puzzle board and editing that dates back to 1997[[note]](Games could still end "normally" until October 1, 1999 at the earliest)[[/note]]. This also applies for road shows. For familiarity, and possibly for the chance of Pat spinning $5,000, it is kept. In 2001 the rules were changed so that ''all'') games end this way.
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** The Speed-Up round, thanks to both the electronic puzzle board and editing that dates back to 1997[[note]](Games could still end "normally" until October 1, 1999 at the earliest)[[/note]]. This also applies for road shows. For familiarity, and possibly for the chance of Pat spinning $5,000, it is kept. In 2001 the rules were changed so that ''all'') ''all'' games end this way.

** December 26, 2014: Matt absolutely blows his opponents out of the water, sweeping the game and cleaning out the show to the tune of [[CurbStompBattle ''$91,892'']] (far surpassing the previous record for pre-Bonus Round total above), but he loses $32,000 in the bonus round.
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** December 26, 2014: Matt absolutely blows his opponents out of the water, sweeping the game and cleaning out the show to the tune of [[CurbStompBattle ''$91,892'']] ''[[CurbStompBattle $91,892]]'' (far surpassing the previous record for pre-Bonus Round total above), but he loses $32,000 in the bonus round.

** January 7, 2013: The cast of ''Series/SharkTank'' promote their new season; aired on ABC affiliates only.
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** January 7, 2013: The cast of ''Series/SharkTank'' ''[[Series/DragonsDen Shark Tank]]'' promote their new season; aired on ABC affiliates only.

** ComicallyMissingThePoint on the Prize Puzzle, and making the contestant believe they've won a booby prize themed to the puzzle instead of a trip. It's actually pretty harsh, as the Prize Puzzle has only ever offered a non-trip prize something like three times.
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** ComicallyMissingThePoint on the Prize Puzzle, and making the contestant believe they've won [[{{Zonk}} a booby prize prize]] themed to the puzzle instead of a trip. It's actually pretty harsh, as the Prize Puzzle has only ever offered a non-trip prize something like three times.
30th Dec '15 7:06:43 PM WarioBarker
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** In the earliest days, any money left over after shopping (less than the least-expensive prize remaining) was immediately put "on account", meaning that it carried over to the next shopping round and would be lost if the contestant hit Bankrupt. By mid-1975, contestants could put leftover money on a gift certificate while retaining the "on account" option. Until the shopping aspect was ousted entirely in mid-1989, almost ''all'' contestants asked for the gift certificate. That said, one recollection had at least one contestant place all of his money "on account" for the first two rounds (i.e., deciding not to go shopping) ... and after winning the game, he used his winnings to buy one of the new cars onstage, which plenty left over for some of the other prizes); said episode was believed to air either in 1978 or 1979.
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** In the earliest days, any money left over after shopping (less than the least-expensive prize remaining) was immediately put "on account", meaning that it carried over to the next shopping round and would be lost if the contestant hit Bankrupt. By mid-1975, mid-July 1975, contestants could put leftover money on a gift certificate while retaining the "on account" option. Until the shopping aspect was ousted entirely in mid-1989, almost ''all'' contestants asked for the gift certificate. That said, one recollection had at least one contestant place all of his money "on account" for the first two rounds (i.e., deciding not to go shopping) ... and after winning the game, he used his winnings to buy one of the new cars onstage, which with plenty left over for some of the other prizes); said episode was believed to air either in 1978 or 1979. '79.

** December 23, 2015: A game that sees seven rounds of game play and all three contestants winning $10,000+ ends with a $100,000-loss.
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** December 23, 2015: A game that sees seven rounds of game play and all three contestants winning $10,000+ ends with a $100,000-loss.$100,000 loss.

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Several examples:
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Several examples:examples.

*** Also during the first year, the speed-up round (the round so-designated by the "final spin") was timed at 60 seconds (or sometimes, 2 minutes), and the contestant could not call vowels. Although not known based on existing episodes that circulate, this led to the possibility of puzzles going unsolved if the time limit expired. By the fall of 1975, the time limit was lifted and the "no vowels" rule was modified by allowing contestants to call vowels (at no charge) after 30 seconds. By early 1976, the speed-up round rules as we know it came into play. *** In the earliest days, contestants played puzzles to the last consonant and rarely bought vowels. Lin Bolen, then NBC's vice president of daytime programming, insisted on this so contestants would have more money to shop with she thought that putting more emphasis on shopping would help the show appeal better to the female demographic. Once she was ousted in 1975-76 for poor programming performance and replaced by Earl Greenburg, contestants began playing puzzles at their own pace. Also during the earlist months, each contestant (prior to the show) selected which showcase they wanted to shop first if they won the first round, with the first-round winner's choice told after the round was completed. *** During the first few years after the Bonus Round became permanent, contestants often played for lower-tier bonus prizes such as children's room furniture, a washer-dryer, a video camera-and-VCR package and a bedroom set (all in 1982-era episodes); there was speculation that the producers wanted to have contestants win at least twice before playing for the more expensive trips, cars and other grand prizes (although even then, cars and such were available during the regular rounds). Once the syndicated version took off -- where contestants played for cars about 75 percent of the time, with expensive jewelry a distant (surprising) second -- contestants on the daytime show began playing for the larger-ticket prizes on their first day more often.
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*** Also during the first year, the speed-up Speed-Up round (the round so-designated by the "final spin") "Final Spin") was timed at 60 seconds (or sometimes, 2 minutes), and the contestant contestants could not call vowels. Although not known based on existing episodes that circulate, this led to the possibility of puzzles going unsolved if the time limit expired. By the fall of In late Summer or early Fall 1975, the time limit was lifted and the "no vowels" rule was modified by allowing contestants to call vowels (at no charge) after 30 seconds. By early 1976, the speed-up Speed-Up round rules as we know it came into play. *** In the earliest days, contestants played puzzles to the last consonant and rarely bought vowels. Lin Bolen, then NBC's vice president of daytime programming, insisted on this so contestants would have more money to shop with she thought that putting more emphasis on shopping would help the show appeal better to the female demographic. Once she was ousted in 1975-76 for poor programming performance and replaced by Earl Greenburg, contestants began playing puzzles at their own pace. Also during the earlist earliest months, each contestant (prior to the show) selected which showcase they wanted to shop first if they won the first round, with the first-round winner's choice told after the round was completed. *** During the first few years after the Bonus Round became permanent, contestants often played for lower-tier bonus prizes such as children's room furniture, a washer-dryer, a video camera-and-VCR package and a bedroom set (all in 1982-era episodes); there was speculation that the producers wanted to have contestants win at least twice before playing for the more expensive trips, cars and other grand prizes (although even then, cars and such were available during the regular rounds). Once the syndicated version took off -- - where contestants played for cars about 75 percent 75% of the time, with expensive jewelry a distant (surprising) second -- - contestants on the daytime show began playing for the larger-ticket prizes on their first day more often.

* EnforcedPlug: The Jackpot round was sponsored by various products, which got a plug at the top of the round. After the Jackpot round's retirement, the Mystery Round inherited its sponsors. Some companies regularly place $1,000 gift cards on the Wheel as well.
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* EnforcedPlug: The Jackpot round was sponsored by various products, which got a plug at the top of the round. After the Jackpot round's Jackpot's retirement, the Mystery Round inherited its sponsors. Some companies regularly place $1,000 gift cards on the Wheel as well.

** During the New York City remote tapings of 2013, '''only 2 out of 20 Bonus Rounds were won''', largely due to some very difficult puzzles such as FIZZLE OUT, ZIP UP YOUR JACKET, and FINICKY BABY. The only wins occured on the first and sixth shows, with the latter '''14''' consecutive losses breaking a record for the longest known streak of Bonus Round losses in show history. It has been speculated that the increased difficulty was a result of a $1,000,000 win that occured in Culver City before these episodes were taped (but would not air until the week after them).
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** During the New York City remote tapings of 2013, '''only 2 out of 20 Bonus Rounds were won''', largely due to some very difficult puzzles such as FIZZLE OUT, ZIP UP YOUR JACKET, and FINICKY BABY. The only wins occured occurred on the first and sixth shows, with the latter '''14''' consecutive losses breaking a record for the longest known streak of Bonus Round losses in show history. It has been speculated that the increased difficulty was a result of a $1,000,000 win that occured occurred in Culver City before these episodes were taped (but would not air until the week after them).them)...even though said Million is insured.

** If a contestant has a lot in their bank already and/or is holding something significant like the Million Dollar Wedge, then it's pretty obvious that they will ''not'' flip over a Mystery wedge. Especially true on October 11, 2013, where a contestant got $11,000 from finding ''eleven'' M's at the wedge's $1,000-per-letter face value, meaning that flipping it over actually had ''less'' of a potential reward than taking the per-letter amount (since the per-letter amount is forfeited if you choose to flip it).[[note]]It turned out that the Bankrupt was on the other side, anyway.[[/note]] * ForeignRemake: ''Pole Chudes'' ("Field of Wonders", an interesting choice taken from Alexey Tolstoi's ''Buratino''...a foreign remake of ''Pinocchio'') is very similar, except the word is an answer to a question, you can't buy a vowel, there's Black Box instead of Mystery Wedge (you can either immediately quit the show with the contents or keep playing, it can contain anything from a house to a [[{{Zonk}} cabbage]]), but the most important and memetic part is the fact that most contestants come from pretty obscure and interesting places all over Russia and bring their local crafts and so on along with them to give to the host - they are then placed in the Museum, which is seriously a lot like an ethnography museum at this point, especially considering this remake has run for 21 years and counting.
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** If a contestant has a lot in their bank already and/or is holding something significant like the Million Dollar Million-Dollar Wedge, then it's pretty obvious that they will ''not'' flip over a Mystery wedge. Especially true on October 11, 2013, where a contestant got $11,000 from finding ''eleven'' M's at the wedge's $1,000-per-letter face value, meaning that flipping it over actually had ''less'' of a potential reward than taking the per-letter amount (since the per-letter amount is forfeited if you choose to flip it).[[note]]It turned out that the Bankrupt was on the other side, anyway.[[/note]] * ForeignRemake: ''Pole Chudes'' ("Field of Wonders", an interesting choice taken from Alexey Tolstoi's ''Buratino''...a foreign remake of ''Pinocchio'') is very similar, except the word is an answer to a question, you can't buy a vowel, there's Black Box instead of Mystery Wedge (you can either immediately quit the show with the contents or keep playing, it can contain anything from a house to a [[{{Zonk}} cabbage]]), but the most important and memetic part is the fact that most contestants come from pretty obscure and interesting places all over Russia and bring their local crafts and so on along with them to give to the host - they are then placed in the Museum, which is seriously a lot like an ethnography museum at this point, especially considering this remake has run for 21 25 years and counting.

** Many repeated letter calls over the years have seem to be due to a contestant clearly having one letter on their mind but accidentally blurting out another.
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** Many repeated letter calls over the years have seem to be due to a contestant clearly having one letter on their mind but accidentally blurting out another.

** Sometimes in the 1980s, Pat would scramble the letters in the bonus puzzle while Jack was reading the fee plugs, so that once the board was seen again near the end of the credits, it would say something funny (e.g., FRANK SINATRA becoming RANK RATS).
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** Sometimes in the 1980s, Pat would scramble the letters in the bonus puzzle while announcer Jack Clark was reading the fee plugs, so that once the board was seen again near the end of the credits, it would say something funny (e.g., FRANK SINATRA becoming RANK RATS).RATS or NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS becoming NEW GLAND).

** After a fan forum discovered that B-G-H-O is strategically the best letter combination in the bonus round, a number of contestants tried that very combination, and most of them profited handsomely.
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** After a fan forum discovered that B-G-H-O is strategically the best letter combination in the bonus round, Bonus Round, a number of contestants tried that very combination, and most of them profited handsomely.

** The 1994-95 season had one of the infamous "Megaword" puzzles solved as "EROTICISM"; to which afterwards [[DeadpanSnarker Pat]] quipped that "If you can use that megaword in a sentence '''suitable for the family hour''', we'll throw in an additional $500." Pat then hints that this seemed to be a running theme that particular week, mentioning a previous puzzle pertaining to sex magazines and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking corns and warts]].
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** The 1994-95 season had one of the infamous "Megaword" puzzles solved as "EROTICISM"; to which afterwards [[DeadpanSnarker Pat]] quipped that "If you can use that megaword Megaword in a sentence '''suitable for the family hour''', we'll throw in an additional $500." Pat then hints that this seemed to be a running theme that particular week, mentioning a previous puzzle pertaining to sex magazines and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking corns and warts]].

** June 6, 2012: Round 1 is I'LL HAVE WHAT SHE'S HAVING (Movie Quote), which comes from a rather not-family-friendly scene in ''Film/WhenHarryMetSally''. ** May 13, 2013: While trying to solve the Bonus Round puzzle HALFWAY POINT with __LF___ _O_NT showing, a contestant accidentally lets the word "MILF" slip out among his random guesses of DOLPHIN ("DOLFIN"?), DIVING, WOLFING, etc.
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** June 6, 2012: Round 1 is I'LL HAVE WHAT SHE'S HAVING (Movie Quote), which comes from a a...rather not-family-friendly scene in ''Film/WhenHarryMetSally''. ** May 13, 2013: While trying to solve the Bonus Round puzzle HALFWAY POINT with __LF___ _O_NT showing, a contestant accidentally lets the word "MILF" slip out among his random guesses of DOLPHIN ("DOLFIN"?), ("DOLLFIN"?), DIVING, WOLFING, etc.

** A rare example of a guest ''director''. Longtime director Mark Corwin died after directing only two weeks of Season 31. As his death came right before a set of episodes was to be taped on location in Las Vegas, ''Jeopardy!'' director Kevin [=McCarthy=], a friend of Corwin's, filled in for him. Meanwhile, subsequent tapings in Culver City used associate director Bob Cisneros, followed by a two-week batch done by technical director Robert Ennis before Cisneros was promoted to full-time director. Ennis also directed two weeks in Season 32 due to Cisneros recovering from neck surgery at the time of taping, and became the permanent director at the start of season 33.
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** A rare example of a guest ''director''. Longtime director Mark Corwin died after directing only two weeks of Season 31. As his death came right before a set of episodes was to be taped on location in Las Vegas, ''Jeopardy!'' director Kevin [=McCarthy=], a friend of Corwin's, filled in for him. Meanwhile, subsequent tapings in Culver City used associate director Bob Cisneros, followed by a two-week batch done by technical director Robert Ennis before Cisneros was promoted to full-time director. Ennis also directed two weeks in Season 32 due to Cisneros recovering from neck surgery at the time of taping, and became the permanent director at the start of season Season 33.

* HisAndHers: In the late 1980s to early 1990s, his-and-hers cars were sometimes up for grabs in the bonus round.
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* HisAndHers: In the late 1980s to early 1990s, his-and-hers cars were sometimes up for grabs in the bonus round.Bonus Round.

* InflationNegation: Buying a vowel. The cost was $250 in 1974, and it is still $250 in the syndicated version. As of Season 32, the ''minimum'' cash wedge on the wheel is $500, enough to buy ''two'' vowels. ** [[InvertedTrope The vowel price was reduced]] to $200 when the daytime version moved to CBS in July 1989 and cut to $100 six months later, due to that version's lower stakes.
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* InflationNegation: Buying a vowel. The cost was $250 in 1974, 1973, and it is still $250 in the syndicated version. As of Season 32, the ''minimum'' cash wedge on the wheel is $500, enough to buy ''two'' vowels. ** [[InvertedTrope The vowel price was reduced]] to $200 when the daytime version moved to CBS in July 1989 and cut to $100 six months later, sometime in the first half of 1990, due to that version's lower stakes.

** When a round starts with a cycle of three consecutive lost turns that were edited out, the wide shot of the first spin is that of the original spin whose corresponding letter call was edited out, which always results in a jump cut with the Wheel landing in a different area than where it was originally headed. For example, if the first spin looks like it's about to land on Lose a Turn but ends up on the other side of the Wheel.
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** When a round starts with a cycle of three consecutive lost turns that were edited out, the wide shot of the first spin is that of the original spin whose corresponding letter call was edited out, which always results in a jump cut with the Wheel landing in a different area than where it was originally headed. For example, if the first spin looks like it's about to land on Lose a A Turn but ends up on the other side of the Wheel.

** During the second pilot, contestant Roseanne is pressured twice by host Edd Byrnes to keep spinning when she wants to solve. She solves three out of four puzzles, but loses by $90 (although she would have lost by only $40 if not for a scoring error).
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** During the second 1974 pilot, contestant Roseanne is pressured twice by host Edd Byrnes to keep spinning when she wants to solve. She solves three out of four puzzles, but loses by $90 (although she would have lost by only $40 if not for a scoring error).

* LongRunner: ''Wheel'', counting daytime and nighttime as one series, has run for over 37 years without interruption, placing it second behind only ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' for the longest-running game show currently on the air. Even counting only the nighttime seasons, it's still second only to ''Price''.
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* LongRunner: ''Wheel'', counting daytime and nighttime as one series, has run for over 37 40 years without interruption, placing it second behind only ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' for the longest-running game show currently on the air. Even counting only the nighttime seasons, it's still second only to ''Price''.

** Since about Season 20, the difficulty is usually ramped up by relying heavily on rarely-called letters (e.g. JAZZ BAND), vowels (e.g. OAK BUREAU), arcane and rarely-used phrases (e.g. WHAT A KICK), completely arbitrary noun-adjective pairings (e.g. FAVORITE MUG, WILDLY HAPPY GUY), or some combination of the above (e.g. JACUZZI BUBBLES).
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** Since about Season 20, the difficulty is usually ramped up by relying heavily on rarely-called letters (e.g. JAZZ BAND), vowels (e.g. OAK BUREAU), arcane and rarely-used phrases (e.g. WHAT A KICK), completely arbitrary noun-adjective pairings (e.g. FAVORITE MUG, AVID HIKER, WILDLY HAPPY GUY), GUY, WACKY NEIGHBOR), or some combination of the above (e.g. JACUZZI BUBBLES).

** In rare occurences, RSTLNE will reveal only the S at the end of a pluralized puzzle (e.g. HIGHWAYS, WHIZ KIDS).
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** In rare occurences, occurrences, RSTLNE will reveal only the S at the end of a pluralized puzzle (e.g. HIGHWAYS, WHIZ KIDS).

** May 30 had the second $1,000,000 win, although it had been rescheduled from the 31st (the date was leaked right after that week's taping session) because, you know...30. *** The final tally of $1,0'''30''',340 was not lost on Jim Thornton.
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** May 30 had the second $1,000,000 win, although it had been rescheduled from the 31st (the date was leaked right after that week's taping session) because, you know...30. *** The 30. (The final tally of $1,0'''30''',340 was not wasn't lost on Jim Thornton.Thornton, though). ** The sixth show of this taping day aired shortly afterward (and itself had a $100,000 win), but the contestants' connections to the number 30 weren't stated.

** The 1973 pilot, ''[[http://www.gameshowgarbage.com/ind128_shoppersbazaar.html Shopper's Bazaar]]''; Lin Bolen thought a shopping element could make the show stand out, but this pilot took it a bit too far: the intro featured the three contestants being introduced by browsing through the "store" while the announcer described their prizes, whilst simultaneously playing their first turns each. Among other things, there was a motorized carnival-style Wheel (with a mind of its own at times), a rotary telephone to dispense clues (if a contestant landed on the "Your Own Clue" wedge), an ugly pull-card puzzle board, a way-too-easy first attempt at a bonus round, a way-too-hard to understand scoring system, a rule where the contestant that won a round started the next one, a set that NBC boss Lin Bolen called "old-fashioned", and an instrumental "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" as the theme. Once thought to be [[MissingEpisode lost in the archives]] (only about four publicity shots ever turned up, only one of which was in color), the pilot later circulated on Website/YouTube before getting taken down except for the intro. [[CreatorBacklash Not even Griffin himself liked it.]] ** A better-received (although not by much) pair of pilots were taped in 1974, with Edd "Kookie" Byrnes as the host. A few differences were seen from these shows and the eventual premiere, including the host giving a more specific category (e.g., "something you eat" was the clue for the puzzle SPAGHETTI, rather than the more generic categories that would be used by January 1976), a consistent set of prizes to choose from throughout the episode (as opposed to going to a different platform of prizes in a subsequent round). Although there was still lots of criticism, Lin Bolen put her job on the line and NBC accepted...under the condition that Chuck Woolery was host. ** Even the Bonus Round underwent changes prior to the permanent version being implemented in December 1981. However, those versions had the same basic rules as the ones that would become most familiar to contestants, except that the contestant chose only four consonants (plus the vowel). The major difference with the hour-long and Star Bonus bonus games, the puzzle they were faced with had everything to do with the prize the contestant chose to play for that is, if the contestant picked the Cadillac Eldorado parked onstage, he could be assured of facing a very difficult puzzle (one with few of the common consonants in it), while if he played for just a living room set, the puzzle would be fairly easy to guess with the right pick of letters. The difficulty of the puzzles starting in 1981 would have nothing to do with the prize selected.
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** The 1973 pilot, ''[[http://www.gameshowgarbage.com/ind128_shoppersbazaar.html Shopper's Bazaar]]''; Lin Bolen thought a shopping element could make the show stand out, but this pilot took it a bit too far: the intro featured the three contestants being introduced by browsing through the "store" while the announcer described their prizes, whilst simultaneously playing their first turns each. Among other things, there was a motorized carnival-style Wheel (with a mind of its own at times), a rotary telephone to dispense clues (if a contestant landed on the "Your Own Clue" wedge), an ugly pull-card puzzle board, a way-too-easy first attempt at a bonus round, Bonus Round, a way-too-hard to understand scoring system, a rule where the contestant that won a round started the next one, a set that NBC boss Lin Bolen called "old-fashioned", and an instrumental versions of "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" and "Spinning Wheel" as the theme. show's main theme and commercial outro cue respectively. [[CreatorBacklash Merv himself would later state that "everything about it was WRONG".]] Once thought to be [[MissingEpisode lost in the archives]] a MissingEpisode (only about four publicity shots ever turned up, up in specials and retrospectives, only one of which was in color), the pilot later circulated finally surfaced in 2012 on Website/YouTube before getting taken down except for the intro. [[CreatorBacklash Not even Griffin himself liked it.]] and quickly began circulating among collectors. ** A better-received (although not by much) pair of pilots were taped in 1974, with Edd "Kookie" Byrnes as the host. A few differences were seen from these shows and the eventual premiere, including the host generally giving a more specific clue rather than a category (e.g., "something you "the name of something good to eat" was the clue for the puzzle SPAGHETTI, rather than the more generic categories that would be used by January 1976), mid-July 1975), a consistent set of prizes to choose from throughout the episode (as opposed to going to a different platform of prizes in a subsequent round). Although there was still lots of criticism, Lin Bolen put her job on the line and NBC accepted...under the condition that Chuck Woolery was host. ** Even the Bonus Round underwent changes prior to the permanent version being implemented in December 1981. However, those While these prior versions had the same basic rules as the ones that would become most familiar to contestants, except that the contestant player chose only four consonants (plus the vowel). vowel) and did not know the category until ''after'' the chosen letters were revealed (if any). The one major difference with the hour-long and Star Bonus bonus games, versions, however, was that the puzzle they were the player faced with had everything to do with the prize the contestant s/he chose to play for that is, if the contestant you picked the Cadillac Eldorado parked onstage, he you could be assured of facing a very difficult puzzle (one with few of the common consonants in it), while if he you played for just a living room set, the puzzle would be fairly easy to guess with the right pick of letters. The difficulty of the puzzles starting in 1981 would have nothing to do with the prize selected.

** Buying a vowel. From the 1973 pilot through part of 1975, there was a "Buy A Vowel" wedge (later two) on the Wheel even though players could buy vowels anytime through at least the premiere [[note]](making it really obvious was that the '74 pilots added the wedge in Round 2)[[/note]]. Sometime in '75, around the time the minimum Wheel value was bumped to $100 and gift certificates were introduced, this was revoked in favor of ''needing'' to hit the wedge. Even then, contestants unfairly lost their turn by hitting it without enough money to buy a vowel, or after all the vowels had been revealed. By November 3, the wedges were just kicked out and contestants could buy vowels freely again.
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** Buying a vowel. From the 1973 pilot through part most of 1975, there was a "Buy A Vowel" wedge (later two) (two in later rounds) on the Wheel even though players could buy vowels anytime through at least the premiere early September 1975 [[note]](making it this really obvious was that the '74 1974 pilots added the wedge in Round 2)[[/note]]. Sometime in '75, around the time the minimum Wheel value was bumped to $100 and gift certificates were introduced, this was revoked in favor of ''needing'' The Milton Bradley home games had a rule where players ''needed'' to hit the wedge. Even then, wedge, but this most likely was never the case on the show itself. Regardless, contestants unfairly lost their turn by hitting it without enough money to buy a vowel, vowel (such as on the very first spin of the September 5, 1975 show), or after all the vowels had been revealed. By November 3, 1975, the wedges were finally just kicked out and contestants could buy vowels freely again.out.

** The addition of Proper Name in 1996, ending more than two decades of inconsistent "Person does not always mean proper name." reminders. Strangely, the reverse is now true: Proper Name can also refer to a business, sports team, college, etc.
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** The addition of Proper Name in 1996, ending more than two decades of inconsistent "Person does not always mean 'proper name'." reminders (generally, the use of the disclaimer depended on whether or not it ''was'' a proper name." reminders.name - if it was given, it wasn't; if it was omitted, it was). Strangely, the reverse is now true: Proper Name can also refer to a business, sports team, college, etc.

** The rename of On The Menu (introduced in Season 21) to Food & Drink in Season 24. Previously, some food-and-drink puzzles were shoehorned into On the Menu [[note]](most egregiously, the bonus puzzle BIG GULP)[[/note]], while other foods that wouldn't necessarily be found on a menu were called just Thing [[note]](such as CABBAGE)[[/note]] or Around The House [[note]](another egregious example in the bonus puzzle ALMOND JOY)[[/note]]. This could be seen as a RealLife example of {{Snowclone}}, as they were obviously snowcloning On the Map.
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** The rename of On The the Menu (introduced in Season 21) to Food & Drink in Season 24. Previously, some food-and-drink puzzles were shoehorned into On the Menu [[note]](most egregiously, the bonus puzzle BIG GULP)[[/note]], while other foods that wouldn't necessarily be found on a menu were called just Thing [[note]](such as CABBAGE)[[/note]] or Around The House [[note]](another egregious example in the bonus puzzle ALMOND JOY)[[/note]]. This could be seen as a RealLife example of {{Snowclone}}, as they were obviously snowcloning On the Map.
24th Dec '15 12:12:27 PM KoopaKid17
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Added DiffLines:
** December 23, 2015: A game that sees seven rounds of game play and all three contestants winning $10,000+ ends with a $100,000-loss.
14th Dec '15 5:44:20 PM Twentington
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** In Season 25, the Wheel had a "Big Money Wedge" that shuffled between penalties and flat cash amounts up to $25,000. Originally, there was presumably no rule about using the Wild Card for an extra consonant on one of the cash amounts. When one contestant managed to do this (albeit for a wrong letter), a rule was quickly enforced stating that the Wild Card could not be used on the wedge except in its post-claim $1,000-per-letter state. Although the show has many [[GameBreaker game breakers]], the potential to earn $50,000 from as little as two consonants was understandably not going to fly.
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** In Season 25, the Wheel had a "Big Money Wedge" that shuffled between penalties and flat cash amounts up to $25,000. Originally, there was presumably no rule about using the Wild Card for an extra consonant on one of the cash amounts. When one contestant managed to do this (albeit for a wrong letter), a rule was quickly enforced stating that the Wild Card could not be used on the wedge except in its post-claim $1,000-per-letter state. Although the show has many [[GameBreaker game breakers]], game-breakers, the potential to earn $50,000 from as little as two consonants was understandably not going to fly.
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