History Series / WheelOfFortune

25th May '16 8:11:58 PM nombretomado
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** Several board games, video game versions as early as the NES, and several PC versions as well. One of the most recent home-game versions was released on the {{Wii}} and NintendoDS in November 2010, along with a Wii / DS version of sister show ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' as much as a PS3, Macintosh and XBOX 360 version of America's Game.

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** Several board games, video game versions as early as the NES, and several PC versions as well. One of the most recent home-game versions was released on the {{Wii}} and NintendoDS in November 2010, along with a Wii / DS version of sister show ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' as much as a PS3, [=PS3=], Macintosh and XBOX 360 version of America's Game.



** Season 28: Each intro is tied in to the week's theme, using the Pat and Vanna avatars from the show's {{Wii}} and {{PS3}} games. Some of these showed up again in later seasons, most often as bumpers but occasionally as openings.

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** Season 28: Each intro is tied in to the week's theme, using the Pat and Vanna avatars from the show's {{Wii}} UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and {{PS3}} UsefulNotes/{{PS3}} games. Some of these showed up again in later seasons, most often as bumpers but occasionally as openings.
7th May '16 12:07:58 AM Gimere
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** A 1986 song by Dr. Dave ([[MisattributedSong who sounds remarkably like Cheech Marin]]), "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1vr2an65Pc Vanna, Pick Me a Letter]]" (a parody of "The Letter" by the Box Tops), has him on the show during the shopping era.

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** A 1986 song by Dr. Dave ([[MisattributedSong who (who sounds remarkably like Cheech Marin]]), Marin), "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1vr2an65Pc Vanna, Pick Me a Letter]]" (a parody of "The Letter" by the Box Tops), has him on the show during the shopping era.
7th May '16 12:06:44 AM Gimere
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When ''Wheel'' debuted in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host and Susan Stafford operated the puzzle board. By late 1983, after Woolery left the show in a salary dispute with Merv Griffin and Stafford left to do humanitarian work, Pat Sajak and Vanna White had become the show's full-time hosts in both daytime and UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, although there was a ten-month period from 1981-82 in which Pat and Susan worked together. (White became popular out of proportion to the popularity of any other woman in a similar role on a game show.) The syndicated ''Wheel'' dropped the shopping element in 1987, then switched from a mechanical puzzle board to one with touch screens a decade later. Starting in the early 1990s, it has added (and occasionally [[RetiredGameShowElement retired]]) all manner of new wrinkles, including new puzzle categories and a trio of Toss-Up puzzles.

After Sajak left the daytime ''Wheel'' to try his luck as a late-night talk show host on Creator/{{CBS}}, former football player Rolf Benirschke (who had very little previous TV experience) and Bob Goen tried unsuccessfully to take his place. Under Goen's watch, ''Wheel'' jumped to CBS for 18 months before returning to NBC for another nine (and eventually folding). In 1997, CBS and Creator/{{GSN}} tried a children's [[IncrediblyLamePun spin]]-off titled ''Wheel 2000'', which did not fare well and remains the last daytime version. The nighttime version has carried on for [[LongRunner an impressively long time]], and is still one of the highest-rated TV series in syndication.

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When ''Wheel'' debuted in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host and Susan Stafford operated the puzzle board. By late 1983, after Woolery left the show in a salary dispute with Merv Griffin and Stafford left to do humanitarian work, Pat Sajak and Vanna White had become the show's full-time hosts in both daytime and UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, although there was a ten-month period from 1981-82 in which Pat and Susan worked together. (White became popular out of proportion to the popularity of any other woman in a similar role on a game show.) The syndicated ''Wheel'' dropped the shopping element in 1987, then switched from a mechanical puzzle board to one with touch screens a decade later. Starting in the early 1990s, it has added (and ([[RetiredGameShowElement and occasionally [[RetiredGameShowElement retired]]) all manner of new wrinkles, including new puzzle categories and a trio of Toss-Up puzzles.

After Sajak left the daytime ''Wheel'' to try his luck as a late-night talk show host on Creator/{{CBS}}, former football player Rolf Benirschke (who had very little previous TV experience) and Bob Goen tried unsuccessfully to take his place. Under Goen's watch, ''Wheel'' jumped to CBS for 18 months before returning to NBC for another nine (and eventually folding). In 1997, CBS and Creator/{{GSN}} tried a children's [[IncrediblyLamePun spin]]-off spin-off titled ''Wheel 2000'', which did not fare well and remains the last daytime version. The nighttime version has carried on for [[LongRunner an impressively long time]], and is still one of the highest-rated TV series in syndication.



* AllOrNothing: Played with. The show itself averts it, as contestants are guaranteed at least $1,000[[note]]$2,000 for two-person teams[[/note]] by the end of the game; however, the Mystery Wedges in Round 2 and the Express Wedge in Round 3 play the trope straight during their respective rounds.

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* AllOrNothing: Played with. The show itself averts it, as contestants are guaranteed at least $1,000[[note]]$2,000 $1,000[[note]]or $2,000 for two-person teams[[/note]] by the end of the game; however, the Mystery Wedges in Round 2 and the Express Wedge in Round 3 play the trope straight during their respective rounds.rounds:



* GameShowAppearance: ''227'', ''Series/TheATeam'', ''Series/LALaw'', ''Series/GimmeABreak'', and ''Santa Barbara'' all had characters appearing on the show, while ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' and ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' used a fictional representation. Notably, ''LA Law'' used the Goen version, even though the two were still on different networks at that point.

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* GameShowAppearance: GameShowAppearance:
**
''227'', ''Series/TheATeam'', ''Series/LALaw'', ''Series/GimmeABreak'', and ''Santa Barbara'' all had characters appearing on the show, while ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' and ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' used a fictional representation. Notably, ''LA Law'' used the Goen version, even though the two were still on different networks at that point.



** The Speed-Up round (Final Spin). Vowels worth nothing, consonants worth the amount landed on (plus $1,000 since 1999). Unlike most examples of this trope, Speed-Ups have no overall time limit, only the three seconds that a player is given to solve if he/she finds a letter.

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** The Speed-Up round (Final Spin). Vowels worth nothing, consonants worth the amount landed on (plus $1,000 since 1999). Unlike most examples of this trope, Speed-Ups have no overall time limit, only the three seconds that a player is given to solve if he/she (s)he finds a letter.



** Similarly, the "house minimum" for a round solve with anything less and you get a chunk of cash (originally $200, then $500, now $1,000) by default. This was initially done so the contestant would at least be able to buy ''some''thing during the shopping rounds (although even that backfired at least once). Now, it's just there to make the contestant feel better for not having an opportunity to get more.

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** Similarly, the "house minimum" for a round solve with anything less and you get a chunk of cash (originally $200, then $500, now $1,000) by default. This was initially done so the contestant would at least be able to buy ''some''thing ''something'' during the shopping rounds (although even that backfired at least once). Now, it's just there to make the contestant feel better for not having an opportunity to get more.



** November 17, 2008: A team wins the $100,000...but they had failed to claim the Million-Dollar Wedge in a previous round, meaning that the $100,000 envelope would've been replaced with $1,000,000 had they claimed it.
** Subverted on June 11, 2013. A contestant misses out on both the car and Mystery Prize in Round 2, but makes it to the Bonus Round regardless...and wins the $100,000.

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** November 17, 2008: A team wins the $100,000...$100,000, but they had failed to claim the Million-Dollar Wedge in a previous round, meaning that the $100,000 envelope would've been replaced with $1,000,000 had they claimed it.
** Subverted on June 11, 2013. A contestant misses out on both the car and Mystery Prize in Round 2, but makes it to the Bonus Round regardless...and wins the $100,000.



** One episode had a contestant who could imitate ForrestGump and another who could imitate [[WesternAnimation/WileECoyoteAndTheRoadrunner the Road Runner]]. Pat then asked the former to "do Forrest Gump as the Road Runner". He did.

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** One episode had a contestant who could imitate ForrestGump Forrest Gump and another who could imitate [[WesternAnimation/WileECoyoteAndTheRoadrunner the Road Runner]]. Pat then asked the former to "do Forrest Gump as the Road Runner". He Runner", which he did.



** He's also fond of snarking at contestants who seem to be playing the "what an idiot" card straight...or ones who are really good at playing the game. (Prime example: claiming that a bonus puzzle will be "very difficult" when the contestant picks letters that leave it mostly or completely filled in.)

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** He's also fond of snarking at contestants who seem to be playing the "what an idiot" card straight...straight, or ones who are really good at playing the game. (Prime example: claiming that a bonus puzzle will be "very difficult" when the contestant picks letters that leave it mostly or completely filled in.)



* DoubleUnlock: The Million-Dollar Wedge. To win the Million, the contestant has to:
## Land on the wedge, which is 1/3 the width of normal wedges and surrounded by 1/3-size Bankrupts.
## Call a letter that's in the puzzle.
## Solve that round's puzzle without first hitting a Bankrupt.
## Win the game without hitting Bankrupt.
## Land on the $1,000,000 envelope (which replaces the normal top prize of $100,000) in the Bonus Round.
## Solve the bonus puzzle.
** Despite the large number of steps needed and the sheer odds against it, the $1,000,000 was won just a month after its introduction by a contestant who hit it on her first spin!
** There were also the ½ Car wedges used for one week in April 2011. Similarly to the above, the contestant had to land on ''two'' one-third-sized wedges with "car" tags on them to win a car it was made easier by 1) not having Car tags get lost to Bankrupts hit in subsequent rounds and 2) putting a new one on the Wheel in the next round if somebody got one. However, the whole week, nearly everyone's spins were about as far from either wedge as you could get.
** The ½ Car tags were made more accessible in Season 29, as they're now just placed over dollar amounts like the Gift Tag. However, they're vulnerable to Bankrupt in all rounds.

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* DoubleUnlock: DoubleUnlock:
**
The Million-Dollar Wedge. To win the Million, the contestant has to:
## ### Land on the wedge, which is 1/3 the width of normal wedges and surrounded by 1/3-size Bankrupts.
## ### Call a letter that's in the puzzle.
## ### Solve that round's puzzle without first hitting a Bankrupt.
## ### Win the game without hitting Bankrupt.
## ### Land on the $1,000,000 envelope (which replaces the normal top prize of $100,000) in the Bonus Round.
## ### Solve the bonus puzzle.
** *** Despite the large number of steps needed and the sheer odds against it, the $1,000,000 was won just a month after its introduction by a contestant who hit it on her first spin!
** There were There's also the ½ Car wedges used for one week in April 2011. Similarly to the above, the contestant had to land on ''two'' one-third-sized wedges with "car" tags on them to win a car it was made easier by 1) not having Car tags get lost to Bankrupts hit in subsequent rounds and 2) putting a new one on the Wheel in the next round if somebody got one. However, the whole week, nearly everyone's spins were about as far from either wedge as you could get.
**
get. The ½ Car tags were made more accessible in Season 29, as they're now just placed over dollar amounts like the Gift Tag. However, they're vulnerable to Bankrupt in all rounds.



** February 18, 2005: A contestant sets a new one-round record of $54,000 in the Speed-Up and wins $60,150 overall...then loses $100,000 in the Bonus Round.

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** February 18, 2005: A contestant sets a new one-round record of $54,000 in the Speed-Up and wins $60,150 overall...then overall, but loses $100,000 in the Bonus Round.



** June 6, 2012: Round 1 is I'LL HAVE WHAT SHE'S HAVING (Movie Quote), which comes from a...rather not-family-friendly scene in ''Film/WhenHarryMetSally''.

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** June 6, 2012: Round 1 is I'LL HAVE WHAT SHE'S HAVING (Movie Quote), which comes from a...a rather not-family-friendly family-''un''friendly scene in ''Film/WhenHarryMetSally''.



** May 30 had the second $1,000,000 win, although it had been rescheduled from the 31st (the date was leaked right after that week's taping session) because, you know...30. (The final tally of $1,0'''30''',340 wasn't lost on Jim Thornton, though).

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** May 30 had the second $1,000,000 win, although it had been rescheduled from the 31st (the date was leaked right after that week's taping session) because, you know...know, 30. (The final tally of $1,0'''30''',340 wasn't lost on Jim Thornton, though).



** Still happens now and then. A Teen Best Friends week in February 2011 had TOTALLY AWESOME WATER PARK as a Prize Puzzle (which makes it worse since Prize Puzzles aren't exactly known for their quality...or quantity of hits on Google), and the puzzles all week were (sometimes poorly) skewed towards teens in general.

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** Still happens now and then. A Teen Best Friends week in February 2011 had TOTALLY AWESOME WATER PARK as a Prize Puzzle (which makes it worse since Prize Puzzles aren't exactly known for their quality...or quality [or quantity of hits on Google), Google]), and the puzzles all week were (sometimes poorly) skewed towards teens in general.
3rd Apr '16 5:22:52 PM Twentington
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Added DiffLines:

** The week of March 17, 2008 was sponsored by QVC, with {{Enforced Plug}}s all over the place. Notably, the Prize wedge was a $5,000 shopping spree for QVC merchandise, and any BonusRound win would have awarded the contestant $10,000 in QVC credit on their birthday. However, this backfired horribly, as nobody won the bonus round that week...
1st Apr '16 8:33:12 PM Twentington
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** January/February 1989 (nighttime): A contestant has the Bonus Round puzzle MILAN ITALY the first word of which is pronounced "mi-LAHN" partially revealed. She mispronounces it as "MILL-in", then "MY-lun"[[note]]which is the pronunciation of Milan, Indiana[[/note]], and her expression after the answer is revealed amounts to "But that's what I said!" Pat took her side and consulted with the judge during the commercial break. Unfortunately, they decided not to accept either pronunciation.

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** January/February 1989 (nighttime): A contestant has the Bonus Round puzzle MILAN ITALY the first word of which is pronounced "mi-LAHN" partially revealed. She mispronounces it as "MILL-in", then "MY-lun"[[note]]which is the pronunciation of Milan, Indiana[[/note]], Indiana and Milan, Michigan[[/note]], and her expression after the answer is revealed amounts to "But that's what I said!" Pat took her side and consulted with the judge during the commercial break. Unfortunately, they decided not to accept either pronunciation.
1st Apr '16 8:31:33 PM Twentington
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Added DiffLines:

** 2016: Jim reads a promo for "Live like a Pilgrim Week" after the first round.
1st Apr '16 5:15:47 PM KoopaKid17
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** January/February 1989 (nighttime): A contestant has the Bonus Round puzzle MILAN ITALY the first word of which is pronounced "mi-LAHN" partially revealed. She mispronounces it as "MILL-in", then "MY-lun", and her expression after the answer is revealed amounts to "But that's what I said!" Pat took her side and consulted with the judge during the commercial break. Unfortunately, they decided not to accept either pronunciation.

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** January/February 1989 (nighttime): A contestant has the Bonus Round puzzle MILAN ITALY the first word of which is pronounced "mi-LAHN" partially revealed. She mispronounces it as "MILL-in", then "MY-lun", "MY-lun"[[note]]which is the pronunciation of Milan, Indiana[[/note]], and her expression after the answer is revealed amounts to "But that's what I said!" Pat took her side and consulted with the judge during the commercial break. Unfortunately, they decided not to accept either pronunciation.
20th Mar '16 7:07:16 AM Gimere
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* NumerologicalMotif: The week of May 27, 2013 was "Celebrating 30!", with contestants who had a connection to that number, many of whom were 30 years old. Most of the puzzles had to do with the number 30, the 1980s, or age including PEARL BRACELET and GREEN BAY WISCONSIN on the 29th, which ended with Pat and Vanna talking about how they were themed [[note]](A possible 30th anniversary gift and the 30th state admitted to the Union, respectively)[[note]].

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* NumerologicalMotif: The week of May 27, 2013 was "Celebrating 30!", with contestants who had a connection to that number, many of whom were 30 years old. Most of the puzzles had to do with the number 30, the 1980s, or age including PEARL BRACELET and GREEN BAY WISCONSIN on the 29th, which ended with Pat and Vanna talking about how they were themed [[note]](A possible 30th anniversary gift and the 30th state admitted to the Union, respectively)[[note]].respectively)[[/note]].
20th Mar '16 7:06:09 AM Gimere
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* NumerologicalMotif: The week of May 27, 2013 was "Celebrating 30!", with contestants who had a connection to that number, many of whom were 30 years old. Most of the puzzles had to do with the number 30, the 1980s, or age including PEARL BRACELET and GREEN BAY WISCONSIN on the 29th, which ended with Pat and Vanna talking about how they were themed (30th-Anniversary gift and 30th state admitted to the Union, respectively).

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* NumerologicalMotif: The week of May 27, 2013 was "Celebrating 30!", with contestants who had a connection to that number, many of whom were 30 years old. Most of the puzzles had to do with the number 30, the 1980s, or age including PEARL BRACELET and GREEN BAY WISCONSIN on the 29th, which ended with Pat and Vanna talking about how they were themed (30th-Anniversary [[note]](A possible 30th anniversary gift and the 30th state admitted to the Union, respectively).respectively)[[note]].
28th Feb '16 11:39:24 PM Gimere
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* HideYourPregnancy:
** Averted with Vanna's two pregnancies. As there was simply no way to conceal it due to all the walking around that she does, she just wore maternity clothes throughout.
** A more tragic straight example occured when a round with the puzzle VANNA'S PREGNANT had to be edited out of a 1992 episode due to her miscarriage shortly before the episode aired.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.WheelOfFortune