History Series / WheelOfFortune

22nd Sep '17 5:20:53 PM Twentington
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Just as ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' was ending its daytime run on Creator/{{NBC}}, Creator/MervGriffin introduced an even more durable GameShow format: Take the children's game of Hangman, add a carnival wheel with various dollar amounts, as well as [[{{Whammy}} hazards such as "Lose A Turn" and "Bankrupt"]], and allow the winner to spend the money on prizes ''right there in the studio''. The 1973 pilot, ''[[http://gscentral.net/wof/1974.htm Shopper's Bazaar]]'', was very different from the series; a further two pilots in 1974 hosted by Edd "Kookie" Byrnes (who admitted that he was drunk) held far closer to the rules we know today.

When ''Wheel'' debuted in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host and Susan Stafford operated the puzzle board. By late 1983, after Woolery left the show in a salary dispute with Merv Griffin and Stafford left to do humanitarian work, Pat Sajak and Vanna White had become the show's full-time hosts in both daytime and UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, although there was a ten-month period from 1981-82 in which Pat and Susan worked together. (White became popular out of proportion to the popularity of any other woman in a similar role on a game show.) The syndicated ''Wheel'' dropped the shopping element in 1987, then switched from a mechanical puzzle board to one with touch screens a decade later. Starting in the early 1990s, it has added ([[RetiredGameShowElement and occasionally retired]]) all manner of new wrinkles, including new puzzle categories and a trio of Toss-Up puzzles.

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Just as ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' was ending its daytime run on Creator/{{NBC}}, Creator/MervGriffin introduced an even more durable GameShow format: Take the children's game of Hangman, add a carnival wheel with various dollar amounts, as well as [[{{Whammy}} hazards such as "Lose A Turn" and "Bankrupt"]], and allow the winner to spend the money on prizes ''right there in the studio''. The 1973 pilot, ''[[http://gscentral.net/wof/1974.htm Shopper's Bazaar]]'', {{pilot}}, ''Shopper's Bazaar'', was very different from the series; a further two pilots in 1974 hosted by Edd "Kookie" Byrnes (who admitted that he was drunk) held far closer to the rules we know today.

When ''Wheel'' debuted in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host and Susan Stafford [[LovelyAssistant operated the puzzle board.board]]. By late 1983, after Woolery left the show in a salary dispute with Merv Griffin and Stafford left to do humanitarian work, Pat Sajak and Vanna White had become the show's full-time hosts in both daytime and UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, although there was a ten-month period from 1981-82 in which Pat and Susan worked together. (White became popular out of proportion to the popularity of any other woman in a similar role on a game show.) The syndicated ''Wheel'' dropped the shopping element in 1987, then switched from a mechanical puzzle board to one with touch screens a decade later. Starting in the early 1990s, it has added ([[RetiredGameShowElement and occasionally retired]]) all manner of new wrinkles, including new puzzle categories and a trio of Toss-Up puzzles.
21st Sep '17 10:54:11 AM fruitstripegum
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* VocalEvolution: Charlie's voice got deeper not long after he returned to the show in 1989. He also had a spell throughout most of the 1990s where he was noticeably mellower, but actually became only ''more'' enthusiastic come the 2000s (see above).



* VocalEvolution: Charlie's voice got deeper not long after he returned to the show in 1989. He also had a spell throughout most of the 1990s where he was noticeably mellower, but actually became only ''more'' enthusiastic come the 2000s (see above).
21st Sep '17 10:53:24 AM fruitstripegum
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* SdrawkcabName: PlayedForLaughs on September 12, 1996, while discussing the Jackpot round that debuted the next Monday. Pat held the wedge upside-down and said that "Beginning next week, we have our Topkcaj..." before Vanna took it from him and turned it right-side-up.


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* SdrawkcabName: PlayedForLaughs on September 12, 1996, while discussing the Jackpot round that debuted the next Monday. Pat held the wedge upside-down and said that "Beginning next week, we have our Topkcaj..." before Vanna took it from him and turned it right-side-up.
21st Sep '17 10:51:24 AM fruitstripegum
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* {{Pilot}}: The first, ''Shopper's Bazaar'', taped in 1973 with Woolery and focused more on the prizes than the puzzles (in addition to having a vertical Wheel instead of a horizontal one). A subsequent pair taped in 1974 were much closer to the final product, but with the shopping prizes behind the puzzle board and a drunk Edd "Kookie" Byrnes hosting.



* {{Pilot}}: The first, ''Shopper's Bazaar'', taped in 1973 with Woolery and focused more on the prizes than the puzzles (in addition to having a vertical Wheel instead of a horizontal one). A subsequent pair taped in 1974 were much closer to the final product, but with the shopping prizes behind the puzzle board and a drunk Edd "Kookie" Byrnes hosting.
21st Sep '17 10:49:19 AM fruitstripegum
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* ConfettiDrop: $100,000 and $1,000,000 winners get showered with confetti and streamers. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] multiple times by Pat, either by making verbal references to it, sweeping it up after a big win, or having the contestants sweep it up themselves.


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* ConfettiDrop: $100,000 and $1,000,000 winners get showered with confetti and streamers. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] multiple times by Pat, either by making verbal references to it, sweeping it up after a big win, or having the contestants sweep it up themselves.
20th Sep '17 7:41:44 AM crazysamaritan
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* ClosedCaptioning: In March 1986, it became the first game show to have it.
19th Sep '17 11:22:23 PM Twentington
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* ShowTheFolksAtHome: From the second month of Season 23 through Season 30, the home audience was always shown what is on the other side of a Mystery Wedge if one was landed on. Starting in Season 31, they are now shown only if the contestant declines to flip it over.

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* ShowTheFolksAtHome: ShowTheFolksAtHome:
** The short-lived Preview Puzzle, used only in Season 17. A partially filled in puzzle was shown to the home audience, and after the intro, Vanna would reveal the answer on the puzzle board.
**
From the second month of Season 23 through Season 30, the home audience was always shown what is on the other side of a Mystery Wedge if one was landed on. Starting in Season 31, they are now shown only if the contestant declines to flip it over.
17th Sep '17 7:42:44 PM Spindini
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* ShouldersUpNudity: ''Wheel'' was a notable exception in that its model (i.e., Vanna White, who during the shopping era was at the peak of her ravishing beauty) ''never'' posed in a ModestyTowel while displaying prizes such a sauna or hot tub [[note]](although she did once wear a rather modest one-piece swimsuit during a prize description of a patio package whose centerpiece was an in-ground swimming pool; she was swimming in the pool, justifying her choice of clothing)[[/note]], there was one very large exception. In 1987, Vanna -- along with Pat Sajak -- sat in a hot tub that was on the stage during the close, and both were shirtless. Vanna (possibly wearing a bikini top in reality) was sitting in a way where only her bare shoulders were visible above the top edge of the hot tub, and thus to the audience; Sajak was bare chested, and both remained that way through the closing segment and credits.

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* ShouldersUpNudity: ''Wheel'' was a notable exception in that its model (i.e., Vanna White, who during the shopping era was at the peak of her ravishing beauty) White) ''never'' posed in a ModestyTowel while displaying prizes such a sauna or hot tub [[note]](although she did once wear a rather modest one-piece swimsuit during a prize description of a patio package whose centerpiece was an in-ground swimming pool; she was swimming in the pool, justifying her choice of clothing)[[/note]], there was one very large exception. In 1987, Vanna -- along with Pat Sajak -- sat in a hot tub that was on the stage during the close, and both were shirtless. Vanna (possibly wearing a bikini top in reality) was sitting in a way where only her bare shoulders were visible above the top edge of the hot tub, and thus to the audience; Sajak was bare chested, and both remained that way through the closing segment and credits.
11th Sep '17 11:54:21 PM Twentington
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Added DiffLines:

* InstantWinCondition: Subverted if the contestant fills in the puzzle completely; he or she still has to read it off correctly. This has backfired more than once, as a few contestants over the years have been ruled incorrect for misreading a fully-revealed puzzle.
11th Sep '17 12:27:16 PM RAS310
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** Every week, the show's website features a "contestant blog" written by one of the week's players. The featured contestant is almost-always someone who wins their game.



** Every week on the show's website, there is a preview featuring clips of the current week's episodes. Nearly every preview shows contestants landing on or picking up prizes, the $10,000 side of the Mystery Wedge, or the Million-Dollar Wedge...or just outright spoil outcomes. Similar edits of these previews are often aired by local affiliates.

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** Every week on the show's website, there is a preview featuring clips of the current week's episodes. Nearly every preview shows contestants landing on or picking up prizes, the $10,000 side of the Mystery Wedge, or the Million-Dollar Wedge...Wedge, or just outright spoil outcomes.celebrating after solving a puzzle with their score in plain sight. They also often feature contestants screaming after Pat tells them they've won a trip, spoiling which contestant wins the Prize Puzzle (and likely that episode's game). Similar edits of these previews are often aired by local affiliates.



** While the show's "Song Title", "Song Lyrics", and "Song/Artist" categories are fairly common, the songs used for their puzzles are almost-always from the 1980s or earlier. This has resulted in some younger contestants struggling with song puzzles that are obviously before their time. Even the teen and college weeks hardly ever use recent songs (or movies or TV shows) that the contestants would likely know (although they sometimes use the ''name'' of a currently-popular celebrity in a Proper Name or Show Biz puzzle). For example, one College Week episode in 2014 had a Toss-Up of REVENGE OF THE NERDS under the category "The 80s" (which was likely before any of the week's contestants were born). Two contestants rang in with incorrect guesses, obviously not being familiar with the movie. It can be painfully obvious during these weeks that MostWritersAreAdults.
** The show's current events category, "Headline", has become increasingly rare in recent seasons to the point of appearing only once per season on average.

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** While the show's "Song Title", "Song Lyrics", and "Song/Artist" categories are fairly common, the songs used for their puzzles are almost-always from the 1980s or earlier. This has resulted in some younger contestants struggling with song puzzles that are obviously before their time. Even the earlier, even if it's a teen and or college weeks hardly ever use recent songs (or movies or TV shows) that the contestants would likely know week (although they sometimes use the ''name'' of a currently-popular celebrity artist in a Proper Name or Show Biz puzzle). For example, one It can be painfully obvious during these weeks especially that MostWritersAreAdults.
** One
College Week episode in 2014 had a Toss-Up of REVENGE OF THE NERDS under the category "The 80s" (which was likely before any of the week's contestants were born). Two contestants rang in with incorrect guesses, obviously not being familiar with the movie. It can be painfully obvious during these weeks that MostWritersAreAdults.
movie.
** The show's current events category, "Headline", has become increasingly rare in recent seasons to the point of sometimes not appearing for over a year. Nowadays, when it does get used, it is usually related to a recent sports victory or an astronomical event.
** The very few puzzles ''Wheel'' has used related to gaming have
only once per season on average.involved arcade classics such as ''VideoGames/PacMan'' and ''VideoGames/SpaceInvaders''.
This list shows the last 10 events of 516. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.WheelOfFortune