History Series / TwentyOneJumpStreet

29th Jan '18 1:44:43 AM LB7979
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** "Last Chance High": Was Frances really physically abused by her parents, or was she making all of that up being at best delusional, at worst a pathological liar?



** "Eternal Flame": The person who turns out to be the bad guy, fraud and criminal, [[spoiler:is arrested for it; and his wife, whom he deceived and lied to, dumps him, which he most people would argue, deserves]]. It ends with a Tearjerker for [[spoiler:Hanson though, as he almost gets the girl (whom he speaks of as the love of his life), but she, at the end, abruptly says to him she wants to start a new life elsewhere, and leaves]].



** Ioki as a character gets much less attention than Hanson and Penhall, but gets the Season 2 episode "Christmas in Saigon" entirely, and the Season 3 episode "The Dragon and the Angel" mostly, devoted to him.



** Fuller's son, between the two episodes he appears in: first, he's a teenager who has become a Rastafarian and is acting like a hippie (this is played as "a teenager trying to find his identity") and has dreadlocks. In the other episode, three seasons later, he's an ambitious and almost preppy college student--and he's cut his hair short.



** Hanson's ex-girlfriend Linda he runs into in Season 4; she is an aspiring painter / artist, married to a nightclub owner (as admitted by herself, mostly because this man has the financial means to get her her own gallery). The attraction between this wacky character and the straight-laced cop Hanson is, is hard to explain, but it's probably "for old time's sake" only. At the end of the episode, she does a ScrewThisImOutOfHere, leaving town and leaving ''both'' her husband and a heartbroken Hanson behind [[note]]She is never mentioned again in the series, but, whether tellingly or not, in contrast to Seasons 2 and 3 in which Hanson had a girlfriend in Amy and Jackie respectively, Hanson's character never finds romance again during the series[[/note]].



** "Eternal Flame": Hanson encounters an ex-girlfriend (by now married to someone else) and relives romance with her; [[spoiler:at first the romance seems to be played straight / real, but at the end, even though Hanson goes straight for her, she denounces ''both'' her husband and Hanson, says she "needs to choose herself", and leaves town]].



** ''Last Chance High'' subverted this. Hanson meets teenager Frances who shows him her baby. When he asks around at her school about "when [Frances] was pregnant", they reply "Uh no, Frances ''never'' was pregnant...". [[spoiler:Turns out the baby is not Frances' daughter, but her baby sister whom she kidnapped from her own parents]].



** ''Best Years of Your Life'' is about suicide among teenagers.



** A criminal guy who gets a death sentence (in an interesting twist, earlier in the series he's featured as a pretty much one-dimensional criminal; by the 4th Season, he ends up getting the death sentence for his murders and a whole episode is devoted to showing his backstory, drawing some sympathy from the viewer).



** ''Eternal Flame'': Hanson runs into an ex-girlfriend, Linda, who's now married. That doesn't stop Linda from sleeping with and dating Hanson. Hanson and her are unaware that her husband actually knows of their affair, and it ends with [[spoiler:the husband attacking Hanson with a gun as a retaliation for Linda's cheating on him with Hanson; after which the husband is overmastered and arrested for his selling drugs, and shipped off; and Linda then [[ScrewThisImOutOfHere leaves town and]] ''both'' her husband and ex Hanson]].
27th Jan '18 6:56:26 AM LB7979
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* AgentScully:
** Hanson is totally skeptical of Penhall's claims that he encountered aliens (and this story is soon revealed to have a different explanation); and he's the one who doesn't believe the "medium" the team hires in "Old Haunts in the New Age" really channels the spirits of the dead, and quickly exposes him as a fraud.
** Also Captain Fuller, when the team starts to use ouija boards and hire spirit-channeling mediums, is very disbelieving of this, and basically calls the rest of the team idiots for hiring/believing the medium.



* SpookySeance: After a skeleton is found in the Jump Street chapel, the team (except for Hanson) use an ouija board and hire a medium, who supposedly channels the spirit of the dead body. He [[spoiler:quickly is exposed by Hanson as fraud though]].



** ''2245'' is about a man getting the death penalty.



* WhatDoesSheSeeInHim: Not a romantic, but a platonic and same-sex example. In Universe, other characters (a.o. Penhall, Fuller and the Sheriff) repeatedly wonder how on earth Russell Buckins can be Hanson's friend. Russell is a polar opposite from Hanson--reckless, impulsive and wacky--and the other characters worry because under the influence of Russell, Hanson, totally out-of-character, neglects his job and even does unlawful things.
27th Jan '18 1:37:08 AM LB7979
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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: The 'psychic' girl in "Old Haunts in the New Age". She sees / draws things that she shouldn't have any way to know, but she's not infallible either. Psychic, or lucky guess?
* MistakenForAliens: "Old Haunts in the New Age": Doug is convinced he has encountered aliens, and that they moved his belly button. [[spoiler:Turns out the lights he saw was just an advertisement by normal humans, not aliens]].
26th Jan '18 11:19:41 PM LB7979
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* ChristmasEpisode: Set against the backdrop of Christmas, "Christmas in Saigon" is about the police finding out that Ioki has been lying about his identity. It has flashbacks taking place in '70s Vietnam, but in present time it is Chrismas, and at the end, all characters have a Christmas dinner together.



* {{Cliffhanger}}:
** The ending of Season 3. Hanson is [[spoiler:wrongly convicted and sent to prison for a murder he didn't commit]] and Ioki is [[spoiler:in coma and on the brink of death after being shot]]. Also, Booker and Penhall have fallen out with each other over [[spoiler:the former's arresting Hanson, and the latter's lying during testimony in court]].
** The ending of Season 2--the team are told that Jump Street will be dismantled, and they all find other jobs during the season finale. [[spoiler:Come Season 3, Jump Street is restarted]].

to:

* {{Cliffhanger}}:
**
{{Cliffhanger}}: The ending of Season 3. Hanson is [[spoiler:wrongly convicted and sent to prison for a murder he didn't commit]] and Ioki is [[spoiler:in coma and on the brink of death after being shot]]. Also, Booker and Penhall have fallen out with each other over [[spoiler:the former's arresting Hanson, and the latter's lying during testimony in court]].
** The ending of Season 2--the team are told that Jump Street will be dismantled, and they all find other jobs during the season finale. [[spoiler:Come Season 3, Jump Street is restarted]].
court]].






* NeverLearnedToRead:
** The relevantly-titled "Afterschool Special": An illiterate boy in a disadvantaged-neighborhood high school.
** "Say It Ain't So, Pete": An illiterate university student that got into university on an athletic scholarship.

to:

* NeverLearnedToRead:
**
NeverLearnedToRead: The relevantly-titled "Afterschool Special": An illiterate boy in a disadvantaged-neighborhood high school.
** "Say It Ain't So, Pete": An illiterate university student that got into university on an athletic scholarship.
school.



* OutOfFocus: Most episodes tend to center around the one or two officers working a case, with the captain and the other characters only getting a few lines here and there, but Season 4's ''God Is a Bullet'' is notable for not featuring any scenes at the precinct, and Penhall and Hoffs being the only main characters who appear. Later in Season 4, an entire episode took place in El Salvador, and didn't feature any police work at all and no characters but Doug and Tom.

to:

* OutOfFocus: Most episodes tend to center around the one or two officers working a case, with the captain and the other characters only getting a few lines here and there, but Season 4's ''God "God Is a Bullet'' Bullet" is notable for not featuring any scenes at the precinct, and Penhall and Hoffs being the only main characters who appear. Later in Season 4, an entire episode took place in El Salvador, and didn't feature any police work at all and no characters but Doug and Tom.



* RashomonStyle: In ''How I Saved the Senator'', a [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Senator was saved]] from a bomb explosion targeted at him during a speech. A journalist interrogates all Jump Street members, and gets vastly different and contradictory stories from everyone. They are all shown as films in different styles: Hanson's is a silent, black-and-white movie [[note]]Which coincidentally already showcased Creator/JohnnyDepp's talent for physical comedy for which he was later praised for his role in ''Film/BennyAndJoon''[[/note]], Ioki's a martial arts movie, Penhall's a James Bond-style movie, etc. In the end, it turns out [[spoiler:none of the stories was true and a student did most to get everybody away from the bomb]].

to:

* RashomonStyle: In ''How "How I Saved the Senator'', Senator", a [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Senator was saved]] from a bomb explosion targeted at him during a speech. A journalist interrogates all Jump Street members, and gets vastly different and contradictory stories from everyone. They are all shown as films in different styles: Hanson's is a silent, black-and-white movie [[note]]Which coincidentally already showcased Creator/JohnnyDepp's talent for physical comedy for which he was later praised for his role in ''Film/BennyAndJoon''[[/note]], Ioki's a martial arts movie, Penhall's a James Bond-style movie, etc. In the end, it turns out [[spoiler:none of the stories was true and a student did most to get everybody away from the bomb]].



* RequiredSpinoffCrossover: ''Wheels And Deals: Part 2'':[[note]]"Part 1" was part of Bookers own spin-off series[[/note]] After Booker left the Jump Street team (In Universe) and got his own spin-off show (in Real Life), he returned a few episodes later to work with the team to catch the criminal ultimately responsible for the events that happened to Hanson and Ioki at the end of Season 3.
* RewatchBonus: The opening scene of ''Higher Education'' shows a teacher interacting with a girl of his class, Patti. The teacher seems casual and nice towards her, and he to be a popular teacher with the whole class. Later it turns out that he [[spoiler:had coerced another student, Joy, into sex and gotten her pregnant after which he didn't want anything to do with her anymore; plus he probably slept with other female students too]]. Knowing that and watching the opening scene again, you realize he's actually subtly flirting with Patti. FridgeHorror especially sets in when you realize Patti later is shown to be tutored by him at his own house, and that's precisely how [[spoiler:Joy had gotten raped and pregnant]]--Patti was probably next...
* RoadTripPlot: ''A.W.O.L.'' starts out as this, as Hanson and Penhall have to transport a military guy who dodged service. About halfway through though, [[spoiler:the military guy escapes and Hanson and Penhall are lost and stuck in the wilderness and the cold]].

to:

* RequiredSpinoffCrossover: ''Wheels "Wheels And Deals: Part 2'':[[note]]"Part 2":[[note]]"Part 1" was part of Bookers own spin-off series[[/note]] After Booker left the Jump Street team (In Universe) and got his own spin-off show (in Real Life), he returned a few episodes later to work with the team to catch the criminal ultimately responsible for the events that happened to Hanson and Ioki at the end of Season 3.
* RewatchBonus: The opening scene of ''Higher Education'' "Higher Education" shows a teacher interacting with a girl of his class, Patti. The teacher seems casual and nice towards her, and he to be a popular teacher with the whole class. Later it turns out that he [[spoiler:had coerced another student, Joy, into sex and gotten her pregnant after which he didn't want anything to do with her anymore; plus he probably slept with other female students too]]. Knowing that and watching the opening scene again, you realize he's actually subtly flirting with Patti. FridgeHorror especially sets in when you realize Patti later is shown to be tutored by him at his own house, and that's precisely how [[spoiler:Joy had gotten raped and pregnant]]--Patti was probably next...
* RoadTripPlot: ''A."A.W.O.L.'' " starts out as this, as Hanson and Penhall have to transport a military guy who dodged service. About halfway through though, [[spoiler:the military guy escapes and Hanson and Penhall are lost and stuck in the wilderness and the cold]].



** In the episode ''Woolly Bullies'', the main characters recount the bullies who have plagued them in their youth. When Doug Penhall recounts his particularly bitter memories of such a tormentor, a friend suggests he seek the bully out and confront him. However, when Penhall does just that by finding the bully's current home, he learns that the bully is now a pathetic unemployed loser with an unhappy marriage to a shrewish wife. Delighted at this turn of events, Penhall decides not to speak to him and returns home quietly gloating how he got the classic best revenge by living well.

to:

** In the episode ''Woolly Bullies'', "Woolly Bullies", the main characters recount the bullies who have plagued them in their youth. When Doug Penhall recounts his particularly bitter memories of such a tormentor, a friend suggests he seek the bully out and confront him. However, when Penhall does just that by finding the bully's current home, he learns that the bully is now a pathetic unemployed loser with an unhappy marriage to a shrewish wife. Delighted at this turn of events, Penhall decides not to speak to him and returns home quietly gloating how he got the classic best revenge by living well.



** ''Eternal Flame'': Hanson encounters an ex-girlfriend (by now married to someone else) and relives romance with her; [[spoiler:at first the romance seems to be played straight / real, but at the end, even though Hanson goes straight for her, she denounces ''both'' her husband and Hanson, says she "needs to choose herself", and leaves town]].

to:

** ''Eternal Flame'': "Eternal Flame": Hanson encounters an ex-girlfriend (by now married to someone else) and relives romance with her; [[spoiler:at first the romance seems to be played straight / real, but at the end, even though Hanson goes straight for her, she denounces ''both'' her husband and Hanson, says she "needs to choose herself", and leaves town]].



** Early in the series, Ronnie Seebok is a criminal who crosses paths with Hanson. In Season 4, we see more of his background and follow his (downer) fate: he's on death row and reaches out to Hanson (who earlier in the series arrested him) for support.
** In ''Wheels and Deals'', the whole team goes after the man who ultimately was responsible for Hanson getting [[spoiler:wrongfully convicted for murder and Harry nearly dying]] nine episodes earlier in ''Draw the Line''.
* SeriesContinuityError: ''Things We Said Today'' has a minor one, at least if episodes are assumed to be set in the same year they aired. A flashback to the day of the Challenger Explosion in January 1986 shows Ioki working a case and the Jump Street squad commenting on Captain Fuller as if he were still new to the squad. The first episode of the series aired in April 1987; Captain Jenko was still in charge at that point and Hanson was just joining the squad.

to:

** Early in the series, Ronnie Seebok is a criminal who crosses paths with Hanson. In Season 4, we see more of his background and follow his (downer) fate: he's on death row and reaches out to Hanson (who earlier in the series arrested him) for support.
** In ''Wheels "Wheels and Deals'', Deals", the whole team goes after the man who ultimately was responsible for Hanson getting [[spoiler:wrongfully convicted for murder and Harry nearly dying]] nine episodes earlier in ''Draw the Line''.
* SeriesContinuityError: ''Things "Things We Said Today'' Today" has a minor one, at least if episodes are assumed to be set in the same year they aired. A flashback to the day of the Challenger Explosion in January 1986 shows Ioki working a case and the Jump Street squad commenting on Captain Fuller as if he were still new to the squad. The first episode of the series aired in April 1987; Captain Jenko was still in charge at that point and Hanson was just joining the squad.
11th Jan '18 1:08:01 AM LB7979
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** "2245" episode: Ronnie Seebok kills one of the 21 Jump Street officers; there isn't enough evidence to arrest or convict him for this though. Later, he gets a death sentence for for a murder he ''didn't'' actually commit (it was his girlfriend who had shot the convenience store employee, but he was convicted for it).



* DeathRow: "2245": A criminal's last days, and past story, before he gets the death sentence are shown.



* DudeNotFunny: Both played straight and inverted in "Blackout", when Hanson, while undercover at a high school, plays a prank on two other students where he briefly fakes having cut off his fingers. The other students find it ActuallyPrettyFunny, but the teacher absolutely doesn't:
-->'''Teacher:''' ''[Annoyed]'' Do you think that's funny?!
-->'''Other students:''' ''[Laughing, and nodding their heads]'' Yeah.
-->'''Teacher:''' Maybe it'll be funnier in detention hall.



* NonIndicativeTitle: Though many episodes were named ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, there also were some with puzzling names.
** ''2245'' is a VerySpecialEpisode about a prisoner who gets the death sentence. That number doesn't appear anywhere in the episode, and fans have always been wondering what its significance is.
** ''Say It Ain't So, Pete'' is about gambling college students. There isn't any ''Pete'' character in the episode, and that phrase isn't uttered or referenced in any way in the episode.

to:

* NonIndicativeTitle: Though many episodes were named ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, there also were some with puzzling names.
** ''2245'' is a VerySpecialEpisode about a prisoner who gets the death sentence. That number doesn't appear anywhere in the episode, and fans have always been wondering what its significance is.
**
names. ''Say It Ain't So, Pete'' is about gambling college students. There isn't any ''Pete'' character in the episode, and that phrase isn't uttered or referenced in any way in the episode.



* OverlyLongTitle: Season 4's episode "Awomp-Bomp-Aloobomb, Aloop Bamboom go Awomp-Bomp-Aloobomb, Aloop Bamboom".



** ''2245'': Takes (mostly) place in a prison, where it follows a man convicted to the death penalty.



* RelationshipRevolvingDoor: Douglas and his girlfriend Dorothy break up a few times during the series, and Penhall says about her:
-->'''Penhall:''' I've been with her for [a decade], but never any longer than 6 months at a time.



10th Jan '18 6:12:00 PM LB7979
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* BreatherEpisode: In Season 4, "Awomp-Bomp-Aloobomp-Aloop-Bamboom" (ep. 18) takes place in Florida during Spring Break and features partying college students and lots of girls in bikinis; this follows after episodes dealing with the death penalty and with illiteracy and college sports corruption, and following it comes arguably the most grim episode of the entire series, "La Bizca", which is about the civil war in El Salvador.



** Judy Hoffs was the female version. As Penhall remarks at a certain point, it doesn't say anything about Booker that he's flirting with Judy because "''everybody'' always flirts with Judy!". This character trait of Judy's was sometimes exploited when she played the DirtyHarriet.



* {{Fingore}}:
** Subverted / downplayed in "Blackout". Hanson seemingly cuts off three of his fingers while he's operating machinery; but then it's revealed this is a prank he plays on some other students, and he still got all of his fingers attached. His fingers ''are'' covered in blood though, so he did at least cut himself.
** Played straight and for drama when a student buys a cheap gun from the black market, and it malfunctions and explodes in his hand; his entire hand is severely injured.

to:

* {{Fingore}}:
** Subverted / downplayed in "Blackout". Hanson seemingly cuts off three of his fingers while he's operating machinery; but then it's revealed this is a prank he plays on some other students, and he still got all of his fingers attached. His fingers ''are'' covered in blood though, so he did at least cut himself.
**
{{Fingore}}: Played straight and for drama when a student buys a cheap gun from the black market, and it malfunctions and explodes in his hand; his entire hand is severely injured.



* ShooOutTheNewGuy: Booker, who is [[CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority totally rad]] and [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold a good guy deep down]], but is [[{{Badbutt}} kinda dangerous]] and [[CowboyCop plays by his own rules]]. Like, ''totally''.



* VacationEpisode:
** ''Awomp-Bomp'' [[note]][[Full title actually Awomp-Bomp-Aloobomb, Aloop Bamboom go Awomp-Bomp-Aloobomb, Aloop Bamboom[[/note]]: Although Hanson and Penhall go to Florida on a police assignment, it happens during Spring Break, so it has a vacation atmosphere.
** A very grim version is ''La Bizca'', in which Penhall and Hanson go to war-ridden El Salvador and find out [[spoiler:Penhall's wife is dead]].
6th Jan '18 3:59:08 PM LB7979
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* ByTheBookCop:
** Captain Fuller was this straight. He's strict about following procedure and expects his Officers to do the same, scolding or even suspending them when they do otherwise.
** Subverted for Officer Tom Hanson. He is strict by-the-book during the pilot episodes, but loosens up--sometimes purposely withholding information from Fuller, and one time even breaking into fellow Officer Booker's apartment to get evidence.
** Double subverted for Officer Booker. He first seems an inversion of this: he goes way over the line doing pranks on suspects, and acts racist. Then it turns out [[spoiler:that was a role he played because he is Internal Affairs, and he is trying to provoke the Jump Street team into unacceptable behavior]].



* DisappearedDad:
** Hanson's backstory, as his father died on the job as a police officer when Hanson was 16; his father apparently was a big inspiration for Hanson to chose to become a police officer.
** Many of the teens the team works with are also without Dads ([[MissingMom or moms]]). Most notably Quincy, the girl who acts reckless in "Out of Control"--her having lost her Dad is explained to be the main reason for her behavior, and she bonds with Hanson over losing a Dad as a teen.



* DaChief: After Capt. Jenko is killed off, Capt. Fuller takes over and makes it very clear from the beginning that he means business and giving him any lip is a ''bad'' idea.
* DroppedABridgeOnHim: Captain Jenko, WeHardlyKnewYe.



* FairCop:
** Tom Hanson was the male version. As his colleagues Hoffs and Penhall remark in "Back from the Future", the ladies really noticed him. And he was played by Creator/JohnnyDepp, who was the shows MrFanservice.
** "In the Name of Love" referenced this for Hanson's Season 5 SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute Tony [=McCann=], only in a negative fashion. The FBI agent they're working with refers to the 21 Jump street 'studs', in a tone of voice full of UnfortunateImplications. Mac and Capt Fuller are both clearly offended by the implications in the agent's tone, but they can't protest too much because they have to work with the man on an important case.



* HenpeckedHusband: Despite not actually being married, Penhall gets a bad case of this when Dorothy rather abruptly decides to not only get back together with him, but also to move in with him (uninvited). Cue every nagging housewife cliche the writers can think of. Taken Up To Eleven when Dorothy ''throws Penhall out of the house'' they just bought together, forcing him to beg his friends to give him a place to stay.



* HiddenHeartOfGold: Captain Fuller, when he showed up to replace Captain Jenko in Season 1 ep. 6, was played as a very stern, strict man and police Captain--essentially the opposite of the Hippie, rocker Captain Jenko. Fuller remained a very strict and by-the-book Captain for the police officers, but throughout the series little bits of background about the man were unfolded that made you feel for him--especially, that he was hurt very much by having his son taken away out of his life after a divorce after he cheated on his wife with a police co-worker (something he confessed to his police subordinates in a Season 2 Valentine episode, and which he still was regretful about). He also despite his strictness ''was'' willing to come through for his officers when push came to shove--most notably, in Season 3 ep. 1 when Hanson suspects something is off about Booker, Fuller pulls some strings to find out Booker is from Internal Affairs.



* NewAgeRetroHippie: Captain Jenko, an aging hippie who, in the first episode, has to teach Hanson how to act like a bad seed.



* RedOniBlueOni:
** Penhall and his (most-of-the-time) partner, and best friend, Hanson, respectively. Penhall was more brash, Hanson more by-the-book.
** When Penhall was living in Ioki's apartment during Season 3, Penhall was the Red Oni to Ioki's Blue Oni; Ioki was shown to be very precise in keeping his house neat and clean, and Penhall was shown to be messy, which caused friction between them.



* SadClown: Penhall. He acts all brawny but as the show progresses, we learn that he has a tragic backstory--including [[spoiler:that his mother committed suicide when he was six years old, and that he's estranged from his brother.]]
5th Jan '18 10:24:02 PM DemonDuckofDoom
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Added DiffLines:

* StarterVillain: Tyrell "Waxer" Thompson, a drug dealer harassing a client to pay overdue fees. He never returns after his arrest, but his {{Dragon}} Reggie does.
1st Jan '18 10:10:14 PM LB7979
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* EndOfSeriesAwareness:
** Season 2 ends with the Jump Street program being suspended, possibly due to the writers not knowing if the show itself would be canned or get a third season.
** Hanson makes several references to wanting to quit the force in Season 4. It was well known by this point that Johnny Depp wanted to leave the show, which he actually did at the end of the season.

to:

* EndOfSeriesAwareness:
** Season 2 ends with the Jump Street program being suspended, possibly due to the writers not knowing if the show itself would be canned or get a third season.
**
EndOfSeriesAwareness: Hanson makes several references to wanting to quit the force in Season 4. It was well known by this point that Johnny Depp wanted to leave the show, which he actually did at the end of the season.
29th Dec '17 5:55:52 AM LB7979
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* ArtisticLicenseLaw: "Higher Education": A high school teacher confesses having raped a teenage student of his... while the girl's father threatens him with a baseball bat and officer Ioki stands by and does nothing. As much as this teacher is an abusive bastard that the viewer wants justice served upon, a confession obtained this way wouldn't hold up in court.
* AssholeVictim:
** The ShockJock whose car gets blown up in "Next Victim". Due to his hateful and racist ranting, the team is none too happy about having to look for the person who did it.
** Character Booker was written out of the show after lasting only one season; ironically, his character was shipped off due to doing the ''right'' thing (uncovering that Hanson was sent to prison innocently), but due to Booker being antagonistic to Hanson (the most popular character--hey, it is / was Creator/JohnnyDepp) from his first appearance on, and to Booker seeming ambiguously racist, Booker can easily be taken for an Asshole.

to:

\n* ArtisticLicenseLaw: "Higher Education": A high school teacher confesses having raped a teenage student of his... while the girl's father threatens him with a baseball bat and officer Ioki stands by and does nothing. As much as this teacher is an abusive bastard that the viewer wants justice served upon, a confession obtained this way wouldn't hold up in court.
* AssholeVictim:
**
AssholeVictim: The ShockJock whose car gets blown up in "Next Victim". Due to his hateful and racist ranting, the team is none too happy about having to look for the person who did it.
** Character Booker was written out of the show after lasting only one season; ironically, his character was shipped off due to doing the ''right'' thing (uncovering that Hanson was sent to prison innocently), but due to Booker being antagonistic to Hanson (the most popular character--hey, it is / was Creator/JohnnyDepp) from his first appearance on, and to Booker seeming ambiguously racist, Booker can easily be taken for an Asshole.
it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.TwentyOneJumpStreet