History Series / RowanAndMartinsLaughIn

23rd Apr '16 6:14:49 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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Added DiffLines:

** Tyrone F. Horneigh, however, didn't pass -- his name had to be pronounced hor-NIGH, which kind of ruins the joke.
23rd Apr '16 6:07:47 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* LaughTrack

to:

* LaughTrackLaughTrack: The SmashCut-heavy nature of the show made it necessary to use "sweetening" to avoid abrupt cuts in laughter.



* RapidFireComedy: an early example, which made the censors uncomfortable. Lampshaded in the ReunionShow.

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* RapidFireComedy: an An early example, which made the censors uncomfortable. Lampshaded in the ReunionShow.


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** That might've been the origin of the "[[Radio/TheBurnsAndAllenShow say goodnight, Gracie]]" [[BeamMeUpScotty misquote]].
** After Rowan would announce "it's now time to say goodnight, Dick," several shots of cast members and guests stars saying "Goodnight, Dick" would follow, as well as a random joke ("Who's Dick?").
* SmashCut: All over the place, as an essential part of the RapidFireComedy.
23rd Apr '16 5:45:44 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* "Look ''that'' up in your Funk & Wagnall's!"

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* "Look ''that'' up in your Funk & Wagnall's!"Wagnalls!"


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** "Look ''that'' up in your Funk & Wagnalls!" -- the closest thing you could get to an F-bomb on late-1960's television.


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** "Look ''that'' up in your Funk & Wagnalls!"
23rd Apr '16 5:37:39 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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23rd Apr '16 5:35:19 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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** ThrowItIn: Charley Douglass - the man who invented the LaughTrack for television - once recorded himself clapping in the control room as he was laughing up an episode, and inserted it during the closing credits, mainly as a joke. He later apologized for doing this, but the producers loved how unintentionally funny the sarcastic-sounding one-man applause was, and used it regularly during the show's end titles after that.

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** ThrowItIn: Laugh tracks in those days were created via a machine with several keys that would cue up tape loops of prerecorded laughter in a way similar to a Mellotron. When the first episodes were being "laughed up", a key stuck after the closing credits' "standing ovation" was recorded. That key cued up a recording of Charley Douglass - the man who invented the LaughTrack for television - once recorded himself clapping in the control room as he was laughing up an episode, and inserted it during the closing credits, mainly as a joke. He by himself. The operator later apologized for doing this, the accident, but the producers loved how unintentionally funny the sarcastic-sounding one-man applause was, and used it regularly during the show's end titles after that.



* VanityPlate: The sound of George Schlatter laughing and clapping as an animated logo displays.

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* VanityPlate: The sound of "[[http://image.wikifoundry.com/image/1/Z5Zfw6I6XX-hfUhuFhIRqg17184/GW430 George Schlatter laughing and Schlatter/Ed Friendly Productions]], in association with [[http://image.wikifoundry.com/image/1/ZAJkRzPFu-PSRbqMBeS8bg22145/GW430 Romart]]", accompanied by Charley Douglass' clapping as an animated logo displays.(see above).
24th Aug '15 8:52:55 PM PaulA
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George Schlatter attempted to recreate the success of ''Laugh-In'' for ABC by cloning it into a show called ''Turn-On''. However, the first episode of ''Turn-On'' was met with so many complaints about its quality that it was either banned from airing, cancelled fifteen minutes into the episode (TheOtherWiki says the last sketch that aired was one where a woman violently shakes a vending machine that dispenses birth control pills), or aired in full and then never again. Before the 1970s were over, Schlatter would try once again with a proper revival of ''Laugh-In''. It too, failed, but even so, it proved that Schlatter's eye for comedic talent had in no way diminished -- the cast he assembled for the revival included several performers who later went on to stardom or superstardom, including a then-unknown RobinWilliams.

''Laugh-In'''s influence is extremely obvious in ''Series/SesameStreet'', and ''YouCantDoThatOnTelevision''.

to:

George Schlatter attempted to recreate the success of ''Laugh-In'' for ABC by cloning it into a show called ''Turn-On''. However, the first episode of ''Turn-On'' was met with so many complaints about its quality that it was either banned from airing, cancelled fifteen minutes into the episode (TheOtherWiki says the last sketch that aired was one where a woman violently shakes a vending machine that dispenses birth control pills), or aired in full and then never again. Before the 1970s were over, Schlatter would try once again with a proper revival of ''Laugh-In''. It too, failed, but even so, it proved that Schlatter's eye for comedic talent had in no way diminished -- the cast he assembled for the revival included several performers who later went on to stardom or superstardom, including a then-unknown RobinWilliams.

Creator/RobinWilliams.

''Laugh-In'''s influence is extremely obvious in ''Series/SesameStreet'', and ''YouCantDoThatOnTelevision''.
''Series/YouCantDoThatOnTelevision''.
8th Jun '15 11:39:46 AM JRSL88
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Added DiffLines:

* ButtMonkey: Judy Carne. Usually when she utters the magic words "Sock It To Me".
8th Jun '15 11:32:31 AM JRSL88
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* BerserkButton: Joanne Worley doesn't like to hear chicken jokes.
22nd Apr '15 3:22:37 PM Prfnoff
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The show is best known today for the future stars whose careers it launched -- Goldie Hawn, ''Creator/Lily Tomlin'', Music/TinyTim, Henry Gibson, Ruth Buzzi, Arte Johnson, Pat Paulson, and Joanne Worley among others -- and the incredible comic moments it managed to pull off (such as then-presidential-candidate Richard M. Nixon asking America to "sock it to him"). But until the birth of ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' several years later, ''Laugh-In'' was the touchstone of modern American humor. (''SNL'' emulated it, in some ways -- unsurprisingly, because many ''Laugh-In'' writers later worked on ''SNL'', including the later show's creator and executive producer, Creator/LorneMichaels.) It was possibly the single largest source of {{Running Gag}}s, {{Catch Phrase}}s and other pop culture contributions during the middle of the 20th century, and developed during its surprisingly brief run an utterly unique and frenetically subversive style that carried them directly into the subconscious of the viewer. Because of its wild and unpredictable yet ''intelligent'' style, it was also often very successful at getting surprisingly risque material (for the era) on the air -- usually by setting up apparently-innocent situations where the viewer's mind would fill in the blanks with suitably dirty punchlines and speculations of their own.

to:

The show is best known today for the future stars whose careers it launched -- Goldie Hawn, ''Creator/Lily Tomlin'', Creator/GoldieHawn, Creator/LilyTomlin, Music/TinyTim, Henry Gibson, Ruth Buzzi, Arte Johnson, Pat Paulson, and Joanne Worley among others -- and the incredible comic moments it managed to pull off (such as then-presidential-candidate Richard M. Nixon UsefulNotes/RichardNixon asking America to "sock it to him"). But until the birth of ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' several years later, ''Laugh-In'' was the touchstone of modern American humor. (''SNL'' emulated it, in some ways -- unsurprisingly, because many ''Laugh-In'' writers later worked on ''SNL'', including the later show's creator and executive producer, Creator/LorneMichaels.) It was possibly the single largest source of {{Running Gag}}s, {{Catch Phrase}}s and other pop culture contributions during the middle of the 20th century, and developed during its surprisingly brief run an utterly unique and frenetically subversive style that carried them directly into the subconscious of the viewer. Because of its wild and unpredictable yet ''intelligent'' style, it was also often very successful at getting surprisingly risque material (for the era) on the air -- usually by setting up apparently-innocent situations where the viewer's mind would fill in the blanks with suitably dirty punchlines and speculations of their own.
11th Apr '15 6:07:41 PM FaxModem1
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The show is best known today for the future stars whose careers it launched -- Goldie Hawn, Creator/Lily Tomlin, Music/TinyTim, Henry Gibson, Ruth Buzzi, Arte Johnson, Pat Paulson, and Joanne Worley among others -- and the incredible comic moments it managed to pull off (such as then-presidential-candidate Richard M. Nixon asking America to "sock it to him"). But until the birth of ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' several years later, ''Laugh-In'' was the touchstone of modern American humor. (''SNL'' emulated it, in some ways -- unsurprisingly, because many ''Laugh-In'' writers later worked on ''SNL'', including the later show's creator and executive producer, Creator/LorneMichaels.) It was possibly the single largest source of {{Running Gag}}s, {{Catch Phrase}}s and other pop culture contributions during the middle of the 20th century, and developed during its surprisingly brief run an utterly unique and frenetically subversive style that carried them directly into the subconscious of the viewer. Because of its wild and unpredictable yet ''intelligent'' style, it was also often very successful at getting surprisingly risque material (for the era) on the air -- usually by setting up apparently-innocent situations where the viewer's mind would fill in the blanks with suitably dirty punchlines and speculations of their own.

to:

The show is best known today for the future stars whose careers it launched -- Goldie Hawn, Creator/Lily Tomlin, ''Creator/Lily Tomlin'', Music/TinyTim, Henry Gibson, Ruth Buzzi, Arte Johnson, Pat Paulson, and Joanne Worley among others -- and the incredible comic moments it managed to pull off (such as then-presidential-candidate Richard M. Nixon asking America to "sock it to him"). But until the birth of ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' several years later, ''Laugh-In'' was the touchstone of modern American humor. (''SNL'' emulated it, in some ways -- unsurprisingly, because many ''Laugh-In'' writers later worked on ''SNL'', including the later show's creator and executive producer, Creator/LorneMichaels.) It was possibly the single largest source of {{Running Gag}}s, {{Catch Phrase}}s and other pop culture contributions during the middle of the 20th century, and developed during its surprisingly brief run an utterly unique and frenetically subversive style that carried them directly into the subconscious of the viewer. Because of its wild and unpredictable yet ''intelligent'' style, it was also often very successful at getting surprisingly risque material (for the era) on the air -- usually by setting up apparently-innocent situations where the viewer's mind would fill in the blanks with suitably dirty punchlines and speculations of their own.
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