History Series / Poirot

19th Feb '17 6:56:37 PM danlansdowne
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** In ''Hickory Dickory Dock'', someone ends up falling/jumping in front of an Underground train.
19th Feb '17 6:38:28 PM danlansdowne
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* EveryCarIsAPinto: In ''The Incredible Theft'', a fighter plane uses a test car as target practice by riddling it full of bullets, and after a few shots the car bursts into flames.

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* EveryCarIsAPinto: In ''The Incredible Theft'', a fighter plane uses a test car as target practice by riddling it full of bullets, and after a few shots the car bursts into flames. Potentially justified if the plane were equipped with incendiary bullets.



* JustTrainWrong: The adaptation of ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' was filmed in the UK with a series of Wagon-Lits Pullman lounge cars and a British steam locomotive.

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* JustTrainWrong: The adaptation of ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' was filmed in the UK with a series of Wagon-Lits Pullman lounge cars and a British steam locomotive. Also partly for ''Literature/TheMysteryoftheBlueTrain'', which did have Pullmans.
19th Feb '17 6:04:43 PM danlansdowne
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** ''Literature/TheBigFour'' is a very loose adaptation of the novel, and the villain's motives and actions are completely different from the books.

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** ''Literature/TheBigFour'' is a very loose adaptation of the novel, and the villain's motives and actions are completely different from the books. Somewhat justified in that even Agatha Christie hated the book, which consisted of a few short stories strung together with a loose plot to meet a contractual requirement.
10th Feb '17 5:37:25 AM jouXIII
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* AndIMustScream: In ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'', [[spoiler:Franco Cassetti was drugged into immobility, and was conscious through every ''single'' stab, but unable to move. [[AssholeVictim He deserved every minute of it.]]]]
1st Feb '17 5:52:08 AM Adept
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** Jeanne Beroldy's rich lover Mr Hiram is omitted from ''Literature/MurderOnTheLinks''. She manipulated George Conneau into murdering her husband to claim his inheritance, whereas in the books she wanted to be "freed" so she can marry Hiram.

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** Jeanne Beroldy's rich lover Mr Hiram is omitted from ''Literature/MurderOnTheLinks''.''Literature/TheMurderOnTheLinks''. She manipulated George Conneau into murdering her husband to claim his inheritance, whereas in the books she wanted to be "freed" so she can marry Hiram.
1st Feb '17 5:50:46 AM Adept
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** Genevieve "Jenny" Driver from ''Literature/LordEdgwareDies'' is mostly recognisable, in the book, from her distinctive red heir. In the adaptation, she's dark-haired.

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** Genevieve "Jenny" Driver from ''Literature/LordEdgwareDies'' is mostly recognisable, in the book, from her distinctive red heir.hair. In the adaptation, she's dark-haired.



** ''Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles'' has a minor case, but a plot point in the investigation involves the suspicious manner in which Lawrence insisted that his stepmother's death is natural, and his feeble attempt to suggest that Mrs Inglethorp might have been ''accidentally'' (rather than willfully) administered due to an overdose of her tonic. When Poirot mentions this oddity, Hastings dismissed it as a common layman mistake, until Poirot reminded his friend that while Lawrence is not a doctor, he has a medical degree and is thus qualified as one. While this is true in the books, in the movie, Lawrence ''is'' a medical professional, and he's working in the same hospital as Cynthia.
** The removal of Mr. Satterthwaite from ''Literature/ThreeActTragedy'' causes some slight changes to the progress of the investigation, which causes the eventual reveal to make less sense. In the books, Mr. Satterthwaite is the one who baits Poirot into being involved in the case, while in the ITV series, he's enlisted by Sir Charles. The only problem? [[spoiler:Sir Charles is the murderer! Why would he ask for Poirot's help?]]

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** ''Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles'' has a A minor case, case in ''Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles'', but a plot point in the investigation involves the suspicious manner in which Lawrence insisted that his stepmother's death is natural, and his feeble attempt to suggest that Mrs Inglethorp might have been ''accidentally'' (rather than willfully) administered due to an overdose of her tonic. When Poirot mentions this oddity, Hastings dismissed it as a common layman mistake, until Poirot reminded his friend that while Lawrence is not a doctor, he has a medical degree and is thus qualified as one. While this is true in the books, in the movie, Lawrence ''is'' a medical professional, and he's working in the same hospital as Cynthia.
** The removal of Mr. Satterthwaite from ''Literature/ThreeActTragedy'' causes some slight changes to the progress of the investigation, which causes the eventual reveal to make less sense. In the books, Mr. Satterthwaite is the one who baits Poirot into being involved in the case, case (the others was quite reluctant to have him interfere), while in the ITV series, he's enlisted by Sir Charles.[[spoiler:Sir Charles]]. The only problem? [[spoiler:Sir Charles is the murderer! Why would he ask for Poirot's help?]]
28th Jan '17 7:41:46 PM Shoebox
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* AdaptationalVillainy:



** The novel ''Three-Act Tragedy'' was a team-up between Poirot and [[Literature/TheMysteriousMrQuin Mr Satterthwaite]], one of Christie's other detectives; the TV adaptation does not have Mr Satterthwaite in it.

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** The novel ''Three-Act Tragedy'' was a team-up between Poirot and [[Literature/TheMysteriousMrQuin Mr Satterthwaite]], one of Christie's other detectives; the TV adaptation does not have Mr Satterthwaite in it.it, thus--since he's in the novel precisely because he's a consummate aesthete and theatre connoisseur, and therefore has a very specific set of reactions to Sir Charles' theatrics--subtly changing the entire tone of the investigation, and indeed the overall story.
23rd Jan '17 3:07:47 PM yisfidri
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** In the original novel and most adaptations of the ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' (notably excluding SidneyLumet's 1974 film), Poirot [[spoiler: rather cavalierly lets the murderers go free]], but in the series version [[spoiler: this is shown as a difficult choice for him to make due to his Catholic beliefs]]. The first ten minutes or so of this particular adaptation come across as a TraumaCongaLine; first, the case in Palestine mentioned in the novel is revealed to Poirot giving one heck of a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech to a British Army officer that it [[DrivenToSuicide makes him shoot himself rather than stand trial]]. Then Poirot and some other characters witness [[TorchesAndPitchforks the public stoning of an adultress]] on the streets of Istanbul.



** In the original novel and most adaptations of the ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' (notably excluding SidneyLumet's 1974 film), Poirot [[spoiler: rather cavalierly lets the murderers go free]], but in the series version [[spoiler: this is shown as a difficult choice for him to make due to his Catholic beliefs]]. The first ten minutes or so of this particular adaptation come across as a TraumaCongaLine; first, the case in Palestine mentioned in the novel is revealed to Poirot giving one heck of a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech to a British Army officer that it [[DrivenToSuicide makes him shoot himself rather than stand trial]]. Then Poirot and some other characters witness [[TorchesAndPitchforks the public stoning of an adultress]] on the streets of Istanbul.



** Jim Ferguson of ''Literature/DeathOnTheNile'' is a downplayed example. When hears of Cornelia's [[spoiler:engagement, he looks genuinely brokenhearted and seems to finally realize that his behavior in trying to win her wasn't the best, and his jealous comments from the book are eliminated.]]



** The Duke of Merton from ''Literature/LordEdgwareDies'' is more likeable in this adaptation, and ends up rewarding Poirot for saving him from unknowingly marrying a murderess. Downplayed [[spoiler:and subverted]] with Jane Wilkinson, who in the book is described as a blatantly selfish individual who shamelessly brags about wanting to kill her husband so that she can marry another man, and refuses to take the hint when Poirot tries to refuse her commission to "get rid" of her husband. In this adaptation, she is portrayed [[spoiler:(initially, anyway)]] as a sympathetic victim who is forced to silently endure her husband's cruelty, and her asking for Poirot's help comes across more like a desperate plea than a callous demand.



** Jim Ferguson of ''Literature/DeathOnTheNile'' is a downplayed example. When hears of Cornelia's [[spoiler:engagement, he looks genuinely brokenhearted and seems to finally realize that his behavior in trying to win her wasn't the best, and his jealous comments from the book are eliminated.]]
** The Duke of Merton from ''Literature/LordEdgwareDies'' is more likeable in this adaptation, and ends up rewarding Poirot for saving him from unknowingly marrying a murderess. Downplayed [[spoiler:and subverted]] with Jane Wilkinson, who in the book is described as a blatantly selfish individual who shamelessly brags about wanting to kill her husband so that she can marry another man, and refuses to take the hint when Poirot tries to refuse her commission to "get rid" of her husband. In this adaptation, she is portrayed [[spoiler:(initially, anyway)]] as a sympathetic victim who is forced to silently endure her husband's cruelty, and her asking for Poirot's help comes across more like a desperate plea than a callous demand.



* AdaptationalVillainy: The adaptation of''Literature/TheMurderOnTheLinks'' makes Jack Renaud is selfish, arrogant and an overall unpleasant character. In the novel, Jack loves both of his parents, including his father, despite having frequent rows with the latter; in the adaptation, he outright states that he dislikes Paul (who is turned into his step-father, rather than his biological father). In the novel, when [[spoiler:Bella arrives at his trial to confess to the crime]] he was distraught that his HeroicSacrifice for her was all for nothing, and sent Stonor to stay for her trial to help her defence; in the adaptation, he happily went on to celebrate his acquittal with Marthe, apparently forgetting about Bella.

to:

* AdaptationalVillainy: AdaptationalVillainy:
**
The adaptation of''Literature/TheMurderOnTheLinks'' makes Jack Renaud is selfish, arrogant and an overall unpleasant character. In the novel, Jack loves both of his parents, including his father, despite having frequent rows with the latter; in the adaptation, he outright states that he dislikes Paul (who is turned into his step-father, rather than his biological father). In the novel, when [[spoiler:Bella arrives at his trial to confess to the crime]] he was distraught that his HeroicSacrifice for her was all for nothing, and sent Stonor to stay for her trial to help her defence; in the adaptation, he happily went on to celebrate his acquittal with Marthe, apparently forgetting about Bella.
** In ''Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'', Dr Sheppard comes across as a much less sympathetic character than in the original novel: [[spoiler:his journal entries are entirely callous, his loving relationship with his sister is downplayed]].
** Caroline gets a bit of this in ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' due to the change in [[spoiler:Philip Blake's sexuality. While in the original story he tried to seduce Caroline while her marriage was apparently on the rocks; in the adaptation it was she who tried to seduce him, and then taunted his homosexuality when he refused her, making her come across less sympathetically than she had been in the original novel.]]
** In ''Literature/CatAmongThePigeons'', Miss Springer is a comparatively innocuous character; in the adaptation, she becomes a nasty sadist and an AssholeVictim.



** In ''Literature/CatAmongThePigeons'', Miss Springer is a comparatively innocuous character; in the adaptation, she becomes a nasty sadist and an AssholeVictim.
** Caroline gets a bit of this in ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' due to the change in [[spoiler:Philip Blake's sexuality. While in the original story he tried to seduce Caroline while her marriage was apparently on the rocks; in the adaptation it was she who tried to seduce him, and then taunted his homosexuality when he refused her, making her come across less sympathetically than she had been in the original novel.]]
** In ''Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'', Dr Sheppard comes across as a much less sympathetic character than in the original novel: [[spoiler:his journal entries are entirely callous, his loving relationship with his sister is downplayed]].



* AdaptationDyeJob: In the novel ''Curtain'', Stephen Norton is portrayed as a bird-watcher with [[WhiteHairBlackHeart grayish silver hair]] and a quiet disposition. But here, in this adaptation, he is more like an EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette with raven-black hair.

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* AdaptationDyeJob: In the novel ''Curtain'', Stephen Norton is portrayed as a bird-watcher with [[WhiteHairBlackHeart grayish silver hair]] and a quiet disposition. But here, in this adaptation, he is more like an EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette with raven-black hair.



**In the novel ''Curtain'', Stephen Norton is portrayed as a bird-watcher with [[WhiteHairBlackHeart grayish silver hair]] and a quiet disposition. But here, in this adaptation, he is more like an EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette with raven-black hair.



** ''Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles'' has a minor case, but a plot point in the investigation involves the suspicious manner in which Lawrence insisted that his stepmother's death is natural, and his feeble attempt to suggest that Mrs Inglethorp might have been ''accidentally'' (rather than willfully) administered due to an overdose of her tonic. When Poirot mentions this oddity, Hastings dismissed it as a common layman mistake, until Poirot reminded his friend that while Lawrence is not a doctor, he has a medical degree and is thus qualified as one. While this is true in the books, in the movie, Lawrence ''is'' a medical professional, and he's working in the same hospital as Cynthia.



** ''Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles'' has a minor case, but a plot point in the investigation involves the suspicious manner in which Lawrence insisted that his stepmother's death is natural, and his feeble attempt to suggest that Mrs Inglethorp might have been ''accidentally'' (rather than willfully) administered due to an overdose of her tonic. When Poirot mentions this oddity, Hastings dismissed it as a common layman mistake, until Poirot reminded his friend that while Lawrence is not a doctor, he has a medical degree and is thus qualified as one. While this is true in the books, in the movie, Lawrence ''is'' a medical professional, and he's working in the same hospital as Cynthia.



** The novel ''Three-Act Tragedy'' was a team-up between Poirot and [[Literature/TheMysteriousMrQuin Mr Satterthwaite]], one of Christie's other detectives; the TV adaptation does not have Mr Satterthwaite in it.



** Jeanne Beroldy's rich lover Mr Hiram is omitted from ''Literature/MurderOnTheLinks''. She manipulated George Conneau into murdering her husband to claim his inheritance, whereas in the books she wanted to be "freed" so she can marry Hiram.



** Jeanne Beroldy's rich lover Mr Hiram is omitted from ''Literature/MurderOnTheLinks''. She manipulated George Conneau into murdering her husband to claim his inheritance, whereas in the books she wanted to be "freed" so she can marry Hiram.



** The novel ''Three-Act Tragedy'' was a team-up between Poirot and [[Literature/TheMysteriousMrQuin Mr Satterthwaite]], one of Christie's other detectives; the TV adaptation does not have Mr Satterthwaite in it.



** Despite his PoirotSpeak constantly reminding us that French is his first language, there are times when he interviews other native Francophones in English, e.g. in "Elephants Can Remember" in which there is a lengthy two-hander between Poirot and another native French-speaker ''in Paris'' - and Poirot still lapses into Poirot Speak, thereby destroying the excuse that it could be simple TranslationConvention. Even more noticeable in ‘The Chocolate Box’. The entire story takes place in Brussels, yet everyone only speaks perfect British English, except for Poirot who continues in Poirot Speak.
** Also noticeable at the beginning of ''The Underdog'', in which a letter from a German scientist was written entirely in German, yet his voice is spoken in English, albeit with a German accent.

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** Despite his PoirotSpeak constantly reminding us that French is his first language, there are times when he interviews other native Francophones in English, e.g. in "Elephants Can Remember" in which there is a lengthy two-hander between Poirot and another native French-speaker ''in Paris'' - and Poirot still lapses into Poirot Speak, thereby destroying the excuse that it could be simple TranslationConvention. Even more noticeable in ‘The Chocolate Box’. The entire story takes place in Brussels, yet everyone only speaks perfect British English, except for Poirot who continues in Poirot Speak.
** Also noticeable
Noticeable at the beginning of ''The Underdog'', in which a letter from a German scientist was written entirely in German, yet his voice is spoken in English, albeit with a German accent.



** Despite his PoirotSpeak constantly reminding us that French is his first language, there are times when he interviews other native Francophones in English, e.g. in "Elephants Can Remember" in which there is a lengthy two-hander between Poirot and another native French-speaker ''in Paris'' - and Poirot still lapses into Poirot Speak, thereby destroying the excuse that it could be simple TranslationConvention. Even more noticeable in ‘The Chocolate Box’. The entire story takes place in Brussels, yet everyone only speaks perfect British English, except for Poirot who continues in Poirot Speak.



** CloseupOnHead: Also happens in the same episode from time to time.



* CloseupOnHead: Happens in ''Literature/ThreeActTragedy'' from time to time.



** Ted Horlick from ''Literature/SadCypress'', the gardener who is in love with Mary, corresponds to Ted Bigland, Mary's farmer boyfriend, and Horlick, the gardener who noticed some suspicious activity around the house during the time of murder.
** ''Literature/DeathOnTheNile'' combines the roles of Cornelia Robson and Miss Bowers and gives Fanthorp's role to Ferguson and Marie's to Louise.



** Ted Horlick from ''Sad Cypress'', the gardener who is in love with Mary, corresponds to Ted Bigland, Mary's farmer boyfriend, and Horlick, the gardener who noticed some suspicious activity around the house during the time of murder.



** In ''Literature/SadCypress'', Ted Bigland's character is combined with Horlick the gardener.
** ''Literature/DeathOnTheNile'' combines the roles of Cornelia Robson and Miss Bowers and gives Fanthorp's role to Ferguson and Marie's to Louise.
** Linnet's maids, Marie and Louise, are combined into the same character in both film versions.



* DemotedToExtra: In ''Literature/OneTwoBuckleMyShoe'', Mr Albert Chapman, in the books, is a Secret Service agent whose insights on the political situation and whose theories about what happened to Moley helped Poirot reach the truth. In the TV series, he's just a random civilian whose name was borrowed by the killer in order to [[spoiler:fabricate the persona of Mrs Sylvia Chadman]].

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* DemotedToExtra: DemotedToExtra:
**
In ''Literature/OneTwoBuckleMyShoe'', Mr Albert Chapman, in the books, is a Secret Service agent whose insights on the political situation and whose theories about what happened to Moley helped Poirot reach the truth. In the TV series, he's just a random civilian whose name was borrowed by the killer in order to [[spoiler:fabricate the persona of Mrs Sylvia Chadman]].Chadman]].
** While Inspector Raglan didn't have a particularly huge role in ''Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'' to begin with, his role in the adaptation was sidelined even further in favour of Chief Inspector Japp (who did not appear in the original book).



** One example is Bob, the titular character of ''Dumb Witness'', who sees the motives of the murderer at night and knows what they're up to.
** In ''The Veiled Lady'', just when the search for the two suspects is growing cold, Hastings hears a meow from a random cat, who sneaks in to their hiding place and rubs on them, all the while meowing and purring. It doesn't take long for Hastings, Japp and Poirot to figure out where the suspects are.
** There is also an evil-detecting mouse in ''Hickory Dickory Dock'' which becomes a plot point later on.



** Another Evil-Detecting Dog is Bob, the titular character of ''Dumb Witness'', who sees the motives of the murderer at night and knows what they're up to.
** In ''The Veiled Lady'', just when the search for the two suspects is growing cold, Hastings hears a meow from a random cat, who sneaks in to their hiding place and rubs on them, all the while meowing and purring. It doesn't take long for Hastings, Japp and Poirot to figure out where the suspects are.
** There is also an evil-detecting mouse in ''Hickory Dickory Dock'' which becomes a plot point later on.



* FakingTheDead: [[spoiler:Poirot in ''The Big Four''. This, however, is sadly subverted in ''Curtain''.]]
** Also, in ''The Adventure of the Egyptian Tomb'', [[spoiler:Poirot does it again by pretending to drink the cyanide in the tisane and lying motionless in bed in order for Hastings to lure Dr. Robert Ames into a confrontation with the detective.]]

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* FakingTheDead: [[spoiler:Poirot in ''The Big Four''. This, however, is sadly subverted in ''Curtain''.]]
FakingTheDead:
** Also, in In ''The Adventure of the Egyptian Tomb'', [[spoiler:Poirot does it again by pretending to drink the cyanide in the tisane and lying motionless in bed in order for Hastings to lure Dr. Robert Ames into a confrontation with the detective.]]



** [[spoiler:Poirot in ''The Big Four''. This, however, is sadly subverted in ''Curtain''.]]



** At the beginning of ''Curtain'', we hear Elizabeth Cole play Chopin's "Raindrop Prelude", which both foreshadows and symbolizes [[spoiler:the final confrontation with Norton]].
** There's also backshadowing in that episode: [[spoiler:as Poirot is on his deathbed, he tells Hastings that his final case is ended, then asks him if God will ever forgive Poirot for his deeds, to which Hastings answers yes; as soon as Hastings leaves for the last time, Poirot suffers his final bout of angina, then clasps his rosary and asks God to forgive him. All of these trace back to the outcome of his final confrontation and Norton's final attempt to [[BreakThemByTalking break him by talking]] about his doom by Judgment Day.]]

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** At the beginning of ''Curtain'', we hear Elizabeth Cole play Chopin's "Raindrop Prelude", which both foreshadows and symbolizes [[spoiler:the final confrontation with Norton]].
**
Norton]]. There's also backshadowing in that episode: [[spoiler:as Poirot is on his deathbed, he tells Hastings that his final case is ended, then asks him if God will ever forgive Poirot for his deeds, to which Hastings answers yes; as soon as Hastings leaves for the last time, Poirot suffers his final bout of angina, then clasps his rosary and asks God to forgive him. All of these trace back to the outcome of his final confrontation and Norton's final attempt to [[BreakThemByTalking break him by talking]] about his doom by Judgment Day.]]
23rd Jan '17 2:38:46 PM yisfidri
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Added DiffLines:

* AgeLift: In the original novel of ''Literature/CatAmongThePigeons'', Honoria Bulstrode is already reaching her retirement age. In the adaptation, she's still a relatively young woman who wanted to retire because she no longer felt the challenge and thrills of running a school.
22nd Jan '17 3:50:47 AM yisfidri
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Added DiffLines:

* ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections: While in other versions of ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' Cassetti merely escaped from the law, in this version, he used his mafia and political connections to avoid prosecution.
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