History Series / Poirot

3rd Mar '18 6:17:02 AM moloch
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The ITV series of television adaptations of Creator/AgathaChristie's novels and short stories starring Literature/HerculePoirot. By which we mean it adapts ''all'' of the Poirot novels and short stories. '''''[[LongRunningBookSeries All of them.]]''''' (Black Coffee as a play and later novelization by another writer doesn't count).

The series ran as hour-long episodes on Creator/{{ITV}} (UK) and Creator/{{PBS}} (US) from 1989 to 1993, with sets of feature-length specials running in 1994, 1995, 2000-1, 2003-4, 2005-6, 2008-9, and 2010. The final set of stories was released in 2013, just missing David Suchet's original intention to do all of them before his 65th birthday in May 2011.

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The ITV series of television adaptations of Creator/AgathaChristie's novels and short stories starring Literature/HerculePoirot. By which we mean it adapts ''all'' of the Poirot novels and short stories. '''''[[LongRunningBookSeries All of them.]]''''' (Black Coffee as a play and later novelization by another writer doesn't count).

]]''''' The series ran as hour-long episodes on Creator/{{ITV}} (UK) and Creator/{{PBS}} (US) from 1989 to 1993, with sets of feature-length specials running in 1994, 1995, 2000-1, 2003-4, 2005-6, 2008-9, and 2010. The final set of stories was released in 2013, just missing David Suchet's original intention to do all of them before his 65th birthday in May 2011.


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The only Poirot story they didn't adapt was the play ''Black Coffee'' (later [[{{Novelisation}} novelised]] by another writer, not Christie). In 2012 Suchet performed a rehearsed reading of it in aid of Chichester Festival Theatre's restoration fund, checking the very last Poirot story off his list.
25th Feb '18 1:06:35 AM saltin
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** ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'' replaces the twist ending nature of the book's conclusion with a darker and more misanthropic finale which sours Poirot's dream of retiring peacefully to the countryside as the case proves that evil can exist just about anywhere. Even reading the killer's journal to get a better grasp on how and why the murder happened fails to get him much in the way of closure.
25th Feb '18 12:18:05 AM saltin
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* TheGreatDepression: The stories set during the 1930s put a little more stress on this part of the time period than the books to show why the criminals go to such lengths to swindle grand sums of money.
25th Feb '18 12:10:33 AM saltin
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* IWasQuiteTheLooker: Poirot, Hastings, and Japp are depicted with darker hair, tidier appearances, and leaner builds in ''The Mysterious Affair at Styles,'' their first canonical adventure together that was only adapted after several episodes set during what constitutes their present day.
22nd Feb '18 9:05:25 PM lakingsif
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* BuryYourGays:
** In ''Cards On The Table'' [[spoiler:Rhoda Dawes]] is implied to be a lesbian who possessively loves [[spoiler:her housemate, Anne Meredith.]] When the latter tries to leave to marry someone else, [[spoiler:Rhoda]] attempts to kill [[spoiler:Anne]] in a fit of jealous rage, but it backfires, and she dies instead.
** And in ''Hallowe'en Party'', we learn that [[spoiler:Beatrice White and Elizabeth Whittaker]] were lesbian lovers, but once their relationship was found out, [[spoiler:Beatrice]] drowned herself, leaving [[spoiler:Mrs. Whittaker]] heartbroken and alone.

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* BuryYourGays:
**
BuryYourGays: In ''Cards On The Table'' [[spoiler:Rhoda Dawes]] is implied to be a lesbian who possessively loves [[spoiler:her housemate, Anne Meredith.]] When the latter tries to leave to marry someone else, [[spoiler:Rhoda]] attempts to kill [[spoiler:Anne]] in a fit of jealous rage, but it backfires, and she dies instead.
** And in ''Hallowe'en Party'', we learn that [[spoiler:Beatrice White and Elizabeth Whittaker]] were lesbian lovers, but once their relationship was found out, [[spoiler:Beatrice]] drowned herself, leaving [[spoiler:Mrs. Whittaker]] heartbroken and alone.
instead.


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* GayngstInducedSuicide: In ''[[HalloweenEpisode Hallowe'en Party]]'', we learn that Beatrice White and Elizabeth Whittaker were lesbian lovers, but once their relationship was found out, [[DrivenToSuicide Beatrice drowned herself]], leaving Mrs. Whittaker heartbroken and alone.
22nd Feb '18 7:43:26 PM saltin
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* EatTheDog: Darkly subverted and played for laughs during ''The Disappearance of Mr. Davenheim.'' Poirot is shanghaied into taking care of a parrot for an entire week, one who annoys him sufficiently that he alternatively deigns to train or threaten it depending on his mood. Sufficiently annoyed, he invites Hastings and Japp to a lovely fowl roast dinner, which they proceed to cut up and eat in front of the parrot who spends a great part of their meal shrieking in fearful distress.
12th Feb '18 1:23:37 PM Adept
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* PromotedToLoveInterest: Downplayed in ''Literature/MurderOnTheLinks''; Madame Renaud shares a lot of intimate scenes with Stonor, which did not exist in the original books. Whether those moments are meant to be romantic is not really clear, however.

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* PromotedToLoveInterest: Downplayed in ''Literature/MurderOnTheLinks''; ''Literature/TheMurderOnTheLinks''; Madame Renaud shares a lot of intimate scenes with Stonor, which did not exist in the original books. Whether those moments are meant to be romantic is not really clear, however.
11th Feb '18 12:29:41 PM Adept
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** The changes made to ''Literature/TheClocks'' give a lot more dramatic tension to the story and character arcs. Colin is an emotional wreck because his lover died while fighting off an MI6 mole, and he blamed himself for her death because he had refused her call of help earlier. Sheila does not have an aunt in this continuity. She's an orphan who has lost both her parents ''and'' her adoptive parents, and, in her loneliness, became involved in a love affair with one of her clients. [[spoiler:Her "disgraceful" behaviour is the reason why Miss Martindale decided to frame her for the crime.]] Also, while both versions of the story saw her as the primary suspect of the murder, she was never arrested in the book. Miss Pebmarsh lost two sons (which she does not have in the original novel) during the first World War, and [[spoiler:this was the reason why she became a spy/traitor. She believed that, if Hitler takes over England before Churchill, the second War would be avoided.]] The Waterhouses, originally a pair of wacky siblings, is turned into Jewish refugees who came to England to escape the Nazi regime, but were still forced to hide their identities due to the anti-Semitic discrimination they faced in the new country.

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** The changes made to ''Literature/TheClocks'' give a lot more dramatic tension to the story and character arcs.
***
Colin is an emotional wreck because his lover died while fighting off an MI6 mole, and he blamed himself for her death because he had refused her earlier call of help earlier. help.
***
Sheila does not have an aunt in this continuity. She's an orphan who has had lost both her parents ''and'' her adoptive parents, and, in her loneliness, became involved in a love affair with one of her clients. [[spoiler:Her "disgraceful" behaviour is the reason why Miss Martindale decided to frame her for the crime.]] Also, while both versions of the story saw her as the primary suspect of the murder, she was never arrested in the book.
***
Miss Pebmarsh lost two sons (which she does not have in the original novel) during the first World War, and [[spoiler:this was the reason why she became a spy/traitor. She believed that, if Hitler takes over England before Churchill, the second War would be avoided.]] ]]
***
The Waterhouses, originally a pair of wacky siblings, is turned into Jewish refugees who came to England to escape the Nazi regime, but were still forced to hide their identities due to the anti-Semitic discrimination they faced in the new country.
3rd Jan '18 8:44:48 PM Vilui
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* {{Gayngst}}: Later adaptations (for example, ''Five Little Pigs'', ''Halloween Party'') occasionally add quite angsty storylines about gay characters (that weren't necessarily gay in the original). Since Britain of the 30's wasn't a gay-friendly place by all means, the "angst" part is justified.

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* {{Gayngst}}: Later adaptations (for example, ''Five Little Pigs'', ''Halloween Party'') occasionally add quite angsty storylines about gay characters (that weren't necessarily gay in the original). Since Britain of the 30's 30s wasn't a gay-friendly place by all means, the "angst" part is justified.
24th Dec '17 5:42:12 PM WanderingBrowser
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** In the original novel and most adaptations of the ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' (notably excluding Creator/SidneyLumet's 1974 film), Poirot [[spoiler: rather cavalierly lets the murderers go free]], but in the series version [[spoiler: this is shown as a difficult choice for him to make due to his Catholic beliefs]]. The first ten minutes or so of this particular adaptation come across as a TraumaCongaLine; first, the case in Palestine mentioned in the novel is revealed to Poirot giving one heck of a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech to a British Army officer that it [[DrivenToSuicide makes him shoot himself rather than stand trial]]. Then Poirot and some other characters witness [[TorchesAndPitchforks the public stoning of an adultress]] on the streets of Istanbul.

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** In the original novel and most adaptations of the ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' (notably excluding Creator/SidneyLumet's 1974 film), Poirot [[spoiler: rather cavalierly lets the murderers go free]], but in the series version [[spoiler: this is shown as a difficult choice for him to make due to his Catholic beliefs]]. The first ten minutes or so of this particular adaptation come across as a TraumaCongaLine; first, the case in Palestine mentioned in the novel is revealed to Poirot giving one heck of a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech to a British Army officer that it [[DrivenToSuicide makes him shoot himself rather than stand trial]]. Then Poirot and some other characters witness [[TorchesAndPitchforks the public stoning of an adultress]] on the streets of Istanbul. There are implications that these events are what ultimately convinces him to make the final decision he does.



** In this adaptation of ''Murder on the Orient Express'', [[spoiler:Dr. Constantine becomes one of the murdering conspirators, whereas in the novel he was innocent and could not have been involved in the crime.]]

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** In this adaptation of ''Murder on the Orient Express'', [[spoiler:Dr. Constantine becomes one of the murdering conspirators, whereas in the novel he was innocent and in fact could not have been involved in the crime.]]



%%* AssholeVictim: Miss Grace Springer in ''Cat Among the Pigeons''; Mrs. Clapperton in ''Problem at Sea''; Henry Reedburn in ''The King Of Clubs''; Harrington Pace in ''The Mystery of Hunter's Lodge''; Sir Reuben Astwell in ''The Underdog''; Simeon Lee in ''Hercule Poirot's Christmas''; Paul Renauld in ''Murder on the Links''; Ratchett in ''Murder On The Orient Express''; Lord Edgware of ''Lord Edgware Dies''; Lady Boynton in ''Appointment with Death''; Mme. Giselle in ''Death in the Clouds''; Paul Deroulard in ''The Chocolate Box''; [[spoiler:Stephen Norton]] in ''Curtain''.

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%%* * AssholeVictim: It would prob ably be easier to name the murder victims Poirot encounters who don't fit this trope! But, if you need the specifics: Miss Grace Springer in ''Cat Among the Pigeons''; Mrs. Clapperton in ''Problem at Sea''; Henry Reedburn in ''The King Of Clubs''; Harrington Pace in ''The Mystery of Hunter's Lodge''; Sir Reuben Astwell in ''The Underdog''; Simeon Lee in ''Hercule Poirot's Christmas''; Paul Renauld in ''Murder on the Links''; Ratchett in ''Murder On The Orient Express''; Lord Edgware of ''Lord Edgware Dies''; Lady Boynton in ''Appointment with Death''; Mme. Giselle in ''Death in the Clouds''; Paul Deroulard in ''The Chocolate Box''; [[spoiler:Stephen Norton]] in ''Curtain''.



%%* DramaticSpotlight: [[spoiler:Occurs during the reveal in ''The Big Four''.]]

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%%* * DramaticSpotlight: [[spoiler:Occurs during the reveal in ''The Big Four''.]]



%%* EverybodyLaughsEnding: ''Four and Twenty Blackbirds'', ''Evil Under the Sun''.
%%** In a downplayed example, many of the early episodes end with Poirot smiling in amusement after making one final little joke or revelation to the other characters.

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%%* * EverybodyLaughsEnding: ''Four and Twenty Blackbirds'', Blackbirds'' and ''Evil Under the Sun''.
%%**
Sun'' both end with the surviving cast having a group laugh.
**
In a downplayed example, many of the early episodes end with Poirot smiling in amusement after making one final little joke or revelation to the other characters.



%%* ExoticDetective: Poirot.

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%%* * ExoticDetective: Poirot.Poirot himself, a Belgian detective who tends to work in countries other than Belgium, mostly European and occasionally America. He enjoys deliberately [[FunnyForeigner playing up his exoticness]] as a form of ObfuscatingStupidity, and his nationality is often brought up as an excuse for his strange behavior.



* HeroicSacrifice: [[spoiler:In ''Curtain'', Poirot shoots Norton dead in an effort to save his friend Hastings and many other innocents from becoming victims to his manipulation for them to kill each other... but does so at the cost of his own religious morals, and eventually his own life.]]

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* HeroicSacrifice: [[spoiler:In ''Curtain'', Poirot shoots Norton dead in an effort to save his friend Hastings and many other innocents from becoming victims to his manipulation for them to kill each other... but does so at the cost of his own religious morals, and eventually his own life.life, as he stops taking his medicine and allows his heart to stop in atonement.]]



%%* IllGirl: Barbara Franklin in ''Curtain,'' although the extent of her illness is debatable.

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%%* * IllGirl: Barbara Franklin in ''Curtain,'' although the extent of her illness is debatable.



%%* ImpromptuTracheotomy: [[spoiler:This is how Roger Ackroyd dies in ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd''.]]
%%** In ''Lord Edgware Dies'' [[spoiler:both Lord Edgware and Donald Ross die this way, by Jane Wilkinson's hand.]]
%%* InCaseYouForgotWhoWroteIt: The official title has always been ''Agatha Christie's Poirot'', though it is sometimes shortened for export.
%%* IncurableCoughOfDeath: [[spoiler:Poirot in ''Curtain''. ''Pauvre, pauvre Poirot...'']]

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%%* * ImpromptuTracheotomy: [[spoiler:This is how Roger Ackroyd dies in ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd''.]]
%%** ** In ''Lord Edgware Dies'' [[spoiler:both Lord Edgware and Donald Ross die this way, by Jane Wilkinson's hand.]]
%%* * InCaseYouForgotWhoWroteIt: The official title has always been ''Agatha Christie's Poirot'', in order to remind people who created Poirot, though it is sometimes shortened for export.
%%* * IncurableCoughOfDeath: [[spoiler:Poirot in ''Curtain''.''Curtain'' suffers this, a visible indication of his ultimately fatal heart disease. ''Pauvre, pauvre Poirot...'']]



** While it's largely left open to interpretation, it's implied that this happens to the murderer at the end of ''Murder on the Orient Express'', much like in the novel.
%%* KarmicDeath: The fate of [[spoiler:Sister Agnieszka]] in the desert in ''Appointment with Death''.

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** While it's largely left open to interpretation, it's implied that this happens to the murderer murderers at the end of ''Murder on the Orient Express'', much like in the novel.
%%* * KarmicDeath: The fate of [[spoiler:Sister Agnieszka]] in the desert in ''Appointment with Death''.



** Invoked in ''Murder on the Orient Express'', when Poirot points out that, judging by the angles, some of the stabs on the AssholeVictim were made by right-handed people, and others by left-handed people.



* OrgyOfEvidence: ''Murder on the Orient Express''.

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* OrgyOfEvidence: ''Murder on the Orient Express''. [[spoiler:Invoked, in that the entire cart's worth of passengers is trying to throw off detectives as to the truth.]]



%%* SerialKillingsSpecificTarget: ''The ABC Murders'', ''Three Act Tragedy''

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%%* * SerialKillingsSpecificTarget: ''The ABC Murders'', Murders'' and ''Three Act Tragedy''Tragedy'' both feature a murderer deliberately targeting other people to conceal their true motivations for the one murder that actually mattered to them.



** Poirot at the conclusion of ''Murder On the Orient Express''. At first, he refuses to compromise his principles by allowing the killers to go unpunished and [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech delivers an angry rant]] about how [[SlipperySlopeFallacy taking the law into your own hands will plunge society back to the middle ages]]. To which their only response is, "We tried it your way. The law failed us." With the weight of the entire Armstrong family on his shoulders, Poirot ultimately walks right past the police, letting the perpetrators off the hook.
** Downplayed, though, in that Poirot seems unsure if what he did was "good".

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** Poirot at the conclusion of ''Murder On the Orient Express''. At first, he refuses to compromise his principles by allowing the killers to go unpunished and [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech delivers an angry rant]] about how [[SlipperySlopeFallacy taking the law into your own hands will plunge society back to the middle ages]]. To which their only response is, "We tried it your way. The law failed us." With the weight of the entire Armstrong family on his shoulders, Poirot ultimately walks right past the police, letting the perpetrators off the hook.
**
hook. Downplayed, though, in that Poirot seems unsure if what he did was "good".
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