History Series / Poirot

22nd Sep '17 2:53:13 PM ProfessorGrimm
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The ITV series of television adaptations of Creator/AgathaChristie's novels and short stories starring Literature/HerculePoirot. By which we mean it adapts ''all'' of the Poirot novels and short stories. '''''[[LongRunningBookSeries All of them.]]'''''

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The ITV series of television adaptations of Creator/AgathaChristie's novels and short stories starring Literature/HerculePoirot. By which we mean it adapts ''all'' of the Poirot novels and short stories. '''''[[LongRunningBookSeries All of them.]]'''''
]]''''' (Black Coffee as a play and later novelization by another writer doesn't count).
16th Sep '17 11:36:28 PM cheese4g
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* KarmaHoudini: [[spoiler: Caroline Sheppard]] in ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd''. [[spoiler:She]] hands the murderer a pistol which he uses to attempt to escape Japp and Hercule, but it is implied that [[spoiler:she]] is not arrested for obstruction. [[spoiler:In fact, Poirot explicitly states that James' crimes were kept secret for her sake.]]
** While it's largely left open to interpretation, it's implied that this happens to the murderer at the end of ''Murder on the Orient Express'', much like in the novel.
16th Sep '17 11:28:54 PM cheese4g
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** [[spoiler:Caroline]] in ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'' is another downplayed example. Near the end of the episode [[spoiler:she discovers her brother's journal. While she's clearly shocked by what she reads, she's desperate to keep James from confessing to his crimes and even hands him the gun he uses to attempt his escape from Japp and Poirot]].



** Toward the end of ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'', [[spoiler:Dr. James Sheppard]] refuses to surrender to the police, culminating in a ChaseScene at the factory in which he blindly shoots at Poirot and Japp before deciding to end it all with a shotgun to the head.

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** Toward the end of ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'', [[spoiler:Dr. James Sheppard]] refuses to surrender to the police, culminating in a ChaseScene at the factory in which he blindly shoots at Poirot and Japp before deciding to end it all with a shotgun pistol to the head.
15th Sep '17 4:25:10 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Poirot's personal involvement with the cases is frequently increased by giving him personal connections to the victims or suspects, which were not there in the original novels. For example, in ''Cat among the Pigeons'', he is an old friend of Miss Turnbull. In ''Sad Cypress'', he is well acquainted to Dr Lord.

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** Poirot's personal involvement with the cases is frequently increased by giving him personal connections to the victims or suspects, which were not there in the original novels. For example, in ''Cat among the Pigeons'', he is an old friend of Miss Turnbull. In ''Sad Cypress'', he is well acquainted to Dr Lord. In ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'', he is an old friend of Roger Ackroyd and has invested in his business.
14th Sep '17 11:06:50 PM DoctorNemesis
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** In the adaptation of ''Literature/TheABCMurders'', Hastings arrives in London bringing a preserved crocodile corpse, whom he named "Cedric". He's really proud of his kill, and tries to tell his story of the hunt to whoever is around, but is always interrupted before he can even start. In the last scene, though, he finally got an interested listener in the form of Cust, and Poirot and Japp could quietly slipped away while the two chatted about the crocodile. Especially, the other characters come to dread Hastings' use of the words "

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** In the adaptation of ''Literature/TheABCMurders'', Hastings arrives in London bringing a preserved crocodile corpse, whom he named "Cedric". He's really proud of his kill, and tries to tell his story of the hunt to whoever is around, but is always interrupted before he can even start. In the last scene, though, he finally got an interested listener in the form of Cust, and Poirot and Japp could quietly slipped away while the two chatted about the crocodile. Especially, the other characters come to dread Hastings' use of the words "I shot him on the Orinoko, a few miles upstream from La Urbana..."
24th Aug '17 6:25:51 AM Adept
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24th Aug '17 6:25:46 AM Adept
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** Downplayed with [[TheRival Giraud]] from ''Literature/TheMurderOnTheLinks''. While he is as unpleasant as he was in the books throughout most of the case, by the end of the episode, Giraud finally acknowledges Poirot's skills and the two make amends. In the original story, the two men parted ways still despising each other (even though Giraud had the decency to pay the 500 francs they betted).
24th Aug '17 6:21:43 AM Adept
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* AdaptationalJerkass:
** The adaptation of''Literature/TheMurderOnTheLinks'' makes Jack Renaud is selfish, arrogant and an overall unpleasant character. In the novel, Jack loves both of his parents, including his father, despite having frequent rows with the latter; in the adaptation, he outright states that he dislikes Paul (who is turned into his step-father, rather than his biological father). In the novel, when [[spoiler:Bella arrives at his trial to confess to the crime]] he was distraught that his HeroicSacrifice for her was all for nothing, and sent Stonor to stay for her trial to help her defence; in the adaptation, he happily went on to celebrate his acquittal with Marthe, apparently forgetting about Bella.
** In ''Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'', Dr Sheppard comes across as a much less sympathetic character than in the original novel: [[spoiler:his journal entries are entirely callous, his loving relationship with his sister is downplayed]]. It also doesn't help that the role he played as Poirot's assistant in the narrative is in this version largely taken by Inspector Japp. [[spoiler: Which also means that it's less of a surprise when he turns out to be the killer, as he's now just another suspect.]]
** Caroline gets a bit of this in ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' due to the change in [[spoiler:Philip Blake's sexuality. While in the original story he tried to seduce Caroline while her marriage was apparently on the rocks; in the adaptation it was she who tried to seduce him, and then taunted his homosexuality when he refused her, making her come across less sympathetically than she had been in the original novel.]]
** In ''Literature/CatAmongThePigeons'', Miss Springer is a comparatively innocuous character; in the adaptation, she becomes a nasty sadist and an AssholeVictim.
** Played with in ''Sad Cypress'', in which the angelically sweet and innocent Mary Gerard may or may not be quite as sweet and innocent as she appears [[spoiler: since she's more openly interested in Roddy than she was in the novel and more actively steals him away from Eleanor.]]



** [[spoiler:Dr. Gerard]] in the adaptation of ''Appointment with Death'' is a downplayed case. He's not the killer, but he becomes an accomplice to the murder in the TV series.
** The adaptation of''Literature/TheMurderOnTheLinks'' makes Jack Renaud is selfish, arrogant and an overall unpleasant character. In the novel, Jack loves both of his parents, including his father, despite having frequent rows with the latter; in the adaptation, he outright states that he dislikes Paul (who is turned into his step-father, rather than his biological father). In the novel, when [[spoiler:Bella arrives at his trial to confess to the crime]] he was distraught that his HeroicSacrifice for her was all for nothing, and sent Stonor to stay for her trial to help her defence; in the adaptation, he happily went on to celebrate his acquittal with Marthe, apparently forgetting about Bella.
** In ''Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'', Dr Sheppard comes across as a much less sympathetic character than in the original novel: [[spoiler:his journal entries are entirely callous, his loving relationship with his sister is downplayed]]. It also doesn't help that the role he played as Poirot's assistant in the narrative is in this version largely taken by Inspector Japp. [[spoiler: Which also means that it's less of a surprise when he turns out to be the killer, as he's now just another suspect.]]
** Caroline gets a bit of this in ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' due to the change in [[spoiler:Philip Blake's sexuality. While in the original story he tried to seduce Caroline while her marriage was apparently on the rocks; in the adaptation it was she who tried to seduce him, and then taunted his homosexuality when he refused her, making her come across less sympathetically than she had been in the original novel.]]
** In ''Literature/CatAmongThePigeons'', Miss Springer is a comparatively innocuous character; in the adaptation, she becomes a nasty sadist and an AssholeVictim.

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** [[spoiler:Dr. Gerard]] in the adaptation of ''Appointment with Death'' is a downplayed case. He's not While in the killer, but books he serves as one of Poirot's assistants, he becomes an accomplice to the murder in the TV series.
** The adaptation of''Literature/TheMurderOnTheLinks'' makes Jack Renaud is selfish, arrogant and an overall unpleasant character. In the novel, Jack loves both of his parents, including his father, despite having frequent rows with the latter; in the adaptation, he outright states that he dislikes Paul (who is turned into his step-father, rather than his biological father). In the novel, when [[spoiler:Bella arrives at his trial to confess to the crime]] he was distraught that his HeroicSacrifice for her was all for nothing, and sent Stonor to stay for her trial to help her defence; in the adaptation, he happily went on to celebrate his acquittal with Marthe, apparently forgetting about Bella.
** In ''Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'', Dr Sheppard comes across as a much less sympathetic character than in the original novel: [[spoiler:his journal entries are entirely callous, his loving relationship with his sister is downplayed]]. It also doesn't help that the role he played as Poirot's assistant in the narrative is in this version largely taken by Inspector Japp. [[spoiler: Which also means that it's less of a surprise when he turns out to be the killer, as he's now just another suspect.]]
** Caroline gets a bit of this in ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' due to the change in [[spoiler:Philip Blake's sexuality. While in the original story he tried to seduce Caroline while her marriage was apparently on the rocks; in the adaptation it was she who tried to seduce him, and then taunted his homosexuality when he refused her, making her come across less sympathetically than she had been in the original novel.]]
** In ''Literature/CatAmongThePigeons'', Miss Springer is a comparatively innocuous character; in the adaptation, she becomes a nasty sadist and an AssholeVictim.
series.



** Played with in ''Sad Cypress'', in which the angelically sweet and innocent Mary Gerard may or may not be quite as sweet and innocent as she appears [[spoiler: since she's more openly interested in Roddy than she was in the novel and more actively steals him away from Eleanor.]] Also downplayed, in that the adaptation merely makes her more of a possible BitchInSheepsClothing than an actual villain.
8th Aug '17 2:18:22 AM DoctorNemesis
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* JerkassHasAPoint: In ''Sad Cypress'', Nurse O'Brian is a poisonous FauxAffablyEvil gossip with a seemingly unprovoked malice against Elinor Carlisle. But when Mary Gerard gripes that Elinor didn't seem entirely pleased to be granting Mary a sum of the inheritance that Elinor received from her dead aunt, O'Brian does point out that any hostility on Elinor's part probably has something to do with the fact that Mary basically seduced Elinor's fiancé away from her.

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* JerkassHasAPoint: In ''Sad Cypress'', Nurse O'Brian is a poisonous FauxAffablyEvil gossip with a seemingly unprovoked malice against Elinor Carlisle. But when Mary Gerard gripes that Elinor didn't seem entirely pleased to be granting Mary a sum of the inheritance that Elinor received from her dead aunt, O'Brian does point out that any hostility on Elinor's part probably has something to do with the fact that Mary basically seduced Elinor's fiancé away from her.her, which might also explain why she's not overly thrilled to be giving Mary a huge sum of money on top of it.



** In the adaptation of ''Literature/TheABCMurders'', Hastings arrives in London bringing a preserved crocodile corpse, whom he named "Cedric". He's really proud of his kill, and tries to tell his story of the hunt to whoever is around, but is always interrupted before he can even start. In the last scene, though, he finally got an interested listener in the form of Cust, and Poirot and Japp could quietly slipped away while the two chatted about the crocodile.

to:

** In the adaptation of ''Literature/TheABCMurders'', Hastings arrives in London bringing a preserved crocodile corpse, whom he named "Cedric". He's really proud of his kill, and tries to tell his story of the hunt to whoever is around, but is always interrupted before he can even start. In the last scene, though, he finally got an interested listener in the form of Cust, and Poirot and Japp could quietly slipped away while the two chatted about the crocodile. Especially, the other characters come to dread Hastings' use of the words "
8th Aug '17 1:51:56 AM DoctorNemesis
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* DoubleMeaning: The title of ''The Big Four'' both refers to the "Big Four" criminal conspiracy which drives the events of the novel and to the reunion of Poirot, Hastings, Japp and Miss Lemon, who were the four original main characters of the series.

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* DoubleMeaning: The title of ''The Big Four'' both refers to the "Big Four" criminal conspiracy which drives the events of the novel (and adaptation) and to the reunion of Poirot, Hastings, Japp and Miss Lemon, who were the four original main characters of the series.series and to whom the episode reworks the novel as something of a tribute.
This list shows the last 10 events of 392. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.Poirot