History Series / MissionImpossible

18th Jul '17 8:40:58 AM nightkiller
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* SpottingTheThread: Since many of the team's plans involved some form of elaborate deception, this was a problem that sometimes came up. For instance, one episode centered around tricking a Russian spy that he was in Moscow being tried for treason, but during the trial a chair is knocked over, revealing a manufacturer's label from a Los Angeles furniture company. Of course, in many of the episodes, the team deliberately left loose threads to be spotted as a way of [[KansasCityShuffle tricking their target into thinking that they know what's going on]].

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* SpottingTheThread: Since many of the team's plans involved some form of elaborate deception, this was a problem that sometimes came up. For instance, one episode centered around tricking a Russian Eastern Bloc spy that he was in Moscow his home country being tried for treason, but during the trial a chair is knocked over, revealing a manufacturer's label from a Los Angeles furniture company. Of course, in many of the episodes, the team deliberately left loose threads to be spotted as a way of [[KansasCityShuffle tricking their target into thinking that they know what's going on]].
18th Jul '17 7:56:50 AM nightkiller
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* CovertGroup: The Impossible Mission Force routinely takes on covert operations while shielding Washington from culpability. "Should you or any of your I.M. Force be captured or killed, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions."

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* CovertGroup: The Impossible Mission Force routinely takes on covert operations while shielding Washington from culpability. "Should you or any of your I.M. Force be captured caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions."
18th Jul '17 7:32:18 AM nightkiller
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* BadHabits: In "The Cardinal," the BigBad has taken over a monastery as part of his scheme for power. His soldiers are disguised as monks, and his Major is disguised as a nun.

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* BadHabits: In "The Cardinal," the BigBad has taken over a monastery as part of his scheme for power. His soldiers are disguised as monks, and his pistol-packing Major is disguised as a nun.
22nd May '17 12:40:36 PM Cindylover1969
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* GhostStory: An occasional theme in their {{Gaslighting}} attempts. Played straight (!) in an early episode.

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* GhostStory: An occasional theme in their {{Gaslighting}} attempts. In fact, one episode in even ''called'' "A Ghost Story." Played straight (!) in an early episode.
22nd May '17 12:38:07 PM Cindylover1969
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* KarmicDeath: The villains in "The Bank" and "The Bride" get caught in their own favoured death traps in the climax, which both involve a DisneyVillainDeath... although see MultipleEndings below.

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* KarmicDeath: The villains in "The Bank" and "The Bride" get caught in their own favoured death traps in the climax, which both involve a DisneyVillainDeath... although see MultipleEndings below.Many, many examples ("The Bride", for instance).



* MultipleEndings: [[spoiler: On some prints of "The Bank" (and on the [=DVDs=]) the evil banker finds that his escape route has been bricked up (thanks to Rollin) and thus he's captured. On other prints... well, see KarmicDeath above.]]
27th Mar '17 11:49:25 PM MarkLungo
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* ImprovisedMicrogravityManeuvering" In "Target Earth", Shannon is set adrift in space. Shes uses the purge valve on her spacesuit to bleed air out of her air tanks to propel her back to the shuttle.

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* ImprovisedMicrogravityManeuvering" ImprovisedMicrogravityManeuvering: In "Target Earth", Shannon is set adrift in space. Shes uses the purge valve on her spacesuit to bleed air out of her air tanks to propel her back to the shuttle.



** The '80s revival series notably ''opened'' with a personal mission - Jim is forced out of retirement when [[RememberTheNewGuy his protegé]] is murdered, but getting to the killer, his boss and his boss's employee is still an official IMF mission... at least as official as those missions got. The disc's voice in a variant of it's usual opening, said sympathetically, "Welcome Back Jim, though I wish it weren't under these circumstances."

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** The '80s revival series notably ''opened'' with a personal mission - Jim is forced out of retirement when [[RememberTheNewGuy his protegé]] is murdered, but getting to the killer, his boss and his boss's employee is still an official IMF mission... at least as official as those missions got. The disc's voice in a variant of it's its usual opening, said sympathetically, "Welcome Back Jim, though I wish it weren't under these circumstances."



* KilledOffForReal: Casey Randall in the 1988 series.

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* KilledOffForReal: Casey Randall [[spoiler:Casey Randall]] in the 1988 series.



** Also seen above, when the mark appears to be close to discovering TheMasquerade or something appears to have went wrong, right before a major commercial break.

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** Also seen above, when the mark appears to be close to discovering TheMasquerade or something appears to have went gone wrong, right before a major commercial break.



* TitlePlease: Neither series never displayed the episode titles onscreen, which was atypical for the era when the original show was made.



* UsefulNotes/TheTroubles: In "Banshee", the IMF has to shut down an ArmsDealer who is deliberately inflaming the Troubles in order to sell weapons to both sides.

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* UsefulNotes/TheTroubles: In "Banshee", the IMF has to shut down an ArmsDealer who is deliberately inflaming the Troubles in order to [[WarForFunAndProfit sell weapons to both sides.sides]].
18th Mar '17 4:33:37 AM MarkLungo
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* SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute: There were changes to the team almost every season, with the exception of between Seasons 2 and 3 where stability was maintained. Probably the most clear invoking of this trope was the replacement of Martin Landau's MasterOfDisguise character Rollin Hand with Leonard Nimoy's Master of Disguise character The Great Paris.

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* SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute: There were changes to the team almost every season, with the exception of between Seasons 2 and 3 where stability was maintained. Probably the most clear clearest invoking of this trope was the replacement of Martin Landau's MasterOfDisguise character Rollin Hand with Leonard Nimoy's Master of Disguise character The Great Paris.
18th Mar '17 4:25:33 AM bjex
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* SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute: There were changes to the team almost every season (Along with Willy being repeated switched off with Sam Elliot's character in Season 5), with the exception of between Seasons 2 and 3 where stability was maintained.

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* SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute: There were changes to the team almost every season (Along with Willy being repeated switched off with Sam Elliot's character in Season 5), season, with the exception of between Seasons 2 and 3 where stability was maintained.maintained. Probably the most clear invoking of this trope was the replacement of Martin Landau's MasterOfDisguise character Rollin Hand with Leonard Nimoy's Master of Disguise character The Great Paris.
16th Mar '17 10:49:06 PM bjex
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For the first few years, every episode followed the same outline: First, a prerecorded briefing informs the team leader of the target, what needs to be done to him, and why. Second, the leader assembles his team and the viewer gets to see a selected but [[UnspokenPlanGuarantee mostly uninformative subset of their planning and briefing]]. Thirdly, the mission -- usually a [[TheCaper caper]] or [[TheCon con]] -- is executed, sometimes with real or bogus crises along the way. Finally, the team reassembles in a convenient vehicle and escapes as the target confesses, turns state's evidence, or slowly cools in a spreading pool of blood after [[DoWithHimAsYouWill his own men kill him]]. Later seasons did away with some of the traditions, much to viewer chagrin.

to:

For the first few years, every episode followed the same outline: outline:
*
First, a prerecorded briefing informs the team leader of the target, target(s), what needs to be done to him, him/her/them, and why. why.
*
Second, the leader assembles his team and the viewer gets to see a selected but [[UnspokenPlanGuarantee mostly uninformative subset of their planning and briefing]]. Thirdly, briefing]].
* Third,
the mission -- usually a [[TheCaper caper]] or [[TheCon con]] -- is executed, sometimes with real or bogus crises along the way. This, of course, is what the bulk of the episode consists of.
*
Finally, in the very last scenes, the team reassembles in a convenient vehicle and escapes makes an escape, as the target confesses, target(s) see a massive reversal of fortunes occur - either making an inadvertent confession of his crimes, turns state's evidence, discovers his valuable possessions have disappeared or been destroyed, or slowly cools in a spreading pool of blood after [[DoWithHimAsYouWill his own men kill him]]. Later seasons did away with some of the traditions, much to viewer chagrin.
16th Mar '17 10:30:05 PM bjex
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Martin Landau played Rollin Hand, a MasterOfDisguise, sleight-of-hand, {{card sharp}}ing and many other skills, as a guest star in the pilot, but was so popular with audiences that he became the EnsembleDarkHorse and was called back for virtually every subsequent episode, always billed as a "[[AndStarring special appearance]]." He was made a series regular in season two.

When Hill became increasingly difficult to work with (as one of the few Orthodox Jewish actors in Hollywood, Hill was unwilling to abide by the show's production schedule, as it stipulated that he work on the Sabbath and after sundown of Friday when he was committed to being in prayer. See ''The Complete Mission: Impossible Dossier'' by Patrick White), he was gradually written out of the series; when he was replaced by Creator/PeterGraves as stern-faced Jim Phelps in season two, the classic cast was set. Other cast changes followed; with Landau and Bain leaving at the end of season three, Landau was replaced by Creator/LeonardNimoy, fresh from the recently cancelled ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Star Trek]]'', playing master of disguise The Great Paris, and Bain by an assortment of leading ladies, culminating in Lesley Warren as the waif-like Dana. There was an ill-advised attempt made at writing out Peter Lupus in favor of a medical doctor team member played by a pre-cowboy-stardom Sam Elliott, until the producers realized how popular Willy was. An attempt was eventually made to invigorate the leading lady role by casting Lynda Day George as Casey, who was both the leading lady and the MasterOfDisguise, but by then the series was on its last legs. One final cast tweak in the final season saw George temporarily replaced by ''Series/{{Ironside 1967}}'' veteran Barbara Anderson as ex-convict Mimi while George was on maternity leave.

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\n* Finally, Martin Landau played Rollin Hand, a MasterOfDisguise, sleight-of-hand, {{card sharp}}ing sharp}}, and many other skills, as overall Jack-of-All-Trades. He was a guest star in the pilot, but was he proved so popular with audiences that he became the EnsembleDarkHorse and was called back for virtually every subsequent episode, always billed as a "[[AndStarring special appearance]]." He The billing was made actually by his request - Landau was not quite so convinced that the show had staying power. After the show was renewed for season two, he agreed to be billed as a series regular in season two.

for the rest of his time.

When Hill became increasingly difficult to work with (as one of the few Orthodox Jewish actors in Hollywood, Hill was unwilling to abide by the show's production schedule, as it stipulated that he which required work on the Sabbath and after sundown of Friday when he was committed to being in prayer. See ''The Complete Mission: Impossible Dossier'' by Patrick White), he was gradually written out of the series; when he was replaced by Creator/PeterGraves as stern-faced Jim Phelps in season two, the classic cast was set. Other cast changes followed; with Landau and Bain leaving at the end of season three, Landau was replaced by Creator/LeonardNimoy, fresh from the recently cancelled ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Star Trek]]'', playing master of disguise The Great Paris, and Bain by an assortment of leading ladies, culminating in Lesley Warren as the waif-like Dana. There was an ill-advised attempt made at writing out Peter Lupus in favor of a medical doctor team member played by a pre-cowboy-stardom Sam Elliott, until the producers realized how popular Willy was. An attempt was eventually made to invigorate the leading lady role by casting Lynda Day George as Casey, who was both the leading lady and the MasterOfDisguise, but by then the series was on its last legs. One final cast tweak in the final season saw George temporarily replaced by ''Series/{{Ironside 1967}}'' veteran Barbara Anderson as ex-convict Mimi while George was on maternity leave.



There was a two-season Next Generation-style continuation of the original series filmed in Australia in the [[TheEighties 1980s]]; Peter Graves returned as Jim Phelps, mentoring an all-new team (including Barney Collier's son, Grant); originally conceived as a straight-out remake in order to fill a hole in ABC's schedule created by a Hollywood writer's strike, the series ended up being a continuation of the original (though the strike still forced them to remake a couple of original series episodes), while Greg Morris and Lynda Day George made guest appearances as their original characters. An NES game was also developed.

A successful revival occurred with a ''Film/MissionImpossibleFilmSeries'' starring Creator/TomCruise. The film series differed from its original counterpart with a YoungerAndHipper vibe, a far-smaller IMF team (reflecting the AllStarCast of one that is, apparently, just Tom Cruise), and most especially with a ''big'' boost in action at the expense of strategy (at least after the first film).

A TV series based on the movies is possibly being developed.

to:

There was a two-season Next Generation-style continuation of the original series filmed in Australia in the [[TheEighties 1980s]]; Peter Graves returned as Jim Phelps, mentoring an all-new team (including Barney Collier's son, Grant); Grant, played by Greg Morris's real son, Phil Morris); originally conceived as a straight-out remake in order to fill a hole in ABC's schedule created by a Hollywood writer's strike, the series ended up being a continuation of the original (though the strike still forced them to remake a couple of original series episodes), while Greg Morris and Lynda Day George made guest appearances as their original characters. An A NES game was also developed.

developed based on the revival series.

A successful revival occurred with a the ''Film/MissionImpossibleFilmSeries'' starring Creator/TomCruise. The film series differed from its original counterpart with a YoungerAndHipper vibe, a far-smaller IMF team (reflecting the AllStarCast of one that is, apparently, just Tom Cruise), and most especially with a ''big'' boost in action at the expense of strategy (at least after the first film).

A
film). Rumors of a TV series based on the movies is possibly being developed.
have been bandied about for some time, but ultimately no solid plans for a revival have surfaced.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.MissionImpossible