History Series / MissionImpossible

31st Dec '16 7:59:34 PM ZarbiNerada
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Added DiffLines:

* NothingIsScarier: In one episode, a neo-Nazi banker in East Berlin is pretending to offer defectors a way into West Berlin. What he really does is take their money and send them into a deathtrap. What makes it this trope is that all we hear is a cry and a splash, and have no indication as to whether it's simply a drowning trap or something nastier.
6th Dec '16 5:09:51 AM Morgenthaler
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A successful revival occurred with a ''Film/MissionImpossible'' film series starring Creator/TomCruise. The film series differed from its original counterpart with a YoungerAndHipper vibe, a far-smaller IMF team (reflecting the AllStarCast of one that is, apparently, just Tom Cruise), and most especially with a ''big'' boost in action at the expense of strategy (at least after the first film).

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A successful revival occurred with a ''Film/MissionImpossible'' film series ''Film/MissionImpossibleFilmSeries'' starring Creator/TomCruise. The film series differed from its original counterpart with a YoungerAndHipper vibe, a far-smaller IMF team (reflecting the AllStarCast of one that is, apparently, just Tom Cruise), and most especially with a ''big'' boost in action at the expense of strategy (at least after the first film).
6th Dec '16 5:09:38 AM Morgenthaler
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''Series/MissionImpossible'' was a thinking man's espionage program. Gunplay was kept to a minimum (with a few notable [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness early-series exceptions]] when the series was still finding its rhythm), and the focus was always on outwitting and outmaneuvering the foe, who usually didn't know he was being targeted at all. The IMF were never dispatched for ''ordinary'' tasks that a simple Film/JamesBond type could handle with a couple of explosions and a chase scene - they were called upon to accomplish their goals by outplanning and outthinking their opposition, often by playing mind games with them on such a scale that more than one may have been driven into madness. After the first season IMF operatives rarely killed anybody directly, but their targets didn't always survive as a favored outcome was usually the target being killed by his own organization; one episode established that IMF did not go in for assassinations, however there was nothing saying they couldn't arrange assassination by proxy.

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''Series/MissionImpossible'' ''Mission: Impossible'' was a thinking man's espionage program. Gunplay was kept to a minimum (with a few notable [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness early-series exceptions]] when the series was still finding its rhythm), and the focus was always on outwitting and outmaneuvering the foe, who usually didn't know he was being targeted at all. The IMF were never dispatched for ''ordinary'' tasks that a simple Film/JamesBond type could handle with a couple of explosions and a chase scene - they were called upon to accomplish their goals by outplanning and outthinking their opposition, often by playing mind games with them on such a scale that more than one may have been driven into madness. After the first season IMF operatives rarely killed anybody directly, but their targets didn't always survive as a favored outcome was usually the target being killed by his own organization; one episode established that IMF did not go in for assassinations, however there was nothing saying they couldn't arrange assassination by proxy.
29th Nov '16 7:48:25 PM LarryMullen
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* CaliforniaDoubling: And, in the case of the 80s revival, [[CaliforniaDoubling Australia Doubling]].
** Although the latter averted it in three episodes ("The Cattle King" and the two-parter "The Golden Serpent"), which were set wholly or partly in Australia.
** The episode "Action!" centers on an Eastern European film studio, which is actually Creator/DesiluStudios, where ''Mission: Impossible'' itself was filmed.
** In one season one episode it was literal - the team was trying to trick a Russian spy into believing that the compound they were holding him in outside Los Angeles was actually a KGB facility near Moscow.
24th Nov '16 2:22:29 PM ANTMuddle
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* Greg Morris as Barney Collier, a mechanical and electronic genius and reverse AirVentPassageway escape artist -- the casting of a black actor as this highly accomplished character in 1966 was revolutionary, although the producers insisted race had nothing to do with their decision. [[AbsenteeActor While no one appears in each episode, he appears more often than anyone else.]]

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* Greg Morris as Barney Collier, a mechanical and electronic genius and reverse AirVentPassageway escape artist -- the casting of a black actor as this highly accomplished character in 1966 was revolutionary, although the producers insisted race had nothing to do with their decision. [[AbsenteeActor While no one appears in each episode, he appears more often than anyone else.]]]] Oh, and he was no slouch as a fighter, either.



Martin Landau played Rollin Hand, a MasterOfDisguise, sleight-of-hand, card sharping and many other skills, as a guest star in the pilot, but was so popular with audiences that he became the EnsembleDarkHorse and was called back for virtually every subsequent episode, always billed as a "[[AndStarring special appearance]]." He was made a series regular in season two.

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Martin Landau played Rollin Hand, a MasterOfDisguise, sleight-of-hand, card sharping {{card sharp}}ing and many other skills, as a guest star in the pilot, but was so popular with audiences that he became the EnsembleDarkHorse and was called back for virtually every subsequent episode, always billed as a "[[AndStarring special appearance]]." He was made a series regular in season two.
1st Oct '16 11:34:37 AM Angeldeb82
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All but invented LatexPerfection and the MasterOfDisguise, and originated many of its own unique tropes, not the least of which is its most famous and most parodied elements, "[[ThisPageWillSelfDestruct this tape will self-destruct in five seconds]]" and "if you or any member of your IM force are caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow all knowledge of your actions." Interestingly, early seasons only used the self-destructing tape on occasion, with other methods such as melting vinyl records and hidden recordings being used more frequently. A growing number of episodes as the series went on omitted the tape scenes altogether, sometimes featuring missions joined in progress, or "[[AVerySpecialEpisode personal missions]]" where an IMF member goes off-book.

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All but invented LatexPerfection and the MasterOfDisguise, and originated many of its own unique tropes, not the least of which is its most famous and most parodied elements, "[[ThisPageWillSelfDestruct this tape will self-destruct in five seconds]]" and "if you or any member of your IM force are caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow all knowledge of your actions." Interestingly, early seasons only used the self-destructing tape on occasion, with other methods such as melting vinyl records and hidden recordings being used more frequently. A growing number of episodes as the series went on omitted the tape scenes altogether, sometimes featuring missions joined in progress, or "[[AVerySpecialEpisode "[[VerySpecialEpisode personal missions]]" where an IMF member goes off-book.



* CreepyCrossdresser: The assassin is "The Princess" is [[spoiler:a woman]], thanks to Shannon recognizing "Camion" which is a [[spoiler:French perfume said assassin wore]]. However, in the climactic sequence, [[spoiler:she poses as a man with short slicked-back hair and a tux.]]



* [[AFatherToHisMen A Father To His Team:]] Jim to the 80's IMF team (though more "uncle" to Grant as Barney Collier was still alive). [[spoiler: When Casey died, he said right out, "She was like a daughter to me."]]

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* [[AFatherToHisMen A Father To to His Team:]] Jim to the 80's IMF team (though more "uncle" to Grant as Barney Collier was still alive). [[spoiler: When Casey died, he said right out, "She was like a daughter to me."]]



* TheGeneralissimo: The IMF would occassionally be tasked with dealing with these (or just to undertake a mission in a country ruled by one). In the pilot episode, the team has to retrieve nuclear warheads being held in the hotel the Generalissimo uses as his party headquarters.

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* TheGeneralissimo: The IMF would occassionally occasionally be tasked with dealing with these (or just to undertake a mission in a country ruled by one). In the pilot episode, the team has to retrieve nuclear warheads being held in the hotel the Generalissimo uses as his party headquarters.



* ImpossibleMission: trope-namer.

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* ImpossibleMission: trope-namer.Trope-namer.



* ItsPersonal: A handful of episodes have Briggs or Phelps plotting a plan to right a wrong affecting someone close to them instead of a mission given to them by the Secretary. In one episode Phelps is kidnapped and the team members are blackmailed into helping his kidnapper commit a crime. Arguably the most "personal" of these comes in the '80s version, when [[spoiler: Casey, the new version's initial FemmeFatale, becomes the ''only'' regular in either version to be killed off. Note: not to be confused with Lynda Day George's Casey character from the original series.]] The "it's personal" aspect of the storylines is usually emphasized by there being no tape scene shown.

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* ItsPersonal: A handful of episodes have Briggs or Phelps plotting a plan to right a wrong affecting someone close to them instead of a mission given to them by the Secretary. In one episode Phelps is kidnapped and the team members are blackmailed into helping his kidnapper commit a crime. Arguably the most "personal" of these comes in the '80s version, when [[spoiler: Casey, the new version's initial FemmeFatale, becomes the ''only'' regular in either version to be killed off. Note: not to be confused with Lynda Day George's Casey character from the original series.]] series]]. The "it's personal" aspect of the storylines is usually emphasized by there being no tape scene shown.



* JusticeByOtherLegalMeans: At the end of "The Counterfeiter", the titular villain claims that even with a recording of his EngineeredPublicConfession, the IMF still can't do anything more than slap him with a fine. Then Phelps points out that he didn't just confess to his criminal operations, he also confessed the scope of said operations, which is large enough to sick the [[IntimidatingRevenueService IRS]] on him for tax evasion.

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* JusticeByOtherLegalMeans: At the end of "The Counterfeiter", the titular villain claims that even with a recording of his EngineeredPublicConfession, the IMF still can't do anything more than slap him with a fine. Then Phelps points out that he didn't just confess to his criminal operations, he also confessed the scope of said operations, which is large enough to sick the [[IntimidatingRevenueService IRS]] {{I|ntimidatingRevenueService}}RS on him for tax evasion.



* MissionImpossibleCableDrop: The TropeNamer.

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* MissionImpossibleCableDrop: The TropeNamer.{{Trope Namer|s}}.



* OnceAnEpisode: "This tape will self-destruct in five seconds." (At least, that is the stereotype. In fact there are many episodes in which this is not actually heard, especially in early seasons when another method of messaging is used, or in episodes in which Briggs or Phelps are instructed to destroy the tape themselves.) The 80's revival would have "This disc will self-destruct in five seconds."

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* OnceAnEpisode: OncePerEpisode: "This tape will self-destruct in five seconds." (At least, that is the stereotype. In fact there are many episodes in which this is not actually heard, especially in early seasons when another method of messaging is used, or in episodes in which Briggs or Phelps are instructed to destroy the tape themselves.) The 80's revival would have "This disc will self-destruct in five seconds."



* OneNameOnly: Paris and Casey in the original series; however, due to the presence (and [[spoiler: recent death]]) of another character named Casey in the revival series, when Lynda Day George guest starred as Casey, her character was belatedly given a first name, Lisa.

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* OneNameOnly: OnlyOneName: Paris and Casey in the original series; however, due to the presence (and [[spoiler: recent death]]) of another character named Casey in the revival series, when Lynda Day George guest starred as Casey, her character was belatedly given a first name, Lisa.



* SpecialEffectsFailure: This is done in-universe deliberately in the 88-89 series episode "Submarine". After the IMF team tricks the villian into giving a confession and a computer program they need by making him think he's on a sinking sub, they leave him in there to make his way out of the "sub" alone...with the wind and rain machines and projector off, he gets to see that the sub is in fact a studio set, right before he's arrested.
* SplittingTheArrow: In "The Golden Serpent (Part 1)", the [[BodyguardBabes Bodyguard Babe]] of one of the villains is shown doing this while practicing with her pistol crossbow; to show how deadly she is.

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* SpecialEffectsFailure: SpecialEffectFailure: This is done in-universe deliberately in the 88-89 series episode "Submarine". After the IMF team tricks the villian villain into giving a confession and a computer program they need by making him think he's on a sinking sub, they leave him in there to make his way out of the "sub" alone...with the wind and rain machines and projector off, he gets to see that the sub is in fact a studio set, right before he's arrested.
* SplittingTheArrow: In "The Golden Serpent (Part 1)", the [[BodyguardBabes Bodyguard Babe]] {{Bodyguard Babe|s}} of one of the villains is shown doing this while practicing with her pistol crossbow; crossbow, to show how deadly she is.



* ThisPageWillSelfDestruct: Most probably the TropeMaker, though in some episodes the briefing tape had to be destroyed manually.

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* ThisPageWillSelfDestruct: Most probably the TropeMaker, {{Trope Maker|s}}, though in some episodes the briefing tape had to be destroyed manually.



* {{Tricksters}}

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* {{Tricksters}}TheTrickster



* VillainousCrossdresser: The assassin is "The Princess" is [[spoiler:a woman]], thanks to Shannon recognizing "Camion" which is a [[spoiler:French perfume said assassin wore]]. However, in the climactic sequence, [[spoiler:she poses as a man with short slicked-back hair and a tux.]]



->[[OnceAnEpisode As always]], should you or any of your IM Force be caught or killed, The Secretary will disavow all knowledge of your actions.

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->[[OnceAnEpisode ->[[OncePerEpisode As always]], should you or any of your IM Force be caught or killed, The Secretary will disavow all knowledge of your actions.
21st Sep '16 1:08:50 PM nightkiller
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* SuddenlyAlwaysKnewThat: The team are often revealed to be skilled in something in an episode where they need that skill, after which said skill is never used or brought up again (This generally tended to happen in later episodes - in the early seasons, if the team needed a specialist in some skill the cast regulars didn't have, they'd introduce a guest star who played a specialist in that skill for the episode). Examples include Barney being revealed to have boxed in college when they need to take down a crooked boxing promoter, Willy knowing martial arts when they are up against a man who sponsors martial arts tournaments (Where he still has problems because he's trained in Jujitsu and he has to compete in a Judo match) and Jim being an expert pool player in an episode where they go up against a Syndicate boss who owns a pool parlor. The episode where it makes the most sense is halfway through season six when Willy plays a crooked card dealer in a casino owned by their target - by that point Willy had spent five years working alongside former entertainers Rollin and Paris, and could have easily learned sleight of hand tricks from them.

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* SuddenlyAlwaysKnewThat: The team are often revealed to be skilled in something in an episode where they need that skill, after which said skill is never used or brought up again (This generally tended to happen in later episodes - in the early seasons, if the team needed a specialist in some skill the cast regulars didn't have, they'd introduce a guest star who played a specialist in that skill for the episode). Examples include Barney being revealed to have boxed in college the Navy when they need to take down a crooked boxing promoter, Willy knowing martial arts when they are up against a man who sponsors martial arts tournaments (Where he still has problems because he's trained in Jujitsu and he has to compete in a Judo match) and Jim being an expert pool player in an episode where they go up against a Syndicate boss who owns a pool parlor. The episode where it makes the most sense is halfway through season six when Willy plays a crooked card dealer in a casino owned by their target - by that point Willy had spent five years working alongside former entertainers Rollin and Paris, and could have easily learned sleight of hand tricks from them.
9th Sep '16 11:56:48 PM IuraCivium
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Added DiffLines:

* DeadDrop: Jim Phelps received the information about his missions via this method.
8th Sep '16 6:01:42 PM foxley
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* TrickBullet: In "Gunslinger", Jim uses tranquilizer bullets to allow him to capture the BigBad andTheDragon by staging a ShowdownAtHighNoon.

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* TrickBullet: In "Gunslinger", Jim uses tranquilizer bullets to allow him to capture the BigBad andTheDragon and TheDragon by staging a ShowdownAtHighNoon.
8th Sep '16 6:00:08 PM foxley
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* TrickBullets: In "Gunslinger", Jim uses tranquilizer bullets to allow him to capture the BigBad andTheDragon by staging a ShowdownAtHighNoon.

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* TrickBullets: TrickBullet: In "Gunslinger", Jim uses tranquilizer bullets to allow him to capture the BigBad andTheDragon by staging a ShowdownAtHighNoon.
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