History Series / IClaudius

23rd May '16 4:15:04 PM costanton11
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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, and of course Julius, Claudius, or Caesar, with other recurring names such as Marcus, Lucius, and Agrippa thrown in, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.

to:

* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, and of course Julius, Claudius, or Caesar, with other recurring names such as Marcus, Lucius, and Agrippa thrown in, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina.Agrippina, with a few Octavias and Drusillas as well. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.
22nd May '16 11:00:56 AM costanton11
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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.

to:

* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, and of course Julius, Claudius, or Caesar, with other recurring names such as Marcus, Lucius, and Agrippa thrown in, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.
14th May '16 6:25:22 PM mlsmithca
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-->'''Tiberius:''': Let me go you fat, drunken cow!
-->'''Julia:''': FAT?!

to:

-->'''Tiberius:''': -->'''Tiberius:''' Let me go you fat, drunken cow!
-->'''Julia:''': -->'''Julia:''' FAT?!
2nd May '16 6:14:32 PM costanton11
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Added DiffLines:

** Tiberius' son Drusus is mainly referred to as Castor.
2nd May '16 6:12:47 PM costanton11
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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius or Germanicus, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.

to:

* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.
2nd Apr '16 9:46:32 PM mlsmithca
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** Messalina's reaction to being told she can't see Claudius. Her slow, eye-bulging, 360 look at the soldiers surrounding her is rather expressive.

to:

** Messalina's reaction to being told she can't see Claudius. Her slow, eye-bulging, 360 look at the soldiers surrounding her is rather expressive. She gets a second one shortly afterward when Praetorian guardsman Geta shows up with a warrant for her execution with Claudius' signature on it.
2nd Apr '16 9:38:40 PM mlsmithca
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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: Did all the signs and prophecies mentioned in the series really come true, or were they just coincidences? Did Claudius really see the Sibyl on his deathbed or was it just a DyingDream? Did Herod die a horrible death because he tried to set himself up as a god and the real God struck him down, or was ''that'' just a coincidence? The narrative seems to imply that supernatural forces might have been at work within the story, (and many of the characters were dead certain of it, at least.)

to:

* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: MaybeMagicMaybeMundane:
**
Did all the signs and prophecies mentioned in the series really come true, or were they just coincidences? Did Claudius really see the Sibyl on his deathbed or was it just a DyingDream? Did Herod die a horrible death because he tried to set himself up as a god and the real God struck him down, or was ''that'' just a coincidence? The narrative seems to imply that supernatural forces might have been at work within the story, story (and many of the characters were dead certain of it, at least.) least).



* OhCrap: Several, but extra points to Sejanus' look when Tiberius denounces him in the senate. Also, Messalina's reaction to being told she can't see Claudius. Her slow, eye-bulging, 360 look at the soldiers surrounding her is rather expressive.

to:

* OhCrap: Several, but extra OhCrap:
** Extra
points to Sejanus' look when Tiberius denounces him in the senate. Also, Senate; he assumes that Macro has delivered a proclamation naming him to a position of even more responsibility, and his proud expression gradually gives way to absolute terror as Tiberius' message shifts to observing how terrible it is to have deep trust betrayed.
** At the celebration of Messalina's bigamous marriage to Silius, Mnester is busy joking about seeing a cloud in the shape of Claudius rising over Ostia, until it farts and blows itself out to sea - but his demeanour changes from playful to alarmed in a heartbeat as he announces that he can see a troop of guards marching up the hill toward the villa. Silius bids him welcome them and give them wine, but Mnester says their swords are drawn. A MassOhCrap follows soon after when one of the guests runs in, screaming that Claudius has returned to Rome and the guards have come to arrest them all.
**
Messalina's reaction to being told she can't see Claudius. Her slow, eye-bulging, 360 look at the soldiers surrounding her is rather expressive.



* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius or Germanicus, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful ot to fall into the same trap.
** This is actually TruthInTelevision: In the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where A man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.

to:

* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius or Germanicus, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful ot not to fall into the same trap.
**
trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: In in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where A a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.
20th Mar '16 10:29:53 AM alchixinren
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* SelfDepreciation: There is a lengthy conversation in the first episode about why invading Britain would be trivially easy but not worth it because there's nothing to find there, all spoken in the Queen's English, naturally.

to:

* SelfDepreciation: SelfDeprecation: There is a lengthy conversation in the first episode about why invading Britain would be trivially easy but not worth it because there's nothing to find there, all spoken in the Queen's English, naturally.
20th Mar '16 10:22:55 AM alchixinren
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Added DiffLines:

* SelfDepreciation: There is a lengthy conversation in the first episode about why invading Britain would be trivially easy but not worth it because there's nothing to find there, all spoken in the Queen's English, naturally.
20th Mar '16 9:18:16 AM alchixinren
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Added DiffLines:

* BookEnds: The last episode has a scene almost identical to the symposium which opens the first, with Claudius in Augustus's couch and Britannicus in Marcellus's place, complete with flower crown. Counts as {{foreshadowing}} given Britannicus's fate.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.IClaudius