History Series / IClaudius

9th Sep '16 9:46:13 AM Morgenthaler
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* AncientRome: First century of TheRomanEmpire.

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* AncientRome: First century of TheRomanEmpire.UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire.
21st Jun '16 7:13:40 PM Narsil
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** To Caligula, it's Livia is a case of GrandmaWhatMassiveHotnessYouHave. But it's presented as perversion on his part (one of his many, many perversions).

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** To Caligula, it's Livia is a case of GrandmaWhatMassiveHotnessYouHave. But it's presented as perversion on his part (one of his many, many perversions).
21st Jun '16 7:12:32 PM Narsil
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* IWasQuiteALooker: Livia in "What Shall We Do About Claudius?". She is also a case of GrandmaWhatMassiveHotnessYouHave, as stated by the person she was addressing in the above episode.

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* IWasQuiteALooker: We see [[EvilMatriarch Augustus's wife Livia]] as a middle-aged woman, then an elderly widow, then an unbelievably old crone. But as she comments to Claudius late in life, she was quite a dish in her youth:
-->'''Claudius:''' The most beautiful in the world, they say.\\
'''Livia:''' There was one other. [[UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII But she was in Egypt]]. And besides, she didn't last as long as I have.
** To Caligula, it's
Livia in "What Shall We Do About Claudius?". She is also a case of GrandmaWhatMassiveHotnessYouHave, GrandmaWhatMassiveHotnessYouHave. But it's presented as stated by the person she was addressing in the above episode.perversion on his part (one of his many, many perversions).
6th Jun '16 5:34:08 PM costanton11
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** John Rhys-Davies' character, Macro, plays a key role in the downfall of Sejanus and accession of Caligula, and then disappears without explanation. In the book, Caligula soon got suspicious of him (probably correctly, for once), tricked him into giving up the command of the Praetorian Guard by promising to make him the governor of Egypt instead, and then had him arrested and forced both him and his wife to commit suicide.

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** John Rhys-Davies' character, Macro, plays a key role in the downfall of Sejanus and accession of Caligula, and then disappears without explanation.explanation, although it's implied that he died since Caligula mentioned that he considered giving Cassius his command. In the book, Caligula soon got suspicious of him (probably correctly, for once), tricked him into giving up the command of the Praetorian Guard by promising to make him the governor of Egypt instead, and then had him arrested and forced both him and his wife to commit suicide.
23rd May '16 4:15:04 PM costanton11
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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, and of course Julius, Claudius, or Caesar, with other recurring names such as Marcus, Lucius, and Agrippa thrown in, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.

to:

* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, and of course Julius, Claudius, or Caesar, with other recurring names such as Marcus, Lucius, and Agrippa thrown in, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina.Agrippina, with a few Octavias and Drusillas as well. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.
22nd May '16 11:00:56 AM costanton11
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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.

to:

* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, and of course Julius, Claudius, or Caesar, with other recurring names such as Marcus, Lucius, and Agrippa thrown in, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.
14th May '16 6:25:22 PM mlsmithca
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-->'''Tiberius:''': Let me go you fat, drunken cow!
-->'''Julia:''': FAT?!

to:

-->'''Tiberius:''': -->'''Tiberius:''' Let me go you fat, drunken cow!
-->'''Julia:''': -->'''Julia:''' FAT?!
2nd May '16 6:14:32 PM costanton11
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Added DiffLines:

** Tiberius' son Drusus is mainly referred to as Castor.
2nd May '16 6:12:47 PM costanton11
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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius or Germanicus, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.

to:

* OneSteveLimit: Averted. Pretty much all men in the series bear one or more of the names Tiberius, Nero, Gaius Gaius, Drusus, or Germanicus, while many of the women are some variant of Julia, Livia or Agrippina. It's discussed in the novel, where Claudius muses on how much his own historical research has been hampered by the inability of earlier authors to keep their Steves separated and distinct, and that he'll have to be careful not to fall into the same trap. This is actually TruthInTelevision: in the upper crust of Roman society, the variety of first names for men was quite limited, and for women even more limited. A given ''gens'' (clan, more or less) would often recycle anywhere from two to six given names and certain variations on them, to the point where a man named Quintus, say, might have three sons named Quintus distinguished by different middle names or epithets like "Elder", "Younger", "the Tall", "The Dark", etc.
2nd Apr '16 9:46:32 PM mlsmithca
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** Messalina's reaction to being told she can't see Claudius. Her slow, eye-bulging, 360 look at the soldiers surrounding her is rather expressive.

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** Messalina's reaction to being told she can't see Claudius. Her slow, eye-bulging, 360 look at the soldiers surrounding her is rather expressive. She gets a second one shortly afterward when Praetorian guardsman Geta shows up with a warrant for her execution with Claudius' signature on it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.IClaudius