History Series / Elementary

7th Feb '16 4:20:19 PM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* HollywoodLaw: A pretty severe one, given the premise of the show. Sherlock and Joan are often shown questioning witnesses/suspects without police presence or permission, entering and searching private property on their own without a search warrant, plus sometimes Sherlock collects evidence from crime scenes for his own personal use. It's difficult to understate what a ''huge'' no-no this is in criminal investigations. In the real world the defense attorneys for the criminals Sherlock captures would have a field day with this, and Sherlock himself would be under arrest, not to mention no longer consulting with police.
to:
* HollywoodLaw: A pretty severe one, given the premise of the show. Sherlock and Joan are often shown questioning witnesses/suspects without police presence or permission, entering and searching private property on their own without a search warrant, plus sometimes Sherlock collects evidence from crime scenes for his own personal use. It's difficult to understate what a ''huge'' huge no-no this is in criminal investigations. In the real world the defense attorneys for the criminals Sherlock captures would have a field day with this, these criminals would have all had mistrials, and Sherlock himself would be under arrest, not to mention no longer consulting with police.
3rd Feb '16 5:49:00 PM jcast
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* DumbassHasAPoint: The term "dumbass" should be very loosely on this show. On several occasions, Holmes has laid into detectives who have incorrectly analyzed cases. The thing is that these detectives are making ''perfectly reasonable assumptions'' based on the evidence available. Their only fault is that they don't have Sherlock's powers of deduction or his almost ridiculously large knowledge base.
2nd Feb '16 1:13:17 PM gallium
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* BikiniBar: In "Murder Ex Machina" Sherlock follows a lead to the standard kind of network TV strip club in which all the strippers are oddly overdressed. Somewhat averted, as the stripper he's come to interview is in the process of unhooking her bra when he tells her to stop.
29th Jan '16 10:07:16 AM MarkLungo
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** In "Bella", the [[CharacterTitle titular character]] is an AI under investigation for murder, and the B-plot involves a GentlemanThief who's been hired by a technology firm to steal it. Add some vans loaded with explosives and it could be a TabletopGaming/ShadowRun adventure.
to:
** In "Bella", the [[CharacterTitle titular character]] is an AI under investigation for murder, and the B-plot involves a GentlemanThief who's been hired by a technology firm to steal it. Add some vans loaded with explosives and it could be a TabletopGaming/ShadowRun ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' adventure.
29th Jan '16 10:06:15 AM MarkLungo
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** "Alma Matters" provides yet another example. [[spoiler:William Trager runs Fairbanks University, a for-profit private college that saddles its disadvantaged students with crushing debts without really helping them. Even worse, Trager sometimes recruits particularly desperate ex-con students to commit crimes for him, including murder, in exchange for the debts being forgiven. In one case, a student is forced to confess to a murder he didn't commit.]]
28th Jan '16 8:10:19 PM Rebu
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** Sherlock and Joan are frequently shown actually maintaining their broad array of skills and knowledge and spending hours sifting through lots of evidence looking for vital clues.
15th Jan '16 12:14:18 PM MarkLungo
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* InTheBlood: This is the motive between the murder in "A Burden of Blood." [[spoiler:A SerialKiller's two children agree never to have biological children. The sister accidentally gets pregnant and decides to keep the baby, leading her brother to kill her for breaking the deal.]]
9th Jan '16 6:36:44 AM starjammer05
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* ArtisticLicenseBiology: In "Miss Taken" the impostor "Cassie" obtains Mina Davenport's DNA by shaving her hair and using it as a prop. But hair doesn't contain DNA, it's made of strands of protein. Only the follicular tags on the end of a hair have DNA (because they're skin cells) and those only come from hairs that fall out or are pulled out, not cut.
7th Jan '16 9:56:04 PM reub2000
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* ConsummateLiar: Cassie from "Miss Taken". [[spoiler: She pretends to be a couple's long lost daughter.]] So good that only Sherlock is able to unravel the lies. Even then people have a hard time disbelieving her. When confronted with these lies [[spoiler:she hardly breaks a sweat and creates a new story that explains why she lied in the first place while taking the blame off herself.]]
7th Jan '16 9:04:41 PM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* HollywoodLaw: A pretty severe one, given the premise of the show. Sherlock and Joan are often shown questioning witnesses/suspects without police presence or permission, entering and searching private property on their own, and sometimes Sherlock collects evidence from crime scenes for his own personal use. It's difficult to understate what a ''huge'' no-no this is in criminal investigations. In the real world the defense attorneys for the criminals Sherlock captures would have a field day with this, and Sherlock himself would be under arrest. ** Eventually comes up and is very, very thinly masked with BlatantLies by Sherlock (eg claiming that locked doors were 'just open').
to:
* HollywoodLaw: A pretty severe one, given the premise of the show. Sherlock and Joan are often shown questioning witnesses/suspects without police presence or permission, entering and searching private property on their own, and own without a search warrant, plus sometimes Sherlock collects evidence from crime scenes for his own personal use. It's difficult to understate what a ''huge'' no-no this is in criminal investigations. In the real world the defense attorneys for the criminals Sherlock captures would have a field day with this, and Sherlock himself would be under arrest. arrest, not to mention no longer consulting with police. ** Eventually this comes up and is very, very thinly masked with BlatantLies by Sherlock (eg (e.g. claiming that locked doors were 'just open')."just open").
This list shows the last 10 events of 1185. Show all.