History Series / DealOrNoDeal

27th Mar '16 7:13:36 AM Kitch
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* RecycledSoundtrack: The US version has an identical theme music to ''Series/DogEatDog''.



* ShoutOut: The title music for the US version is derived from the theme music of ''Series/DogEatDog'', which also appeared on NBC in the States.

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* ShoutOut: The title music for the US version [[RecycledSoundtrack is derived from the theme music of of]] ''Series/DogEatDog'', which also appeared on NBC in the States.
27th Mar '16 7:12:14 AM Kitch
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Added DiffLines:

* RecycledSoundtrack: The US version has an identical theme music to ''Series/DogEatDog''.
11th Mar '16 3:33:20 AM Gimere
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(* In the Rockin' 80's special of January 2008: $1 was replaced by a scrunchy, $5 was replaced by hairspray, $10 was replaced by leg warmers, and $25 was replaced by a boom box.

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(* ** In the Rockin' 80's special of January 2008: $1 was replaced by a scrunchy, $5 was replaced by hairspray, $10 was replaced by leg warmers, and $25 was replaced by a boom box.
11th Mar '16 3:32:42 AM Gimere
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* {{Zonk}}: What happens when you knock out the big prizes early in the game.
** The Christmas 2007 episode featured gag prizes in lieu of certain small amounts. The case usually reserved for 1¢ contained a "Lump Of Coal", for example.

to:

* {{Zonk}}: {{Zonk}}:
**
What happens when you knock out the big prizes early in the game.
** For the Thanksgiving specials and Christmas, $10 was replaced by a pumpkin pie and $25 by a turkey. The doubled suitcase top prize had a stuffed turkey inside as a humorous touch for the winner that never was.
** In another special, they added gravy, which replaced $.01, cranberry sauce, which replaced $1, and stuffing, which replaced $5.
** On a
Christmas 2007 episode featured gag prizes special in lieu 2007, $1 was replaced by coal, $5 was replaced by eggnog, and $10 was replaced by fruitcake.
(* In the Rockin' 80's special
of certain small amounts. The case usually reserved for 1¢ contained January 2008: $1 was replaced by a "Lump Of Coal", for example.scrunchy, $5 was replaced by hairspray, $10 was replaced by leg warmers, and $25 was replaced by a boom box.
** Subverted when a real prize was in play was on the January 14th, 2008 edition airing-a truck replaced the $50,000 spot.



** Contestant Mark on the UK version managed to set an impossibly low record during the Gold Medal Deal week, which was held in honor of the [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames London 2012 Olympic Games]]. The week featured a NintendoHard Catapult game when there were 5 boxes left, and one of the prizes was an all-expenses-paid holiday. When Mark managed to knock down all the highest amounts from the board and failed the catapult game (like everyone else that week), he was down to two boxes, £50 and £500. Possibly in an attempt to throw the poor guy a bone, the Banker said that if he had the box with £500 in it, he would also throw in the holiday that nobody had been able to win, under the condition that if the box contained the £50, he would walk away with nothing at all. Mark accepted, and... his box had £50. Meaning that Mark was the first person in any Deal ever to walk away without even a single penny. Everyone was in tears, and Noel stated that it was unquestionably the unluckiest game of Deal ever. Three or four other contestants have taken similar offers from the Banker, failed, and walked away penniless, but considering he knocked out 10 of the reds save for the £5,000 in his first 11 boxes and never got an offer above £199, he still easily holds the title of unluckiest DoND contestant ever.

to:

** Contestant Mark on the UK version managed to set an impossibly low record during the Gold Medal Deal week, which was held in honor of the [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames London 2012 Olympic Games]]. The week featured a NintendoHard Catapult game when there were 5 boxes left, and one of the prizes was an all-expenses-paid holiday. When Mark managed to knock down all the highest amounts from the board and failed the catapult game (like everyone else that week), he was down to two boxes, £50 and £500. Possibly in an attempt to throw the poor guy a bone, the Banker said that if he had the box with £500 in it, he would also throw in the holiday that nobody had been able to win, under the condition that if the box contained the £50, he would walk away with nothing at all. Mark accepted, and... his box had £50. Meaning that Mark was the first person in any Deal ever to walk away without even a single penny. Everyone was in tears, and Noel stated that it was unquestionably the unluckiest game of Deal ever. Three or four other contestants have taken similar offers from the Banker, failed, and walked away penniless, but considering he knocked out 10 of the reds save for the £5,000 in his first 11 boxes and never got an offer above £199, he still easily holds the title of unluckiest DoND [=DoND=] contestant ever.



** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWjwWkVfXjc This player]] from the early Australian episodes (the ones with the $2,000,000 top prize) knocked out the top three amounts in her first three picks ($1M, $2M, $500K). By the "final six", the remaining cases were 25¢, 50¢, $5, $25, $250, and $100K, with a $24,500 offer from the Bank. Her father suggested she open one more case, which she did, and I'd give you three guesses as to what her next pick contained, but you'll only need one.[[note]](For the record, she ended up leaving with $25.)[[/note]]

to:

** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWjwWkVfXjc This player]] from the early Australian episodes (the ones with the $2,000,000 top prize) knocked out the top three amounts in her first three picks ($1M, $2M, $500K). By the "final six", the remaining cases were 25¢, 50¢, $5, $25, $250, and $100K, with a $24,500 offer from the Bank. Her father suggested she open one more case, which she did, and I'd did. We'd give you three guesses as to what her next pick contained, but you'll only need one.[[note]](For the record, she ended up leaving with $25.)[[/note]]



* {{Filler}}: The NBC run had two-hour episodes during sweeps consisting of '''one game''' with so much filler (celebrity cameos, gimmick-deals the contestant would never take, lengthened pauses, even field pieces!) that it was obviously done to keep NBC from airing a bomb drama or sitcom. Unfortunately, they ended up airing a bomb game show, instead.
* FollowTheLeader: A self-inflicted example. Endemol gave Creator/{{ABC}} a big-money, luck-based "pick the object" game called ''Series/SetForLife'' in Summer 2007. It was terrible and got canned after seven episodes.

to:

* {{Filler}}: The NBC run had two-hour episodes during sweeps consisting of '''one game''' with so much filler (celebrity cameos, gimmick-deals the contestant would never take, lengthened pauses, even field pieces!) that it was obviously done to keep NBC from airing a bomb drama or sitcom. Unfortunately, they ended up airing a bomb game show, instead.
* FollowTheLeader: A self-inflicted example. Endemol gave Creator/{{ABC}} a big-money, luck-based "pick the object" game called ''Series/SetForLife'' in Summer 2007. It was terrible and got canned after seven episodes.
show instead.



* {{Zonk}}: In the US version, for the Thanksgiving specials and Christmas. $10 was replaced by a pumpkin pie and $25 by a turkey. The doubled suitcase top prize had a stuffed turkey inside as a humorous touch for the winner that never was. In another special, they added gravy, which replaced $.01, cranberry sauce, which replaced $1, and stuffing, which replaced $5. On a Christmas special in 2007, $1 was replaced by coal, $5 was replaced by eggnog, and $10 was replaced by fruitcake. Gag prizes showed up in the Rockin' 80's special of January 2008: $1 was replaced by a scrunchy, $5 was replaced by hairspray, $10 was replaced by leg warmers, and $25 was replaced by a boom box. Subverted when a real prize was in play was on the January 14th, 2008 edition airing- where a truck replaced the $50,000 spot.
7th Jan '16 5:13:44 PM Gimere
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* CarriedByTheHost: Well, maybe more by the ladies, but Howie defined the show for Americans.

to:

* CarriedByTheHost: CarriedByTheHost:
**
Well, maybe more by the ladies, but Howie defined the show for Americans.



* CelebrityEdition: The Australian version has special weeks where ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'' contestants play for home viewers. One of them, Anh Do, actually became the series' second top prize winner (though technically, it was the home viewer he was playing for who won that money).

to:

* CelebrityEdition: CelebrityEdition:
**
The Australian version has special weeks where ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'' contestants play for home viewers. One of them, Anh Do, actually became the series' second top prize winner (though technically, it was the home viewer he was playing for who won that money).



* LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened: Even when a contestant takes a deal, the rest of the game was played out as if s/he hadn't. It was a really painful experience if the contestant had the top amount in their suitcase. Especially annoying on NBC, which sometimes stretched it out ''over two or more segments''.

to:

* LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened: LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened:
**
Even when a contestant takes a deal, the rest of the game was played out as if s/he (s)he hadn't. It was a really painful experience if the contestant had the top amount in their suitcase. Especially annoying on NBC, which sometimes stretched it out ''over two or more segments''.






* ArtisticLicenseEconomics: The banker tends to offer better deals for higher-risk investments, the opposite of a real-life economist. For example, if there are two cases left worth $30 000 and $50 000, he might offer $37 000, while if the two cases are worth $1 and $1 000 000, he might offer $500 000, or even $550 000. Justified for making the choice more suspenseful from the player\audience's point of view.

to:

* ArtisticLicenseEconomics: The banker tends to offer better deals for higher-risk investments, the opposite of a real-life economist. For example, if there are two cases left worth $30 000 $30,000 and $50 000, $50,000, he might offer $37 000, $37,000, while if the two cases are worth $1 and $1 000 000, $1,000,000, he might offer $500 000, $500,000, or even $550 000. $550,000. Justified for making the choice more suspenseful from the player\audience's player/audience's point of view.



* {{Filler}}: The NBC run had two-hour episodes during sweeps consisting of '''one game''' with so much filler (celebrity cameos, gimmick-deals the contestant would never take, lengthened pauses, even field pieces!) that it was obviously done to keep NBC from airing a bomb drama or sitcom. [[HilariousInHindsight They ended up airing a bomb game show, instead.]]

to:

* {{Filler}}: The NBC run had two-hour episodes during sweeps consisting of '''one game''' with so much filler (celebrity cameos, gimmick-deals the contestant would never take, lengthened pauses, even field pieces!) that it was obviously done to keep NBC from airing a bomb drama or sitcom. [[HilariousInHindsight They Unfortunately, they ended up airing a bomb game show, instead.]]



* {{Jerkass}}: The Banker in the American version usually insulted players (through Howie on the phone) if said contestants did or said something funny or obnoxious. One of the last NBC-era contestants was a math teacher trying to figure out what the Banker's first offer would be, which made the Banker flash the studio lights with a sound clip saying "Nerd alert!" The Banker then stuck it to him by making the offer a measly $3 for trying to do the Banker's job.

to:

* {{Jerkass}}: {{Jerkass}}:
**
The Banker in the American version usually insulted players (through Howie on the phone) if said contestants did or said something funny or obnoxious. One of the last NBC-era contestants was a math teacher trying to figure out what the Banker's first offer would be, which made the Banker flash the studio lights with a sound clip saying "Nerd alert!" The Banker then stuck it to him by making the offer a measly $3 for trying to do the Banker's job.



* PetTheDog: One contestant on the British version really needed money, but made some bad decisions and was left with a pitiful amount. He was so obviously distressed that the Banker phoned up again and [[HeartwarmingMoment offered to buy the mug he'd been drinking from for a ridiculously-high sum]].

to:

* PetTheDog: One contestant on the British version really needed money, but made some bad decisions and was left with a pitiful amount. He was so obviously distressed that the Banker phoned up again and [[HeartwarmingMoment offered to buy the mug he'd been drinking from for a ridiculously-high sum]].sum.



* SomethingCompletelyDifferent

to:

* SomethingCompletelyDifferentSomethingCompletelyDifferent:
23rd Oct '15 8:42:19 PM Gimere
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** AdaptationDistillation: The Miljoenenjacht format (quiz and all) did get exported to Belgium, but must of the international versions since either downsized the quiz portion into something more akin to the Fastest Finger rounds from ''WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', or dropped the quiz entirely and either picked a contestant randomly from a pool of contestants on-stage (like most European versions and the U.S. syndicated run), or just used a contestant pre-determined before the show (like the U.S. primetime version).

to:

** AdaptationDistillation: The Miljoenenjacht format (quiz and all) did get exported to Belgium, but must of the international versions since either downsized the quiz portion into something more akin to the Fastest Finger rounds from ''WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', or dropped the quiz entirely and either picked a contestant randomly from a pool of contestants on-stage (like most European versions and the U.S. syndicated run), or just used a contestant pre-determined before the show (like the U.S. primetime version).
20th Oct '15 4:05:03 PM moogal
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*** Not only that, but to celebrate 10 years of DOND in the UK, there was a very special edition where the 22 box holders were previous contestants. And the contestant taking part? [[spoiler:None other than Noel Edmonds himself, with Sarah Milligan, also a former contestant, as the [[SpecialGuest Special Guest Host]]!]]

to:

*** Not only that, but to celebrate 10 years of DOND in the UK, there was a very special edition where the 22 box holders were previous contestants. And the contestant taking part? [[spoiler:None other than Noel Edmonds himself, with Sarah Milligan, Millican, also a former contestant, as the [[SpecialGuest Special Guest Host]]!]]
26th Sep '15 3:49:06 PM nombretomado
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** Contestant Mark on the UK version managed to set an impossibly low record during the Gold Medal Deal week, which was held in honor of the [[OlympicGames London 2012 Olympic Games]]. The week featured a NintendoHard Catapult game when there were 5 boxes left, and one of the prizes was an all-expenses-paid holiday. When Mark managed to knock down all the highest amounts from the board and failed the catapult game (like everyone else that week), he was down to two boxes, £50 and £500. Possibly in an attempt to throw the poor guy a bone, the Banker said that if he had the box with £500 in it, he would also throw in the holiday that nobody had been able to win, under the condition that if the box contained the £50, he would walk away with nothing at all. Mark accepted, and... his box had £50. Meaning that Mark was the first person in any Deal ever to walk away without even a single penny. Everyone was in tears, and Noel stated that it was unquestionably the unluckiest game of Deal ever. Three or four other contestants have taken similar offers from the Banker, failed, and walked away penniless, but considering he knocked out 10 of the reds save for the £5,000 in his first 11 boxes and never got an offer above £199, he still easily holds the title of unluckiest DoND contestant ever.

to:

** Contestant Mark on the UK version managed to set an impossibly low record during the Gold Medal Deal week, which was held in honor of the [[OlympicGames [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames London 2012 Olympic Games]]. The week featured a NintendoHard Catapult game when there were 5 boxes left, and one of the prizes was an all-expenses-paid holiday. When Mark managed to knock down all the highest amounts from the board and failed the catapult game (like everyone else that week), he was down to two boxes, £50 and £500. Possibly in an attempt to throw the poor guy a bone, the Banker said that if he had the box with £500 in it, he would also throw in the holiday that nobody had been able to win, under the condition that if the box contained the £50, he would walk away with nothing at all. Mark accepted, and... his box had £50. Meaning that Mark was the first person in any Deal ever to walk away without even a single penny. Everyone was in tears, and Noel stated that it was unquestionably the unluckiest game of Deal ever. Three or four other contestants have taken similar offers from the Banker, failed, and walked away penniless, but considering he knocked out 10 of the reds save for the £5,000 in his first 11 boxes and never got an offer above £199, he still easily holds the title of unluckiest DoND contestant ever.
19th Sep '15 12:38:34 AM auroVee
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Added DiffLines:

*** Not only that, but to celebrate 10 years of DOND in the UK, there was a very special edition where the 22 box holders were previous contestants. And the contestant taking part? [[spoiler:None other than Noel Edmonds himself, with Sarah Milligan, also a former contestant, as the [[SpecialGuest Special Guest Host]]!]]
27th Jun '15 11:53:19 AM Gimere
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A popular GameShow; the format itself originated as the BonusRound of a game show for the Netherlands' Postcode Lottery known as ''Miljoenenjacht'', but soon took a life of its own as a stand-alone game worldwide. The American version achieved near-instant popularity after its debut on Creator/{{NBC}} in December 2005, while other versions which some have compared to the Geoff Edwards versions of ''[[TreasureHuntUS Treasure Hunt]]'' air pretty much everywhere.

to:

A popular GameShow; the format itself originated as the BonusRound of a game show for the Netherlands' Postcode Lottery known as ''Miljoenenjacht'', but soon took a life of its own as a stand-alone game worldwide. The American version achieved near-instant popularity after its debut on Creator/{{NBC}} in December 2005, while other versions which some have compared to the Geoff Edwards versions of ''[[TreasureHuntUS ''[[Series/TreasureHuntUS Treasure Hunt]]'' air pretty much everywhere.



* CelebrityEdition: The Australian version has special weeks where ''DancingWithTheStars'' contestants play for home viewers. One of them, Anh Do, actually became the series' second top prize winner (though technically, it was the home viewer he was playing for who won that money).

to:

* CelebrityEdition: The Australian version has special weeks where ''DancingWithTheStars'' ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'' contestants play for home viewers. One of them, Anh Do, actually became the series' second top prize winner (though technically, it was the home viewer he was playing for who won that money).



* AdaptationExpansion: As mentioned before, the game itself began as the bonus round of a Endemol-produced lottery game show in the Netherlands known as ''Miljoenenjacht'' (hosted by Linda de Mol, the sister of Endemol co-founder John de Mol). Basically, an audience of 500 contestants, divided into 10 sections, played a multi-stage elimination quiz (first going between the two halves of the studio as teams, then by the five sections within, then through the people in the section, with some ''LetsMakeADeal'' style bail-out offers and other things here and there too, etc). The single remaining contestant then played ''Deal'' as we know it. The show previously used a trivia-based bonus round where correct answers to seven multiple-choice questions added zeros to their prize (similarly to ''ThePriceIsRight'''s Grand Game) with a top prize of 10,000,000 guilder) before switching to the briefcase game shortly after the official adoption of the Euro currency.

to:

* AdaptationExpansion: As mentioned before, the game itself began as the bonus round of a Endemol-produced lottery game show in the Netherlands known as ''Miljoenenjacht'' (hosted by Linda de Mol, the sister of Endemol co-founder John de Mol). Basically, an audience of 500 contestants, divided into 10 sections, played a multi-stage elimination quiz (first going between the two halves of the studio as teams, then by the five sections within, then through the people in the section, with some ''LetsMakeADeal'' ''Series/LetsMakeADeal'' style bail-out offers and other things here and there too, etc). The single remaining contestant then played ''Deal'' as we know it. The show previously used a trivia-based bonus round where correct answers to seven multiple-choice questions added zeros to their prize (similarly to ''ThePriceIsRight'''s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'''s Grand Game) with a top prize of 10,000,000 guilder) before switching to the briefcase game shortly after the official adoption of the Euro currency.
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