History Series / CriminalMinds

17th Sep '17 12:41:53 AM OperativeBluebird
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* ArtShift: In "True Night", the [=UnSub=] was a comic artist who unknowingly acted out scenes from his own violent comics by murdering gang members. The audience knows in real life, he wears a hooded sweatshirt, but while "on camera" within his delusion, he's wearing a hooded BadassLongcoat that seems to come standard issue from [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII Organization XIII]], wielding a pair of scimitars. He moves in slow motion, smooth techno music in the background. The entire scenes are in highly contrasted black and white, with highly sharpened raindrops and super slo-mo splashes when he steps in a puddle or slashes one of the "werewolves" he's fighting, with occasional bright splashes of blue or red. The entire style is deliberately evocative of something directed by Creator/FrankMiller, like the film versions of ''Film/TheSpirit'' or SinCity. Which makes it FridgeBrilliance for those familiar with those movies, as both Frank Miller and the [=UnSub=] (in-universe) are both highly successful and revolutionary comic authors.
** Less fridge when you watch the epilogue of that story and Garcia actually compares the [=UnSub=] to Creator/FrankMiller.

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* ArtShift: In "True Night", the [=UnSub=] was a comic artist who unknowingly acted out scenes from his own violent comics by murdering gang members. The audience knows in real life, he wears a hooded sweatshirt, but while "on camera" within his delusion, he's wearing a hooded BadassLongcoat that seems to come standard issue from [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII Organization XIII]], wielding a pair of scimitars. He moves in slow motion, smooth techno music in the background. The entire scenes are in highly contrasted black and white, with highly sharpened raindrops and super slo-mo splashes when he steps in a puddle or slashes one of the "werewolves" he's fighting, with occasional bright splashes of blue or red. The entire style is deliberately evocative of something directed by Creator/FrankMiller, like the film versions of ''Film/TheSpirit'' or SinCity. Which makes it FridgeBrilliance FanService for those familiar with those movies, as both Frank Miller and the [=UnSub=] (in-universe) are both highly successful and revolutionary comic authors.
** Less fridge when you watch the epilogue of that story and
authors. Garcia actually compares the [=UnSub=] to Creator/FrankMiller.



** Hotchalanches. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BlJ_MQNjY0 Wherein Aaron Hotchner is made of awesome]], though were this real life the complaint of the defense attorney, especially in pointing how ''wrong'' the team's methods often are on specifics, would have been entirely justified.

to:

** Hotchalanches. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BlJ_MQNjY0 Wherein Aaron Hotchner is made of awesome]], though were this real life the complaint of the defense attorney, especially in pointing how ''wrong'' the team's methods often are on specifics, would have been entirely justified.awesome]].
17th Sep '17 12:31:41 AM OperativeBluebird
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* AndTheAdventureContinues: Two ''extremely'' dark subversions of this. One is in "Bloodlines," where it's revealed [[spoiler: there are other families perpetuating the cycle of murder and abduction]]; the second is in "Solitary Man," where it's heavily implied there are other serial killers using trucking as a cover; the third is in "Awake" where we discover that the man that everyone assumed the [=UnSub=] imagined kidnap his daughter is real.

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* AndTheAdventureContinues: Two ''extremely'' dark subversions inversions of this. One is in "Bloodlines," where it's revealed [[spoiler: there are other families perpetuating the cycle of murder and abduction]]; the second is in "Solitary Man," where it's heavily implied there are other serial killers using trucking as a cover; the third is in "Awake" where we discover that the man that everyone assumed the [=UnSub=] imagined kidnap his daughter is real.
13th Sep '17 7:56:21 AM NekoHybrid
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Added DiffLines:

** [[spoiler: In "100", the Reaper gets [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown savagely beaten to death]] by Hotch when the bastard had the gall to beg for mercy after everything he's done]].
9th Sep '17 6:11:05 PM nombretomado
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** To ''Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' in "Breath Play": A woman who arranges {{BDSM}} meet-ups makes it clear that the [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed not-FSOG romance novel]] isn't an accurate portrayal the lifestyle, which is supposed to be freeing and life-affirming not terrifying and abusive [[note]] to be fair while the killer uses the victims' love of the book to get them in a vulnerable state his ''real'' fetish isn't in either novel[[/note]].

to:

** To ''Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' in "Breath Play": A woman who arranges {{BDSM}} UsefulNotes/{{BDSM}} meet-ups makes it clear that the [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed not-FSOG romance novel]] isn't an accurate portrayal the lifestyle, which is supposed to be freeing and life-affirming not terrifying and abusive [[note]] to be fair while the killer uses the victims' love of the book to get them in a vulnerable state his ''real'' fetish isn't in either novel[[/note]].
4th Sep '17 10:40:20 AM Sharlee
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** Also some pretty ominous ones implying past outrages by the unsubs, that are mentioned only in passing and/or in veiled terms (e.g. "that thing with the puppies", "I said I was sorry!").

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** Also some pretty ominous ones implying past outrages by the unsubs, that are mentioned only in passing and/or in veiled terms that make them sound [[NothingIsScarier worse than any amount of detail]] (e.g. "that thing with the puppies", "I said I was sorry!").
4th Sep '17 10:38:52 AM Sharlee
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** Also some pretty ominous ones referenced about the unsubs, mentioned only in passing and/or in veiled terms (e.g. "that thing with the puppies", "I said I was sorry!", etc).

to:

** Also some pretty ominous ones referenced about implying past outrages by the unsubs, that are mentioned only in passing and/or in veiled terms (e.g. "that thing with the puppies", "I said I was sorry!", etc).sorry!").
4th Sep '17 10:36:41 AM Sharlee
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Added DiffLines:

** Also some pretty ominous ones referenced about the unsubs, mentioned only in passing and/or in veiled terms (e.g. "that thing with the puppies", "I said I was sorry!", etc).
31st Aug '17 1:11:59 PM HalcyonDayz
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* ActionFilmQuietDramaScene: Viewers can always tell when the scene shifts from the BAU to the Unsub because the former is always more dialogue-heavy while the latter is punctuated by less talk and more action.

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* ActionFilmQuietDramaScene: Viewers can always tell when the scene shifts from the BAU to the Unsub [=UnSub=] because the former is always more dialogue-heavy while the latter is punctuated by less talk and more action.



* AlasPoorVillain: The series has its fair share of these. Usually bundled with DespairEventHorizon to evoke SympathyForTheDevil. Case in point: the unsub from "Devil's Night."

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* AlasPoorVillain: The series has its fair share of these. Usually bundled with DespairEventHorizon to evoke SympathyForTheDevil. Case in point: the unsub [=UnSub=] from "Devil's Night."



* AndTheAdventureContinues: Two ''extremely'' dark subversions of this. One is in "Bloodlines," where it's revealed [[spoiler: there are other families perpetuating the cycle of murder and abduction]]; the second is in "Solitary Man," where it's heavily implied there are other serial killers using trucking as a cover; the third is in "Awake" where we discover that the man that everyone assumed the unsub imagined kidnap his daughter is real.

to:

* AndTheAdventureContinues: Two ''extremely'' dark subversions of this. One is in "Bloodlines," where it's revealed [[spoiler: there are other families perpetuating the cycle of murder and abduction]]; the second is in "Solitary Man," where it's heavily implied there are other serial killers using trucking as a cover; the third is in "Awake" where we discover that the man that everyone assumed the unsub [=UnSub=] imagined kidnap his daughter is real.



* ArtisticLicenseBiology: in episode "Magnum Opus", the unsub turns out to be a hemophiliac suffering from Christmas disease. When the team ask García to pull up a list of people suffering from Christmas disease in San Francisco, we see a list with 15 matches, at least 3 of which are women. However, Christmas disease is ''extremely'' rare in females, as in, females can carry the disease but it is very rare that they suffer from it. And yet it turns out that at least 20% of San Francisco's B-hemophiliac population are women? Unless they are trans women, the odds for that are so close to 0 that Dr. Reid wouldn't even bother to calculate them.

to:

* ArtisticLicenseBiology: in episode "Magnum Opus", the unsub [=UnSub=] turns out to be a hemophiliac suffering from Christmas disease. When the team ask García to pull up a list of people suffering from Christmas disease in San Francisco, we see a list with 15 matches, at least 3 of which are women. However, Christmas disease is ''extremely'' rare in females, as in, females can carry the disease but it is very rare that they suffer from it. And yet it turns out that at least 20% of San Francisco's B-hemophiliac population are women? Unless they are trans women, the odds for that are so close to 0 that Dr. Reid wouldn't even bother to calculate them.



** And Quantico is apparently right in DC or the immediate surrounding area, as in the episode "Sex, Birth, Death," where Reid [[spoiler: thinks he meets the unsub]] as he's exiting the Metro to work. In reality, Quantico is over an hour away, separated by two highways.

to:

** And Quantico is apparently right in DC or the immediate surrounding area, as in the episode "Sex, Birth, Death," where Reid [[spoiler: thinks he meets the unsub]] [=UnSub=]]] as he's exiting the Metro to work. In reality, Quantico is over an hour away, separated by two highways.



* AxCrazy: A vast majority of the unsubs that the BAU arrest.

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* AxCrazy: A vast majority of the unsubs [=UnSubs=] that the BAU arrest.



** JJ being tortured in the Middle East by someone she considered an ally made her more reckless (she has PTSD and blames herself for not recognizing how dangerous he was to the point that she's almost committing [[SuicideByCop suicide by unsub]]), and despite a DeadPersonConversation with her torturer where she realizes what "he's" doing to her it's not clear if she's getting better or not.

to:

** JJ being tortured in the Middle East by someone she considered an ally made her more reckless (she has PTSD and blames herself for not recognizing how dangerous he was to the point that she's almost committing [[SuicideByCop suicide by unsub]]), [=UnSub=]]]), and despite a DeadPersonConversation with her torturer where she realizes what "he's" doing to her it's not clear if she's getting better or not.



-->'''Unsub:''' I'm the man who took Hope.

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-->'''Unsub:''' -->'''[=UnSub=]:''' I'm the man who took Hope.



* MercyKill: Some unsubs believe they're performing these on their victims. They assume that the people they target want to die and unable to do so without "assistance" or are dying inside and need to be set free.
** In ''Childhood's Finest Hour'', the Unsub targets depressed and suicidal mothers, kidnapping their children and killing the mothers with their child's "permission". [[spoiler:When he was younger, he was in the same situation, living with a depressed and suicidal mother. He followed her one day where she was sitting on the bridge, possibly considering jumping off. To "help" her, he pushed her off into the water. It's unknown if she wanted to die or if she just wanted to be alone on those days.]]

to:

* MercyKill: Some unsubs [=UnSubs=] believe they're performing these on their victims. They assume that the people they target want to die and unable to do so without "assistance" or are dying inside and need to be set free.
** In ''Childhood's Finest Hour'', the Unsub [=UnSub=] targets depressed and suicidal mothers, kidnapping their children and killing the mothers with their child's "permission". [[spoiler:When he was younger, he was in the same situation, living with a depressed and suicidal mother. He followed her one day where she was sitting on the bridge, possibly considering jumping off. To "help" her, he pushed her off into the water. It's unknown if she wanted to die or if she just wanted to be alone on those days.]]



** The entire second half of "Mr. Scratch." [[spoiler:We're shown two versions of events mostly from Hotch's perspective. The first is a nightmare where his entire team dies, then snaps out of it into a second, much more believable scenario where his team come to the rescue, but the UnSub inexplicably surrenders. This is potentially ''also'' a drug-induced fantasy, and he prepares to tell Rossi what ''actually'' happened - [[TheUnReveal but then the episode ends]].]]

to:

** The entire second half of "Mr. Scratch." [[spoiler:We're shown two versions of events mostly from Hotch's perspective. The first is a nightmare where his entire team dies, then snaps out of it into a second, much more believable scenario where his team come to the rescue, but the UnSub [=UnSub=] inexplicably surrenders. This is potentially ''also'' a drug-induced fantasy, and he prepares to tell Rossi what ''actually'' happened - [[TheUnReveal but then the episode ends]].]]



** The [[SerialKiller UnSub]] from the "Hashtag" episode used a nail gun to kill all his victims except the first one because he was emulating a CreepyPasta called The Mirror Man that kills people with his long (finger)nails. Also, during the second murder, he fired his nail-gun repeatedly at the back of the driver's seat of the victim's car, forming a hashtag with the holes as a CallingCard.

to:

** The [[SerialKiller UnSub]] [=UnSub=]]] from the "Hashtag" episode used a nail gun to kill all his victims except the first one because he was emulating a CreepyPasta called The Mirror Man that kills people with his long (finger)nails. Also, during the second murder, he fired his nail-gun repeatedly at the back of the driver's seat of the victim's car, forming a hashtag with the holes as a CallingCard.



* NegativeContinuity: Either as a way to keep the show grounded in some sense of reality, or to make it more appealing to occasional viewers, most past unsubs will never be mentioned again after the episode they appear in. Profiles, books and conferences will continue to mention real serial killers from decades past like Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer and John Wayne Gacy, even though the exploits of more recent fictional unsubs like George Foyet, Frank Breitkopf and Billy Flynn put theirs to shame.

to:

* NegativeContinuity: Either as a way to keep the show grounded in some sense of reality, or to make it more appealing to occasional viewers, most past unsubs [=UnSubs=] will never be mentioned again after the episode they appear in. Profiles, books and conferences will continue to mention real serial killers from decades past like Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer and John Wayne Gacy, even though the exploits of more recent fictional unsubs [=UnSubs=] like George Foyet, Frank Breitkopf and Billy Flynn put theirs to shame.



* NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity: The unsub in "The Performer" turns out to be [[spoiler: the manager of a rock star who hoped to cash in on this trope by manipulating a mentally ill fan into killing people in ways that referenced the singer's music. The singer himself was completely oblivious]].

to:

* NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity: The unsub [=UnSub=] in "The Performer" turns out to be [[spoiler: the manager of a rock star who hoped to cash in on this trope by manipulating a mentally ill fan into killing people in ways that referenced the singer's music. The singer himself was completely oblivious]].



** There have been two Allen (Alan) Archers. One is a minor character in "Magnum Opus," the other is a heroic witness [[spoiler: actually one of the UnSubs]] two years later in "Hero Worship," with Indianapolis's mayor even declaring "Allen Archer Day."

to:

** There have been two Allen (Alan) Archers. One is a minor character in "Magnum Opus," the other is a heroic witness [[spoiler: actually one of the UnSubs]] [=UnSubs=]]] two years later in "Hero Worship," with Indianapolis's mayor even declaring "Allen Archer Day."



** Reid's theory that the unsub in "Dorado Falls" is suffering from Capgras Syndrome is spot-on in the academic sense. Given how rare Capgras is in real life, viewers could be forgiven for thinking such a disease was just made up by the writers.

to:

** Reid's theory that the unsub [=UnSub=] in "Dorado Falls" is suffering from Capgras Syndrome is spot-on in the academic sense. Given how rare Capgras is in real life, viewers could be forgiven for thinking such a disease was just made up by the writers.



* SinisterMinister: the [=UnSub=] in "Demonology", and the [[RedHerring decoy UnSub]] in "Angels".

to:

* SinisterMinister: the [=UnSub=] in "Demonology", and the [[RedHerring decoy UnSub]] [=UnSub=]]] in "Angels".



* TraumaCongaLine: Not a very long one compared to victims who were kidnapped for days or even years, but last victim in "Pariahville" was almost assaulted by a friend who then abandoned her on the side of the road. She was then picked up by another friend [[spoiler: who turned out to be the cheerleader-murdering UnSub]].

to:

* TraumaCongaLine: Not a very long one compared to victims who were kidnapped for days or even years, but last victim in "Pariahville" was almost assaulted by a friend who then abandoned her on the side of the road. She was then picked up by another friend [[spoiler: who turned out to be the cheerleader-murdering UnSub]].[=UnSub=]]].



* WickedCultured: Some UnSubs can paint themselves as this, though they usually break down at some point. In the Season One finale, the Fisher King hid a music box that played "Fischerweise" by Schubert in the wall of apartment where he left a body to show the BAU how much he enjoyed playing with them.

to:

* WickedCultured: Some UnSubs [=UnSubs=] can paint themselves as this, though they usually break down at some point. In the Season One finale, the Fisher King hid a music box that played "Fischerweise" by Schubert in the wall of apartment where he left a body to show the BAU how much he enjoyed playing with them.
31st Aug '17 11:10:40 AM HalcyonDayz
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* {{Bookends}}: The opening scene of Season 12's premiere episode, "The Crimson King", features a semi-truck nearly ramming into a man who escaped a serial killer. The ending scene of Season 12's finale episode, "Red Light", [[spoiler: features a semi-truck ramming into the BAU's SUVs with them inside, while they are about to face off against the season's BigBad (who had been completely responsible for the events of "The Crimson King").]]

to:

* {{Bookends}}: The opening scene of Season 12's premiere episode, "The Crimson King", features a semi-truck nearly ramming into a man who escaped a serial killer. The ending scene of Season 12's finale episode, "Red Light", [[spoiler: features a semi-truck ramming into the BAU's SUVs [=SUVs=] with them inside, while they are about to face off against the season's BigBad (who had been completely responsible for the events of "The Crimson King").]]
31st Aug '17 1:15:08 AM betterwatchit
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** The end of the case (but not the episode) in "Normal" - [[spoiler: Norman's family was DeadAllAlong, and he'd been hallucinating that they were still alive the whole time]].

to:

** The end of the case (but not the episode) in "Normal" - [[spoiler: Norman's family was DeadAllAlong, and he'd been hallucinating that they were still alive the whole time]].time. Even worse, the time of death was confirmed to have been before the BAU's involvement, meaning there was absolutely nothing they could have done to save them at all]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.CriminalMinds