History Series / Batman

25th Mar '17 10:20:48 PM C2
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* BrokeAesop: Batman explaining students that nothing in life is free. Coming from the guy who inherited his parents' fortune.

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* BrokeAesop: BrokenAesop: Batman explaining students that nothing in life is free. Coming from the guy who inherited his parents' fortune.
25th Mar '17 10:20:06 PM C2
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* BrokeAesop: Batman explaining students that nothing in life is free. Coming from the guy who inherited his parent's fortune.

to:

* BrokeAesop: Batman explaining students that nothing in life is free. Coming from the guy who inherited his parent's parents' fortune.
22nd Mar '17 9:19:23 PM DoctorRayman
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* BoundAndGagged
** Batgirl in "Catwoman's Dressed to Kill", among others.
** It's not like the Dynamic Duo aren't exempt of getting tied up... even BEFORE Batgirl showed up.

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* BoundAndGagged
** Batgirl in "Catwoman's Dressed
BoundAndGagged: This happened quite a lot to Kill", among others.
** It's not like
several characters throughout the course of this show. The Dynamic Duo aren't exempt of getting were often tied up... even BEFORE up during the cliffhangers, although they were gagged only a few times. And after being introduced at the beginning of the third season, Batgirl showed up.was tied up (while sometimes being gagged) quite a few times as well.
18th Mar '17 11:00:03 AM Killerikala
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Added DiffLines:

* BrokeAesop: Batman explaining students that nothing in life is free. Coming from the guy who inherited his parent's fortune.
16th Mar '17 3:05:56 AM C2
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*** One issue introduces Batman '66's own version of The Red Hood (the original version, not [[Comicbook/RedHoodAndTheOutlaws Jason Todd]]) as [[spoiler: a helmet that caused anyone wearing it to become a Joker-aligned criminal mastermind, created when an attempt to calm the prisoners of Arkham Asylum down by projecting brainwaves onto them backfired when [[AMindIsATerribleThingToRead The Joker proved to be too much to handle]]]]. Said issue also introduced a psychiatric nurse by the name of [[ComicBook/HarleyQuinn Dr. Holly Quinn, who referred to the Joker as "Patient J."]] She later dons the helmet, which has been reworked as a device to subdue insanity, to stop the Joker and Catwoman from turning Gotham into a city of laughing lunatics; in doing so, she herself becomes insane and incarcerated at Arkham, until a few issues later, she escapes and becomes exactly who we're talking about.

to:

*** One issue introduces Batman '66's own version of The Red Hood (the original version, not [[Comicbook/RedHoodAndTheOutlaws Jason Todd]]) as [[spoiler: a helmet that caused anyone wearing it to become a Joker-aligned criminal mastermind, created when an attempt to calm the prisoners of Arkham Asylum down by projecting brainwaves onto them backfired when [[AMindIsATerribleThingToRead The Joker proved to be too much to handle]]]]. Said issue also introduced a psychiatric nurse by the name of [[ComicBook/HarleyQuinn Dr. Holly Quinn, who referred to the Joker as "Patient J."]] She later dons the helmet, which has been reworked as a device to subdue insanity, to stop the Joker and Catwoman from turning Gotham into a city of laughing lunatics; in doing so, she herself becomes insane and incarcerated at Arkham, until a few issues later, she escapes and becomes exactly who we're talking about.about (under the non-punny name of "the Harlequin").
15th Mar '17 7:48:54 PM AndyLA
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*** One issue introduces Batman '66's own version of The Red Hood (the original version, not [[Comicbook/RedHoodAndTheOutlaws Jason Todd]]) as [[spoiler: a helmet that caused anyone wearing it to become a Joker-aligned criminal mastermind, created when an attempt to calm the prisoners of Arkham Asylum down by projecting brainwaves onto them backfired when [[AMindIsATerribleThingToRead The Joker proved to be too much to handle]]]]. Said issue also introduced a psychiatric nurse by the name of [[ComicBook/HarleyQuinn Dr. Quinn, who referred to the Joker as "Patient J."]]

to:

*** One issue introduces Batman '66's own version of The Red Hood (the original version, not [[Comicbook/RedHoodAndTheOutlaws Jason Todd]]) as [[spoiler: a helmet that caused anyone wearing it to become a Joker-aligned criminal mastermind, created when an attempt to calm the prisoners of Arkham Asylum down by projecting brainwaves onto them backfired when [[AMindIsATerribleThingToRead The Joker proved to be too much to handle]]]]. Said issue also introduced a psychiatric nurse by the name of [[ComicBook/HarleyQuinn Dr. Holly Quinn, who referred to the Joker as "Patient J."]]"]] She later dons the helmet, which has been reworked as a device to subdue insanity, to stop the Joker and Catwoman from turning Gotham into a city of laughing lunatics; in doing so, she herself becomes insane and incarcerated at Arkham, until a few issues later, she escapes and becomes exactly who we're talking about.
14th Mar '17 10:12:06 PM Karxrida
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* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Penguin, acting as a respected restaurateur as part of a FasleyReformedVillain scheme, has considerable difficulty when he actively tries to get thrown in prison so that he can consult an expert forger criminal colleague. (Although this is because Batman recognizes that he's trying to get sent to prison and convinces the cops not to arrest him.) When [[spoiler:he finally succeeds in getting sent to prison, the criminal he wanted to hook up with gets released]].

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* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Penguin, acting as a respected restaurateur as part of a FasleyReformedVillain FalselyReformedVillain scheme, has considerable difficulty when he actively tries to get thrown in prison so that he can consult an expert forger criminal colleague. (Although this is because Batman recognizes that he's trying to get sent to prison and convinces the cops not to arrest him.) When [[spoiler:he finally succeeds in getting sent to prison, the criminal he wanted to hook up with gets released]].
14th Mar '17 10:11:22 PM Karxrida
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* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Penguin, acting as a respected restaurateur as part of a CivilianVillain scheme, has considerable difficulty when he actively tries to get thrown in prison so that he can consult an expert forger criminal colleague. (Although this is because Batman recognizes that he's trying to get sent to prison and convinces the cops not to arrest him.) When [[spoiler:he finally succeeds in getting sent to prison, the criminal he wanted to hook up with gets released]].

to:

* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Penguin, acting as a respected restaurateur as part of a CivilianVillain FasleyReformedVillain scheme, has considerable difficulty when he actively tries to get thrown in prison so that he can consult an expert forger criminal colleague. (Although this is because Batman recognizes that he's trying to get sent to prison and convinces the cops not to arrest him.) When [[spoiler:he finally succeeds in getting sent to prison, the criminal he wanted to hook up with gets released]].
14th Mar '17 3:36:20 PM maxwellsilver
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** Inverted with Catwoman. It's heavily implied the duo both have interest in her, at least until Eartha Kitt took over the role and [[ExecutiveMeddling the studio overruled Adam West's wishes to continue]].

to:

** Inverted with Catwoman. It's heavily implied the duo both have interest in her, at least until Eartha Kitt took over the role and [[ExecutiveMeddling the studio overruled Adam West's wishes to continue]].continue.



* BattleButler: Alfred shows himself to be a surprisingly good fighter on occasion, able to deliver solid punches to henchmen and once single-handedly defeating the Joker in a fencing duel. And then single-handedly trapping him in the Batpoles (conveniently unlabeled since Alfred had just repainted them), and sending him repeatedly up and down the poles with the Bat-elevator until the Joker was begging him for mercy. And ''then'' having the childish paintings he'd created to foil the Joker's art heist scheme be praised by the art world and sold for big bucks... which he donated to a children's charity. A whole string of [[MomentOfAwesome Crowning Moments of Awesome]] in a row.

to:

* BattleButler: Alfred shows himself to be a surprisingly good fighter on occasion, able to deliver solid punches to henchmen and once single-handedly defeating the Joker in a fencing duel. And then single-handedly trapping him in the Batpoles (conveniently unlabeled since Alfred had just repainted them), and sending him repeatedly up and down the poles with the Bat-elevator until the Joker was begging him for mercy. And ''then'' having the childish paintings he'd created to foil the Joker's art heist scheme be praised by the art world and sold for big bucks... which he donated to a children's charity. A whole string of [[MomentOfAwesome Crowning Moments of Awesome]] in a row.



** This was double subverted at least once. In the episode where the Mad Hatter was using radioactive chemicals to terrorize Gotham, he locked Batman and Robin inside a "fluoroscopic cabinet" to have their flesh burned off by deadly radiation. His plan appeared to have worked: we saw two skeletons (actually dummies) wearing the heroes' costumes inside the cabinet. Once the "bodies" were discovered, a wave of horror and grief swept the entire world; even Commissioner Gordon and Chief O'Hara burst into tears. Finally, in a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming, Batman and Robin came out of hiding and explained that they had indeed escaped; they had left the skeletons behind as decoys in order to fool the Mad Hatter and his goons.
** Also {{Lampshaded}} in the beginning of the second season. After the customary near escape, Robin exclaims that this time, he was really worried. Batman replies that he himself was not scared one bit. Has Robin not noticed how every time a criminal puts them at mortal peril, they escape? Robin concludes that they must be smarter than the criminals. Batman, in a [[{{Narm}} crowning moment of narm]], says that he prefers to believe it's because they're pure at heart.

to:

** This was double subverted at least once. In the episode where the Mad Hatter was using radioactive chemicals to terrorize Gotham, he locked Batman and Robin inside a "fluoroscopic cabinet" to have their flesh burned off by deadly radiation. His plan appeared to have worked: we saw two skeletons (actually dummies) wearing the heroes' costumes inside the cabinet. Once the "bodies" were discovered, a wave of horror and grief swept the entire world; even Commissioner Gordon and Chief O'Hara burst into tears. Finally, in a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming, Batman and Robin came out of hiding and explained that they had indeed escaped; they had left the skeletons behind as decoys in order to fool the Mad Hatter and his goons.
** Also {{Lampshaded}} in the beginning of the second season. After the customary near escape, Robin exclaims that this time, he was really worried. Batman replies that he himself was not scared one bit. Has Robin not noticed how every time a criminal puts them at mortal peril, they escape? Robin concludes that they must be smarter than the criminals. Batman, in a [[{{Narm}} crowning moment of narm]], Batman says that he prefers to believe it's because they're pure at heart.



* CivilianVillain
** Very common, particularly with the frequently recurring SpecialGuest Villains. Sometimes played straight (e.g., [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "Catwoman Goes To College"]]), but frequently, the trope is only implicit. At the beginning of an episode, (for example) the Joker is allowed to move about freely and lay the groundwork for his next scheme, Batman and Robin being helpless until he commits an actual crime. The details of Joker's parole status, rationale for lack of outstanding arrest warrants, etc., are generally unspecified.
** Most of Penguin's appearances tended to use this trope to one degree or another, all under the guise of being reformed, and always as a front for some criminal scheme. Two notable occurrences are when he becomes a crime fighter, and when he runs for mayor.


Added DiffLines:

* FalselyReformedVillain
** Very common, particularly with the frequently recurring SpecialGuest Villains. Sometimes played straight (e.g., [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "Catwoman Goes To College"]]), but frequently, the trope is only implicit. At the beginning of an episode, (for example) the Joker is allowed to move about freely and lay the groundwork for his next scheme, Batman and Robin being helpless until he commits an actual crime. The details of Joker's parole status, rationale for lack of outstanding arrest warrants, etc., are generally unspecified.
** Most of Penguin's appearances tended to use this trope to one degree or another, all under the guise of being reformed, and always as a front for some criminal scheme. Two notable occurrences are when he becomes a crime fighter, and when he runs for mayor.
13th Mar '17 5:58:55 PM dsneybuf
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In 2013, [[http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/2013/03/dc-to-launch-digital-first-batman-comic-based-on-classic-tv-show/ DC announced]] ''Batman '66'', a digital-first comic based on the series, with license to the rights for all the actors on the show, and written by Jeff Parker of ''ComicBook/{{Aquaman}}'' and Marvel's ''ComicBook/AgentsOfAtlas''; it ended in 2015 with print issue #30. The popularity and critical success of this series led to a number of crossover miniseries, including Kevin Smith and Ralph Garman's ''Batman '66 Meets Franchise/TheGreenHornet'', Ian Edginton's ''Batman '66 Meets [[Series/TheAvengers Steed and Mrs Peel]]'', Jeff Parker and Marc Andreyko's ''Batman '66 Meets Series/WonderWoman '77'', and Parker's own ''Batman '66 Meets Series/TheManFromUNCLE''. Parker also introduced versions of some characters who post-date the series, starting with [[spoiler: Harley Quinn]]. ''The Lost Episode'', adapted by Len Wein from a rejected Creator/HarlanEllison treatment, also features the first appearance of Comicbook/TwoFace in this continuity.

to:

In 2013, [[http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/2013/03/dc-to-launch-digital-first-batman-comic-based-on-classic-tv-show/ DC announced]] ''Batman '66'', a digital-first comic based on the series, with license to the rights for all the actors on the show, and written by Jeff Parker of ''ComicBook/{{Aquaman}}'' and Marvel's ''ComicBook/AgentsOfAtlas''; it ended in 2015 with print issue #30. The popularity and critical success of this series led to a number of crossover miniseries, including Kevin Smith and Ralph Garman's ''Batman '66 Meets Franchise/TheGreenHornet'', Ian Edginton's ''Batman '66 Meets [[Series/TheAvengers Steed and Mrs Peel]]'', Jeff Parker and Marc Andreyko's ''Batman '66 Meets Series/WonderWoman '77'', and Parker's own ''Batman '66 Meets Series/TheManFromUNCLE''. Parker also introduced versions of some characters who post-date the series, starting with [[spoiler: Harley Quinn]].series. ''The Lost Episode'', adapted by Len Wein from a rejected Creator/HarlanEllison treatment, also features the first appearance of Comicbook/TwoFace in this continuity.
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