History Series / Batman

4th Feb '16 8:03:21 AM Rubber_Lotus
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* IKnowYouKnowIKnow: Used ''constantly''. A good chunk of the screen-time in every adventure consists of Batman deliberately walking into traps and setups so he can find out what the villains are up to, and the villains counteracting ''that''.
29th Jan '16 12:37:34 AM marcoasalazarm
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In 2013, [[http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/2013/03/dc-to-launch-digital-first-batman-comic-based-on-classic-tv-show/ DC announced]] ''Batman '66'', a digital-first comic based on the series, with license to the rights for all the actors on the show, and written by Jeff Parker of ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} and Marvel's ComicBook/AgentsOfAtlas. The popularity of this series led to Kevin Smith and Ralph Garman's ''Batman '66 Meets Franchise/TheGreenHornet'' SequelEpisode miniseries. Parker has also introduced versions of some characters who post-date the series, starting with [[spoiler: Harley Quinn]]. ''The Lost Episode'', adapted by Len Wein from a rejected Creator/HarlanEllison script, also features the first appearance of Comicbook/TwoFace in this continuity.
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In 2013, [[http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/2013/03/dc-to-launch-digital-first-batman-comic-based-on-classic-tv-show/ DC announced]] ''Batman '66'', a digital-first comic based on the series, with license to the rights for all the actors on the show, and written by Jeff Parker of ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} and Marvel's ComicBook/AgentsOfAtlas. The popularity of this series led to Kevin Smith and Ralph Garman's ''Batman '66 Meets Franchise/TheGreenHornet'' SequelEpisode miniseries.miniseries, as well as the crossover ''Batman '66 Meets Series/TheManFromUNCLE''. Parker has also introduced versions of some characters who post-date the series, starting with [[spoiler: Harley Quinn]]. ''The Lost Episode'', adapted by Len Wein from a rejected Creator/HarlanEllison script, also features the first appearance of Comicbook/TwoFace in this continuity.
16th Jan '16 5:59:34 PM CallingAlameda
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* FakeShemp: Dr. Cassandra springs Joker, Penguin, Riddler, Catwoman, King Tut, and Egghead from prison to form her criminal gang. This being the third season (the season of NoBudget), all were played by stand-ins, nobody's face was shown clearly, and none of them had any dialogue (though audio clips of Riddler's maniacal giggling and Penguin's squawking were recycled from earlier episodes). On top of that, they were all given pills which turned them invisible... and then the episode's Batfight took place mainly in the dark.

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* NoBudget: The third season was embarrassingly cheap-looking; the majority of the sets (apart from already-built ones like the Batcave and Commissioner Gordon's office) were simply cardboard scenery in front of stark black backgrounds.
16th Jan '16 5:39:05 PM CallingAlameda
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* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Penguin, acting as a respected restaurateur as part of a CivilianVillain scheme, has considerable difficulty when he actively tries to get thrown in prison so that he can consult an expert forger criminal colleague. (Although this is because Batman recognizes that he's trying to get sent to prison and convinces the cops not to arrest him.) When [[spoiler:he was finally sent there, the criminal he wanted to meet got reformed]].
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* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Penguin, acting as a respected restaurateur as part of a CivilianVillain scheme, has considerable difficulty when he actively tries to get thrown in prison so that he can consult an expert forger criminal colleague. (Although this is because Batman recognizes that he's trying to get sent to prison and convinces the cops not to arrest him.) When [[spoiler:he was finally succeeds in getting sent there, to prison, the criminal he wanted to meet got reformed]].hook up with gets released]].

* CantGetInTroubleForNuthin: The Penguin, acting ** Most of Penguin's appearances tended to use this trope to one degree or another, all under the guise of being reformed, and always as a respected restaurateur as part of a CivilianVillain scheme, has considerable difficulty when he actively tries to get thrown in prison so that he can consult an expert forger front for some criminal colleague. (Although this is because Batman recognizes that he's trying to get sent to prison scheme. Two notable occurrences are when he becomes a crime fighter, and convinces the cops not to arrest him.) When [[spoiler:he was finally sent there, the criminal when he wanted to meet got reformed]].runs for mayor.

* ContinuityNod: remembering that it was common for syndicated episodes to be broadcast in random order (albeit with the two- and three-part storylines kept together), the use of direct callbacks of this nature were rare for this era. ** In "Ring of Wax" Riddler is careful to deactivate the Batmobile security system before driving it away. This seems to nod to his intro episode, in which he set off the security system trying to steal it.
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* ContinuityNod: remembering Remembering that it was common for syndicated episodes to be broadcast in random order (albeit with the two- and three-part storylines kept together), the use of direct callbacks of this nature were rare for this era. ** In "Ring "The Ring of Wax" Wax", Riddler is careful to deactivate the Batmobile security system before driving it away. This seems to nod to his intro episode, in which he set off the security system trying to steal it.

* CowboyEpisode: "Come Back, Shame"/"It's How You Play The Game"
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* CowboyEpisode: "Come Back, Shame"/"It's How You Play The Game"two Shame appearances.

* EasyAmnesia: King Tut.
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* EasyAmnesia: Getting hit on the head causes King Tut.Tut to go back and forth between his regular self (a mild-mannered college professor) and his criminal alter ego. In "King Tut's Coup", two of his students suffer blows to the head and immediately become his hechmen.

* ElectionDayEpisode: In one episode, the Penguin runs for Mayor of Gotham against Incumbent Mayor John Linseed, who in turn runs as the running mate of Batman. [[spoiler: Linseed in turn returns as Mayor following Batman's successful election and subsequent resignation at the end of the episode]].
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* ElectionDayEpisode: In one episode, "Hizzoner the Penguin"/"Dizzoner the Penguin", the Penguin runs for Mayor of Gotham against Incumbent Mayor incumbent mayor John Linseed, who in turn withdraws from the race and instead runs as the running mate of Batman. [[spoiler: Linseed in turn returns as Mayor following Batman's successful [[spoiler:Batman wins the election and subsequent resignation at the end of the episode]].then immediately resigns, making Linseed mayor again]].
13th Jan '16 8:09:31 PM ultimomant
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** In a particularly memorable example, the Dynamic Duo encountered Franchise/TheGreenHornet and [[BruceLee Kato]] in the window, greeting them as fellow heroes. In a later episode, these heroes were full-fledged guest stars, but now Batman and Robin believed them to be criminals, as they pretended to be in their own series. (Although it didn't go both ways; in the universe of ''The Green Hornet''[[note]]from the same producers[[/note]], ''Batman'' was a fictional program that various characters were occasionally seen watching on television.)
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** In a particularly memorable example, the Dynamic Duo encountered Franchise/TheGreenHornet and [[BruceLee [[Creator/BruceLee Kato]] in the window, greeting them as fellow heroes. In a later episode, these heroes were full-fledged guest stars, but now Batman and Robin believed them to be criminals, as they pretended to be in their own series. (Although it didn't go both ways; in the universe of ''The Green Hornet''[[note]]from the same producers[[/note]], ''Batman'' was a fictional program that various characters were occasionally seen watching on television.)

** The series itself had a two-part crossover with Franchise/TheGreenHornet. Most notably, at the end of Part 2, Batman and Robin square off against The Green Hornet and [[BruceLee Kato]]. The fight ends on BruceLee whooping the ever-loving shit out of Burt Ward... I mean: A "tie"...
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** The series itself had a two-part crossover with Franchise/TheGreenHornet. Most notably, at the end of Part 2, Batman and Robin square off against The Green Hornet and [[BruceLee [[Creator/BruceLee Kato]]. The fight ends on BruceLee Bruce Lee whooping the ever-loving shit out of Burt Ward... I mean: A "tie"...

** Franchise/TheGreenHornet and [[BruceLee his sidekick]].
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** Franchise/TheGreenHornet and [[BruceLee [[Creator/BruceLee his sidekick]].
13th Jan '16 8:07:29 PM ultimomant
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* DanceBattler: Batgirl, as portrayed by former professional ballerina Yvonne Craig. Almost a required trope given that Batgirl was not allowed to throw punches, confining her fights mostly to kicking.
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* DanceBattler: Batgirl, as portrayed by former professional ballerina Yvonne Craig.Creator/YvonneCraig. Almost a required trope given that Batgirl was not allowed to throw punches, confining her fights mostly to kicking.
10th Jan '16 2:05:38 PM CallingAlameda
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** And then there's Batgirl. Batman and Robin are continually perplexed at how Batgirl manages to keep turning up where the action is; it never once dawns on them that Commissioner Gordon has a daughter who's the right age and size to be Batgirl, speaks with the same voice, and above all, who showed up in Gotham City at the exact same time Batgirl did. Did the red wig really fool them ''that'' much?
3rd Jan '16 7:57:32 AM CallingAlameda
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** Alfred had already shown off his badassery several episodes earlier, when he (disguised as his own security-guard brother... [[ItMakesSenseInContext don't ask]]) holds the Joker and his gang at gunpoint and [[HoistByHisOwnPetard forces them to eat their own time-reversing pills]].
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** Alfred had already shown off his badassery several episodes earlier, when he (disguised as his own security-guard brother...cousin... [[ItMakesSenseInContext don't ask]]) holds the Joker and his gang at gunpoint and [[HoistByHisOwnPetard forces them to eat their own time-reversing pills]].

* YouWouldntHitAGuyWithGlasses: Several examples.
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* YouWouldntHitAGuyWithGlasses: Several examples. examples, most prominently the Bookworm episode, where Batman and Robin pause before the fight to allow all of Bookworm's henchmen to remove their spectacles. ** In Shame's first appearance, one of Shame's accomplices says to Batman, "You wouldn't hit a man with glasses, would you?". Batman points out that the man isn't wearing glasses and proceeds to punch him.
3rd Jan '16 7:41:29 AM CallingAlameda
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* CutLexLuthorACheck: "The Joker's Flying Saucer". The Joker creates a flying saucer that can (based on the Joker's comments) travel through outer space to other planets. He decides on the standard "conquer the world" strategy when he could have just sold the design to NASA for billions of dollars. ** Also applies to Catwoman who if she used her intelligence productively (or, let's be honest, became a model or movie star with her looks) -- or even simply give up crime and marry Bruce Wayne -- could easily become as rich as she desires.
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* CutLexLuthorACheck: CutLexLuthorACheck: ** In "The Penguin's Nest", Penguin opens a hugely popular restaurant, which by all indications positively rakes in the cash. However, Penguin chooses to use it as the front for a forgery scheme instead of simply living off the restaurant's proceeds. ** "The Joker's Flying Saucer". The Joker creates a flying saucer that can (based on the Joker's comments) travel through outer space to other planets. He decides on the standard "conquer the world" strategy when he could have just sold the design to NASA for billions of dollars. ** Also applies to Catwoman Catwoman, who if she used her intelligence productively (or, let's be honest, became a model or movie star with her looks) -- or even simply give up crime and marry married Bruce Wayne -- could easily become as rich as she desires.

* PublicSecretMessage: Batman talks to one of the villains over a broadcast radio station, but requests that all other citizens of Gotham switch off to avoid hearing his private message. Naturally they oblige. * PunchClockVillain: Zelda the Great only steals (and quite reluctantly) to pay for the amazing devices she uses in her act. She ultimately performs a sincere HeelFaceTurn.
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* PublicSecretMessage: Batman talks to one of the villains King Tut over a broadcast radio station, but requests that all other citizens of Gotham switch off to avoid hearing his private message. Naturally they oblige. * PunchClockVillain: PunchClockVillain: ** Zelda the Great only steals (and quite reluctantly) to pay for the amazing devices she uses in her act. She ultimately performs a sincere HeelFaceTurn.HeelFaceTurn. ** Chandell only commits crimes in order to pay off his blackmailing brother, and seems deeply distressed at having to do so.
20th Dec '15 5:44:57 PM nombretomado
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With its intentionally absurd writing (particularly Batman's array of gadgets, which seemed large enough to cater for [[CrazyPrepared any given situation]] -- the legendary Shark-Repellent Batspray comes to mind) and shonky production values, this was more like a televised {{pantomime}}/vaudeville/burlesque than anything resembling portrayals of superheroes in modern day media. The series managed to become something of a cultural icon, but it is also partly responsible for the general public's dim view of comic book writing and comics in general today (though, [[SilverAge at the time]], it was a pretty faithful adaptation of the comics).
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With its intentionally absurd writing (particularly Batman's array of gadgets, which seemed large enough to cater for [[CrazyPrepared any given situation]] -- the legendary Shark-Repellent Batspray comes to mind) and shonky production values, this was more like a televised {{pantomime}}/vaudeville/burlesque than anything resembling portrayals of superheroes in modern day media. The series managed to become something of a cultural icon, but it is also partly responsible for the general public's dim view of comic book writing and comics in general today (though, [[SilverAge [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks at the time]], it was a pretty faithful adaptation of the comics).

If you want Batman played DarkerAndEdgier, see Creator/TimBurton's [[Film/{{Batman}} 1989 film]] (and [[Film/BatmanReturns its 1992 sequel]]), ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' or Creator/ChristopherNolan's ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga''. For a more modern take on Batman that retains the SilverAge fun-factor[=/=]{{Camp}} absurdity combo of the series, see Creator/JoelSchumacher's ''Film/BatmanForever''. For Silver Age fun-factor with more tasteful {{Camp}} absurdity, see ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold''. For a DarkerAndEdgier take nonetheless heavy on {{Camp}}, see ''ComicBook/AllStarBatmanAndRobinTheBoyWonder''. And for camp absurdity minus the Silver Age fun-factor, see Schumacher's ''Film/BatmanAndRobin''.
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If you want Batman played DarkerAndEdgier, see Creator/TimBurton's [[Film/{{Batman}} 1989 film]] (and [[Film/BatmanReturns its 1992 sequel]]), ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' or Creator/ChristopherNolan's ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga''. For a more modern take on Batman that retains the SilverAge UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}} fun-factor[=/=]{{Camp}} absurdity combo of the series, see Creator/JoelSchumacher's ''Film/BatmanForever''. For Silver Age fun-factor with more tasteful {{Camp}} absurdity, see ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold''. For a DarkerAndEdgier take nonetheless heavy on {{Camp}}, see ''ComicBook/AllStarBatmanAndRobinTheBoyWonder''. And for camp absurdity minus the Silver Age fun-factor, see Schumacher's ''Film/BatmanAndRobin''.

** The {{irony}} is that given the [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks state of the comics at the time of the TV series]], this was a very accurate adaptation, or even DarkerAndEdgier. It was only in later adaptations that Batman would be SeriousBusiness.
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** The {{irony}} is that given the [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks state of the comics at the time of the TV series]], this was a very accurate adaptation, or even DarkerAndEdgier. It was only in later adaptations that Batman would be SeriousBusiness.
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