History Series / AlfredHitchcockPresents

18th Jan '17 7:45:36 PM Temmere
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* CantGetAwayWithNuthin: Stories would frequently end with someone seemingly getting away with a crime, but content restrictions at the time wouldn't allow this, which is why Hitchcock would come out afterwards and say something to the effect of "But they later went to jail."
16th Jan '17 5:02:00 PM PaulA
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* SettingUpdate: "The Monkey's Paw -- A Retelling" has the same basic plot as the original 1902 short story, but is set in the present day (as of the time the episode was made), with many details altered accordingly. In particular, the death that occurs during the story is made a car crash, much more common in the 1960s than in the 1900s.
16th Jan '17 4:06:54 AM yisfidri
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to:

* "Literature/TheMonkeysPaw" (A Retelling)



* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: "Literature/TheMonkeysPaw -- A Retelling"
15th Jan '17 4:17:57 PM PaulA
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* BodybagTrick: In "Final Escape" (1950s and 1980s versions), a prisoner plans to escape by hiding in the coffin of the next inmate to diae, with an accomplice on the prison staff to come and dig it up later. [[spoiler:The prisoner succeeds in hiding and being buried, and only then discovers that the other occupant of the coffin is the accomplice...]]

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* BodybagTrick: In "Final Escape" (1950s and 1980s versions), a prisoner plans to escape by hiding in the coffin of the next inmate to diae, die, with an accomplice on the prison staff to come and dig it up later. [[spoiler:The prisoner succeeds in hiding and being buried, and only then discovers that the other occupant of the coffin is the accomplice...]]
15th Jan '17 4:17:26 PM PaulA
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* BodybagTrick: In "Final Escape" (1950s and 1980s versions), a prisoner plans to escape by hiding in the coffin of the next inmate to die, with an accomplice on the prison staff to come and dig it up later. [[spoiler:The prisoner succeeds in hiding and being buried, and only then discovers that the other occupant of the coffin is the accomplice...]]

to:

* BodybagTrick: In "Final Escape" (1950s and 1980s versions), a prisoner plans to escape by hiding in the coffin of the next inmate to die, diae, with an accomplice on the prison staff to come and dig it up later. [[spoiler:The prisoner succeeds in hiding and being buried, and only then discovers that the other occupant of the coffin is the accomplice...]]



* MayDecemberRomance: In "Backward, Turn Backward", a 59-year-old man is accused of murdering the father of his 19-year-old girlfriend. [[spoiler:She is mentally ill, and it was she who killed her father and has no memory of it.]]

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* MayDecemberRomance: In "Backward, Turn Backward", a 59-year-old man is accused of murdering the father of his has a 19-year-old girlfriend. [[spoiler:She is mentally ill, and it was she who killed her father and has no memory of it.]] girlfriend.
13th Jan '17 7:00:52 AM yisfidri
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* SawAWomanInHalf: "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" features a magic act in which the showstopper is a version of this trick with a power saw.

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* SawAWomanInHalf: SawAWomanInHalf:
**
"The Sorcerer's Apprentice" features a magic act in which the showstopper is a version of this trick with a power saw.saw.
** Also done in Hitchcock's host segments surrounding "The Safe Place".
13th Jan '17 6:59:14 AM yisfidri
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* ExactWords: In "The Cure", while exploring the Amazon, a man whose wife attacks him with a knife assumes that she's suffering from a tropical brain-affecting fever. He directs his friend and his native servant Luiz to take her to a shrink. Along the way, at her urging, the friend tries to murder Luiz, but is killed in self-defence. Luiz then faithfully carries out his master's orders - [[spoiler:by taking her to a native "head doctor" who shrinks her head.]]



* MayDecemberRomance: In "Backward, Turn Backward", a 59-year-old man is accused of murdering the father of his 19-year-old girlfriend. [[spoiler:She is mentally ill, and it was she who killed her father and has no memory of it.]]



* YearOutsideHourInside: "Fog Horn" has a very tragic non-magic example. A woman lying in bed gradually recalls a boat trip accident in which her beloved fiance was killed; to her it seems only a few days ago, but since the accident she has been [[spoiler:in a nightmarish half-sleep for [[AndIMustScream''fifty years'']].]]

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* YearOutsideHourInside: "Fog Horn" has a very tragic non-magic example. A woman lying in bed gradually recalls a boat trip accident in which her beloved fiance was killed; to her it seems only a few days ago, but since the accident she has been [[spoiler:in a nightmarish half-sleep for [[AndIMustScream''fifty years'']].''[[AndIMustScream fifty years]]''.]]
13th Jan '17 6:47:54 AM yisfidri
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* YearOutsideHourInside: "Fog Horn" has a very tragic non-magic example. A woman lying in bed gradually recalls a boat trip accident in which her beloved fiance was killed; to her it seems only a few days ago, but since the accident she has been [[spoiler:in a nightmarish half-sleep for [[AndIMustScream''fifty years''.]]]]

to:

* YearOutsideHourInside: "Fog Horn" has a very tragic non-magic example. A woman lying in bed gradually recalls a boat trip accident in which her beloved fiance was killed; to her it seems only a few days ago, but since the accident she has been [[spoiler:in a nightmarish half-sleep for [[AndIMustScream''fifty years''.]]]] years'']].]]
13th Jan '17 6:47:02 AM yisfidri
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* AccidentalMurder: In "O Youth and Beauty!", an obsessed husband who wants to do a hurdling routine gives his wife a gun to use as the starting gun. Unfamiliar with guns, she accidentally shoots him dead.

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* AccidentalMurder: In "O Youth and Beauty!", an obsessed husband who wants to do a hurdling routine gives his wife a [[spoiler:a gun to use as the starting gun. Unfamiliar with guns, she accidentally shoots him dead. ]]



* BlackmailBackfire: The blackmailing plumber from "The Deadly" gets his comeuppance when the housewives he has targeted team up to turn the tables on him and force him to work for them for free.
* BlackWidow: "The End of Indian Summer" involves a woman who collected life insurance money after the suspicious deaths of her two previous husbands.
* TheBluebeard: At the end of "The End of Indian Summer" it is revealed that the BlackWidow's new fiancé made insurance claims after the suspicious deaths of his four previous wives.

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* BlackmailBackfire: The blackmailing plumber from "The Deadly" gets his comeuppance when the [[spoiler:the housewives he has targeted team up to turn the tables on him and force him to work for them for free.]]
* BlackWidow: "The End of Indian Summer" involves a woman who collected life insurance money after the suspicious deaths of her two previous husbands.

* BlackWidow: "The End of Indian Summer" involves a woman who collected life insurance money after the suspicious deaths of her two previous husbands.
* TheBluebeard: At the end of "The End of Indian Summer" it is revealed that the [[spoiler:the BlackWidow's new fiancé made insurance claims after the suspicious deaths of his four previous wives.]]



* DeathByIrony: In "Your Witness", an AmoralAttorney gets a hit-and-run driver acquitted by introducing misleading medical reports indicating that the sole eyewitness is legally blind and therefore incompetent as a witness. When the attorney is later run down in the courthouse parking lot by his long-suffering wife, the only witness is the same man he had earlier discredited, who gleefully tells the cops, "It's a ''legal fact'' that I am incompetent as a witness!"

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* DeathByIrony: In "Your Witness", an AmoralAttorney gets a hit-and-run driver acquitted by introducing misleading medical reports indicating that the sole eyewitness is legally blind and therefore incompetent as a witness. When the attorney is later run down in the courthouse parking lot by his long-suffering wife, the [[spoiler:the only witness is the same man he had earlier discredited, who gleefully tells the cops, "It's a ''legal fact'' that I am incompetent as a witness!"witness!"]]



* DeathByWomanScorned: The adulterous man in "One for the Road" is killed this way; when his wife attempts to MurderTheHypotenuse with poisoned sugar, her husband's mistress gets wind of the plan and gives the sugar to him for his coffee.

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* DeathByWomanScorned: The adulterous man in "One for the Road" is killed this way; when his wife attempts to MurderTheHypotenuse with poisoned sugar, her husband's mistress gets [[spoiler:gets wind of the plan and gives the sugar to him for his coffee. coffee.]]



* TheDogBitesBack: In "Out There - Darkness", the rich lady ends up being killed in her home by her dog-walker in revenge for misidentifying him as the man who attacked her in a dark alleyway, which resulted in him spending a year in prison, and his ill girlfriend dying largely because he could no longer support her from prison.

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* TheDogBitesBack: In "Out There - Darkness", the rich lady ends up being [[spoiler:being killed in her home by her dog-walker dog-walker]] in revenge for misidentifying him as the man who attacked her in a dark alleyway, which resulted in him spending a year in prison, and his ill girlfriend dying largely because he could no longer support her from prison.



* EvilDetectingBaby: Subverted in "Silent Witness". The baby cries whenever the man who killed her babysitter comes nearby. His guilty feelings make him suspect that the baby will actually get him caught, and it seems like he's deciding whether to do away with the child too. (He doesn't.) At the end we learn that the baby cries whenever ''any'' unknown man comes nearby.

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* EvilDetectingBaby: Subverted in "Silent Witness". The baby cries whenever the man who killed her babysitter comes nearby. His guilty feelings make him suspect that the baby will actually get him caught, and it seems like he's deciding whether to do away with the child too. (He doesn't.) At the end we learn that the [[spoiler:the baby cries whenever ''any'' unknown man comes nearby.]]



** An implied example in "Very Moral Theft": a crook's girlfriend embezzles $8000 from her office to help him in dire straits; when he finds out where she got the money, he returns it by borrowing from his "friends", who end up killing him when he cannot pay it back.

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** An implied example in "Very Moral Theft": a crook's girlfriend embezzles $8000 from her office to help him in dire straits; when he finds out where she got the money, he returns [[spoiler:returns it by borrowing from his "friends", who end up killing him when he cannot pay it back.]]



* IHaveThisFriend: PlayedForDrama in "The Return of the Hero". The soldier returning from war phones his aristocratic family to ask if they will accommodate his friend, who lost a leg saving his life. When they say they cannot welcome a cripple, he decides never to return home, because it is ''he'' who lost his leg.

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* IHaveThisFriend: PlayedForDrama in "The Return of the Hero". The soldier returning from war phones his aristocratic family to ask if they will accommodate his friend, who lost a leg saving his life. When they say they cannot welcome a cripple, he decides [[spoiler:decides never to return home, because it is ''he'' who lost his leg. leg.]]



* InsuranceFraud: The female protagonist is plied with drink and convinced by her shady "friend" to do this in "Total Loss". It backfires horribly when she finds out that the cause of her store's destruction was a ''genuine'' accident, but the insurance representative doesn't believe her.
* IronicEcho: In "Help Wanted", the main character is told by his mysterious boss that he will be terminated, but will be sent an enormous cheque if he kills a man that day, adding that there's no point telling anyone because "as far as you're concerned, I don't exist". The protagonist echoes the same line back to the intended victim at the end of the story.

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* InsuranceFraud: The female protagonist is plied with drink and convinced by her shady "friend" to do this in "Total Loss". It backfires horribly when she finds out that the [[spoiler:the cause of her store's destruction was a ''genuine'' accident, but the insurance representative doesn't believe her.
her.]]
* IronicEcho: In "Help Wanted", the main character is told by his mysterious boss that he will be terminated, but will be sent an enormous cheque if he kills a man that day, adding that there's no point telling anyone because "as far as you're concerned, I don't exist". The [[spoiler:The protagonist echoes the same line back to the intended victim at the end of the story. story.]]



* LyingToProtectYourFeelings: In "The Legacy", a woman's marriage has much improved after her admirer supposedly committed suicide out of love for her. Her friend finds out that the "admirer" was actually after her money and died accidentally, but decides not to shatter her newfound marital harmony with this information.

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* LyingToProtectYourFeelings: In "The Legacy", a woman's marriage has much improved after her admirer supposedly committed suicide out of love for her. Her friend finds out that the "admirer" was actually [[spoiler:actually after her money and died accidentally, accidentally]], but decides not to shatter her newfound marital harmony with this information.



* MakeItLookLikeAnAccident: In "The Orderly World of Mr Appleby", Laurence Appleby murders his wife and makes it look like she tripped on a rug and fell. This comes back to bite him when his second wife dies in a genuine accident exactly like the one he faked.

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* MakeItLookLikeAnAccident: In "The Orderly World of Mr Appleby", Laurence Appleby murders his wife and makes it look like she tripped on a rug and fell. This comes back to bite him when his second wife dies [[spoiler:dies in a genuine accident exactly like the one he faked.]]



** In "The Big Switch", a gangster who has got away with multiple murders in the past ends up being arrested for one he didn't do.

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** In "The Big Switch", a gangster who has got away with multiple murders in the past ends up being [[spoiler:being arrested for one he didn't do.]]



* MommasBoy: The male protagonist of "Mother, May I Go Out for a Swim?". His new girlfriend obliquely suggests pushing her off a cliff, but he ends up pushing the girlfriend off instead.

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* MommasBoy: The male protagonist of "Mother, May I Go Out for a Swim?". His new girlfriend obliquely suggests pushing her off a cliff, but he ends [[spoiler:ends up pushing the girlfriend off instead. instead.]]



* {{Patricide}}: Committed by the eponymous "Sylvia" when her father tries to keep her suspicious boyfriend away.

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* {{Patricide}}: Committed by the eponymous "Sylvia" [[spoiler:"Sylvia"]] when her father tries to keep her suspicious boyfriend away.



* PuppetPermutation: Hitch's wrapup to the episode "And So Died Riabouchinska"

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* PuppetPermutation: Hitch's wrapup wrap-up to the episode "And So Died Riabouchinska"



* PsychopathicManchild: The main character of "None are So Blind", who kills his wealthy aunt and frames his alter-ego, which he acts out with make-up and a wig. His self-image of perfection and wilful blindness to his own faults - specifically a distinctive birthmark on his face - are his undoing.

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* PsychopathicManchild: The main character of "None are So Blind", who kills his wealthy aunt and frames his alter-ego, which he acts out with make-up and a wig. His self-image of perfection and wilful blindness to his own faults - specifically a [[spoiler:a distinctive birthmark on his face face]] - are his undoing.



* ReverseRelationshipReveal: A number of episodes set up the audience to expect that one character is attempting to kill or otherwise harm another, with the twist ending being that it is actually the other way around. "Malice Domestic" is an example.

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* ReverseRelationshipReveal: A number of episodes set up the audience to expect that one character is attempting to kill or otherwise harm another, with the twist ending being that it is actually the other way around. "Malice [[spoiler:"Malice Domestic" is an example. example.]]



** In "De Mortius", a man is assumed by two friends to have killed his cheating wife and buried her in the basement, and they confront him about it. It turns out that he was unaware of her cheating, and now that they have let him know, he kills and buries her for real.
** In "One for the Road", the wife of a cheating husband tries to poison his mistress with sugar. Later, her fears for her husband's life lead her to give the game away to the mistress, who then proceeds to feed him the poisoned sugar.
** When a father's son is indirectly killed by the eponymous "Road Hog", the father leads the man to believe that he has fatally poisoned him with a drink. The road hog then rushes to the doctor in his car, but in his panic, crashes and dies.
** In "The Gloating Place", a schoolgirl pretends to have been attacked by a masked man to gain attention, and to keep the story going, she then strangles another girl in a manner that will be pinned on the same masked man. These actions inspire a copycat masked man, who attacks and strangles her for real.
* ShootTheDangerousMinion: In "The Cream Of The Jest", a playwright being blackmailed by a down-and-out actor gives him the part of a blackmailer in his new play and tells him to learn a particular speech to deliver to one of the play's producers. The speech contains dangerous details of the producer's real crimes, leading him to shoot the actor dead.

to:

** In "De Mortius", a man is assumed by two friends to have killed his cheating wife and buried her in the basement, and they confront him about it. It turns out that he [[spoiler:he was unaware of her cheating, and now that they have let him know, he kills and buries her for real.
real.]]
** In "One for the Road", the wife of a cheating husband tries to poison his mistress with sugar. Later, her fears for that her husband's life husband may have been poisoned by mistake lead her to give the game away to the mistress, who then [[spoiler:then proceeds to feed him the poisoned sugar.
sugar.]]
** When a father's son is indirectly killed by the eponymous "Road Hog", the father leads the man to believe that he [[spoiler:he has fatally poisoned him with a drink. The road hog then rushes to the doctor in his car, but in his panic, crashes and dies. \n]]
** In "The Gloating Place", a schoolgirl pretends to have been attacked by a masked man to gain attention, and to keep the story going, she then strangles another girl in a manner that will be pinned on the same masked man. These [[spoiler:These actions inspire a copycat masked man, who attacks and strangles her for real.
real.]]
* ShootTheDangerousMinion: In "The Cream Of The Jest", a playwright being blackmailed by a down-and-out actor gives him the part of a blackmailer in his new play and tells him to learn a particular speech to deliver to one of the play's producers. The [[spoiler:The speech contains dangerous details of the producer's real crimes, leading him to shoot the actor dead. dead.]]



** The protagonist of "The Equalizer" turns out to have pulled one on his nemesis.

to:

** The protagonist of "The Equalizer" turns out to have pulled one on the man who stole his nemesis.wife, by [[spoiler:pretending to carry a gun for a duel so that the other man will shoot him dead, claim self-defense, and be arrested as a murderer when no such gun is found]].



* TilMurderDoUsPart: Occurs many times as a basis for the stories. Sometimes, as in "Malice Domestic", it is revealed as a twist ending.

to:

* TilMurderDoUsPart: Occurs many times as a basis for the stories. Sometimes, as in "Malice Domestic", it Domestic" is revealed as an example in which this motive, already implied in the main story, is given a savage spin in the twist ending.



* TraumaInducedAmnesia: The protagonist of "The Hidden Thing" suffers this when his fiancee perishes in a hit-and-run, but a mysterious man arrives and helps him to uncover his memories of that night; specifically of the number-plate of the car that killed her.

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* TraumaInducedAmnesia: The protagonist of "The Hidden Thing" suffers this when his fiancee perishes in a hit-and-run, but a mysterious man arrives and helps him to uncover his memories of that night; specifically of night - and specifically, the number-plate of the car that killed her.



* {{Yandere}}: A number of episodes include one, such as the young man in "The Belfry" and the female novelist in "The Last Dark Step", both of whom go as far as killing their competition.
* YearOutsideHourInside: "Fog Horn" has a very tragic non-magic example. A woman gradually recalls a boat trip accident in which her beloved fiance was killed; to her it seems only a few days ago, but since the accident she has been in a nightmarish half-sleep for ''fifty years''.

to:

* {{Yandere}}: A number of episodes include one, such as the young man in "The Belfry" and the female novelist [[spoiler:female novelist]] in "The Last Dark Step", both of whom go as far as killing their competition.
* YankTheDogsChain: The main character of "Graduating Class" is a woman who, after living through many years of hell in Nazi Germany, has returned to the US and won a post as a school European literature teacher. She seems to be doing well with her class, and gradually learns to open up on a personal level both to one of her enthusiastic female students and to a friendly neighbour. [[spoiler:This neighbour then blackmails the girl and her mother (who falls into a coma), and when he is arrested, he falsely accuses the teacher of masterminding his blackmailing scheme. Her teaching career is ruined, and the police are coming for her.]]
* YearOutsideHourInside: "Fog Horn" has a very tragic non-magic example. A woman lying in bed gradually recalls a boat trip accident in which her beloved fiance was killed; to her it seems only a few days ago, but since the accident she has been in [[spoiler:in a nightmarish half-sleep for ''fifty years''. [[AndIMustScream''fifty years''.]]]]
11th Jan '17 10:11:13 PM PaulA
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* BlackWidow / TheBluebeard: "The End of Indian Summer" involves a woman who collected life insurance money after the suspicious deaths of her two previous husbands; it is revealed that her new fiance similarly made insurance claims after the suspicious deaths of his four previous wives.

to:

* BlackWidow / TheBluebeard: BlackWidow: "The End of Indian Summer" involves a woman who collected life insurance money after the suspicious deaths of her two previous husbands; husbands.
* TheBluebeard: At the end of "The End of Indian Summer"
it is revealed that her the BlackWidow's new fiance similarly fiancé made insurance claims after the suspicious deaths of his four previous wives. wives.



* HeroicSacrifice: In "Death Sentence", a man pulls one to save his wife both from his past and from the threats of his blackmailer, who will be arrested for his murder.
** Another implied example is in "Very Moral Theft"; a crook's girlfriend embezzles $8000 from her office to help him in dire straits; when he finds out where she got the money, he returns it by borrowing from his "friends", who end up killing him when he cannot pay it back.

to:

* HeroicSacrifice: HeroicSacrifice:
**
In "Death Sentence", a man pulls one to save his wife both from his past and from the threats of his blackmailer, who will be arrested for his murder.
murder.
** Another An implied example is in "Very Moral Theft"; Theft": a crook's girlfriend embezzles $8000 from her office to help him in dire straits; when he finds out where she got the money, he returns it by borrowing from his "friends", who end up killing him when he cannot pay it back. back.



* KarmaHoudini: The parents in "Don't Interrupt" don't receive any retribution for silencing their son when he was trying to tell them that a man outside the train was dying. Nor does the female shop-owner's criminal acquaintance in "Total Loss", even though he got her drunk enough to "agree" to pulling off a insurance scam that ended up ruining her.

to:

* KarmaHoudini: KarmaHoudini:
**
The parents in "Don't Interrupt" don't receive any retribution for silencing their son when he was trying to tell them that a man outside the train was dying. dying.
**
Nor does the female shop-owner's criminal acquaintance in "Total Loss", even though he got her drunk enough to "agree" to pulling off a insurance scam that ended up ruining her. her.



* MiscarriageOfJustice: Sometimes the KarmicTwistEnding is legally (but not morally) a miscarriage of justice. An example occurs in "The Big Switch", in which a gangster who has got away with multiple murders in the past ends up being arrested for one he didn't do.
** In "The Kiss-Off", a man has been wrongfully imprisoned for six years for a hold-up someone else committed. In revenge, he robs a tax office, deliberately leaving signs of his guilt for the detectives, but not enough to allow them to make a case against him.

to:

* MiscarriageOfJustice: Sometimes the KarmicTwistEnding is legally (but not morally) a miscarriage of justice. An example occurs in justice.
** In
"The Big Switch", in which a gangster who has got away with multiple murders in the past ends up being arrested for one he didn't do.
do.
** In "The Kiss-Off", a man has been wrongfully imprisoned for six years for a hold-up someone else committed. In revenge, he robs a tax office, deliberately leaving signs of his guilt for the detectives, but not enough to allow them to make a case against him.



* ProductPlacement: At the end of "None Are So Blind" as the ThemeMusic starts up and the camera starts to turn away from him, Hitchcock says "Just a moment....if you would prefer your stories without my comments, might I suggest this new magazine", as he holds up a copy of his Alfred Hitchcock Magazine.

to:

* ProductPlacement: At the end of "None Are So Blind" as the ThemeMusic Theme Music starts up and the camera starts to turn away from him, Hitchcock says "Just a moment....if you would prefer your stories without my comments, might I suggest this new magazine", as he holds up a copy of his Alfred Hitchcock Magazine.



* SelfFulfillingProphecy: In "De Mortius", a man is assumed by two friends to have killed his cheating wife and buried her in the basement, and they confront him about it. It turns out that he was unaware of her cheating, and now that they have let him know, he kills and buries her for real.

to:

* SelfFulfillingProphecy: SelfFulfillingProphecy:
**
In "De Mortius", a man is assumed by two friends to have killed his cheating wife and buried her in the basement, and they confront him about it. It turns out that he was unaware of her cheating, and now that they have let him know, he kills and buries her for real.



* ThanatosGambit: The protagonist of "The Equalizer" turns out to have pulled one on his nemesis.
** A man pulls one in "Death Sentence" to free his wife from the effects of his past and to get a blackmailer arrested for his murder.

to:

* ThanatosGambit: ThanatosGambit:
**
The protagonist of "The Equalizer" turns out to have pulled one on his nemesis.
nemesis.
** A man pulls one in "Death Sentence" to free his wife from the effects of his past and to get a blackmailer arrested for his murder.
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