History Series / AlfredHitchcockPresents

14th Aug '16 3:33:31 PM najhoant
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* GreatDetective: Charles Courtney (played by Creator/VincentPrice) from the episode "The Perfect Crime".
7th Mar '16 4:27:43 PM MarkLungo
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[[quoteright:250:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Alfred_Hitchcock_Presents_7154.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:250:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Alfred_Hitchcock_Presents_7154.org/pmwiki/pub/images/alfred_hitchcock_presents.jpg]]
21st Jan '16 6:31:35 PM nombretomado
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* HorseRacing: "On the Nose", "The Horseplayer".
22nd Oct '15 6:32:02 AM PaulA
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* EdibleBlugeon: The frozen leg of lamb in "Lamb to the Slaughter".

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* EdibleBlugeon: EdibleBludgeon: The frozen leg of lamb in "Lamb to the Slaughter".



* MissingEpisode: "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" was skipped during the original run because the sponsor found it too dark. It was restored to the running order when the show went into syndication.
22nd Oct '15 3:00:06 AM PaulA
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* AbsurdlyHighStakesGame: In "Man From the South" (1950s and 1980s versions), a young gambler accepts a bet that he can't light his cigarette lighter ten times in a row; if he loses the bet, he'll lose a finger.



* ArsonMurderandJaywalking: In the episode "Incident in a Small Jail," Leon Gorwald is arrested for jaywalking when it turns out [[spoiler: he actually is responsible and not caught for several murders]].

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* ArsonMurderandJaywalking: AmoralAttorney: "Your Witness" features one, who gets his comeuppance in the end.
* ArsonMurderAndJaywalking:
In the episode "Incident in a Small Jail," Leon Gorwald is arrested for jaywalking when it turns out [[spoiler: he actually is responsible and not caught for several murders]].murders]].
* TheBadGuyWins: Stories often ended this way, but if they did Hitchcock would usually spare the finer feelings of the MoralGuardians and the show's sponsors by telling the audience in his closing remarks that of course the bad guy was brought to justice later on.



* BodybagTrick: "Final Escape" 1950s and 1980s.

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* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: "Literature/TheMonkeysPaw -- A Retelling"
* BeePeople: In "Consider Her Ways", the human race develops into a hive society following a {{gendercide}} that kills off all the males.
* BodybagTrick: In "Final Escape" 1950s (1950s and 1980s.1980s versions), a prisoner plans to escape by hiding in the coffin of the next inmate to die, with an accomplice on the prison staff to come and dig it up later. [[spoiler:The prisoner succeeds in hiding and being buried, and only then discovers that the other occupant of the coffin is the accomplice...]]



* BubblePipe: Hitchcock introduces "The Perfect Crime" wearing a deerstalker and blowing a bubble pipe.
* BuriedAlive:
** "Breakdown" has Joseph Cotton paralyzed in a car accident and taken for dead. [[spoiler:He is saved at the last minute when an alert coroner notices a tear glimmering in his eye.]]
** In "Final Escape" (1950s and 1980s versions), a prisoner plans to escape by hiding in the coffin of the next inmate to die, with an accomplice on the prison staff to come and dig it up later. The prisoner succeeds in hiding and being buried, but then [[spoiler:discovers that the other occupant of the coffin is the accomplice...]]



* DeadMansChest

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* DeadMansChestDeadlyPrank:
** "Beta Delta Gamma" has a group of frat brothers heavily sedate one of their passed-out-drunk brothers and make the other passed-out-drunk brother think he killed him in an alcoholic blackout. Too bad he decided to bury the "dead guy" on the beach and the high tide washed away footprints and other traces...
** "The Night the World Ended" has a guy use a fake newspaper to trick a homeless man into think the world will end that night. [[spoiler:The homeless guy finds out and kills the prankster at the exact time the world was supposed to end.]]
** In the ''Alfred Hitchcock Hour'' episode "The Cadaver" a college student arranges for another student to go on a date with a woman and wake up with a similar-looking cadaver, to scare him from drinking so much. [[spoiler:And, of course, the prank victim finds out and kills him, putting his body in with the other cadavers.]]
* DeadMansChest: "Bad Actor" has a guy who kills someone and uses the bathtub and some strong acid to get rid of the body, after dismembering it. He's almost done, with just the head to go, when company comes calling, and he has to hide the head in an ice bucket.



* DeathByIrony: In "Your Witness", an AmoralAttorney gets a hit-and-run driver acquitted by introducing misleading medical reports indicating that the sole eyewitness is legally blind and therefore incompetent as a witness. When the attorney is later run down in the courthouse parking lot by his long-suffering wife, the only witness is the same man he had earlier discredited, who gleefully tells the cops, "It's a ''legal fact'' that I am incompetent as a witness!"



* DemonicDummy

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* DemonicDummyDemonicDummy:
** In "The Glass Eye", a woman who has fallen for a charming ventriloquist discovers [[spoiler:that he is just a life-size dummy, and his "dummy", played by Creator/BillyBarty, is the real ventriloquist]].
** "And So Died Riabouchinska", based on a short story written by Creator/RayBradbury, features a ventriloquist who acts as if his dummy Riabouchinska is a separate person (and seems more in love with her than with his wife, to the latter's distress). [[spoiler:In the end, Riabouchinska rats him out for the murder of a blackmailer, but it remains ambiguous whether she acted on her own volition or was just the conduit for a confession he couldn't face making straight out.]]



* EatTheEvidence: "Lamb to the Slaughter"

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* EatTheEvidence: In "Lamb to the Slaughter"Slaughter", a woman murders her husband with a frozen leg of lamb, then puts it in the oven to roast, and serves it to the detectives as they discuss the mystery of where the murder weapon might have gone.
* EdibleBlugeon: The frozen leg of lamb in "Lamb to the Slaughter".



* EvilDetectingBaby: Subverted in "Silent Witness". The baby cries whenever the man who killed her babysitter comes nearby. His guilty feelings make him suspect that the baby will actually get him caught, and it seems like he's deciding whether to do away with the child too. (He doesn't.) At the end we learn that the baby cries whenever ''any'' unknown man comes nearby.



* {{Fingore}}: The protagonist of "Man From the South" is at risk of having one of his fingers chopped off.



* HeatWave: "Shopping for Death" is set during a heatwave, and features a great dealing of crankiness ending in a murder.



* ImprovisedWeapon
* INeverSaidItWasPoison: [[spoiler: "Road Hog"]]

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* ImprovisedWeapon
ImprovisedWeapon: The frozen leg of lamb in "Lamb to the Slaughter".
* INeverSaidItWasPoison: [[spoiler: "Road Hog"]]InCaseYouForgotWhoWroteIt: Alfred Hitchcock ''presents'', but he doesn't actually direct nearly as many episodes as you might assume.
* InnOfNoReturn: Spirro's Club in "Specialty of the House" has a famous meat dish that's only served when a life member retires. Funny thing, the retiring member is never around when the dish is served...



* TheLittleShopThatWasntThereYesterday: In "The Magic Shop", based on the Creator/HGWells story, the shop appears, the owner gets a boy interested, and later the shop ''and boy'' disappear, and the boy is returned, ''different'', years later.



* MakeItLookLikeAnAccident: In "The Orderly World of Mr Appleby", Laurence Appleby murders his wife and makes it look like she tripped on a rug and fell. This comes back to bite him when his second wife dies in a genuine accident exactly like the one he faked.
* MissingEpisode: "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" was skipped during the original run because the sponsor found it too dark. It was restored to the running order when the show went into syndication.



* NeverMessWithGranny: Ms Cheney in "The Cheney Vase" may be an invalid old lady who's physically outmatched by the antagonist, but she has the brains to make up for it.



* NotNowKiddo

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* NotNowKiddoNotNowKiddo: In "Don't Interrupt", a boy who's being disruptive on a train trip is offered a silver dollar if he can just keep quiet for ten minutes. Then the boy is the only person to notice that there's someone outside the window begging for help...
* OffscreenKarma: Hitchcock would dish some out in his closing remarks, for the sake of the MoralGuardians' sensibilities, after any story in which TheBadGuyWins.



* OutOfCharacterAlert: In "You Got to Have Luck", an escaped convict holds a woman hostage in her house when the telephone rings. He makes her answer it, and, listening into the conversation, tells her exactly how to answer each question from her mother on the other end. Later, after the guy let his guard down, the cops come busting in and arrest him. It turns out [[spoiler:the woman was deaf but could speak without an accent and read lips as well. She was able to repeat what the guy said, but the mere fact that she was able to hold up one end of a telephone conversation tipped off her mother that something was going on.]]
* PetHeir: In "Craig's Will", old Mr Craig leaves his fortune to his dog instead of his nephew. The nephew is satisfied to wait until the dog dies and the fortune passes to him, but his girlfriend, who'd been looking forward to a share, decides to take matters into her own hands.



* PrettyInMink: "Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat" is about an adulterous woman trying to keep the mink coat she got from her lover without raising her husband's suspicions.



* RapeAndRevenge: "Revenge"

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* RapeAndRevenge: "Revenge"In "Revenge", a man sets out to get revenge on the man who raped his wife.
* RapeLeadsToInsanity: "Revenge" played on this idea without using the R word. A woman already recovering from a nervous breakdown is "assaulted" in her trailer. Her husband looks to avenge her by killing her assailant. One day, she points the man out to her husband, and he does the deed. [[spoiler:Then she points to another man, and another, and another.]]



* SawAWomanInHalf: "The Sorcerer's Apprentice"

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* SawAWomanInHalf: "The Sorcerer's Apprentice"Apprentice" features a magic act in which the showstopper is a version of this trick with a power saw.



* TheScrooge: The main character of "Cheap is Cheap" is a penny-pinching miser who read other people's newspapers. In reality, he had quite a bit of money saved up.



* ThickerThanWater: "Wet Saturday"

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* ThickerThanWater: "Wet Saturday"Saturday" is about a man who helps cover up a murder committed by his daughter to protect the family name. Hitchcock uses the phrase itself in his closing remarks.
* TomatoInTheMirror: In "Human Interest Story", a reporter interviews a man who has begun having delusions that he used to be a Martian. It turns out, he ''is'' a Martian, and is merely one of thousands of invaders. Fortunately, the reporter is also one, and he's able to silence him before he can blow their cover.
* TomatoSurprise: At least two episodes use the twist "you thought the protagonist was being stalked by the thief/murderer in the news, but actually that's the protagonist and the person following them is the detective trying to bring them to justice".



* UnPerson: In "Into Thin Air", based on an old urban legend, a woman runs an errand from the hotel room where she's staying with her mother, and when she returns her mother and even the room have vanished and the hotel staff deny that they were ever there.



* WakingUpAtTheMorgue: "Breakdown"

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* WakingUpAtTheMorgue: "Breakdown""Breakdown" has Joseph Cotton paralyzed in a car accident and taken for dead.
* WhatDidIDoLastNight:
** Played for drama in "Hangover", where the binge-drinking protagonist gets an answer that isn't remotely funny.
** Something similar also happens in "Never Again".
* WhodunnitToMe: In "Whodunit", a deceased mystery author talks a recording angel into letting him go back to his last day alive to find out who murdered him.
1st Sep '15 3:54:54 PM Eddy1215
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Added DiffLines:

* KarmaHoudini: The parents in "Don't Interrupt" don't receive any retribution for silencing their son when he was trying to tell them that a man outside the train was dying.
26th Jun '15 3:09:24 PM Nire
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* ShootTheShaggyDog: If you believe the closing monologue of "Triggers in Leash." The protagonist stops two characters from throwing their lives away over a pointless duel, but according to Hitchcock afterward, they die from food poisoning from a meal she improperly cooked hours later anyway.

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* ShootTheShaggyDog: If you believe the closing monologue of "Triggers in Leash." The protagonist stops two characters from throwing their lives away over a pointless duel, but according to Hitchcock afterward, they die hours later from food poisoning from a meal she improperly cooked hours later anyway.cooked.
5th Jun '15 12:32:17 AM MisterCPC
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Added DiffLines:

* ShootTheShaggyDog: If you believe the closing monologue of "Triggers in Leash." The protagonist stops two characters from throwing their lives away over a pointless duel, but according to Hitchcock afterward, they die from food poisoning from a meal she improperly cooked hours later anyway.
14th May '15 12:31:33 PM ColeNichols
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* PoorCommunicationKills: The twist ending of "Momentum."
19th Apr '15 1:07:11 PM Morgenthaler
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* {{Zeerust}}: For the most part averted. Unlike competing shows ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' and ''Series/TheOuterLimits'', Alfred Hitchcock did not want science fiction or fantasy episodes. However one episode - "The Blessington Method" - takes place on July 13th 1980, and looks about like what someone from the 50s/60s would imagine that far-off date to be like, including an average lifespan that's increased to 125, Grace being started "Our Father, who art in Space....", and just a faint hint of RaygunGothic. At least they didn't have the characters wear SpaceClothes.

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* {{Zeerust}}: For the most part averted. Unlike competing shows ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' and ''Series/TheOuterLimits'', ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'', Alfred Hitchcock did not want science fiction or fantasy episodes. However one episode - "The Blessington Method" - takes place on July 13th 1980, and looks about like what someone from the 50s/60s would imagine that far-off date to be like, including an average lifespan that's increased to 125, Grace being started "Our Father, who art in Space....", and just a faint hint of RaygunGothic. At least they didn't have the characters wear SpaceClothes.
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