History Series / AlfredHitchcockPresents

16th Dec '17 12:22:12 AM Alvin
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** The ''Alfred Hitchcock Presents'' episode "Number 22", which was about juvenile delinquency. While the introduction shows Hitchcock in a lineup (his earlier films being listed as prior offenses), in his closing remarks, he says that the subject is too serious to be treated with his usual wry remarks, and leaves it at that.
** A couple of these were done for ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour'', addressing social concerns within the series' format. They were "Hangover" , "Never Again", (dealing with alcoholism) and "Memo from Purgatory" (dealing with teen gang violence). In both cases, Hitchcock refrained from his usual humorous comments.

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** The ''Alfred Hitchcock Presents'' episode "Number 22", which was about juvenile delinquency. While the introduction shows Hitchcock in a lineup (his earlier films being listed as prior offenses), in his closing remarks, he says that the subject is too serious to be treated with his usual wry remarks, and leaves it at that.
that. There's also an episode dealing with alcoholism, "Never Again", which is treated the same way.
** A couple of these were done for ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour'', addressing social concerns within the series' format. They were "Hangover" , "Never Again", (dealing ,(dealing with alcoholism) and "Memo from Purgatory" (dealing with teen gang violence). In both cases, Hitchcock refrained from his usual humorous comments.
16th Dec '17 12:15:23 AM Alvin
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** A couple of these were done for ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour'', addressing social concerns within the series' format. They were "Hangover" (dealing with alcoholism) and "Memo from Purgatory" (dealing with teen gang violence). In both cases, Hitchcock refrained from his usual humorous comments.

to:

** A couple of these were done for ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour'', addressing social concerns within the series' format. They were "Hangover" , "Never Again", (dealing with alcoholism) and "Memo from Purgatory" (dealing with teen gang violence). In both cases, Hitchcock refrained from his usual humorous comments.
29th Aug '17 11:48:26 AM Omeganian
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Added DiffLines:

* DeathByAdaptation: "Human Interest Story" is based on a short story by Creator/FredricBrown. In the original, the reporter manages to maintain the cover through non-violent means.
11th Jul '17 3:17:56 PM yisfidri
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Added DiffLines:

* XanatosGambit: In "The Faith of Aaron Menefee", the title character's employer, a faith healer, refuses to let him marry his daughter Emily on the grounds that Aaron's faith in him is not strong enough. Encountering a paralyzed criminal who threatens to kill anyone who takes his money without successfully healing him, Aaron fetches the healer to work on him. Whether the healing works (demonstrating Aaron's faith) or not (resulting in the healer being killed), Aaron will be free to marry Emily.
2nd Jul '17 10:12:53 PM yisfidri
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** "Beta Delta Gamma" has a group of frat brothers heavily sedate one of their passed-out-drunk brothers and make the other passed-out-drunk brother think he killed him in an alcoholic blackout. Too bad he decided to bury the "dead guy" on the beach and the high tide washed away footprints and other traces...

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** "Beta Delta Gamma" has a group of frat brothers heavily sedate one of their passed-out-drunk brothers and make the other another passed-out-drunk brother think he killed him in an alcoholic blackout. Too bad he decided to bury the "dead guy" on the beach and the high tide washed away footprints and other traces...
25th Jun '17 8:15:22 AM Temmere
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* TheButlerDidIt: Hitchcock himself says this at the beginning of "And So Died Riabouchinska," for the benefit of people who can't stay for the whole episode. (It's just a gag, though; there's not even a butler in the story.)
28th Mar '17 2:59:15 AM CJO123
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GenreAnthology television series presented by famed thriller director Creator/AlfredHitchcock. The original run was from 1955 to 1962 (half-hour episodes) and 1962 to 1965 (hour-long episodes, as ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour''), bouncing between Creator/{{CBS}} and Creator/{{NBC}} and totalling over 200 episodes (of which fewer than two dozen were directed by Hitchcock himself).

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GenreAnthology television series presented by famed thriller director Creator/AlfredHitchcock. The original run was from 1955 to 1962 (half-hour episodes) and 1962 to 1965 (hour-long episodes, as ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour''), bouncing between Creator/{{CBS}} and Creator/{{NBC}} and totalling over 200 267 episodes (of which fewer than two dozen 17 were directed by Hitchcock himself).
12th Mar '17 6:44:30 PM PaulA
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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: In "Memo From Purgatory" (adapted by Creator/HarlanEllison from his own nonfiction book), a writer (James Caan) goes undercover in a street gang to research a book. When the gang finds his notes, they contemplate killing him, but the leader, Tiger (Creator/WalterKoenig), says no until he sees the part where the writer describes how Tiger doesn't have a regular girlfriend the way the rest of the gang does, and is likely "afraid of the opposite sex." The way Tiger flies into a rage at that, it's pretty clear that we're meant to understand that Tiger is homosexual and the writer picked up on it.

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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: In "Memo From Purgatory" (adapted by Creator/HarlanEllison from his own nonfiction book), a writer (James Caan) (Creator/JamesCaan) goes undercover in a street gang to research a book. When the gang finds his notes, they contemplate killing him, but the leader, Tiger (Creator/WalterKoenig), says no until he sees the part where the writer describes how Tiger doesn't have a regular girlfriend the way the rest of the gang does, and is likely "afraid of the opposite sex." The way Tiger flies into a rage at that, it's pretty clear that we're meant to understand that Tiger is homosexual and the writer picked up on it.
11th Mar '17 4:12:05 PM Temmere
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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: In "Memo From Purgatory" (adapted by Creator/HarlanEllison from his own nonfiction book), a writer (James Cann) goes undercover in a street gang to research a book. When the gang finds his notes, they contemplate killing him, but the leader, Tiger (Creator/WalterKoenig), says no until he sees the part where the writer describes how Tiger doesn't have a regular girlfriend the way the rest of the gang does, and is likely "afraid of the opposite sex." The way Tiger flies into a rage at that, it's pretty clear that we're meant to understand that Tiger is homosexual and the writer picked up on it.

to:

* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: In "Memo From Purgatory" (adapted by Creator/HarlanEllison from his own nonfiction book), a writer (James Cann) Caan) goes undercover in a street gang to research a book. When the gang finds his notes, they contemplate killing him, but the leader, Tiger (Creator/WalterKoenig), says no until he sees the part where the writer describes how Tiger doesn't have a regular girlfriend the way the rest of the gang does, and is likely "afraid of the opposite sex." The way Tiger flies into a rage at that, it's pretty clear that we're meant to understand that Tiger is homosexual and the writer picked up on it.
11th Mar '17 4:07:38 PM Temmere
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Added DiffLines:

* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: In "Memo From Purgatory" (adapted by Creator/HarlanEllison from his own nonfiction book), a writer (James Cann) goes undercover in a street gang to research a book. When the gang finds his notes, they contemplate killing him, but the leader, Tiger (Creator/WalterKoenig), says no until he sees the part where the writer describes how Tiger doesn't have a regular girlfriend the way the rest of the gang does, and is likely "afraid of the opposite sex." The way Tiger flies into a rage at that, it's pretty clear that we're meant to understand that Tiger is homosexual and the writer picked up on it.
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