History Series / AlfredHitchcockPresents

19th Apr '18 10:11:41 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Zeerust}}: For the most part averted. Unlike competing shows ''Series/{{The Twilight Zone|1959}}'' and ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'', Alfred Hitchcock did not want science fiction or fantasy episodes. However one episode - "The Blessington Method" - takes place on July 13th 1980, and looks about like what someone from the 50s/60s would imagine that far-off date to be like, including an average lifespan that's increased to 125, Grace being started "Our Father, who art in Space....", and just a faint hint of RaygunGothic. At least they didn't have the characters wear SpaceClothes.

to:

* {{Zeerust}}: For the most part averted. Unlike competing shows ''Series/{{The Twilight Zone|1959}}'' and ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'', ''Series/{{The Outer Limits|1963}}'', Alfred Hitchcock did not want science fiction or fantasy episodes. However one episode - "The Blessington Method" - takes place on July 13th 1980, and looks about like what someone from the 50s/60s would imagine that far-off date to be like, including an average lifespan that's increased to 125, Grace being started "Our Father, who art in Space....", and just a faint hint of RaygunGothic. At least they didn't have the characters wear SpaceClothes.
19th Apr '18 9:19:19 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Zeerust}}: For the most part averted. Unlike competing shows ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' and ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'', Alfred Hitchcock did not want science fiction or fantasy episodes. However one episode - "The Blessington Method" - takes place on July 13th 1980, and looks about like what someone from the 50s/60s would imagine that far-off date to be like, including an average lifespan that's increased to 125, Grace being started "Our Father, who art in Space....", and just a faint hint of RaygunGothic. At least they didn't have the characters wear SpaceClothes.

to:

* {{Zeerust}}: For the most part averted. Unlike competing shows ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' ''Series/{{The Twilight Zone|1959}}'' and ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'', Alfred Hitchcock did not want science fiction or fantasy episodes. However one episode - "The Blessington Method" - takes place on July 13th 1980, and looks about like what someone from the 50s/60s would imagine that far-off date to be like, including an average lifespan that's increased to 125, Grace being started "Our Father, who art in Space....", and just a faint hint of RaygunGothic. At least they didn't have the characters wear SpaceClothes.
26th Feb '18 12:53:55 PM MatthewnotMatt
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AxCrazy: Ironically, in "The Older Sister", the episode about Lizzie Borden, it is not Lizzie who fits this trope [[spoiler:but her sister Emma.)]]

to:

* AxCrazy: Ironically, in "The Older Sister", the episode about Lizzie Borden, it is not Lizzie who fits this trope [[spoiler:but her sister Emma.)]] ]]
25th Feb '18 5:44:34 PM MatthewnotMatt
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Ax-Crazy: Ironically, in "The Older Sister", the episode about Lizzie Borden, it is not Lizzie who fits this trope [[spoiler:but her sister Emma.)]]

to:

* Ax-Crazy: AxCrazy: Ironically, in "The Older Sister", the episode about Lizzie Borden, it is not Lizzie who fits this trope [[spoiler:but her sister Emma.)]]
25th Feb '18 5:41:23 PM MatthewnotMatt
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Ax-Crazy: Ironically, in "The Older Sister", the episode about Lizzie Borden, it is not Lizzie who fits this trope [[spoiler:but her sister Emma.)]]
18th Feb '18 6:39:33 AM Temmere
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* OnceForYesTwiceForNo: In "The Long Silence," Nora discovers that her husband Ralph killed her son, but falls down a flight of stairs before she can tell anyone. She becomes comatose, but as she slowly recovers she tries desperately to conceal her recovery from Ralph so he won't try to kill ''her''. But her nurse, Jean, begins to suspect that Nora is alert and that she can control her grip, and tells her to flap her fingers in the trope code as Jean asks her questions (while Ralph is out of the room).
16th Dec '17 12:22:12 AM Alvin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The ''Alfred Hitchcock Presents'' episode "Number 22", which was about juvenile delinquency. While the introduction shows Hitchcock in a lineup (his earlier films being listed as prior offenses), in his closing remarks, he says that the subject is too serious to be treated with his usual wry remarks, and leaves it at that.
** A couple of these were done for ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour'', addressing social concerns within the series' format. They were "Hangover" , "Never Again", (dealing with alcoholism) and "Memo from Purgatory" (dealing with teen gang violence). In both cases, Hitchcock refrained from his usual humorous comments.

to:

** The ''Alfred Hitchcock Presents'' episode "Number 22", which was about juvenile delinquency. While the introduction shows Hitchcock in a lineup (his earlier films being listed as prior offenses), in his closing remarks, he says that the subject is too serious to be treated with his usual wry remarks, and leaves it at that.
that. There's also an episode dealing with alcoholism, "Never Again", which is treated the same way.
** A couple of these were done for ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour'', addressing social concerns within the series' format. They were "Hangover" , "Never Again", (dealing ,(dealing with alcoholism) and "Memo from Purgatory" (dealing with teen gang violence). In both cases, Hitchcock refrained from his usual humorous comments.
16th Dec '17 12:15:23 AM Alvin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A couple of these were done for ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour'', addressing social concerns within the series' format. They were "Hangover" (dealing with alcoholism) and "Memo from Purgatory" (dealing with teen gang violence). In both cases, Hitchcock refrained from his usual humorous comments.

to:

** A couple of these were done for ''The Alfred Hitchcock Hour'', addressing social concerns within the series' format. They were "Hangover" , "Never Again", (dealing with alcoholism) and "Memo from Purgatory" (dealing with teen gang violence). In both cases, Hitchcock refrained from his usual humorous comments.
29th Aug '17 11:48:26 AM Omeganian
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* DeathByAdaptation: "Human Interest Story" is based on a short story by Creator/FredricBrown. In the original, the reporter manages to maintain the cover through non-violent means.
11th Jul '17 3:17:56 PM yisfidri
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* XanatosGambit: In "The Faith of Aaron Menefee", the title character's employer, a faith healer, refuses to let him marry his daughter Emily on the grounds that Aaron's faith in him is not strong enough. Encountering a paralyzed criminal who threatens to kill anyone who takes his money without successfully healing him, Aaron fetches the healer to work on him. Whether the healing works (demonstrating Aaron's faith) or not (resulting in the healer being killed), Aaron will be free to marry Emily.
This list shows the last 10 events of 112. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.AlfredHitchcockPresents