History SeinfeldIsUnfunny / VideoGames

22nd Jun '16 10:15:01 AM SpectralTime
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** This is even happening within its own series - someone used to the sheer number of support options available in Awakening (as well as the less GuideDangIt ways to get them) will find the supports in ''Elibe'' to be much less rewarding. For example, Chrom in ''Awakening'', who is the most limited in terms of his support options, ''still'' has more romance options than the ''main characters'' in Elibe and Sacred Stones.

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** This is even happening within its own series - someone used to the sheer number of support options available in Awakening (as well as the less GuideDangIt ways to get them) will find the supports in ''Elibe'' to be much less rewarding. For example, Chrom in ''Awakening'', who is the most limited in terms of his support options, ''still'' has more romance options than the ''main characters'' in Elibe and Sacred Stones.''Sacred Stones'', and won't lock out of getting them to S-Rank if he goes up to an A support with his best friend first.
16th Jun '16 5:28:31 PM Nicoaln
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** This is even happening within its own series - someone used to the sheer number of support options available in Awakening (as well as the less GuideDangIt ways to get them) will find the supports in ''Elibe'' to be much less rewarding. For example, Chrom in ''Awakening'', who is the most limited in terms of his support options, ''still'' has more romance options than the ''main characters'' in Elibe and Sacred Stones.



** Another good example of the times changing is the fact that ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', a game released in the west in 2016, got away with not one but ''two'' [[TheGayOption gay options]] yet still manages to have a "T" rating... on top of all the innuendo. A game like that would have ''easily'' been even ''more'' {{Bowdlerized}} if it came out in 2006 if not even given an "M" rating.



* Looking back at ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', it's hard to appreciate just how "newb-friendly" the game was back in 200'''4''', with all the things that have been changed and replaced with AntiFrustrationFeatures today. The fact that the worst you had to worry about dying was your equipment eventually breaking was considered a ''MASSIVE'' [[AntiFrustrationFeature headache relief]] back in the day. In fact, you couldn't lose your items (Especially if killed by another player) or de-level. Another big factor was the fact that the game provided a lot of content that could be done by yourself, and in theory it was possible to reach the max level without ever having to group with another player.
** Interestingly, the game is quite interesting in that it has had this trope happen with ''itself'' - the world was revamped back in 2010 for ''Cataclysm'', and this has resulted in ''Burning Crusade'' being considered to be quite dull and grindy. (Back in 2007, the Burning Crusade world was considered to be top notch) Many of the old dungeons (That have not been remade for later expansions) are quite dull by today's standards with lots of boss fights being Tank and Spank.

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* Looking back at ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', it's hard to appreciate just how "newb-friendly" or even [[FandomBerserkButton "Casual"]] the game was back in 200'''4''', with all the things that have been changed and replaced with AntiFrustrationFeatures today. The fact that the worst you had to worry about dying was your equipment eventually breaking was considered a ''MASSIVE'' [[AntiFrustrationFeature headache relief]] back in the day. In fact, you couldn't lose your items (Especially if killed by another player) or de-level. Another big factor was the fact that the game provided a lot of content that could be done by yourself, and in theory it was possible to reach the max level without ever having to group with another player.
** Interestingly, the game is quite interesting in that it has had this trope happen with ''itself'' - the world was revamped back in 2010 for ''Cataclysm'', and this has resulted in ''Burning Crusade'' being considered to be quite dull and grindy. (Back in 2007, the Burning Crusade world was considered to be top notch) Many of the old dungeons (That have not been remade for later expansions) are quite dull by today's standards with lots of boss fights being Tank and Spank.Spank.
*** Many players have also become ''quite'' spoiled by the changes made to balance and class performance over the years - one reason finding a group was so hard in ''Classic'' World of Warcraft was that there was literally only ''one'' class that could feasibly tank: Warriors. Druids and Paladins could not do it as they were better off using their abilities to heal. Druids also had virtually no damage-dealing ability and very little survivability, resulting in them becoming ''quite'' rare.
9th Jun '16 11:40:20 PM gewunomox
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* ''BokosukaWars'', originally released for {{Sharp X1}} and {{MSX}} computers in 1983, was seen as a revolutionary game in {{Japan}}, where it helped to lay the foundations for the {{tactical RPG}} sub-genre. Its UsefulNotes/{{NES}} console port, however, significantly toned down the StrategyGame elements, instead making it look like a badly designed ActionAdventure. When the inferior NES port was discovered in North America, ''Bokosuka Wars'' was rubbished by retro gamers, and is even seen as a joke, especially its GameOver screen with the {{Engrish}} phrase "[[HaveANiceDeath Wow! You Lose!]]"

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* ''BokosukaWars'', ''VideoGame/BokosukaWars'', originally released for {{Sharp X1}} and {{MSX}} computers in 1983, was seen as a revolutionary game in {{Japan}}, UsefulNotes/{{Japan}}, where it helped to lay the foundations for the {{tactical RPG}} sub-genre. Its UsefulNotes/{{NES}} console port, however, significantly toned down the StrategyGame elements, instead making it look like a badly designed ActionAdventure. When the inferior NES port was discovered in North America, ''Bokosuka Wars'' was rubbished by retro gamers, and is even seen as a joke, especially its GameOver screen with the {{Engrish}} phrase "[[HaveANiceDeath Wow! You Lose!]]"
6th Jun '16 4:24:51 AM erforce
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* ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'', in its day, was the UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame that Nintendo couldn't manufacture enough copies of to satisfy worldwide demand. Players who grew up in an age when only the most amateurish PlatformGame would have only four screens might wonder why it became so phenomenally popular. It doesn't help that most people have only played the NES version, [[PortingDisaster which only has three levels out of four]]. [[note]] Actually, almost all the home versions had three levels as well. The NES's is slightly less excusable, though, considering the developers had plenty of space to put the missing level there.[[/note]] To date, the only "complete" home versions are an unlockable arcade port in ''Donkey Kong 64'' as well as a special NES Original Edition on Virtual Console that was only given out on a couple of occasions.

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* ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'', in its day, was the UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame that Nintendo couldn't manufacture enough copies of to satisfy worldwide demand. Players who grew up in an age when only the most amateurish PlatformGame would have only four screens might wonder why it became so phenomenally popular. It doesn't help that most people have only played the NES version, [[PortingDisaster which only has three levels out of four]]. [[note]] Actually, almost all the home versions had three levels as well. The NES's is slightly less excusable, though, considering the developers had plenty of space to put the missing level there.[[/note]] To date, the only "complete" home versions are an unlockable arcade port in ''Donkey Kong 64'' ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong64'' as well as a special NES Original Edition on Virtual Console that was only given out on a couple of occasions.



* ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' was deemed revolutionary upon release on the Super NES in late 1994. In addition to being a pretty darn good platformer, the game's main draw was that its graphics were almost entirely rendered in 3D -- which was, until then, unheard of in 16 bit video games. Granted, it was a sprite-based game, so nothing was rendered in real time. Nonetheless, its graphics were impressive enough to sell truckloads of copies and arguably make it the game that finally pushed sales for the SNES ahead of the competing Sega Genesis in North America for good. Today, when compared to the far more sophisticated rendering that has developed ever since, the once awe-inspiring graphics don't look so impressive anymore[[note]]They have that plastic/rubbery look which was common in CG during the '90s[[/note]]. Meanwhile, its gameplay (while still very good in its own right), has been largely surpassed by its sequels -- particularly ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry2DiddysKongQuest'' and the ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryReturns'' games.

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* ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry1'' was deemed revolutionary upon release on the Super NES in late 1994. In addition to being a pretty darn good platformer, the game's main draw was that its graphics were almost entirely rendered in 3D -- which was, until then, unheard of in 16 bit video games. Granted, it was a sprite-based game, so nothing was rendered in real time. Nonetheless, its graphics were impressive enough to sell truckloads of copies and arguably make it the game that finally pushed sales for the SNES ahead of the competing Sega Genesis in North America for good. Today, when compared to the far more sophisticated rendering that has developed ever since, the once awe-inspiring graphics don't look so impressive anymore[[note]]They have that plastic/rubbery look which was common in CG during the '90s[[/note]]. Meanwhile, its gameplay (while still very good in its own right), has been largely surpassed by its sequels -- particularly ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry2DiddysKongQuest'' and the ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryReturns'' games.
4th Jun '16 5:47:46 PM dinohunterpat
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** Back when it released, ''Doom'' gained much controversy for its use of violence and gore. With a few exceptions like ''Wolfenstein'' and the occasional FMV game, most prior video games were largely marketed towards children and families. As such, audiences were shocked by the amount of mature content and ''Doom'' became one of the main targets of 90s {{Moral Guardian}}s with some even blaming it for inspiring school massacres. Nowadays, most gamers would view its controversy as overblown and its supposed violence to be relatively tame largely due to the dated aesthetics and lack of narrative . With improvements in graphical processing and contextual story telling, many modern games like ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'' and ''VideoGame/TheLastOfUs'' could offer more realistic violence that would leave a more shocking impact on audiences. To younger audiences, the violence in ''Doom'' would seem to simplistic and bland to elicit shock and disgust.

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** Back when it released, ''Doom'' gained much controversy for its use of violence and gore. With a few exceptions like ''Wolfenstein'' and ''Wolfenstein'', ''Mortal Kombat'', the occasional FMV game, most prior video games were largely marketed towards children and families. As such, audiences were shocked by the amount of mature content and ''Doom'' became one of the main targets of 90s {{Moral Guardian}}s with some even blaming it for inspiring school massacres. Nowadays, most gamers would view its controversy as overblown and its supposed violence to be relatively tame largely due to the dated aesthetics graphics and lack of narrative . With improvements in graphical processing and contextual story telling, many modern games like ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'' and ''VideoGame/TheLastOfUs'' could offer depict more realistic violence violent events that would leave a more shocking impact on audiences. To younger audiences, the violence in ''Doom'' would seem to too simplistic and bland to elicit shock and disgust.
4th Jun '16 12:07:50 AM Midna
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* [[RolePlayingGame Console RPGs]]. The plots of many early ones seem to a modern audience like textbook cliché storms, or at best StrictlyFormula. By now, [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyI quests to save the]] {{Cosmic Keystone}}s, [[WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld children stumbling into]] [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII quests far bigger than themselves]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV and]] [[DefectorFromDecadence turncoats against]] TheEmpire are all old hat. Their low StoryToGameplayRatio is only aggravated by the gameplay often demanding intensive LevelGrinding. Some of the best known examples come from the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' series.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' was awesome for being [[SerialNumbersFiledOff more or less a video game port]] of the then-exploding ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' game. Today, ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' exists, complete with [[VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2 a sequel]], and they have many, many more features with more polish and fewer glaring bugs.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' introduced the JobSystem, allowing players to switch character classes at will. This introduced or expanded many of the series' staples, like Geomancer, Dark Knight, and Scholar. Sadly, the game wasn't localized overseas for sixteen years. By then, Western players were used to the more complex and versatile systems of games like [=FFV=] and the ''Tactics'' sub-series, which allowed characters to have secondary abilities from other jobs, multiple abilities ''per'' job, and didn't include III's "adjustment period" where a newly-switched job has lowered stats for a certain number of battles. While the 2006 remake added much more in the way of characterization and graphics, it kept its mechanics largely in line with the original.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' in particular tends to suffer from this. At the time of its release, it was regarded as a revolutionary milestone and hailed as one of the greatest games of all time. Having a troubled protagonist (who may have IdentityAmnesia) chase around a [[TheUnfettered Unfettered]] OmnicidalManiac might seem played out, but at the time you would've been hard-pressed to find many [=RPG=]s with that formula. While earlier ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games had troubled heroes, ''Final Fantasy VII'' was the first with a hero who turns out to be an UnreliableNarrator questioning his existence. Also, on a technical level, the first few seconds of the opening sequence, with the camera panning out slowly from a classic piece of shiny magic rock to a dark futuristic city, were initially meant to be ''shocking'' -- and they were. Finally, the PlotlineDeath of Aerith was originally a huge shock felt across the gaming industry, but is today perhaps ''the'' video-game example of ItWasHisSled. It was not the first to [[KilledOffForReal kill off a party member for real]] (''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' beat it to the punch), but it was the first to try to portray such a death with a feeling of loss rather than it being an intense, dramatic moment.
*** It's also hard for newer gamers to appreciate (in any sense of the word) the [[DysfunctionJunction thoroughly screwed-up nature of the cast]], even though ''FFVII'' was released long before Creator/BioWare made collections of tortured individuals ''de rigueur'' for Western [=RPG=]s. It even beat ''PlanescapeTorment'' by two years, a game in which the thoroughly screwed-up nature of the cast is a major plot point.
*** ''Final Fantasy VII'' is frequently criticized for having a BlindIdiotTranslation. While it does indeed suffer from a large number of spelling errors and wonky sentences that future games in the series, and future [=JRPGs=] in general, would improve upon, the translation was very good for its time. The character limit for names was increased so that the named for people and items wouldn't have to be abbreviated, there was a lack of censorship that allowed for cursing and mature themes to be discussed, and the plot managed to be understandable despite the MindScrew nature of it in the second half.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI''. Getting rid of the Crystals, which were a key staple of ''Final Fantasy'' before this game, was highly controversial at the time, and the game paved the way for the AnachronismStew and SchizoTech that the series is most widely known for. The exclusion of the Crystals is lost on most modern fans, and a common criticism is that the cast is shallow and unexplored and the gameplay is easy and simple. The game's BigBad Kefka is frequently written off as a goofy [[SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker Joker]] knock-off, but prior to Kefka, ''Final Fantasy'' villains fit the generic TinTyrant / EvilOverlord mold, and Kefka's insane wisecracks and clown-like appearance were a huge departure. Similarly, rather than turning into a generic monster as the FinalBoss, Kefka became a PhysicalGod, and the final battle had many parallels to ''TheDivineComedy''. These days, [=JRPGs=] including ''Final Fantasy'' frequently have angelic and divine final bosses, and FauxSymbolism is par for the course, ''especially'' with ''Final Fantasy''.
*** The opera scene is a particular victim -- for gamers in 1994 who were used to getting virtually all speech and information in text format only, hearing ''any'' kind of vocalization was astonishing and groundbreaking. But while gamers at the time were able to forgive the midi/synth approximations of singing under the limits of the era, newer gamers used to full voice acting and lush musical vocals are more likely to find it cheesy.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' was revolutionary during its time because the game introduced a more developed storyline and had CharacterDevelopment; characters actually think about what they have done and what they must do to have a better future for themselves and the story itself still has the "save the world" plot, but it also has much more behind it so that the story isn't ''just'' about world saving. Nowadays, people snub the game for having characters being predictable and the story being too simplistic, even though said people forget that the game using those concepts back when it was new was mind blowing at that time.
*** In addition, the gameplay is seen as rather "Generic" nowadays, yet many gameplay features in the game were pretty much unheard of. The active time battle system required the player to have more of an eye on battles than before in the series (and most other games like this on the market at the time). Not only that, but the bosses themselves would change their attack patterns depending on the battle phase. Thus, players would have to adjust their own strategy and have characters pick convenient times to hide or defend to ward off an incoming attack, adjust to the party's layout being messed with, knock down a shield so that the boss may be damaged, ShootTheMedicFirst, or wait because their actions would be countered. In an age with like ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', and ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', it's hard to believe that these battles actually ''tripped people up'' back in the day.
*** Scarmiglione was itself a minor KaizoTrap ''before'' Kaizo Traps became popular. The boss attacks you, you beat it, but once you take a few steps away, he announces that you did ''exactly'' what he wanted you to do and attacks you even ''stronger'' than before. Not only that, but he did so ''from behind'', meaning your three [[SquishyWizard squishy mages]] are in the ''front'' row. (Some players actually didn't even know you ''could'' swap rows in battle since you had virtually no reason to so at that point, meaning they battled with Cecil's damage output reduced!) Even when people played the remakes, almost everyone [[GuideDangIt used the internet]], had played it before, or knew someone else who had -- so they knew to swap rows right before triggering the next event flag, then said "Scarmiglione is ''hard''?" And compared to most Kaizo Traps... This boss is ''very'' forgiving.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'': The use of voice acting rather than strictly text-based dialog was actually seen as a very controversial move, as many ''Final Fantasy'' fans feared it would detract from the series' sense of identifiability. Furthermore, while ''X'' certainly wasn't the first JRPG to use voice acting, it was the first to really make it an important part of the narrative and use it to enhance the game's sense of cinematic wonder.[[note]]Whereas, earlier voice acting in [=JRPGs=] were often poorly dubbed affairs that felt tacked on and a little cheesy.[[/note]] It turned out to not only be a change for the better but a revolutionary development for the RPG genre. The stellar voice acting and cinematics in games like ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}''? None of that would've been possible without ''Final Fantasy X'' taking this "risk" back in 2001.
*** Even before that, several games had voice acting before ''Final Fantasy X'' -- games like ''VideoGame/LunarEternalBlue'' and ''VideoGame/TalesOfEternia'' (which predated Final Fantasy X) indeed look quite cheesy today, and that's not getting into how many games like ''VideoGame/KingsQuestV'' had voice acting before. Even in 200''1'', they had started to experience this.

to:


* Early [[RolePlayingGame Console RPGs]]. The RPGs]] plots of many early ones seem to a modern audience like textbook cliché storms, or at best StrictlyFormula. By now, [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyI quests to save the]] {{Cosmic Keystone}}s, [[WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld children stumbling into]] [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII quests far bigger than themselves]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV and]] [[DefectorFromDecadence turncoats against]] TheEmpire are all old hat. Their low StoryToGameplayRatio is only aggravated by the gameplay often demanding intensive LevelGrinding. Some of the best known examples come from the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' series.
** * ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' was awesome for being [[SerialNumbersFiledOff more or less a video game port]] of the then-exploding ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' game. Today, ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' exists, complete with [[VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2 a sequel]], and they have many, many more features with more polish and fewer glaring bugs.
** * ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' introduced the JobSystem, allowing players to switch character classes at will. This introduced or expanded many of the series' staples, like Geomancer, Dark Knight, and Scholar. Sadly, the game wasn't localized overseas for sixteen years. By then, Western players were used to the more complex and versatile systems of games like [=FFV=] and the ''Tactics'' sub-series, which allowed characters to have secondary abilities from other jobs, multiple abilities ''per'' job, and didn't include III's "adjustment period" where a newly-switched job has lowered stats for a certain number of battles. While the 2006 remake added much more in the way of characterization and graphics, it kept its mechanics largely in line with the original.
** * ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' in particular tends to suffer from this. At the time of its release, it was regarded as a revolutionary milestone and hailed as one of the greatest games of all time. Having a troubled protagonist (who may have IdentityAmnesia) chase around a [[TheUnfettered Unfettered]] OmnicidalManiac might seem played out, but at the time you would've been hard-pressed to find many [=RPG=]s with that formula. While earlier ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games had troubled heroes, ''Final Fantasy VII'' was the first with a hero who turns out to be an UnreliableNarrator questioning his existence. Also, on a technical level, the first few seconds of the opening sequence, with the camera panning out slowly from a classic piece of shiny magic rock to a dark futuristic city, were initially meant to be ''shocking'' -- and they were. Finally, the PlotlineDeath of Aerith was originally a huge shock felt across the gaming industry, but is today perhaps ''the'' video-game example of ItWasHisSled. It was not the first to [[KilledOffForReal kill off a party member for real]] (''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' beat it to the punch), but it was the first to try to portray such a death with a feeling of loss rather than it being an intense, dramatic moment.
*** ** It's also hard for newer gamers to appreciate (in any sense of the word) the [[DysfunctionJunction thoroughly screwed-up nature of the cast]], even though ''FFVII'' was released long before Creator/BioWare made collections of tortured individuals ''de rigueur'' for Western [=RPG=]s. It even beat ''PlanescapeTorment'' by two years, a game in which the thoroughly screwed-up nature of the cast is a major plot point.
*** ** ''Final Fantasy VII'' is frequently criticized for having a BlindIdiotTranslation. While it does indeed suffer from a large number of spelling errors and errors, wonky sentences sentences, and outright mistranslations that future games in the series, and future [=JRPGs=] in general, would improve upon, the translation was very good for its time. The character limit for names was increased so that the named for people and items wouldn't have to be abbreviated, there was a lack of censorship that allowed for cursing and mature themes to be discussed, and the plot managed to be understandable despite the MindScrew nature of it in the second half.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI''. Getting * ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' got rid of the Crystals, which were a key staple of ''Final Fantasy'' before this game, before. This was highly controversial at the time, and the game paved the way for the AnachronismStew and SchizoTech that the series is most widely known for. The exclusion of the Crystals is lost on most modern fans, and a common criticism is that the cast is shallow and unexplored and the gameplay is easy and simple. The game's BigBad Kefka is frequently written off as a goofy [[SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker Joker]] knock-off, but prior to Kefka, ''Final Fantasy'' villains fit the generic TinTyrant / EvilOverlord mold, and Kefka's insane wisecracks and clown-like appearance were a huge departure. Similarly, rather than turning into a generic monster as the FinalBoss, Kefka became a PhysicalGod, and the final battle had many parallels to ''TheDivineComedy''. These days, [=JRPGs=] including ''Final Fantasy'' frequently have angelic and divine final bosses, and FauxSymbolism is par for the course, ''especially'' with ''Final Fantasy''.
*** ** The opera scene is a particular victim -- for gamers in 1994 who were used to getting virtually all speech and information in text format only, hearing ''any'' kind of vocalization was astonishing and groundbreaking. But while gamers at the time were able to forgive the midi/synth approximations of singing under the limits of the era, newer gamers used to full voice acting and lush musical vocals are more likely to find it cheesy.
** * ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' was revolutionary during its time because the game introduced a more developed storyline and had CharacterDevelopment; characters actually think about what they have done and what they must do to have a better future for themselves and the story itself still has the "save the world" plot, but it also has much more behind it so that the story isn't ''just'' about world saving. Nowadays, people snub the game for having characters being predictable and the story being too simplistic, even though said people forget that the game using those concepts back when it was new was mind blowing at that time.
*** ** In addition, the gameplay is seen as rather "Generic" nowadays, yet many gameplay features in the game were pretty much unheard of. The active time battle system required the player to have more of an eye on battles than before in the series (and most other games like this on the market at the time). Not only that, but the bosses themselves would change their attack patterns depending on the battle phase. Thus, players would have to adjust their own strategy and have characters pick convenient times to hide or defend to ward off an incoming attack, adjust to the party's layout being messed with, knock down a shield so that the boss may be damaged, ShootTheMedicFirst, or wait because their actions would be countered. In an age with like ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', and ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', it's hard to believe that these battles actually ''tripped people up'' back in the day.
*** ** Scarmiglione was itself a minor KaizoTrap ''before'' Kaizo Traps became popular. The boss attacks you, you beat it, but once you take a few steps away, he announces that you did ''exactly'' what he wanted you to do and attacks you even ''stronger'' than before. Not only that, but he did so ''from behind'', meaning your three [[SquishyWizard squishy mages]] are in the ''front'' row. (Some players actually didn't even know you ''could'' swap rows in battle since you had virtually no reason to so at that point, meaning they battled with Cecil's damage output reduced!) Even when people played the remakes, almost everyone [[GuideDangIt used the internet]], had played it before, or knew someone else who had -- so they knew to swap rows right before triggering the next event flag, then said "Scarmiglione is ''hard''?" And compared to most Kaizo Traps... This boss is ''very'' forgiving.
** * ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'': The use of voice acting rather than strictly text-based dialog was actually seen as a very controversial move, as many ''Final Fantasy'' fans feared it would detract from the series' sense of identifiability. Furthermore, while ''X'' certainly wasn't the first JRPG to use voice acting, it was the first to really make it an important part of the narrative and use it to enhance the game's sense of cinematic wonder.[[note]]Whereas, earlier voice acting in [=JRPGs=] were often poorly dubbed affairs that felt tacked on and a little cheesy.[[/note]] It turned out to not only be a change for the better but a revolutionary development for the RPG genre. The stellar voice acting and cinematics in games like ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}''? None of that would've been possible without ''Final Fantasy X'' taking this "risk" back in 2001.
*** ** Even before that, several games had voice acting before ''Final Fantasy X'' -- games like ''VideoGame/LunarEternalBlue'' and ''VideoGame/TalesOfEternia'' (which predated Final Fantasy X) indeed look quite cheesy today, and that's not getting into how many games like ''VideoGame/KingsQuestV'' had voice acting before. Even in 200''1'', they had started to experience this.



** The series has been doomed to almost-niche status abroad due to the following: long localization holdups with the 8-bit generation games rendering them either obsolete or in competition with the new 16-bit generation, the temporary folding of Enix's American wing, and last but definitely not least, the game to break the genre in the West and define it, ''Final Fantasy VII'', stood in stark contrast, being more about outrageous battle systems and cinematic spectacle.

to:

** The series has been doomed to almost-niche status abroad due to the following: long localization holdups with the 8-bit generation games in particular rendering them either obsolete or in competition with the new 16-bit generation, the temporary folding of Enix's American wing, and last but definitely not least, the game to break the genre in the West and define it, ''Final Fantasy VII'', stood in stark contrast, being more about outrageous battle systems and cinematic spectacle.



** The twist of the original ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' was that once you defeated the FinalBoss, suddenly he changes (Or his pet dragon comes to avenge his master, but [[{{Woolseyism}} everyone liked the translation better]]) and you get another more powerful opponent to face before victory. While sequential final bosses are nothing new in games these days, at the time this was actually seen as a pretty big twist.
*** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' has a similar thing - The apparent BigBad of the game is fought and defeated, only for a sudden repeat of the previous game to happen - you have another boss to fight. That wasn't the BigBad you just faced - it was TheDragon. Now you must fight TheManBehindTheMan. Having an apparent BigBad who turns out to be TheDragon or for the BigBad to have TheManBehindTheMan is pretty run of the mill almost thirty years after its release, and its sudden appearance at the end with little foreshadowing would get it labeled an AssPull or GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere by today's standards.

to:

** The twist of the original ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' was that once you defeated the FinalBoss, suddenly he changes (Or reveals his true form (or his pet dragon comes to avenge his master, but [[{{Woolseyism}} everyone everyone, even the creators themselves, liked the translation better]]) and you get another another, more powerful opponent to face before victory. While sequential final bosses are nothing new in games these days, at the time this was actually seen as a pretty big twist.
*** ** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' has a is similar thing - The -- the apparent BigBad of the game is fought and defeated, only for a sudden repeat of the previous game to happen - you have another boss to fight. That wasn't the BigBad you just faced - faced, it was TheDragon. Now you must fight TheManBehindTheMan. Having an apparent BigBad who turns out to be TheDragon or for the BigBad to have TheManBehindTheMan is pretty run of the mill almost thirty years after its release, and its sudden appearance at the end with little foreshadowing would get it labeled an AssPull or GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere by today's standards.



** Or, for that matter, the Atari 2600 itself, which was [[TropeCodifier the first commercially successful]] home console to store games on interchangeable cartridges.
*** There are however atari 2600 games [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVpMBx8BF6c that]] are [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRqCbifUaD0 an exception]] to this trope.

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** Or, for that matter, the Atari 2600 itself, which was [[TropeCodifier the first commercially successful]] home console to store games on interchangeable cartridges.
***
cartridges. There are however atari 2600 games [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVpMBx8BF6c that]] are [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRqCbifUaD0 an exception]] exceptions]] to this trope.



* Bungie's ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' series, or ''VideoGame/PathwaysIntoDarkness''. They were among the first FPS games to feature a complex storyline that drove the gameplay, alternate fire, and the ability for computer players to move the mouse in order to rotate their character's view (including the ability to look up and down ''and'' side to side without restrictions). By today's standards, though, it's hard to believe that these games were once revolutionary.
* ''VideoGame/JurassicParkTrespasser'', granted, part of the reason it was hard to get into was the fact that it was an ObviousBeta. But at the time, a game like that was actually ''highly'' ambitious. Tying back into ''Half-Life 2'', the physics in that game wouldn't have been possible without the physics engine from this game as inspiration.

to:

* Bungie's ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' series, or ''VideoGame/PathwaysIntoDarkness''. They ''VideoGame/PathwaysIntoDarkness'', were among the first FPS games to feature a complex storyline that drove the gameplay, alternate fire, and the ability for computer players to move the mouse in order to rotate their character's view (including the ability to look up and down ''and'' side to side without restrictions). By today's standards, though, it's hard to believe that these games were once revolutionary.
* ''VideoGame/JurassicParkTrespasser'', granted, ''VideoGame/JurassicParkTrespasser''. Granted, part of the reason it was hard to get into was the fact that it was an ObviousBeta. But at the time, a game like that was actually ''highly'' ambitious. Tying back into ''Half-Life 2'', the physics in that game wouldn't have been possible without the physics engine from this game as inspiration.



* ''Franchise/{{Atelier}} Iris''. In an odd combination of SeinfeldIsUnfunny and NoExportForYou, when it ''finally'' came over to the U.S. in 2005. "So it's a standard JRPG with "alchemy crafting"?" While the "standard JRPG" bit is, well, [[ClicheStorm not exactly false]] for ''Iris'', what a lot of Western consumers fail to understand in shrugging off the crafting system is that the progenitor of the ''Atelier'' series, ''Atelier Marie'', was the first JRPG to not only feature a very robust (in the case of ''Marie'', absurdly robust) crafting system, but was the first JRPG to feature alchemy heavily. After ''Marie'' and its sequel sold a quarter million copies each, you suddenly had alchemy coming out of the woodwork in Japanese pop culture and nearly every JRPG in the wake of ''Marie'' has featured some kind of crafting system. The problem is, due to some [[ScrewedByTheNetwork poor business decisions]] on the part of multiple parties, practically '''everything else''' that was influenced by ''Atelier'' crossed the Pacific before it did, and the original games never came over at all. So the ''Atelier'' series is regarded as punctuation in the story of RPG history in the West, when in fact it seems to have had nearly as much influence on game design in Japan as other staple series.
* ''[[VideoGame/GoldenEye1997 GoldenEye 007]]'', one of the first VideoGames based on a movie [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames that didn't suck]] (in some ways, it was better than the movie), now suffers from this. At the time, the game was basically the first console FirstPersonShooter done right[[note]]though it wasn't the first to be positively reviewed or commercially successful[[/note]] and is, in many ways, the reason why the genre became so popular on consoles (before, it was almost entirely PC based). But by today's standards, its lack of online play (not its fault, since it was on the UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}}), crude aiming system, heavy dose of {{Escort Mission}}s, lack of voice acting (again, not its fault, it was on the Nintendo 64 and was an early game on the console to boot), large amount of linearity (which is ironic, since at the time ''[=GoldenEye=]'' was possibly the least linear game on the market), dated graphics, and inconsistent framerate. Ironically, there was [[VideoGame/TheWorldIsNotEnough another]] Film/JamesBond FPS for the N64 that ''vastly'' improved the graphics, controls, missions, and plot, but it's not nearly as well remembered as ''[=GoldenEye=]''.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Atelier}} Iris''. In Iris'' got this, in an odd combination of SeinfeldIsUnfunny and NoExportForYou, when it ''finally'' came over to the U.S. in 2005. "So it's a standard JRPG with "alchemy crafting"?" While the "standard JRPG" bit is, well, [[ClicheStorm not exactly false]] for ''Iris'', what a lot of Western consumers fail to understand in shrugging off the crafting system is that the progenitor of the ''Atelier'' series, ''Atelier Marie'', was the first JRPG to not only feature a very robust (in the case of ''Marie'', absurdly robust) crafting system, but was the first JRPG to feature alchemy heavily. After ''Marie'' and its sequel sold a quarter million copies each, you suddenly had alchemy coming out of the woodwork in Japanese pop culture and nearly every JRPG in the wake of ''Marie'' has featured some kind of crafting system. The problem is, due to some [[ScrewedByTheNetwork poor business decisions]] on the part of multiple parties, practically '''everything else''' that was influenced by ''Atelier'' crossed the Pacific before it did, and the original games never came over at all. So the ''Atelier'' series is regarded as punctuation in the story of RPG history in the West, when in fact it seems to have had nearly as much influence on game design in Japan as other staple series.
* ''[[VideoGame/GoldenEye1997 GoldenEye 007]]'', one of the first VideoGames based on a movie [[TheProblemWithLicensedGames that didn't suck]] (in some ways, it was better than the movie), now suffers from this. At the time, the game was basically the first console FirstPersonShooter done right[[note]]though it wasn't the first to be positively reviewed or commercially successful[[/note]] and is, in many ways, the reason why the genre became so popular on consoles (before, it was almost entirely PC based). But it holds up poorly by today's standards, standards because of its lack of online play (not its fault, since it was on the UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}}), crude aiming system, heavy dose of {{Escort Mission}}s, lack of voice acting (again, not its fault, it was on the Nintendo 64 and was an early game on the console to boot), large amount of linearity (which is ironic, since at the time ''[=GoldenEye=]'' was possibly the least linear game on the market), dated graphics, and inconsistent framerate. Ironically, there was [[VideoGame/TheWorldIsNotEnough another]] Film/JamesBond FPS for the N64 that ''vastly'' improved the graphics, controls, missions, and plot, but it's not nearly as well remembered as ''[=GoldenEye=]''.



*** A revolutionary aspect of [=GoldenEye's=] single player campaign that tends to be retrospectively overlooked is its artificial intelligence. In a time when artificial intelligence models in first person shooters were usually limited to "shoot the hero when he enters the room" alongside some randomly generated movement, [=GoldenEye's=] more sophisticated AI (enemies dodged bullets, recognized noise, set off alarms, etc.) was downright amazing. Unfortunately, after games like ''Half-Life'' and ''Halo'' further revolutionized AI routines in first person shooters, the guards and enemies in [=GoldenEye=] seem downright moronic now (not least of all helped that long-time players have made [[ArtificialStupidity some actual shortcomings in their AI]] very well-known).

to:

*** ** A revolutionary aspect of [=GoldenEye's=] single player campaign that tends to be retrospectively overlooked is its artificial intelligence. In a time when artificial intelligence models in first person shooters were usually limited to "shoot the hero when he enters the room" alongside some randomly generated movement, [=GoldenEye's=] more sophisticated AI (enemies dodged bullets, recognized noise, set off alarms, etc.) was downright amazing. Unfortunately, after games like ''Half-Life'' and ''Halo'' further revolutionized AI routines in first person shooters, the guards and enemies in [=GoldenEye=] seem downright moronic now (not least of all helped that long-time players have made [[ArtificialStupidity some actual shortcomings in their AI]] very well-known).



** This has also affected the ''Doom'' [[GameMod modding community]].
*** Older mods which were acclaimed back in the day may seem downright primitive by today's standards, in part due to evolving mapper skill, but also due to the introduction of increasingly user-friendly level editors which make it a lot easier to add fine detailing. Today's players are also a lot less forgiving of mazelike layouts and [[GuideDangIt confusing puzzles and switch hunts]]. Megawads such as ''Icarus: Alien Vanguard'' and ''Requiem'' were considered some of the best back in the late nineties, but today they seem at best like a mixed bag.
*** This is apparent with maps by the Finnish mapper Iikka Keranen, who was named as the best mapper of all time by Doomworld.com back in 1999. His contributions to ''Requiem'' were applauded in part due to their groundbreaking tricks, such as 3D bridges, and attempts at realism. Now that the novelty has worn off, it becomes painfully obvious that the maps' cramped interiors really don't make for very good gameplay.
* ''VideoGame/{{Elite}}''. David Braben and Ian Bell's game was completely groundbreaking when it was published in the mid '80s with its open-ended trading and shooting gameplay, and massive universe of stars and planets. It's still talked about with fondness by those who spent hours at a time playing it back then. To many who didn't play it in the '80s it's hard to see what all the fuss is about.
** The immediate successors, however, either due to slightly improved interface (or perspective shift), customization, or storyline, did not suffer so terribly. Chalk most of it up to youngsters these days being untrained to deal with vector graphics and unable to gauge depth properly. It is still a commonly used and cherished game mechanic, since it's tough to mass-produce this sort of thing to the point of disgust without sinking a company. ''VideoGame/StarFlight'' and ''VideoGame/{{Privateer}}'' to name just a pair of the oldest.
* The ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' series has been around in a while, but licensing issues have ensured that [[NoExportForYou a Western player is more-or-less forced to emulate if he or she wants to experience them directly]]. To date, the newest and best game in the series that has been fully translated is ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsJudgment''. However, playing it first is an excellent way to ruin all the other games currently available in English, including ''Super Robot Wars Alpha Gaiden'' and the localized ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsOriginalGeneration'' games, as all three make use of much more primitive interfaces, mechanics, and overall presentation than ''Judgment'', and have a much less fair difficulty curve.
* Point-and-click adventure games. Mostly due to a combination of GuideDangIt, YouCantGetYeFlask, and [=GUIs=] becoming popular (and easier to program), it can be a little hard for even some fans of these to pick up old Sierra adventure games such as ''VideoGame/LauraBow'', ''VideoGame/KingsQuest'', ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest'' and ''VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry'', text games like ''VideoGame/{{Zork}}'', and more.
** And it isn't just the ancient parser adventures -- even the most advanced of InteractiveFiction games get overlooked now, because who wants to ''type'' their commands in, after years of YouCantGetYeFlask leaving a bad taste in peoples' mouths?
* ''Franchise/StarOcean''. This happened primarily to the first two games when they were each given an EnhancedRemake. The first ''VideoGame/StarOcean'' game was actually, for the most part, ''drastically'' different in story than most other [=RPG=]s (with a few exceptions like ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' and a couple ''ShinMegamiTensei'' games who often used elements of sci-fi) and the fact that this game was actually credited as the one that pushed the SNES's technology to the limit. People often criticized it as "There isn't enough sci-fi, there's magic so it's not sci-fi", "ItsShortSoItSucks", or "TheyChangedItNowItSucks" regarding the changes to their PSP versions. The plot for the first ''Star Ocean'' game is ''very'' similar to an episode of ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'', and the plot for the second one (called a ClicheStorm by some reviewers who had played the PSP remake) was actually ''far'' more original for the time than it seems now. The entire skill system (which was actually pretty in-depth and thorough) is often ignored, and the amount of recruitable characters and somewhat complex recruitment branches (giving some more replay value than the typical "you get these eight characters but can use only three or four at a time"-RPG) is considered just one part of a cliché storm. Let's also not forget that it was one of the first games that featured optional "Private Actions" to develop characters since the plot was written with only the required characters needing to be involved.
* ''VideoGame/TalesOfPhantasia''. This was a complaint when it had ''finally'' been localized. The first two ''Tales'' games (''Phantasia'' and ''Destiny'') may also be somewhat hard to get into with how their battle systems (which was actually a rather major change in what {{RPG}} gamers have been accustomed to since the days of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' and what was just showing up in action games like ''VideoGame/WorldOfMana'' and ''VideoGame/SecretOfEvermore'') are much slower and simplistic than in the more recent games in the series like ''Vesperia'' and ''Dawn of the New World''. You were restricted to just a 2D plane, there wasn't a lot of comboing, and the action froze to display spells & Special attacks. Also added was the fact that in Japan, ''Phantasia'' was called "The game that sings" for having a theme song, unlike most other games at the time. Nowadays everyone more or less ''expects'' the games to be fast-paced action or else they don't fulfill the Action Quota produced in part ''by Phantasia'' and ''Destiny''. And having a theme song? Psssh... nearly every game's got one of those now.

to:

** * This has also affected the ''Doom'' [[GameMod modding community]].
***
community]]:
**
Older mods which were acclaimed back in the day may seem downright primitive by today's standards, in part due to evolving mapper skill, but also due to the introduction of increasingly user-friendly level editors which make it a lot easier to add fine detailing. Today's players are also a lot less forgiving of mazelike layouts and [[GuideDangIt confusing puzzles and switch hunts]]. Megawads such as ''Icarus: Alien Vanguard'' and ''Requiem'' were considered some of the best back in the late nineties, but today they seem at best like a mixed bag.
*** ** This is apparent with maps by the Finnish mapper Iikka Keranen, who was named as the best mapper of all time by Doomworld.com back in 1999. His contributions to ''Requiem'' were applauded in part due to their groundbreaking tricks, such as 3D bridges, and attempts at realism. Now that the novelty has worn off, it becomes painfully obvious that the maps' cramped interiors really don't make for very good gameplay.
* ''VideoGame/{{Elite}}''. David Braben and Ian Bell's game ''VideoGame/{{Elite}}'' was completely groundbreaking when it was published in the mid '80s '80s, with its open-ended trading and shooting gameplay, gameplay and massive universe of stars and planets. It's still talked about with fondness by those who spent hours at a time playing it back then. To many who didn't play it in the '80s '80s, it's hard to see what all the fuss is about.
** The immediate successors, however, either due to slightly improved interface (or perspective shift), customization, or storyline, did not suffer so terribly. Chalk most of it up to youngsters these days being untrained to deal with vector graphics and unable to gauge depth properly. It is still a commonly used and cherished game mechanic, since it's tough to mass-produce this sort of thing to the point of disgust without sinking a company. company: ''VideoGame/StarFlight'' and ''VideoGame/{{Privateer}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Privateer}}'', to name just a pair of the oldest.
* The ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' series has been around in for a while, but licensing issues have ensured that [[NoExportForYou a Western player is more-or-less forced to emulate if he or she wants to experience them directly]]. To date, the newest and best game in the series that has been fully translated is ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsJudgment''. However, playing it first is an excellent way to ruin all the other games currently available in English, including ''Super Robot Wars Alpha Gaiden'' and the localized ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsOriginalGeneration'' games, as all three make use of much more primitive interfaces, mechanics, and overall presentation than ''Judgment'', and have a much less fair difficulty curve.
* Point-and-click adventure games. Mostly games, mostly due to a combination of GuideDangIt, YouCantGetYeFlask, and [=GUIs=] becoming popular (and easier to program), it program). It can be a little hard for even some point-and-click fans of these to pick up old Sierra adventure games such as ''VideoGame/LauraBow'', ''VideoGame/KingsQuest'', ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest'' and ''VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry'', text games like ''VideoGame/{{Zork}}'', and more.
** And it
more. It isn't just the ancient parser adventures -- even the most advanced of InteractiveFiction games get overlooked now, because who wants to ''type'' their commands in, after years of YouCantGetYeFlask leaving a bad taste in peoples' mouths?
* ''Franchise/StarOcean''. This happened ''Franchise/StarOcean'', primarily to the first two games when they were each given an EnhancedRemake. The first ''VideoGame/StarOcean'' game was actually, for the most part, ''drastically'' different in story than most other [=RPG=]s (with a few exceptions like ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' and a couple ''ShinMegamiTensei'' games who often used elements of sci-fi) and the fact that this game was actually credited as the one that pushed the SNES's technology to the limit. People often criticized it as "There isn't enough sci-fi, there's magic so it's not sci-fi", "ItsShortSoItSucks", or "TheyChangedItNowItSucks" regarding the changes to their PSP versions. The plot for the first ''Star Ocean'' game is ''very'' similar to an episode of ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'', and the plot for the second one (called a ClicheStorm by some reviewers who had played the PSP remake) was actually ''far'' more original for the time than it seems now. The entire skill system (which was actually pretty in-depth and thorough) is often ignored, and the amount of recruitable characters and somewhat complex recruitment branches (giving some more replay value than the typical "you get these eight characters but can use only three or four at a time"-RPG) is considered just one part of a cliché storm. Let's also not forget that it was one of the first games that featured optional "Private Actions" to develop characters since the plot was written with only the required characters needing to be involved.
* ''VideoGame/TalesOfPhantasia''. This was ''VideoGame/TalesOfPhantasia'' had this as a complaint when it had was ''finally'' been localized. The first two ''Tales'' games (''Phantasia'' and ''Destiny'') may also be somewhat hard to get into with how their battle systems (which was actually a rather major change in what {{RPG}} gamers have been accustomed to since the days of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' and what was just showing up in action games like ''VideoGame/WorldOfMana'' and ''VideoGame/SecretOfEvermore'') are much slower and simplistic than in the more recent games in the series like ''Vesperia'' and ''Dawn of the New World''. You were restricted to just a 2D plane, there wasn't a lot of comboing, and the action froze to display spells & Special attacks. Also added was the fact that in Japan, ''Phantasia'' was called "The game that sings" for having a theme song, unlike most other games at the time. Nowadays everyone more or less ''expects'' the games to be fast-paced action or else they don't fulfill the Action Quota produced in part ''by Phantasia'' and ''Destiny''. And having a theme song? Psssh... nearly every game's got one of those now.



* ''VideoGame/DragonsLair''. When new technology opened up new potential doors for media for the video games' storytelling, it can be rather hard to appreciate some of the early attempts at adding voice and cutscenes to games beyond this game's rather simplistic gameplay. Especially games like ''VideoGame/BegasBattle'', ''VideoGame/KingsQuestV'' and ''[[VideoGame/KingsQuestVI VI]]'', or the first two ''{{Lunar}}'' games. ''King's Quest V'' was a rather early example of adventure games and [=RPG=]s using more media to spread information and the story. Nowadays people will probably view the cutscenes on Website/YouTube and just laugh at the stiff animation, the voice acting, or the syncing (Usually a fault of the software used to put the file on Website/YouTube), often praising games like ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' for "doing the [[FullMotionVideo FMVs]] right" without acknowledging that even the most recent of those games (''EternalBlue'') was made at least two years before ''Daggerfall'' was even finished. (And even then, ''Daggerfall'''s videos could all be counted on one-hand.) Despite how rather laughable the cutscenes and voice acting is nowadays, one may have to consider that with the exception of ''VideoGame/LunarEternalBlue'' (which was made in 1994), all of those games were released within the range of 1990-92, and even then, the technology was rather new for the time. (''King's Quest V'', for example, showed a lot of people the potential of using CD-based games as opposed constantly switching out floppy discs.)

to:

* ''VideoGame/DragonsLair''. When new technology opened up new potential doors for media for the video games' storytelling, it can be rather hard to appreciate some of the early attempts at adding voice and cutscenes to games games, beyond this game's the rather simplistic gameplay.gameplay of ''VideoGame/DragonsLair''. Especially games like ''VideoGame/BegasBattle'', ''VideoGame/KingsQuestV'' and ''[[VideoGame/KingsQuestVI VI]]'', or the first two ''{{Lunar}}'' games. ''King's Quest V'' was a rather early example of adventure games and [=RPG=]s using more media to spread information and the story. Nowadays people will probably view the cutscenes on Website/YouTube and just laugh at the stiff animation, the voice acting, or the syncing (Usually a fault of the software used to put the file on Website/YouTube), often praising games like ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' for "doing the [[FullMotionVideo FMVs]] right" without acknowledging that even the most recent of those games (''EternalBlue'') was made at least two years before ''Daggerfall'' was even finished. (And even then, ''Daggerfall'''s videos could all be counted on one-hand.) Despite how rather laughable the cutscenes and voice acting is nowadays, one may have to consider that with the exception of ''VideoGame/LunarEternalBlue'' (which was made in 1994), all of those games were released within the range of 1990-92, and even then, the technology was rather new for the time. (''King's Quest V'', for example, showed a lot of people the potential of using CD-based games as opposed constantly switching out floppy discs.)



* ''VideoGame/{{Metroid}}''. SamusIsAGirl. So what's the big deal? It's quite forgotten that the original was released at a time when female protagonists (or any female fitting [[FlatCharacter any trope besides]] DamselInDistress) in video games were essentially unheard of besides ''[[VideoGame/PacMan Ms. Pac-Man]]'', even the trend of required token females in fighting games hadn't started yet. A rather dull twist today was one hell of a shocker at the time.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Metroid}}''. SamusIsAGirl. So what's the big deal? It's quite forgotten that the original game was released at a time when female protagonists (or any female fitting [[FlatCharacter any trope besides]] DamselInDistress) in video games were essentially unheard of besides ''[[VideoGame/PacMan Ms. Pac-Man]]'', even Pac-Man]]''. Even the trend of required token females in fighting games hadn't started yet. A rather dull twist today was one hell of a shocker at the time.



* ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''. The violence of the first game, and its depiction of digitized characters mutilating, decapitating, and just plain murdering each other with their Fatalities caused quite a stir during the [[TheNineties early 1990s]] with both players and parents. Nintendo caved in to the MoralGuardians when it came to "their" version of the game for the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]], which had all the blood removed and some of the [[strike:Fatalities]] [[NeverSayDie Finishing Moves]] changed, resulting in significantly less units sold than its uncensored UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis counterpart. Arguably, ''Mortal Kombat'' could be cited as the game that single-handedly created the ESRB. Nowadays, the violence of the ''Mortal Kombat'' series seems cartoony and tame compared to some of the more disturbing games released since the rating system has been established, such as ''VideoGame/{{Manhunt}}'' and ''Silent Hill''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''. The violence of the first game, ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''' and its depiction of digitized characters mutilating, decapitating, and just plain murdering each other with their Fatalities caused quite a stir during the [[TheNineties early 1990s]] with both players and parents. Nintendo caved in to the MoralGuardians when it came to "their" version of the game for the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]], which had all the blood removed and some of the [[strike:Fatalities]] [[NeverSayDie Finishing Moves]] changed, resulting in significantly less units sold than its uncensored UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis counterpart. Arguably, ''Mortal Kombat'' could be cited as the game that single-handedly created the ESRB. Nowadays, the violence of the ''Mortal Kombat'' series seems cartoony and tame compared to some of the more disturbing games released since the rating system has been established, such as ''VideoGame/{{Manhunt}}'' and ''Silent Hill''.



* ''VideoGame/PhantasyStar''. A lot of the tropes of [=JRPG=]s in general come from this series, including the mash-up of sci-fi and fantasy elements, customizing party lineups by swapping out party members, and the emotionally shocking but dramatically effective storyline deaths of important protagonists[[note]] Technically, ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' had protagonists meet their demise over the course of the story but they were the fourth party member and not any of the main three[[/note]]. Now it's all par for the course. In addition, while the ''VideoGame/PhantasyStar'' games were generally DarkerAndEdgier than the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games of their day, ever since ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', the majority of [=RPGs=] have been at least as grim as anything in the quadrilogy.

to:

* ''VideoGame/PhantasyStar''. A ''VideoGame/PhantasyStar'' gave birth to a lot of the tropes of [=JRPG=]s in general come from this series, general, including the mash-up of sci-fi and fantasy elements, customizing party lineups by swapping out party members, and the emotionally shocking but dramatically effective storyline deaths of important protagonists[[note]] Technically, ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' had protagonists meet their demise over the course of the story but they were the fourth party member and not any of the main three[[/note]]. Now it's all par for the course. In addition, while the ''VideoGame/PhantasyStar'' games were generally DarkerAndEdgier than the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games of their day, ever since ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', the majority of [=RPGs=] have been at least as grim as anything in the quadrilogy.



*** Early Western [=RPGs=] were so mechanically similar that you could frequently import parties developed in other games. You could play ''BardsTale 2'' with your ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'' party.

to:

*** ** Early Western [=RPGs=] were so mechanically similar that you could frequently import parties developed in other games. You could play ''BardsTale 2'' with your ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'' party.



* ''VideoGame/{{Quake}}''. The original game was an immense hit in its day due to its technological innovations. But its once-shocking 3D graphics now look... underwhelming, due to low polygon counts and lack of texture filtering. Though the overall atmosphere and art design still hold up quite well despite the limitations. Even its other claim to fame, being the first widespread online FPS is relatively unimpressive to today's gamers. Today, with gaming networks like UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, UsefulNotes/PlayStationNetwork and UsefulNotes/XboxLiveArcade, ''Quake'''s lack of a server-browser, let alone a gaming network (excluding early 3rd party networks like [=MPlayer=] and MSN Zone) seems downright primitive. Still, considering today's gaming dominated by multiplayer FPS's, Quake's popularization of online gameplay makes it one of the most important technical feats to this day.
* ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark1992''. That game was probably the TropeCodifier (along with ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil'') for most SurvivalHorror tropes. Yet the animations for it and some of the voice acting come off as narmy and act as [[NightmareRetardant nightmare retadants]]. The game itself [[NonIndicativeName doesn't look very dark]] either, and lacks the sorts of graphical elements that make more modern games actually scary. The game's tech ''does'' give an UncannyValley feel to it that can be quite {{Nightmare Fuel}}ish in its own right.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Quake}}''. The original game ''VideoGame/{{Quake}} 1'' was an immense hit in its day due to its technological innovations. But its once-shocking 3D graphics now look... underwhelming, due to low polygon counts and lack of texture filtering. Though the overall atmosphere and art design still hold up quite well despite the limitations. Even its other claim to fame, being the first widespread online FPS is relatively unimpressive to today's gamers. Today, with gaming networks like UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, UsefulNotes/PlayStationNetwork and UsefulNotes/XboxLiveArcade, ''Quake'''s lack of a server-browser, let alone a gaming network (excluding early 3rd party networks like [=MPlayer=] and MSN Zone) seems downright primitive. Still, considering today's gaming dominated by multiplayer FPS's, Quake's popularization of online gameplay makes it one of the most important technical feats to this day.
* ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark1992''. That game ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark1992'' was probably the TropeCodifier (along with ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil'') for most SurvivalHorror tropes. Yet the animations for it and some of the voice acting come off as narmy and act as [[NightmareRetardant nightmare retadants]]. The game itself [[NonIndicativeName doesn't look very dark]] either, and lacks the sorts of graphical elements that make more modern games actually scary. The game's tech ''does'' give an UncannyValley feel to it that can be quite {{Nightmare Fuel}}ish creepy in its own right.



* ''VideoGame/SuperMario64''. In addition to being arguably the first example of a 3D platformer done right, the game was the first to successfully create a seamless 3D world and show what could really be done with the small addition of the Z-axis. For quite a while, it was the premiere example of the VideoGame3DLeap and set the standard for just about every 3D game thereafter.

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* ''VideoGame/SuperMario64''. In ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'', in addition to being arguably widely considered the first example of a 3D platformer done right, the game was the first to successfully create a seamless 3D world and show what could really be done with the small addition of the Z-axis. For quite a while, it was the premiere example of the VideoGame3DLeap and set the standard for just about every 3D game thereafter.



* ''VideoGame/ApeEscape''. Nowadays, the game is plagued by DamnYouMuscleMemory and what is now considered terrible camera controls (in part because a standardized control scheme is "Right analog stick for camera, left analog stick for movement"). However, at the time, ''Ape Escape'' was a huge experiment in 3D control, as well as for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation in general. For one, it was the first game to ''require'' the [=DualShock=] controller.
* ''VideoGame/TombRaider''. The game was also praised for its detailed, realistic interactive 3D environment and use of set pieces, which was groundbreaking at the time. Nowadays, the original game rarely gets the respect it deserves, and even then, it's mostly remembered for the {{fanservice}} (she has [[BuxomIsBetter big boobs]], therefore the game is sexist and [[AccentuateTheNegative completely cancels out every other positive aspect of Lara's characterization]]) that is mentioned rather than the many other things it did and the major part it played in establishing the 3D ActionAdventure genre in general.

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* ''VideoGame/ApeEscape''. Nowadays, the game ''VideoGame/ApeEscape'' is nowadays plagued by DamnYouMuscleMemory and what is now considered terrible camera controls (in part because a standardized control scheme is "Right analog stick for camera, left analog stick for movement"). However, at the time, ''Ape Escape'' it was a huge experiment in 3D control, as well as for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation in general. For one, it was the first game to ''require'' the [=DualShock=] controller.
* ''VideoGame/TombRaider''. The game ''VideoGame/TombRaider'' was also praised for its detailed, realistic interactive 3D environment and use of set pieces, which was groundbreaking at the time. Nowadays, the original game rarely gets the respect it deserves, and even then, it's mostly [[BestKnownForTheFanservice remembered for the {{fanservice}} fanservice]] (she has [[BuxomIsBetter big boobs]], therefore the game is sexist and [[AccentuateTheNegative completely cancels out every other positive aspect of Lara's characterization]]) that is mentioned rather than the many other things it did and the major part it played in establishing the 3D ActionAdventure genre in general.



* ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}''. [[Creator/BenCroshaw Yahtzee]] once described the series as "needlessly obtuse", which would make sense if there was anything better available at the time the games were released (which is only true for ''VideoGame/UltimaIX'' and perhaps ''VideoGame/UltimaVIII'').

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* ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}''. ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' was once described by [[Creator/BenCroshaw Yahtzee]] once described the series as "needlessly obtuse", which would make sense if there was anything better available at the time the games were released (which is only true for ''VideoGame/UltimaIX'' and perhaps ''VideoGame/UltimaVIII'').



* ''VideoGame/WelcomeToPiaCarrot''. The first game was made in 1995. Like many other [[HGame adult games]] and {{dating sim}}s, it lingered in NoExportForYou territory. By the time a FanTranslation of the PC-FX port was made in 2009, the art style looked quite old on the other hand, only a few other similar games in English in 2009 had simulation-style gameplay).

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* ''VideoGame/WelcomeToPiaCarrot''. The first game ''VideoGame/WelcomeToPiaCarrot'' was made in 1995. Like many other [[HGame adult games]] and {{dating sim}}s, it lingered in NoExportForYou territory. By the time a FanTranslation of the PC-FX port was made in 2009, the art style looked quite old on (on the other hand, only a few other similar games in English in 2009 had simulation-style gameplay).



** Heck, [[http://www.smwcentral.net/?p=showhack&id=1163 Rob-Omb's Quest]] probably looks lousy today compared to other ''Super Mario World'' hacks, but around the time it came out, (many) people were impressed by the custom ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' music, overworld and level ideas.

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** Heck, [[http://www.smwcentral.net/?p=showhack&id=1163 Rob-Omb's Quest]] probably looks lousy today compared to other ''Super Mario World'' hacks, but around the time it came out, (many) people were impressed by the custom ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' music, overworld and level ideas. One world in particular revolves almost entirely around direct remakes of levels from ''Super Mario Bros. 3'', which is something that can get a hack rejected from SMW Central these days.



* When ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' was released in early 1996, just hearing the word "Damn!" uttered at the very beginning was pretty hardcore, let alone being able to do things like dance with (or kill) strippers. Today, with far more brutal and foul-mouthed games having been released ever since, it's hard to look at this game as little more than a standard mid-'90s FPS with a cheesy 80's action movie gimmick, as the reception for VideoGame/DukeNukemForever demonstrates.

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* When ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' was released in early 1996, just hearing the word "Damn!" uttered at the very beginning was pretty hardcore, let alone being able to do things like dance with (or kill) strippers. Today, with far more brutal and foul-mouthed games having been released ever since, it's hard to look at this game as little more than a standard mid-'90s FPS with a cheesy 80's action movie gimmick, as the lukewarm reception for VideoGame/DukeNukemForever demonstrates.



** Hell, ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' has suffered from this badly in general. ''Call Of Duty 4'''s multiplayer was viewed as pretty advanced for the time, with class customisation and smooth multiplayer, and reasonable graphics. However, the problem seems to be that the series has become too formulaic, with a lack of general change until the announcement of ''Black Ops 2''.

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** Hell, ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' has suffered from this badly in general. ''Call Of Duty 4'''s multiplayer was viewed as pretty advanced for the time, with class customisation and customisation, smooth multiplayer, multiplayer and reasonable reasonably good graphics. However, the problem seems to be that the series has become too formulaic, with a lack of general change until the announcement of ''Black Ops 2''.



* ''Joe Montana II Sports Talk Football'' released back in 1991 was the first football video game to actually have continous commentary.
* ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry 1''. When it came out, reviews lauded the first game for its fast action and deep gameplay; today many players who try it find it kind of slow, clunky and limited (not to mention the infamous [[DamnYouMuscleMemory triangle jump]]). It has the right to be, since it basically set all the foundations of the modern Beat 'em All genre, four years before ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'' and Itagaki's ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden''.

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* ''Joe Montana II Sports Talk Football'' Football'', released back in 1991 1991, was the first football video game to actually have continous commentary.
* ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry 1''. When it came out, reviews 1'' was lauded the first game on release for its fast action and deep gameplay; today many players who try it find it kind of slow, clunky and limited (not to mention the infamous [[DamnYouMuscleMemory triangle jump]]). It has the right to be, since it basically set all the foundations of the modern Beat 'em All genre, four years before ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'' and Itagaki's ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden''.



* ''VideoGame/{{Pong}}''. The ultimate example of this trope. Whilst not the first ever video game as is widely believed, it is the first game to truly make the medium ''popular'' which is far more important in establishing whether something will become commercially viable or not. Indeed this sheer popularity is most likely the reason ''why'' essentially no one today can name what came before it without the aid of Google. Pity therefore, that even gamers who grew up with it probably think of it as nothing more than two lines and a dot on a hazy monochrome screen. It doesn't help that game is designed to be played with dials, while most modern versions use a d-pad, touchscreen, or mouse.
* VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}: It's hard to believe that, in the late-90's, this game [[NoExportForYou almost didn't see an American release]] because of its religious overtones. Compared to what a lot of more recent games get away with in terms of religious content, it's hard to believe that the game's [[ShownTheirWork surprisingly reverent]] treatment of the topic was met with so much controversy. Even stranger: ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'', released almost one year earlier, had much stronger and harsher religious overtones. But there were no qualms about giving that game a US release. And let's not even get started on the [[HollywoodSatanism satanic overtones]] of ID Software's mid-90's games.
* ''VideoGame/FrontMission'', the series was ''BandOfBrothers'' with giant robots with a bit of ''Series/TwentyFour'' mixed in. However, Square thinking that westerners wouldn't appreciate such a story and had created a route meant to cater to the American Public with a more traditional anime inspired plot and another which is very similar to previous titles. Too bad they didn't realize that nowadays, moral greyness and protagonists with complex personalities are the norm as seen with Front Mission Evolved.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Pong}}''. The ''VideoGame/{{Pong}}'' is the ultimate example of this trope. Whilst not the first ever video game as is widely believed, it is the first game to truly make the medium ''popular'' ''popular'', which is far more important in establishing whether something will become commercially viable or not. Indeed Indeed, this sheer popularity is most likely the reason ''why'' essentially no one today can name what came before it without the aid of Google. Pity therefore, It's a pity that even gamers who grew up with it probably think of it as nothing more than two lines and a dot on a hazy monochrome screen. It doesn't help that the game is designed to be played with dials, while most modern versions use a d-pad, touchscreen, or mouse.
* VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}: It's hard to believe that, ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'', in the late-90's, this game late '90s, [[NoExportForYou almost didn't see an American release]] because of its religious overtones. Compared to what a lot of more recent games get away with in terms of religious content, it's hard to believe that the game's [[ShownTheirWork surprisingly reverent]] treatment of the topic was met with so much controversy. Even stranger: ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'', released almost one year earlier, had much stronger and harsher religious overtones. But there were no qualms about giving that game a US release. And let's not even get started on the [[HollywoodSatanism satanic Satanic overtones]] of ID Software's mid-90's games.
* ''VideoGame/FrontMission'', the series ''VideoGame/FrontMission'' was essentially ''BandOfBrothers'' with giant robots with a bit of ''Series/TwentyFour'' mixed in. However, Square thinking that westerners wouldn't appreciate such a story and had created a route meant to cater to the American Public with a more traditional anime inspired plot and another which is very similar to previous titles. Too bad they didn't realize that nowadays, moral greyness and protagonists with complex personalities are the norm norm, as seen with Front ''Front Mission Evolved.Evolved''.



* The ''ice bucket'' from ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty.'' Whilst little pieces of 3D interaction had been on the PC for some time, back on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 in 2001 the idea that you could shoot a bucket full of ice off a minibar and watch each individual cube slowly melt before your eyes was so amazing that some period magazine reviews supplied screenshots of the event or advised you to save beforehand just so you could watch it a second time. Needless to say that it is unlikely anyone today would be quite so enthusiastic.

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* The ''ice bucket'' from ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty.'' Whilst little pieces of 3D interaction had been on the PC for some time, back on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 in 2001 the idea that you could shoot a bucket full of ice off a minibar and watch each individual cube slowly melt before your eyes was so amazing that some period magazine reviews supplied screenshots of the event or advised you to save beforehand just so you could watch it a second time. Needless to say that it is say, it's unlikely anyone today would be quite so enthusiastic.



* Upon release on the Super NES in late 1994, ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' was deemed revolutionary. In addition to being a pretty darn good platformer, the game's main draw was that its graphics were almost entirely rendered in 3D -- which was, until then, unheard of in 16 bit video games. Granted, it was a sprite-based game, so nothing was rendered in real time. Nonetheless, its graphics were impressive enough to sell truckloads of copies and arguably make it the game that finally pushed sales for the SNES ahead of the competing Sega Genesis in North America for good. Today, when compared to the far more sophisticated rendering that has developed ever since, the once awe-inspiring graphics don't look so impressive anymore[[note]]They have that plastic/rubbery look which was common in CG during the '90s[[/note]]. Meanwhile, its gameplay (while still very good in its own right), has been largely surpassed by its sequels -- particularly ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry2DiddysKongQuest'' and the ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryReturns'' games.

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* Upon release on the Super NES in late 1994, ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' was deemed revolutionary.revolutionary upon release on the Super NES in late 1994. In addition to being a pretty darn good platformer, the game's main draw was that its graphics were almost entirely rendered in 3D -- which was, until then, unheard of in 16 bit video games. Granted, it was a sprite-based game, so nothing was rendered in real time. Nonetheless, its graphics were impressive enough to sell truckloads of copies and arguably make it the game that finally pushed sales for the SNES ahead of the competing Sega Genesis in North America for good. Today, when compared to the far more sophisticated rendering that has developed ever since, the once awe-inspiring graphics don't look so impressive anymore[[note]]They have that plastic/rubbery look which was common in CG during the '90s[[/note]]. Meanwhile, its gameplay (while still very good in its own right), has been largely surpassed by its sequels -- particularly ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry2DiddysKongQuest'' and the ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryReturns'' games.



* In 1981, ''VideoGame/PolePosition'' was truly ahead of its time, being the first driving game in [[TwoAndAHalfD three dimensions]]; driving games prior to that use a top-down view instead. But it has since been usurped by newer racing games that refine the genre further and are far more popular; ''Pole Position''[='=]s lack of proper racing mechanics (such as positions/ranks) and [[EveryCarIsAPinto excessively volatile cars]] (as in, cars that blow up if they so much as rub paint with each other) means that most players see it as a stepping stone for the genre at best.

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* In 1981, ''VideoGame/PolePosition'' was truly ahead of its time, time when it was released in 1981, being the first driving game in [[TwoAndAHalfD three dimensions]]; driving games prior to that use a top-down view instead. But it has since been usurped by newer racing games that refine the genre further and are far more popular; ''Pole Position''[='=]s lack of proper racing mechanics (such as positions/ranks) and [[EveryCarIsAPinto excessively volatile cars]] (as in, cars that blow up if they so much as rub paint with each other) means that most players see it as a stepping stone for the genre at best.
23rd May '16 12:15:58 PM MegaMarioMan
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* ''VideoGame/ConkersBadFurDay'' has fallen victim to this, but not in the way you might think it has. Rather, it was among the first video games to use context-sensitive gameplay, meaning that you were given unique abilities based on the situation at hand. How? By stepping on a Context Sensitivity Pad, where you were granted otherwise impossible abilities until stepping off. Compared to the context-sensitive gameplay of later games like ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'', Conker's seems very clumsy and limited. On the other hand, the game's liberal use of VulgarHumor is still pretty unique, and probably the only reason one would be likely to choose it over a more recent platformer like ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank'' or ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy''.

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* ''VideoGame/ConkersBadFurDay'' has fallen victim to this, but not in the way you might think it has. Rather, it was among the first video games to use context-sensitive gameplay, meaning that you were given unique abilities based on the situation at hand. How? By stepping on a Context Sensitivity Pad, where you were granted otherwise impossible abilities until stepping off. Compared to the context-sensitive gameplay of later games like ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'', Conker's seems very clumsy and limited. On the other hand, the game's liberal use of VulgarHumor is still pretty unique, and probably the only reason one would be likely to choose it over a more recent platformer like ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank'' ''Franchisee/RatchetAndClank'' or ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy''.
16th May '16 6:06:33 PM Kadorhal
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* ''VideoGame/TalesOfPhantasia''. This was a complaint when it had ''finally'' been localized. The first two ''Tales'' games (''Phantasia'' and ''Destiny'') may also be somewhat hard to get into with how their battle systems (which was actually a rather major change in what {{RPG}} gamers have been accustomed to since the days of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' and what was just showing up in action games like ''VideoGame/WorldOfMana'' and ''VideoGame/SecretOfEvermore'') are much slower and simplistic than in the more recent games in the series like ''Vesperia'' and ''Dawn of the New World''. You were restricted to just a 2D plane, there wasn't a lot of comboing, and the action froze to display spells & Special attacks. Also added was the fact that in Japan, ''VideoGame/TalesOfPhantasia'' was called "The game that sings" for having a theme song, unlike most other games at the time. Nowadays everyone more or less ''expects'' the games to be fast-paced action or else they don't fulfill the Action Quota produced in part ''by'' ''Phantasia'' and ''Destiny''. And having a theme song? Psssh... nearly every game's got one of those now.
** Some of these were subverted by the {{Enhanced Remake}}s the two had. (the UsefulNotes/PlayStation version of ''Phantasia'' is considered the best version of ''Phantasia'').

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* ''VideoGame/TalesOfPhantasia''. This was a complaint when it had ''finally'' been localized. The first two ''Tales'' games (''Phantasia'' and ''Destiny'') may also be somewhat hard to get into with how their battle systems (which was actually a rather major change in what {{RPG}} gamers have been accustomed to since the days of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' and what was just showing up in action games like ''VideoGame/WorldOfMana'' and ''VideoGame/SecretOfEvermore'') are much slower and simplistic than in the more recent games in the series like ''Vesperia'' and ''Dawn of the New World''. You were restricted to just a 2D plane, there wasn't a lot of comboing, and the action froze to display spells & Special attacks. Also added was the fact that in Japan, ''VideoGame/TalesOfPhantasia'' ''Phantasia'' was called "The game that sings" for having a theme song, unlike most other games at the time. Nowadays everyone more or less ''expects'' the games to be fast-paced action or else they don't fulfill the Action Quota produced in part ''by'' ''Phantasia'' ''by Phantasia'' and ''Destiny''. And having a theme song? Psssh... nearly every game's got one of those now.
** Some of these were subverted by the {{Enhanced Remake}}s the two had. had (the UsefulNotes/PlayStation version of ''Phantasia'' is considered the best version of ''Phantasia'').



** If you think that the LiteralSplitPersonality or the escapism are cliché, it's worth noting that you'd be hard pressed to find any more of that back in 1996.
9th May '16 2:53:55 PM Nicoaln
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** The twist of the original ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' was that once you defeated the FinalBoss, suddenly he changes (Or his pet dragon comes to avenge his master, but [[{{Woolseyism}} everyone liked the translation better]]) and you get another more powerful opponent to face before victory. While sequential final bosses are nothing new in games these days, at the time this was actually seen as a pretty big twist.
*** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' has a similar thing - The apparent BigBad of the game is fought and defeated, only for a sudden repeat of the previous game to happen - you have another boss to fight. That wasn't the BigBad you just faced - it was TheDragon. Now you must fight TheManBehindTheMan. Having an apparent BigBad who turns out to be TheDragon or for the BigBad to have TheManBehindTheMan is pretty run of the mill almost thirty years after its release, and its sudden appearance at the end with little foreshadowing would get it labeled an AssPull or GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere by today's standards.
6th May '16 9:30:11 AM DDRMASTERM
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** The game itself also suffers from this, as Samus's jumping is floaty, you take lots of knockback from damage, you can't crouch or shoot diagonally, many of the rooms look the same, there's no map you can reference, and you can only save when you die, after which you must write down a complicated password and then grind back all the health you've lost. However, this was the first ever platformer of such a scale, back when going any other direction than right in a Platformer was unthinkable. While the environments don't change up much over the game, this allowed for a very expansive overworld for an NES cart, by far being one of the biggest games for the NES, and helped set the Metroidvania genre into motion.
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