History RealityEnsues / ComicBooks

22nd May '18 10:36:55 AM KingLyger
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* In ''Comicbook/GrimmFairyTales'', Mercy Dante is a young woman whose parents were killed by a hitman when she was a child. Years later, she tracks down the hitman and finds out that he's retired and now has a young daughter named Trisha. Mercy kidnaps Trisha and then forces her father to watch as she shoots the girl in the head, killing her. When Mercy next appears many issues later, we see that revenge has brought her absolutely no comfort, as she's now wracked with guilt over having slain an innocent child. [[spoiler: She ends up being given a second chance after being sent back to the day she killed Trisha, and this time, she opts to let her go.]]

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* In ''Comicbook/GrimmFairyTales'', Mercy Dante is a young woman whose parents were killed by a hitman when she was a child. Years later, she tracks down the hitman and finds out that he's retired and now has a young daughter named Trisha. Mercy kidnaps Trisha and then forces her father to watch as she shoots the girl in the head, killing her. When Mercy next appears many issues later, we see that [[VengeanceFeelsEmpty revenge has brought her absolutely no comfort, comfort]], as she's now [[HeelRealization wracked with guilt guilt]] over having slain an innocent child. [[spoiler: She ends up being given a second chance after being sent back to the day she killed Trisha, and this time, [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong she opts to let her go.go]].]]
27th Apr '18 10:57:49 PM comicwriter
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* ''Comicbook/WarMachine''
** The original 90s series has Rhodey with murky, volatile situations that the Avengers and S.H.I.E.L.D. can't get involved due to the political ramifications. After shooting a heinous African dictator in the first arc, War Machine spends the ensuing issues being hounded by the press and the United Nations for violating international law. The incident also serves to widen the rift between Rhodey and Iron Man, who is disgusted by his former best friend's violent and reckless actions.
** The series also deals with the realities of owning an advanced piece of technology like the War Machine armor. It costs a fortune just to maintain the suit and restock its weaponry, and when it gets damaged, the machinery's complexity means that Rhodey has no way to repair it on his own. A billionaire inventor like Tony Stark can easily solve problems like these, but Rhodey is just a normal guy without a genius IQ or impossibly deep pockets.
27th Apr '18 10:24:13 PM comicwriter
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* ''ComicBook/{{Hitman}}'' has a memorable scene where a group of supervillains are hired to confront Tommy; Tommy takes advantage of the leader's [[MrExposition dramatic and overly-long]] [[TalkingIsAFreeAction introduction speech]] to pull his gun and [[CombatPragmatist shoot the villains]] before they can get near him.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Hitman}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Hitman}}'':
** An early issue
has a memorable scene where a group of supervillains are hired to confront Tommy; Tommy takes advantage of the leader's [[MrExposition dramatic and overly-long]] [[TalkingIsAFreeAction introduction speech]] to pull his gun and [[CombatPragmatist shoot the villains]] before they can get near him.him.
** A plan that screams "CrazyEnoughToWork" gets {{Deconstructed|Trope}}, {{discussed|Trope}} in issue #24, where Tommy suggests that they "do something completely and totally crazy" to escape the SAS. [[GilliganCut The cover of #25 is Tommy hung upside down and bleeding and Nat unconscious on the floor with the SAS soldiers behind them holding automatic weapons.]] Turns out that, while a full-blown "EnemyMine" may not be applicable, there is such a thing as being so blood-thirstily pissed off that two opposing groups won't bother with trying to fight each other as long as they get their pound of flesh from their mutual enemy (and one side being so badass that the other gets curb-stomped so this kind of diversion doesn't makes a difference). The trope ends up being played (somewhat) straight because of other unforeseen circumstances acting up just in time and saving the protagonists.
-->'''Nat''': We keep hittin' [[TheMafia Louie's]] places 'til we got him so pissed his ass goes nuclear. Then, when the dudes got Sean call us an' arrange a meet, we lead Louie's boys onto 'em an' start the mutha of all firefights. In the confusion we get Sean out an' slip away while [[LetsYouAndHimFight the S.A.S. an' the mob shoot the hell outta each other.]] We go home. That about it? [Well] You know how in movies when some dude says "in the confusion"-- Like, "[[Franchise/StarWars In the confusion we gonna rescue the princess, pop a cap in lord Vader an' do a bunch of stuff to mess up his scary-ass death star]]"-- you know why it always works out just like the dude says? [[ThisIsReality 'Cause it's a movie, Tommy.]] We got two sets of badasses trynna kill us. We bring 'em both together with us in the middle -- what's gonna be so confusin' about that?



* A plan that screams "CrazyEnoughToWork" gets {{Deconstructed|Trope}}, {{discussed|Trope}} in ''ComicBook/{{Hitman}}''. Tommy suggests that they "do something completely and totally crazy" to escape the SAS at the end of #24. [[GilliganCut The cover of #25 is Tommy hung upside down and bleeding and Nat unconscious on the floor with the SAS soldiers behind them holding automatic weapons.]] Turns out that, while a full-blown "EnemyMine" may not be applicable, there is such a thing as being so blood-thirstily pissed off that two opposing groups won't bother with trying to fight each other as long as they get their pound of flesh from their mutual enemy (and one side being so badass that the other gets curb-stomped so this kind of diversion doesn't makes a difference). The trope ends up being played (somewhat) straight because of other unforeseen circumstances acting up just in time and saving the protagonists.
-->'''Nat''': We keep hittin' [[TheMafia Louie's]] places 'til we got him so pissed his ass goes nuclear. Then, when the dudes got Sean call us an' arrange a meet, we lead Louie's boys onto 'em an' start the mutha of all firefights. In the confusion we get Sean out an' slip away while [[LetsYouAndHimFight the S.A.S. an' the mob shoot the hell outta each other.]] We go home. That about it? [Well] You know how in movies when some dude says "in the confusion"-- Like, "[[Franchise/StarWars In the confusion we gonna rescue the princess, pop a cap in lord Vader an' do a bunch of stuff to mess up his scary-ass death star]]"-- you know why it always works out just like the dude says? [[ThisIsReality 'Cause it's a movie, Tommy.]] We got two sets of badasses trynna kill us. We bring 'em both together with us in the middle -- what's gonna be so confusin' about that?
24th Apr '18 6:28:51 AM jaydude
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** The Minutemen, a superhero group active from the late 30's to the late 40's, has many of the prejudices of that time period. Hooded Justice is a nazi supporter until the start of the Second World War, Captain Metropolis has racist opinions of black and hispanic people, the Comedian attempts to rape Silk Spectre on the basis that he thought she wanted it because she wore a {{Stripperific}} outfit, and Silhouette is thrown out of the group when she's discovered to be a lesbian.
24th Apr '18 5:45:24 AM jaydude
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** After the antagonist reveals his scheme to Nite Owl II and Rorsharch, Nite Owl tries to talk him out of it, only for the antagonist to inform him that the only reason he told the pair about it in the first place is because he already carried it out 35 minutes ago, too late for them to stop him.
-->Dan, I'm not a republic serial villain. Do you seriously think I'd explain my masterstroke if there remained the slightest chance of you affecting its outcome?
** The issue after the one with the above example makes clear that, genius or not, you ''cannot'' kill a near-omnipotent being who can walk across the surface of the sun, and literally rebuilt himself after being disintegrated. You can turn the public against him by framing him for spreading cancer, or lure him into a trap by developing a way to block his foresight powers, but in the end, you're just as much a threat to him as a termite would be.

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** After the antagonist reveals his scheme to Nite Owl II and Rorsharch, Rorschach, Nite Owl tries to talk him out of it, only for the antagonist to inform him that the only reason he told the pair about it in the first place is because he already carried set it out 35 minutes ago, into motion, and it's too late for them to stop him.
-->Dan, -->"''Do'' it"? Dan, I'm not a republic serial villain. Do you seriously think I'd explain my masterstroke if there remained the slightest chance of you affecting its outcome?
outcome? I did it thirty-five minutes ago.
** The issue after the one with the above example makes clear that, genius or not, you ''cannot'' kill a near-omnipotent being who can walk across the surface of the sun, and literally rebuilt himself after being disintegrated. You can turn the public against him by framing him for spreading cancer, or lure catch him into a trap off-guard by developing a way to block his foresight powers, but in the end, you're just as much a threat to him his life as a termite would be.
16th Apr '18 4:50:04 PM ultimomant
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** ''ComicBook/SupermanRebirth'' has two instances of that in ''Imperius Lex'' story. First one is when Lex Luthor gets abducted and Superman doesn't come to save him - this is because ever since his HeelFaceTurn Luthor has been [[CryingWolf abusing emergency signals for any excuse to impress Superman]]. Second are Kalibak's fights with Granny Goodness and Superboy - despite his status os resident subject of TheWorfEffect and their as [[BadassGrandpa Badass Grandma]] and BadassAdorable, their SuperStrength is on a comparable level and with that filed more even Granny is an elderly woman and Jon is still a ten-years-old, while Kalibak is an adult man and a seasoned warrior much larger than any of them and very much in shape, so [[CurbStompBattle he effortlessly wins both battles]]. The reason he has a reputation of a loser is that he keeps picking up fights with people like Superman or Orion, who are above his weight class.

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** ''ComicBook/SupermanRebirth'' has two instances of that in ''Imperius Lex'' story. First one is when Lex Luthor gets abducted and Superman doesn't come to save him - this is because ever since his HeelFaceTurn Luthor has been [[CryingWolf abusing emergency signals for any excuse to impress Superman]]. Second are Kalibak's fights with Granny Goodness and Superboy - despite his status os as resident subject of TheWorfEffect and their as [[BadassGrandpa Badass Grandma]] and BadassAdorable, their SuperStrength is on a comparable level and with that filed more even Granny is an elderly woman and Jon is still a ten-years-old, while Kalibak is an adult man and a seasoned warrior much larger than any of them and very much in shape, so [[CurbStompBattle he effortlessly wins both battles]]. The reason he has a reputation of a loser is that he keeps picking up fights with people like Superman or Orion, who are above his weight class.
16th Apr '18 2:07:29 PM DesertDragon
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* During the ''ComicBook/BatmanHush'' storyline, at the start of the story Batman's rope for his grappling gun is cut, causing him to fall toward the ground. He manages to grab onto a nearby statue... except that just causes his arm to snap like a twig due to the inertia of the fall. Then the old, worn-out statue breaks under Batman's added weight and Batman plummets into the alley below. He breaks his fall somewhat but still ends up fracturing or breaking half the bones in his body.
* There's a very similar example in "ComicBook/MarshalLaw Takes Manhattan", in which a psychotic parody of ComicBook/{{Daredevil}} is falling to his death from a skyscraper and manages to grab hold of a flagpole protruding from the building... whereupon the inertia rips his arms off.

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* Comicbook/{{Batman}}:
**
During the ''ComicBook/BatmanHush'' storyline, at the start of the story Batman's rope for his grappling gun is cut, causing him to fall toward the ground. He manages to grab onto a nearby statue... except that just causes his arm to snap like a twig due to the inertia of the fall. Then the old, worn-out statue breaks under Batman's added weight and Batman plummets into the alley below. He breaks his fall somewhat but still ends up fracturing or breaking half the bones in his body.
* There's a very similar example ** Batman's darker villains who never make it to the cartoons (or are severely toned down) are also an aspect of this. Since most of his battles with his enemies are psychological in nature, it was inevitable that he'd eventually go up against some truly disturbed individuals and not just crooks with a quirky gimmick. Mr. Zsasz is a straight-up serial killer, Professor Pyg is a sadistic surgeon whose mooks are mutilated and brainwashed into serving him, Black Mask is a brutal crime boss who delights in ColdBloodedTorture, etc.
** Speaking of Black Mask, this trope also applies to his death at the hands of Comicbook/{{Catwoman}}. She had him at gunpoint, but by this point he had faced off against most of the Bat Family and expected her to follow the same [[ThouShaltNotKill code against killing]] as the rest of them. What Mask didn't realize is that Selina had long been TheLancer of Batman's allies and never fully played by his rules, ''and'' Mask had tortured her brother-in-law to death and traumatized her sister. So while she doesn't ''like'' killing, she had no qualms blowing his head off.
* In
"ComicBook/MarshalLaw Takes Manhattan", in which a psychotic parody of ComicBook/{{Daredevil}} is falling to his death from a skyscraper and manages to grab hold of a flagpole protruding from the building... whereupon the inertia rips his arms off.
16th Apr '18 4:51:37 AM jaydude
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** After the antagonist reveals his scheme to Nite Owl II and Rorsharch, Nite Owl tries to talk him out of it, only for the antagonist to inform him that the only reason he told the pair about it in the first place is because he already carried it out 35 minutes ago, too late for them to stop him.
-->Dan, I'm not a republic serial villain. Do you seriously think I'd explain my masterstroke if there remained the slightest chance of you affecting its outcome?
** The issue after the one with the above example makes clear that, genius or not, you ''cannot'' kill a near-omnipotent being who can walk across the surface of the sun, and literally rebuilt himself after being disintegrated. You can turn the public against him by framing him for spreading cancer, or lure him into a trap by developing a way to block his foresight powers, but in the end, you're just as much a threat to him as a termite would be.
7th Apr '18 11:03:20 AM Traveler123
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** Spider-Man's web shooters' do run out of fluid, usually at the worst possible time. His spider-sense never warns him about this. He carries spare web cartridges in his utility belt, but taking the empty cartridge out and putting a new one in takes time. He also knows he has to reload the other because it's probably almost empty as well. If he uses up all his spare cartridges, it means no webs and he has to do without until he can whip up more web fluid. This was a plot point in the first Secret Wars mini-series. The heroes were on Battleworld so long he ran completely out of webbing. Part of his excitement over getting the new black costume (actually the Venom symbiote) is that it allowed him to shoot webs again.
** Speaking of the web fluid, when Peter has access to a proper lab with high quality chemicals and equipment, the web fluid is of high quality as well and more versatile. This was easier when he was a high school/college student or when he was a high school teacher. However, if he's broke or doesn't have access to a lab, he can cobble together web fluid in his kitchen with off-the-shelf ingredients (he's joked about making webbing using shaving cream and toothpaste), but the webbing is of lower quality and less versatile. It was during one of these periods that Daredevil commented that his webbing smelled faintly of peanut butter.
4th Apr '18 1:38:23 AM TheWanderer
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* ''ComingBook/TheWalkingDead'' breathes this trope:

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* ''ComingBook/TheWalkingDead'' ''ComicBook/TheWalkingDead'' breathes this trope:
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=RealityEnsues.ComicBooks