History Radio / Gunsmoke

20th Dec '13 2:30:20 AM Mdumas43073
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A long running [[TheWestern Western]] series about the adventures of the Marshal and citizenry of Dodge City, Kansas. It aired on CBS radio from 1952 to 1961.

to:

A long running [[TheWestern Western]] series about the adventures of the Marshal and citizenry of Dodge City, Kansas. It aired on CBS Creator/{{CBS}} radio from 1952 to 1961.
20th Dec '13 2:28:58 AM Mdumas43073
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* DownerEnding: A lot of the earlier episodes had these, before ReverseCerebusSyndrome set in.

to:

* DownerEnding: A lot of the earlier episodes had these, before ReverseCerebusSyndrome set in.Frequently.
20th Dec '13 2:28:23 AM Mdumas43073
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Added DiffLines:

* AwayInAManger: "Beeker's Barn"
5th Jun '13 5:29:52 AM Mdumas43073
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* SympatheticMurderBackstory: In the radio version, the Doctor had unwillingly killed a man in a duel back East, and had to flee and change his name to avoid extralegal retaliation.

to:

* SympatheticMurderBackstory: In the radio version, the Doctor Doc Adams had unwillingly killed a man in a duel back East, and had to flee and change his name to avoid extralegal retaliation.
15th Nov '12 2:14:31 AM PaulA
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* CluelessDeputy: Chester more or less served as this, although the character was never officially deputized.

to:

* CluelessDeputy: Chester more or less served as this, although the character in most episodes he was never officially deputized.only described as an "assistant" rather than an official deputy.



* OpeningNarration

to:

* OpeningNarrationHookerWithAHeartOfGold: Miss Kitty. (The producer-director is quoted in a 1953 ''Time'' magazine [[http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,806658,00.html interview]]: "We never say it, but Kitty is a prostitute, plain and simple.")
* OpeningNarration:
-->'''Announcer:''' Around Dodge City and in the territory out west, there's just one way to handle the killers and the spoilers, and that's with a U.S. Marshal and the smell of... ''Gunsmoke!'' (theme music starts) ''Gunsmoke'', starring William Conrad. The story of the violence that moved west with young America, and the story of a man who moved with it.\\
'''William Conrad:''' I'm that man. Matt Dillon, United States Marshal. The first man they look for and the last they want to meet. It's a chancy job, and it makes a man watchful... and a little lonely.
15th Nov '12 12:49:56 AM PaulA
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[[quoteright:310:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/gunsmoke-cast_1691.jpg]]

A long running [[TheWestern Western]] series about the adventures of the Marshal and citizenry of Dodge City, Kansas. It started as a radio series, then moved to television (with a completely different cast) in 1955. It lasted to 1975.

At 20 seasons, the TV version was/is the longest running prime time American dramatic series (''Series/LawAndOrder'' tied this record in 2010, though ''Gunsmoke'' produced more episodes) and the archetypical television example of the Western genre.

The show's cast included some of the most memorable characters in television history, including Marshal Matt Dillon and the sassy Miss Kitty. A good example of its impact: the planet on which the "SpaceWestern" anime ''{{Trigun}}'' is set is called "Gunsmoke".

to:

[[quoteright:310:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/gunsmoke-cast_1691.jpg]]

A long running [[TheWestern Western]] series about the adventures of the Marshal and citizenry of Dodge City, Kansas. It started as a aired on CBS radio series, then moved from 1952 to television (with a completely different cast) in 1955. It lasted to 1975.1961.

At 20 seasons, the TV version was/is the longest running prime time American dramatic series (''Series/LawAndOrder'' tied this record in 2010, though ''Gunsmoke'' produced more episodes) and the archetypical A [[{{Series/Gunsmoke}} television example version of the Western genre.

The show's cast included some of the most memorable characters in
series]] (with a completely different cast) aired on CBS television history, including Marshal Matt Dillon and the sassy Miss Kitty. A good example of its impact: the planet on which the "SpaceWestern" anime ''{{Trigun}}'' is set is called "Gunsmoke".
from 1955 to 1975.



!!This show provides examples of:

to:

!!This show radio series provides examples of:



* AffectionateParody: Both ''{{Maverick}}'' and ''TheFlintstones'' parodied the show.
* AllCrimesAreEqual: Stealing a horse is a hanging offense.
** May fall under Reality Is Unrealistic too, as horse theft in the old west was a capitol offense that was punished by execution.
* YouFailGeographyForever: The show features mountain and desert landscapes. In ''Kansas''.
* TheBartender: Sam, Miss Kitty's right-hand man, who was eventually killed in a bar fight.
* TheBlacksmith: Quint Asper, played by a young Burt Reynolds.
* BloodlessCarnage: For all the times people are getting shot, you'd think there'd be more blood.
* BookDumb: Festus.
* [[BountyHunter Bounty Hunters]]: "Dead or Alive" usually comes with a reward.
* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: Chester disappears without explanation in season 9, as does Miss Kitty in season 20.
* CluelessDeputy: Festus Haggen
** Chester more or less served as this in the radio version and the first few TV seasons, although the character was never officially deputized.
* CorruptHick: A few are inevitable in the WildWest.
* DeadpanSnarker: Doc Adams
* DeterminedHomesteadersWife: Matt meets a few.
* DeterminedWidow: Some of these, too.

to:

* AffectionateParody: Both ''{{Maverick}}'' and ''TheFlintstones'' parodied the show.
* AllCrimesAreEqual: Stealing a horse is a hanging offense.
** May fall under Reality Is Unrealistic too, as horse theft in the old west was a capitol offense that was punished by execution.
* YouFailGeographyForever: The show features mountain and desert landscapes. In ''Kansas''.
* TheBartender: Sam, Miss Kitty's right-hand man, who was eventually killed in a bar fight.
* TheBlacksmith: Quint Asper, played by a young Burt Reynolds.
* BloodlessCarnage: For all the times people are getting shot, you'd think there'd be more blood.
* BookDumb: Festus.
* [[BountyHunter Bounty Hunters]]: "Dead or Alive" usually comes with a reward.
* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: Chester disappears without explanation in season 9, as does Miss Kitty in season 20.
* CluelessDeputy: Festus Haggen
**
Chester more or less served as this in the radio version and the first few TV seasons, this, although the character was never officially deputized.
* CorruptHick: A few are inevitable in the WildWest.
* DeadpanSnarker: Doc Adams
* DeterminedHomesteadersWife: Matt meets a few.
* DeterminedWidow: Some of these, too.
deputized.



* FiveManBand
* FlorenceNightingaleEffect: There's an episode where a woman cares for a wounded prisoner and falls in love with him.



* FrozenInTime: 1873 somehow managed to last for 20 years.
* GorgeousPeriodDress: Kitty's entire wardrobe.
* HeroesWantRedheads: Miss Kitty
* HostageSituation: Used as a plot device a few times.
* [[IHaveYourWife I Have Your Significant Other]]: At least one episode included villains who kidnapped Miss Kitty in order to trap Matt.
* IllGirl: Newly's wife. Her death prompted him to become Doc's apprentice.
* {{Instrumental Theme Tune}}: Probably among the most famous of these.
* JustAFleshWound
* LongRunners: The TV show ran in various versions for 20 seasons, a record for a prime-time drama series that stood for 35 years, and which still stands today, though they now share it with ''Series/LawAndOrder.''
* LoveableRogue: JJ, in the episode ''The Widow and the Rogue.''
* MauveShirt: Even when killing off characters a few minutes after they're introduced, there's often at least some effort at characterization.
* MiscarriageOfJustice: In one episode, a thief is executed for a murder he didn't commit.
** Another time, a man is convicted of stealing a horse that he paid for. It's subverted in that Matt believes he's innocent, and doesn't
* MissKitty: Miss Kitty Russell is now more or less universally assumed to be a Madam as well as saloonkeeper, and her impeccably dressed and coiffed girls up to more activity than just dancing and playful flirting. (The producer-director is quoted in a 1953(!) Time magazine [[http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,806658,00.html interview]]: "We never say it, but Kitty is a prostitute, plain and simple.") But these implications were subtle enough to go over the heads of younger (and extremely naive older) viewers:
--> (From KingOfTheHill)
--> '''Peggy:''' You never objected to Miss Kitty on ''Gunsmoke.''
--> '''Hank:''' What about her?
--> '''Peggy:''' Oh come on, they had all those rooms upstairs....she didn't charge enough for drinks....
--> (Beat)
--> '''Hank:''' (Devastated) Oh, no...not Miss Kitty!!
* [[TheMountainsOfIllinois The Mountains (and Deserts) of Kansas]]
* TheMovie: There were a couple of made-for-television movie sequels to the series, including one that introduced the character of Matt's daughter.
* NeverLearnedToRead: Festus' illiteracy is often brought up; sometimes it serves as a critical plot point, but often is used as comedic fodder, particularly as a target of Doc's sarcastic mockery. This can come off as insensitive to modern-day viewers; however, such humor was not unusual in the show's broadcast era, and illiteracy would have hardly been uncommon in the 19th Century frontier setting.
** It wasn't so much Festus being unable to read that drew Doc's mockery, so much as his stubborn refusal to admit it. This went as far as refusing to learn to read, as that would require admitting that he couldn't read in the first place, and once creating his own language just so throw the mockery back at Doc for not being able to read it.
* NeverSpeakIllOfTheDead: There's a boy whose father is killed, and says the man never loved him. He is chastised by a judge, who shows him that his father ''did'' love him, he just didn't know how to show it.
* OneManArmy: Matt Dillon
* OpeningNarration: In the radio version; some episodes of the television version also opened with a voice-over introducing the show and James Arness as Matt Dillon.
* TheOtherDarrin: The TV show featured an entirely different cast from the radio version.
* {{Outlaw}}: Oodles and oodles.
* PistolWhip
* PropRecycling
* RadioDrama: Originally.
* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Many later-season episodes barely feature star James Arness at all, a concession to his physical ailments (war injuries and his height led to chronic leg and joint pain). Often, Matt Dillon would be featured only in the opening and closing scenes, with his absence in-between explained by some out-of-town errand. Several episodes' worth of these brief scenes would be filmed in a few days, giving Arness more rest time between Dillon-heavy episodes.
** Also, Milburn Stone's 1971 heart surgery caused his absence for a number of episodes. His character, Doc Adams, was said to have unexpectedly left town for updated medical training after he believes his rural isolation and lack of newer skills contributed heavily to the death of a young girl.
* RedRightHand: A few of the bad guys have had scars and such.
* RedShirt: Shootouts would be boring if nobody ever died.
* ReverseCerebusSyndrome
* TheRustler: People who steal livestock
* SaloonOwner: Miss Kitty
* SesquipedalianLoquaciousness: Doc, occasionally.
* SoundToScreenAdaptation
* SpoiledBrat: In the episode ''Susan was Evil,'' Susan is selfish and unkind because she always got whatever she wanted. When it appears as if she isn't going to get her way, [[spoiler: she betrays her aunt's fiance to [[BountyHunter bounty hunters]].]]
* SpoilerTitle: The episode ''The Widow and the Rogue.'' Her husband dies.
* StealthInsult: Doc once told Festus that he would never die of [[BookDumb overusing his cranial faculties]]. [[ComicallyMissingThePoint Festus thought it was a good thing]]. Doc does this sort of thing quite a few times.
* SuddenNameChange: Chester's surname went from "Proudfoot" in the radio series to "Goode" in the TV version.
* SympatheticMurderBackstory: In the radio version, the Doctor had unwillingly killed a man in a duel back East, and had to flee and change his name to avoid extralegal retaliation. This was changed for the TV show.
* SyndicationTitle: The half-hour TV episodes were retitled ''Marshal Dillon'' in order to differentiate them from the hour-long episodes that were later made.
* UnresolvedSexualTension: The show never entirely specified ''what'' the relationship between Matt and Miss Kitty was, but it seemed generally understood by the rest of the cast that they were somehow involved.
** The producers toyed with having them get married, but ultimately held off as they thought it would change the formula too much, in those days when {{Status Quo Is God}} was absolutely the norm.

to:

* FrozenInTime: 1873 somehow managed to last for 20 years.
OpeningNarration
* GorgeousPeriodDress: Kitty's entire wardrobe.
* HeroesWantRedheads: Miss Kitty
* HostageSituation: Used as a plot device a few times.
* [[IHaveYourWife I Have Your Significant Other]]: At least one episode included villains who kidnapped Miss Kitty in order to trap Matt.
* IllGirl: Newly's wife. Her death prompted him to become Doc's apprentice.
* {{Instrumental Theme Tune}}: Probably among the most famous of these.
* JustAFleshWound
* LongRunners: The TV show ran in various versions for 20 seasons, a record for a prime-time drama series that stood for 35 years, and which still stands today, though they now share it with ''Series/LawAndOrder.''
* LoveableRogue: JJ, in the episode ''The Widow and the Rogue.''
* MauveShirt: Even when killing off characters a few minutes after they're introduced, there's often at least some effort at characterization.
* MiscarriageOfJustice: In one episode, a thief is executed for a murder he didn't commit.
** Another time, a man is convicted of stealing a horse that he paid for. It's subverted in that Matt believes he's innocent, and doesn't
* MissKitty: Miss Kitty Russell is now more or less universally assumed to be a Madam as well as saloonkeeper, and her impeccably dressed and coiffed girls up to more activity than just dancing and playful flirting. (The producer-director is quoted in a 1953(!) Time magazine [[http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,806658,00.html interview]]: "We never say it, but Kitty is a prostitute, plain and simple.") But these implications were subtle enough to go over the heads of younger (and extremely naive older) viewers:
--> (From KingOfTheHill)
--> '''Peggy:''' You never objected to Miss Kitty on ''Gunsmoke.''
--> '''Hank:''' What about her?
--> '''Peggy:''' Oh come on, they had all those rooms upstairs....she didn't charge enough for drinks....
--> (Beat)
--> '''Hank:''' (Devastated) Oh, no...not Miss Kitty!!
* [[TheMountainsOfIllinois The Mountains (and Deserts) of Kansas]]
* TheMovie: There were a couple of made-for-television movie sequels to the series, including one that introduced the character of Matt's daughter.
* NeverLearnedToRead: Festus' illiteracy is often brought up; sometimes it serves as a critical plot point, but often is used as comedic fodder, particularly as a target of Doc's sarcastic mockery. This can come off as insensitive to modern-day viewers; however, such humor was not unusual in the show's broadcast era, and illiteracy would have hardly been uncommon in the 19th Century frontier setting.
** It wasn't so much Festus being unable to read that drew Doc's mockery, so much as his stubborn refusal to admit it. This went as far as refusing to learn to read, as that would require admitting that he couldn't read in the first place, and once creating his own language just so throw the mockery back at Doc for not being able to read it.
* NeverSpeakIllOfTheDead: There's a boy whose father is killed, and says the man never loved him. He is chastised by a judge, who shows him that his father ''did'' love him, he just didn't know how to show it.
* OneManArmy: Matt Dillon
* OpeningNarration: In the radio version; some episodes of the television version also opened with a voice-over introducing the show and James Arness as Matt Dillon.
* TheOtherDarrin: The TV show featured an entirely different cast from the radio version.
* {{Outlaw}}: Oodles and oodles.
* PistolWhip
* PropRecycling
* RadioDrama: Originally.
* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Many later-season episodes barely feature star James Arness at all, a concession to his physical ailments (war injuries and his height led to chronic leg and joint pain). Often, Matt Dillon would be featured only in the opening and closing scenes, with his absence in-between explained by some out-of-town errand. Several episodes' worth of these brief scenes would be filmed in a few days, giving Arness more rest time between Dillon-heavy episodes.
** Also, Milburn Stone's 1971 heart surgery caused his absence for a number of episodes. His character, Doc Adams, was said to have unexpectedly left town for updated medical training after he believes his rural isolation and lack of newer skills contributed heavily to the death of a young girl.
* RedRightHand: A few of the bad guys have had scars and such.
* RedShirt: Shootouts would be boring if nobody ever died.
* ReverseCerebusSyndrome
* TheRustler: People who steal livestock
* SaloonOwner: Miss Kitty
* SesquipedalianLoquaciousness: Doc, occasionally.
* SoundToScreenAdaptation
* SpoiledBrat: In the episode ''Susan was Evil,'' Susan is selfish and unkind because she always got whatever she wanted. When it appears as if she isn't going to get her way, [[spoiler: she betrays her aunt's fiance to [[BountyHunter bounty hunters]].]]
* SpoilerTitle: The episode ''The Widow and the Rogue.'' Her husband dies.
* StealthInsult: Doc once told Festus that he would never die of [[BookDumb overusing his cranial faculties]]. [[ComicallyMissingThePoint Festus thought it was a good thing]]. Doc does this sort of thing quite a few times.
* SuddenNameChange: Chester's surname went from "Proudfoot" in the radio series to "Goode" in the TV version.
RadioDrama
* SympatheticMurderBackstory: In the radio version, the Doctor had unwillingly killed a man in a duel back East, and had to flee and change his name to avoid extralegal retaliation. This was changed for the TV show.\n* SyndicationTitle: The half-hour TV episodes were retitled ''Marshal Dillon'' in order to differentiate them from the hour-long episodes that were later made.\n* UnresolvedSexualTension: The show never entirely specified ''what'' the relationship between Matt and Miss Kitty was, but it seemed generally understood by the rest of the cast that they were somehow involved. \n** The producers toyed with having them get married, but ultimately held off as they thought it would change the formula too much, in those days when {{Status Quo Is God}} was absolutely the norm.



* VictimOfTheWeek
* VitriolicBestBuds: Doc Adams and Festus. Much of the show's humor lies in their constant bickering and sarcastic snarking, but just let one or the other get sick/injured or in any kind of trouble, and their underlying affection and respect becomes apparent.
* WeHaveToGetTheBulletOut: In an episode where an outlaw gets shot, they remove the bullet.



* WesternCharacters

to:

* WesternCharacters WesternCharacters



* YouLookFamiliar: Over the 20 season run, a few actors came back to play other characters.
15th Nov '12 12:21:34 AM PaulA
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!!''Gunsmoke'' is the TropeNamer for:
* MissKitty

----



* MissKitty: The TropeNamer, Amanda Blake's character is now more or less universally assumed to be a Madam as well as saloonkeeper, and her impeccably dressed and coiffed girls up to more activity than just dancing and playful flirting. (The producer-director is quoted in a 1953(!) Time magazine [[http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,806658,00.html interview]]: "We never say it, but Kitty is a prostitute, plain and simple.") But these implications were subtle enough to go over the heads of younger (and extremely naive older) viewers:

to:

* MissKitty: The TropeNamer, Amanda Blake's character Miss Kitty Russell is now more or less universally assumed to be a Madam as well as saloonkeeper, and her impeccably dressed and coiffed girls up to more activity than just dancing and playful flirting. (The producer-director is quoted in a 1953(!) Time magazine [[http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,806658,00.html interview]]: "We never say it, but Kitty is a prostitute, plain and simple.") But these implications were subtle enough to go over the heads of younger (and extremely naive older) viewers:
31st Aug '12 6:18:19 AM Byzantine
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A long running [[TheWestern Western]] series about the adventures of the Marshal and citizenry of Dodge City, Kansas. It started as a radio series, then moved to television (with a completely different cast) in 1955.

to:

A long running [[TheWestern Western]] series about the adventures of the Marshal and citizenry of Dodge City, Kansas. It started as a radio series, then moved to television (with a completely different cast) in 1955.
1955. It lasted to 1975.
9th Aug '12 6:56:21 PM Diosoth
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Added DiffLines:

** May fall under Reality Is Unrealistic too, as horse theft in the old west was a capitol offense that was punished by execution.
25th Jul '12 3:16:03 PM JCAll
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Added DiffLines:

**It wasn't so much Festus being unable to read that drew Doc's mockery, so much as his stubborn refusal to admit it. This went as far as refusing to learn to read, as that would require admitting that he couldn't read in the first place, and once creating his own language just so throw the mockery back at Doc for not being able to read it.
This list shows the last 10 events of 26. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Radio.Gunsmoke