History NiceJobBreakingItHero / TabletopRPG

16th Jun '17 9:46:44 AM WanderingBrowser
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Among the many, [[CrapsackWorld many]] potential elements of ParanoiaFuel in the ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' is the potential for [[TabletopGame/HunterTheVigil members of the Vigil]] to do this, due to the fact that most people are either genuinely ignorant of the [[BlackAndGreyMorality subtle shades of darkness]] of the supernatural, too closeminded to accept that things aren't black and white, or both. That [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheForsaken pack of savage shapechangers]]? They're the descendents of a long line of half-mortal half-spirits whose purpose is to keep alien totemic spirits from ripping through the fabric of reality and turning humans into puppets and food. Those [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening crazed self-proclaimed mystics]]? They're actual wizards trying to restore a golden age of humanity, as well as fight off invasions from a kind of 'anti-reality'. The [[TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem vampires running a trendy nightclub and secretly bleeding the human clientele]]? Now the civilised vampires are gonna start being a ''lot'' more brutal in their feeding habits as they struggle to find their own prey... to say nothing of the band of sociopathic-even-by-their-standards vampires who are going to take advantage of that opening to start butchering humans for the hell of it.
** The individual game lines tend to give the players plenty of opportunities to do this without even bringing up setting elements, too:
*** Mage: there is an entire realm made up of the collective dreams and concepts of humanity. Yes, you can do things like kill the entire concept of, say, Love. Accidentally. Plus, spells can misfire, the most common misfire being the spell targeting something selected by the Storyteller instead of the intended target, with the Storyteller advised to go for maximum irony.
*** Werewolf: Spirits tend to correspond to physical places and locations. The bargains you make with those spirits can change the behavior of their corresponding objects and places in the real world.
*** Promethean: Your very existence is this trope, the universe hates you and rips itself apart in your presence. Simply staying in one place for too long can destroy everything.
*** Geist: Many of your powers have a radius effect of miles, and do things like change what season it is. You're a walking point source of collateral damage.

to:

* Among Given that the many, [[CrapsackWorld many]] potential elements ''TabletopGame/ChroniclesOfDarkness'' are to a one defined by the terms "CrapsackWorld" and "ParanoiaFuel", it should be of ParanoiaFuel no surprise that almost every game-line presents some opportunity for this or outright incorporates it into the setting lore.
** TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening: There is an entire realm made up of the collective dreams and concepts of humanity. Yes, you can do things like kill the entire concept of, say, Love. Accidentally. Plus, spells can misfire, the most common misfire being the spell targeting something selected by the Storyteller instead of the intended target, with the Storyteller advised to go for maximum irony.
** TabletopGame/WerewolfTheForsaken: Spirits tend to correspond to physical places and locations. The bargains you make with those spirits can change the behavior of their corresponding objects and places
in the ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' real world.
** TabletopGame/PrometheanTheCreated: Your very existence
is this trope, the potential universe hates you and rips itself apart in your presence. Simply staying in one place for [[TabletopGame/HunterTheVigil members too long can destroy everything.
** TabletopGame/GeistTheSinEaters: Many of your powers have a radius effect of miles, and do things like change what season it is. You're a walking source point of collateral damage.
** TabletopGame/HunterTheVigil: The sourcebooks repeatedly iterate, sometimes subtly, sometimes bluntly, that even beyond the chance for plyers to screw it up, part
of the Vigil]] to do reason the Vigil has very mixed results is that it can fall into this, due to the fact that most people are either genuinely ignorant of the [[BlackAndGreyMorality subtle shades of darkness]] of the supernatural, too closeminded to accept that things aren't black and white, or both. That [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheForsaken pack of savage shapechangers]]? They're the descendents of a long line of half-mortal half-spirits whose purpose is to keep alien totemic spirits from ripping through the fabric of reality and turning humans into puppets and food. Those [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening crazed self-proclaimed mystics]]? They're actual wizards trying to restore a golden age of humanity, as well as fight off invasions from a kind of 'anti-reality'. The [[TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem vampires running a trendy nightclub and secretly bleeding the human clientele]]? Now the civilised vampires are gonna start being a ''lot'' more brutal in their feeding habits as they struggle to find their own prey... to say nothing of the band of sociopathic-even-by-their-standards vampires who are going to take advantage of that opening to start butchering humans for the hell of it.
** The individual game lines tend to give the players plenty of opportunities to do this without even bringing up setting elements, too:
*** Mage: there is an entire realm made up One fan-made gameline, ''TabletopGame/SirenTheDrowning'', outright exploits this: one version of the collective dreams and concepts of humanity. Yes, you can do things like kill BadFuture the entire concept of, say, Love. Accidentally. Plus, spells can misfire, gameline revolves around takes place in a world where the most common misfire being the spell targeting something selected by the Storyteller instead of the intended target, with the Storyteller advised Vigil eventually managed to go for maximum irony.
*** Werewolf: Spirits tend to correspond to physical places and locations. The bargains you make with those spirits can change the behavior of their corresponding objects and places
public. Of course, it turns out than in the real world.
*** Promethean: Your very existence is this trope,
resultant UnmasquedWorld, not only did they send the universe hates you various monster races into full-blown war-mode, but they crippled humanity under an atmosphere of paranoia and rips itself apart in your presence. Simply staying in one place for too long can destroy everything.
*** Geist: Many of your powers have
civil war -- not everyone will agree with "kill all wizards" if their sibling, parent, spouse or ''child'' is a radius effect of miles, and do things like change what season it is. You're a walking point source of collateral damage.wizard, after all. The resultant clusterfrak is essentially World War III... on steroids.
17th Feb '17 11:29:05 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''TabletopGame/{{Deadlands}}'', both the Union and the Confederacy have elite task-forces dedicated to [[TheHunter fighting monsters and the dark powers that make them]]. Both of these task-forces, the Texas Rangers of the Confederacy and [[ThePinkertons Agency]] of the Union, have figured out that the dark powers that are behind monsters literally feed on fear. As a result, they've decided to create/uphold TheMasquerade, reasoning that if the existence of monsters were admitted, people would panic and that would make even more monsters. This in and of itself is a minor example of this trope, since the sourcebooks suggest that proper education would ultimately reduce a lot of the intimidating nature of the forces of darkness; a shadowy beast killing all your cattle is scary, but a mountain lion is just dangerous. However, it's ''how'' they go about enforcing TheMasquerade that really falls under this. The Texas Rangers have a bad tendency to resort to strong-arming and intimidation in order to "convince" people to shut up about the horrible monsters they've seen, which often sabotages their efforts. But the Agency really has it bad; they're known as TheMenInBlack Dusters, and just like their trope-sake, they favor a mixture of enigmatic stoicism, covert activity, intimidation and [[KilledToUpholdTheMasquerade outright murder]] to cover up the existence of the supernatural... which pretty much completely undoes any good they might do by actually catching monsters.

to:

* In ''TabletopGame/{{Deadlands}}'', both the Union and the Confederacy have elite task-forces dedicated to [[TheHunter [[HunterOfMonsters fighting monsters and the dark powers that make them]]. Both of these task-forces, the Texas Rangers of the Confederacy and [[ThePinkertons Agency]] of the Union, have figured out that the dark powers that are behind monsters literally feed on fear. As a result, they've decided to create/uphold TheMasquerade, reasoning that if the existence of monsters were admitted, people would panic and that would make even more monsters. This in and of itself is a minor example of this trope, since the sourcebooks suggest that proper education would ultimately reduce a lot of the intimidating nature of the forces of darkness; a shadowy beast killing all your cattle is scary, but a mountain lion is just dangerous. However, it's ''how'' they go about enforcing TheMasquerade that really falls under this. The Texas Rangers have a bad tendency to resort to strong-arming and intimidation in order to "convince" people to shut up about the horrible monsters they've seen, which often sabotages their efforts. But the Agency really has it bad; they're known as TheMenInBlack Dusters, and just like their trope-sake, they favor a mixture of enigmatic stoicism, covert activity, intimidation and [[KilledToUpholdTheMasquerade outright murder]] to cover up the existence of the supernatural... which pretty much completely undoes any good they might do by actually catching monsters.
3rd Jul '16 9:39:56 PM WanderingBrowser
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''TabletopGame/Deadlands'', both the Union and the Confederacy have elite task-forces dedicated to [[TheHunter fighting monsters and the dark powers that make them]]. Both of these task-forces, the Texas Rangers of the Confederacy and [[ThePinkertons Agency]] of the Union, have figured out that the dark powers that are behind monsters literally feed on fear. As a result, they've decided to create/uphold TheMasquerade, reasoning that if the existence of monsters were admitted, people would panic and that would make even more monsters. This in and of itself is a minor example of this trope, since the sourcebooks suggest that proper education would ultimately reduce a lot of the intimidating nature of the forces of darkness; a shadowy beast killing all your cattle is scary, a mountain lion is just dangerous. However, it's ''how'' they go about enforcing TheMasquerade that really falls under this. The Texas Rangers have a bad tendency to resort to strong-arming and intimidation in order to "convince" people to shut up about the horrible monsters they've seen, which often sabotages their efforts. But the Agency really has it bad; they're known as TheMenInBlack Dusters, and just like their trope-sake, they favor a mixture of enigmatic stoicism, covert activity, intimidation and [[KilledToUpholdTheMasquerade outright murder]] to cover up the existence of the supernatural... which pretty much completely undoes any good they might do by actually catching monsters.

to:

* In ''TabletopGame/Deadlands'', ''TabletopGame/{{Deadlands}}'', both the Union and the Confederacy have elite task-forces dedicated to [[TheHunter fighting monsters and the dark powers that make them]]. Both of these task-forces, the Texas Rangers of the Confederacy and [[ThePinkertons Agency]] of the Union, have figured out that the dark powers that are behind monsters literally feed on fear. As a result, they've decided to create/uphold TheMasquerade, reasoning that if the existence of monsters were admitted, people would panic and that would make even more monsters. This in and of itself is a minor example of this trope, since the sourcebooks suggest that proper education would ultimately reduce a lot of the intimidating nature of the forces of darkness; a shadowy beast killing all your cattle is scary, but a mountain lion is just dangerous. However, it's ''how'' they go about enforcing TheMasquerade that really falls under this. The Texas Rangers have a bad tendency to resort to strong-arming and intimidation in order to "convince" people to shut up about the horrible monsters they've seen, which often sabotages their efforts. But the Agency really has it bad; they're known as TheMenInBlack Dusters, and just like their trope-sake, they favor a mixture of enigmatic stoicism, covert activity, intimidation and [[KilledToUpholdTheMasquerade outright murder]] to cover up the existence of the supernatural... which pretty much completely undoes any good they might do by actually catching monsters.
27th Apr '16 10:53:09 PM WanderingBrowser
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''TabletopGame/Deadlands'', both the Union and the Confederacy have elite task-forces dedicated to [[TheHunter fighting monsters and the dark powers that make them]]. Both of these task-forces, the Texas Rangers of the Confederacy and [[ThePinkertons Agency]] of the Union, have figured out that the dark powers that are behind monsters literally feed on fear. As a result, they've decided to create/uphold TheMasquerade, reasoning that if the existence of monsters were admitted, people would panic and that would make even more monsters. This in and of itself is a minor example of this trope, since the sourcebooks suggest that proper education would ultimately reduce a lot of the intimidating nature of the forces of darkness; a shadowy beast killing all your cattle is scary, a mountain lion is just dangerous. However, it's ''how'' they go about enforcing TheMasquerade that really falls under this. The Texas Rangers have a bad tendency to resort to strong-arming and intimidation in order to "convince" people to shut up about the horrible monsters they've seen, which often sabotages their efforts. But the Agency really has it bad; they're known as TheMenInBlack Dusters, and just like their trope-sake, they favor a mixture of enigmatic stoicism, covert activity, intimidation and [[KilledToUpholdTheMasquerade outright murder]] to cover up the existence of the supernatural... which pretty much completely undoes any good they might do by actually catching monsters.
17th Mar '16 4:54:14 AM Ilya_Rysenkov
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Emperor winning the Horus Heresy is an example of the trope, according to [[Literature/HorusHeresy the novels of the same name]]. It was prophesized that had he lost, humanity would have died out in a couple generations taking Chaos with it and freeing the rest of the galaxy from it. This is the entire reason Alpha Legion decided to join Horus. [[spoiler: Or maybe his winning is a failure, as Eldrad Ultran states.]]

to:

** The Emperor winning the Horus Heresy is an example of the trope, according to [[Literature/HorusHeresy the novels of the same name]]. It was prophesized that had he lost, humanity would have died out in a couple generations taking Chaos with it and freeing the rest of the galaxy from it. This is the entire reason Alpha Legion decided to join Horus. [[spoiler: Or maybe his winning Possibly subverted, and Emperor's victory is a failure, actually the best way, as Eldrad Ultran states.]]
17th Mar '16 4:52:00 AM Ilya_Rysenkov
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Emperor winning the Horus Heresy is an example of the trope, according to [[Literature/HorusHeresy the novels of the same name]]. It was prophesized that had he lost, humanity would have died out in a couple generations taking Chaos with it and freeing the rest of the galaxy from it. This is the entire reason Alpha Legion decided to join Horus.

to:

** The Emperor winning the Horus Heresy is an example of the trope, according to [[Literature/HorusHeresy the novels of the same name]]. It was prophesized that had he lost, humanity would have died out in a couple generations taking Chaos with it and freeing the rest of the galaxy from it. This is the entire reason Alpha Legion decided to join Horus. [[spoiler: Or maybe his winning is a failure, as Eldrad Ultran states.]]
3rd Jan '16 5:36:55 PM thatmadork
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Update: [[spoiler:Ghazghkull has got himself involved in the whole mess, and now the Orks are winning.]]

to:

*** Update: [[spoiler:Ghazghkull has got himself involved in the whole mess, and now the Orks are winning. This is ''not'' a good thing, as Ghazghkull is the biggest, meanest and [[GeniusBruiser brightest]] Ork warboss in the entire galaxy, and the last thing the Imperium wants him to get is a huge army of super-badass Orks on crack.]]
3rd Jan '16 5:34:47 PM thatmadork
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Update: [[spoiler:Ghazghkull has got himself involved in the whole mess, and now the Orks are winning.]]
28th Dec '15 8:45:09 AM ImaginaryMetroid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The selection of Leman Russ probably indicates the Emperor actually had at least some consent for the Space Wolves to attack. The Space Wolves at that time were the only group of loyalist Space Marines that did not find the concept of fighting other Space Marines to be completely incomprehensible. Very early in the Literature/HorusHeresy series, an entire Luna Wolf squad was killed by a single Space Marine that was infected by a demon because not a single Space Marine in their right mind could bring themselves to hire on one of their own, even to preserve their own lives, the lives of their squadmates, or even to ensure they were capable of completing their mission objectives. He could have sent several other primarchs, but he chose to send the Primarch with a grudge, a violent reputation, and a complete willingness to fight other Space Marines. The only other explanation is PlotInducedStupidity.

to:

*** The selection of Leman Russ probably indicates the Emperor actually had at least some consent for the Space Wolves to attack. The Space Wolves at that time were the only group of loyalist Space Marines that did not find the concept of fighting other Space Marines to be completely incomprehensible. Very early in the Literature/HorusHeresy series, an entire Luna Wolf squad was killed by a single Space Marine that was infected by a demon because not a single Space Marine in their right mind could bring themselves to hire fire on one of their own, even to preserve their own lives, the lives of their squadmates, or even to ensure they were capable of completing their mission objectives. He could have sent several other primarchs, but he chose to send the Primarch with a grudge, a violent reputation, and a complete willingness to fight other Space Marines. The only other explanation is PlotInducedStupidity.
31st Oct '15 11:32:27 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Years ago, a French tabletop RPG magazine had released a two seasons campaign for a generic {{dystopia}} TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture setting. Season one had the players going against a NightmareFuel PsychoForHire known as ''[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the Butcher]]'', who was trying to initiate [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt the biblical apocalypse]]. They were helped in their quest by a mysterious cube, which, between fast-paced action sequences in the present, allowed them to [[QuantumLeap time travel via mind-transfer]] to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong. Then in season 2, it is revealed that ''The Butcher'' was really acting this way to prevent a BadFuture to occure ([[SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism effectively willing to sacrifice millions of people to save billions later]]), and the players have been manipulated into opposing him all along, the cube actually being a gift from some monster, with which they really were setting ''worse'' what once went wrong -- and now of course they have to clean their mess, by time traveling again, this time with a cube given by ''The Butcher'', all while fighting BigBad 2 ''[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast The Plague]]'', a NightmareFuel sweating BodyHorror and borderline EldritchAbomination, who is actually one of the secondary antagonists of season 1, LeftForDead by the players and "[[WasOnceAMan reconstructed]]" later -- oh, the {{irony}}! (for extra irony, the second cube, with which the characters are supposed to fix what they spoiled, is actually much less user-friendly than the first one).

to:

* Years ago, a French tabletop RPG magazine had released a two seasons campaign for a generic {{dystopia}} TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture setting. Season one had the players going against a NightmareFuel PsychoForHire known as ''[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the Butcher]]'', who was trying to initiate [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt the biblical apocalypse]]. They were helped in their quest by a mysterious cube, which, between fast-paced action sequences in the present, allowed them to [[QuantumLeap [[Series/QuantumLeap time travel via mind-transfer]] to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong. Then in season 2, it is revealed that ''The Butcher'' was really acting this way to prevent a BadFuture to occure ([[SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism effectively willing to sacrifice millions of people to save billions later]]), and the players have been manipulated into opposing him all along, the cube actually being a gift from some monster, with which they really were setting ''worse'' what once went wrong -- and now of course they have to clean their mess, by time traveling again, this time with a cube given by ''The Butcher'', all while fighting BigBad 2 ''[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast The Plague]]'', a NightmareFuel sweating BodyHorror and borderline EldritchAbomination, who is actually one of the secondary antagonists of season 1, LeftForDead by the players and "[[WasOnceAMan reconstructed]]" later -- oh, the {{irony}}! (for extra irony, the second cube, with which the characters are supposed to fix what they spoiled, is actually much less user-friendly than the first one).
This list shows the last 10 events of 41. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=NiceJobBreakingItHero.TabletopRPG