History NeverTrustATrailer / LiveActionTV

21st Nov '16 7:23:27 AM NOYB
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* ''Series/MadamSecretary'': The trailer for "The French Revolution" makes it look like the scene is very emotional when the FBI ask Liz and Henry, "You want us to just let him go?", implying that [[spoiler:their stalker]] is someone close to them. In reality, [[spoiler:this is a matter-of-fact scene where they are discussing letting a patsy of their actual stalker go so that they can use him. And their actual stalker turns out not to have any connection to them, either]].
21st Nov '16 7:21:27 AM NOYB
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* The trailer for Season 2 of ''Series/{{Defiance}}'' made it look like Nolan and Stahma were kissing. In truth, she just gave him a chaste peck for saving her life from a car bomb.

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* The trailer for Season 2 of ''Series/{{Defiance}}'' made it look like Nolan and Stahma were kissing. In truth, she just gave him a chaste peck for saving her life from a car roller bomb.
1st Nov '16 5:36:52 PM nombretomado
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* A Brazilian cable TV trailer had a promo for ''DawsonsCreek'' whichhad Dawson saying the words ''I love you'' to Pacey, then leaning towards him. The voice-over even joked about ''Dawson borrowing some of Jack's genes'' (all the trailers in that network were really humorous and tongue-in-cheek) It turned out that episode had Dawson and Pacey reading one of Dawson's movie scripts, and he's not leaning towards Pacey, he's just reaching for the script. Though the ''reading the script'' scene was the first one in the episode, so for half a minute you thought Dawson was really professing his love for Pacey.

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* A Brazilian cable TV trailer had a promo for ''DawsonsCreek'' whichhad ''Series/DawsonsCreek'' which had Dawson saying the words ''I love you'' to Pacey, then leaning towards him. The voice-over even joked about ''Dawson borrowing some of Jack's genes'' (all the trailers in that network were really humorous and tongue-in-cheek) It turned out that episode had Dawson and Pacey reading one of Dawson's movie scripts, and he's not leaning towards Pacey, he's just reaching for the script. Though the ''reading the script'' scene was the first one in the episode, so for half a minute you thought Dawson was really professing his love for Pacey.
12th Oct '16 5:09:09 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** The WordOfGod released a blog post later that made it appear to be a miscalculation by the marketing department of Nickelodeon, who either didn't realize that the episode didn't actually do anything they claimed, or TheyJustDidntCare, and release the trailer like that to hype up the episode.

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** The WordOfGod released a blog post later that made it appear to be a miscalculation by the marketing department of Nickelodeon, who either didn't realize that the episode didn't actually do anything they claimed, or TheyJustDidntCare, something, and release the trailer like that to hype up the episode.
6th Oct '16 8:32:55 PM nombretomado
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* ''EverybodyHatesChris'' did this all the time in the later seasons. They weren't even subtle. No editing, just stuff that didn't happen. One episode trailer had Drew in a school talent show, getting booed off the stage and people throwing things at him. Never happened, not even if a dream before hand about how things might go. He just showed up and rocked.

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* ''EverybodyHatesChris'' ''Series/EverybodyHatesChris'' did this all the time in the later seasons. They weren't even subtle. No editing, just stuff that didn't happen. One episode trailer had Drew in a school talent show, getting booed off the stage and people throwing things at him. Never happened, not even if a dream before hand about how things might go. He just showed up and rocked.
19th Sep '16 3:58:48 PM BKelly95
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* NBC promoted ''Better Late Than Never'' (both the series itself and the individual episode) with a shot of the veteran entertainers visiting the border between UsefulNotes/SouthKorea and UsefulNotes/NorthKorea. Their guide, Jeff, tries to take a selfie and accidentally drops his smartphone on the North Korea side of the border and causes a minor international incident. This scene plays out as advertised, but afterwards Jeff reveals that he was never going to take four entertainment legends to the most contested border in the world and the whole thing took place on a movie set as a joke.


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** Summaries of the series finale claimed that Allison and Joe would become increasingly pulled apart by the responsibilities of their new jobs. In reality, they're separated when [[spoiler: Joe dies in a plane crash]].
2nd Sep '16 11:38:48 AM Silverblade2
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!!General Examples
[[folder:General examples]]
* In a broad sense, trailers and promotional photos are often taken from pilot episodes and dress rehearsals, a point at which not everything has been finalized even though a series may be picked up for a full series. The set may be different, there may be different actors and some of the plot lines or segments seen in a promotional trailer may air only in a preview commercial promoting the show itself, and never seen by viewers in any episode aired.
* Bravo is notoriously bad for doing this with their reality TV shows. Misleading episode descriptions, cut n' paste editing, mismatched audio --they've used every trick in the book.
* Website/{{Cracked}} .com has this trope listed as #1 of the "5 Cheap Tricks TV Shows Use To Keep You Watching" found [[http://www.cracked.com/article_16593_p2.html here]].
* Just about everything Judd Apatow's involved with. The trailer for ''FreaksAndGeeks'' pushed it as an uplifting high school drama with scenes like Lindsay telling Nick that he "just needs to work hard and believe in himself" if he wants to be a good drummer (never mind that the corresponding episode ''completely'' subverted that). Meanwhile, the trailer for ''Series/{{Undeclared}}'' made it seem like a televised ''AmericanPie'' set in a university environment. While, more recently, the trailer for ''Series/{{Girls}}'' made it sound like a Generation-Y manifesto (like the F&G example, this was done by taking a line from the show's main character ''completely'' out of context and neglecting its later subversion).
* Nowadays, "OnTheNext" TV trailers will often include footage and plot points that don't actually appear for several weeks yet. This is {{egregious}} in ''Series/PrisonBreak''-style shows with heavy continuity, as it can give the impression of the story progressing more quickly than it really does. ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' is a major offender here; for example, it incorporated material from the entire first season into the trailer for the second episode.
** ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' is a worse offender. There have been several trailers that have cut one line of dialog into clips from several seasons past. The trailer for the seventh season finale was entirely a clip of Lex Luthor looking at the Fortress of Solitude. Not only was this teased two weeks previous, it was cut entirely from the episode it was shot for. Ironically, when a recent episode decided to reveal the adaptation of the Superman Suite, many fans believed they were being played (due to the show's "No Tights, No Flights" rule which is the whole reason why it took eight seasons to make something remotely close to Superman's tights).
** Nearly every show nowadays does this after the season premiere and the voiceover usually explicitly says "This season on..." whichever show you happen to be watching.
* In its early days, Sky One used to have a single set of clips for an entire series which they played every week, regardless of which episode was to be shown at the advertised time. The result being of course that the episode usually had nothing to do with the clips you saw in the ad.
* Verizon [=FiOS=] show descriptions are repeat offenders. Take March 2010 for instance: all of Creator/TomHanks' appearances on talk shows during the month were described as "WesternAnimation/ToyStory3's Tom Hanks" even though he was doing PR for ''Series/ThePacific'' while ''Toy Story 3'' wouldn't arrive until June and never got mentioned. Clearly, [=FiOS=]' info writers know what their viewers ''really'' like to watch.
* History Channel does this a lot in recent years. Their most regarded shows, ''Series/PawnStars'' and ''Series/AmericanRestoration'', do this for their opening previews. They mix and match scenes and voice overs to make up events that never happen in the show. For example making something seem to be a fake in ''Series/PawnStars'' or breaking something in ''Series/AmericanRestoration''.
* Australian television ''always'' markets shows like ''The World's Worst Drivers'' as if they're comedies, when almost all take the form of overly tense ''When Animals Attack''-style shows.
[[/folder]]
----
!!Specific Examples

to:

!!General Examples
[[folder:General examples]]
* In a broad sense, trailers and promotional photos are often taken from pilot episodes and dress rehearsals, a point at which not everything has been finalized even though a series may be picked up for a full series. The set may be different, there may be different actors and some of the plot lines or segments seen in a promotional trailer may air only in a preview commercial promoting the show itself, and never seen by viewers in any episode aired.
* Bravo is notoriously bad for doing this with their reality TV shows. Misleading episode descriptions, cut n' paste editing, mismatched audio --they've used every trick in the book.
* Website/{{Cracked}} .com has this trope listed as #1 of the "5 Cheap Tricks TV Shows Use To Keep You Watching" found [[http://www.cracked.com/article_16593_p2.html here]].
* Just about everything Judd Apatow's involved with. The trailer for ''FreaksAndGeeks'' pushed it as an uplifting high school drama with scenes like Lindsay telling Nick that he "just needs to work hard and believe in himself" if he wants to be a good drummer (never mind that the corresponding episode ''completely'' subverted that). Meanwhile, the trailer for ''Series/{{Undeclared}}'' made it seem like a televised ''AmericanPie'' set in a university environment. While, more recently, the trailer for ''Series/{{Girls}}'' made it sound like a Generation-Y manifesto (like the F&G example, this was done by taking a line from the show's main character ''completely'' out of context and neglecting its later subversion).
* Nowadays, "OnTheNext" TV trailers will often include footage and plot points that don't actually appear for several weeks yet. This is {{egregious}} in ''Series/PrisonBreak''-style shows with heavy continuity, as it can give the impression of the story progressing more quickly than it really does. ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' is a major offender here; for example, it incorporated material from the entire first season into the trailer for the second episode.
** ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' is a worse offender. There have been several trailers that have cut one line of dialog into clips from several seasons past. The trailer for the seventh season finale was entirely a clip of Lex Luthor looking at the Fortress of Solitude. Not only was this teased two weeks previous, it was cut entirely from the episode it was shot for. Ironically, when a recent episode decided to reveal the adaptation of the Superman Suite, many fans believed they were being played (due to the show's "No Tights, No Flights" rule which is the whole reason why it took eight seasons to make something remotely close to Superman's tights).
** Nearly every show nowadays does this after the season premiere and the voiceover usually explicitly says "This season on..." whichever show you happen to be watching.
* In its early days, Sky One used to have a single set of clips for an entire series which they played every week, regardless of which episode was to be shown at the advertised time. The result being of course that the episode usually had nothing to do with the clips you saw in the ad.
* Verizon [=FiOS=] show descriptions are repeat offenders. Take March 2010 for instance: all of Creator/TomHanks' appearances on talk shows during the month were described as "WesternAnimation/ToyStory3's Tom Hanks" even though he was doing PR for ''Series/ThePacific'' while ''Toy Story 3'' wouldn't arrive until June and never got mentioned. Clearly, [=FiOS=]' info writers know what their viewers ''really'' like to watch.
* History Channel does this a lot in recent years. Their most regarded shows, ''Series/PawnStars'' and ''Series/AmericanRestoration'', do this for their opening previews. They mix and match scenes and voice overs to make up events that never happen in the show. For example making something seem to be a fake in ''Series/PawnStars'' or breaking something in ''Series/AmericanRestoration''.
* Australian television ''always'' markets shows like ''The World's Worst Drivers'' as if they're comedies, when almost all take the form of overly tense ''When Animals Attack''-style shows.
[[/folder]]
----
!!Specific Examples
16th Aug '16 10:44:43 AM NOYB
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Added DiffLines:

* The trailer for Season 2 of ''Series/{{Defiance}}'' made it look like Nolan and Stahma were kissing. In truth, she just gave him a chaste peck for saving her life from a car bomb.
7th Jul '16 12:34:35 PM Sapphirea2
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** The trailer for Season 9 prominently featured the shot of Creator/MaisieWilliams removing her Knightmare mask in "The Woman Who Lived", with the Doctor knowingly exclaiming "You!", and Maisie calmly responding "What took you so long, old man?" Since the trailer was shown before anyone knew ''anything'' about Maisie Williams' character, that scene understandably gave fans the impression that she would be playing a character from the Doctor's past, fueling speculation that Romana or Susan Foreman would be returning to the show. The trailer left out the fact that "The Woman Who Lived" is ''not'' the character's introduction. The Doctor acts like he knows her because he first meets her in "The Girl Who Died", the episode right before "The Woman Who Lived".

to:

** The trailer for Season 9 prominently featured the shot of Creator/MaisieWilliams removing her Knightmare mask in "The Woman Who Lived", with the Doctor knowingly exclaiming "You!", and Maisie calmly responding "What took you so long, old man?" Since the trailer was shown before anyone knew ''anything'' about Maisie Williams' character, that scene understandably gave fans the impression that she would be playing a character from the Doctor's past, fueling speculation that Romana or Susan Foreman would be returning to the show. The trailer left out the fact that "The Woman Who Lived" is ''not'' the character's introduction. The Doctor acts like he knows her because he first meets her in "The Girl Who Died", the episode right before "The Woman Who Lived".Lived"; for those who are curious, she is a Viking girl [[spoiler: whom he saves from the grave in a way that makes her functionally immortal, and who from there must take The Slow Path]].
27th May '16 7:27:42 AM RippenFan33
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** The promo for "the Flaming Spittoon Acquisition" had the narrator say something like "sorry [[PortmanteauCoupleName Shamy]] fans" and showed a scene of Sheldon chastising Amy in the comic book store, then had him in Penny's apartment saying "how about you and me go on a date" implying he wanted to get together with her. While he does ask her out in the episode [[spoiler: it was never serious and part of a plan to make Amy jealous; indeed, the episode ends with Sheldon & Amy solidifying their relationship in their own unique way.]]
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