History Music / ToddRundgren

28th Jan '17 10:18:37 PM Mdumas43073
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Todd Rundgren (born June 22, 1948) is an American [[SingerSongwriter singer-songwriter]], [[IAmTheBand multi-instrumentalist]] and {{record producer}} from Philadelphia, known for his [[NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly eclectic, experimental style]], incredibly prolific recording and quirky sense of humour. While he's dabbled in numerous styles and has experimented a lot with his material, he largely operates within a few rock subgenres, namely: PowerPop (coincidentally, the one he made his initial name in), HardRock, ProgressiveRock, Electronic/Club and RAndB (classic [=R&B=]). His [[NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly mix and match musical genres]] approach, dabbling in TrueArtIsIncomprehensible, cult following and emphasis on humour has earned him occasional comparisons to Music/FrankZappa.

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Todd Harry Rundgren (born June 22, 1948) is an American [[SingerSongwriter singer-songwriter]], [[IAmTheBand multi-instrumentalist]] and {{record producer}} from Philadelphia, known for his [[NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly eclectic, experimental style]], incredibly prolific recording and quirky sense of humour. While he's dabbled in numerous styles and has experimented a lot with his material, he largely operates within a few rock subgenres, namely: PowerPop (coincidentally, the one he made his initial name in), HardRock, ProgressiveRock, Electronic/Club and RAndB (classic [=R&B=]). His [[NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly mix and match musical genres]] approach, dabbling in TrueArtIsIncomprehensible, cult following and emphasis on humour has earned him occasional comparisons to Music/FrankZappa.
28th Jan '17 10:18:14 PM Mdumas43073
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Todd Rundgren (born June 22, 1948) is a musician, singer, songwriter, [[IAmTheBand multi-instrumentalist]] and RecordProducer from Philadelphia, known for his [[NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly eclectic, experimental style]], incredibly prolific recording and quirky sense of humour. While he's dabbled in numerous styles and has experimented a lot with his material, he largely operates within a few rock subgenres, namely: PowerPop (coincidentally, the one he made his initial name in), HardRock, ProgressiveRock, Electronic/Club and RAndB (classic [=R&B=]). His [[NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly mix and match musical genres]] approach, dabbling in TrueArtIsIncomprehensible, cult following and emphasis on humour has earned him occasional comparisons to Music/FrankZappa.

to:

Todd Rundgren (born June 22, 1948) is a musician, singer, songwriter, an American [[SingerSongwriter singer-songwriter]], [[IAmTheBand multi-instrumentalist]] and RecordProducer {{record producer}} from Philadelphia, known for his [[NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly eclectic, experimental style]], incredibly prolific recording and quirky sense of humour. While he's dabbled in numerous styles and has experimented a lot with his material, he largely operates within a few rock subgenres, namely: PowerPop (coincidentally, the one he made his initial name in), HardRock, ProgressiveRock, Electronic/Club and RAndB (classic [=R&B=]). His [[NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly mix and match musical genres]] approach, dabbling in TrueArtIsIncomprehensible, cult following and emphasis on humour has earned him occasional comparisons to Music/FrankZappa.
28th Jan '17 10:16:38 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tr.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:He was born to synthesize.]]

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tr.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:He [[caption-width-right:300:He was born to synthesize.]]
10th Jan '17 3:40:08 PM CassandraLeo
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* ConceptAlbum: ''Initiation'' is one (see TakeThatCritics below.) The first side of ''Faithful'' was about faithfully recreating classic pop and rock songs note for note. Side four of ''Something/Anything?'' is a RockOpera (see trope entry below). ''Healing'' also qualifies, as it explores spirituality and how it relates to various aspects of society. Finally, ''Liars'' is a concept album about... well... ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. (The liner notes comment that superficially some songs may seem to be about other topics, but "that is just a reflection of how much dishonesty we have accepted in our daily lives"; they all relate in some way to the album's concept of "a paucity of truth".)

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* ConceptAlbum: ConceptAlbum:
**
''Initiation'' is one (see TakeThatCritics below.) )
**
The first side of ''Faithful'' was about faithfully recreating classic pop and rock songs note for note. note.
**
Side four of ''Something/Anything?'' is a RockOpera (see trope entry below). below).
**
''Healing'' also qualifies, as it explores spirituality and how it relates to various aspects of society. Finally, society.
**
''Liars'' is a concept album about... well... ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. (The liner notes comment that superficially some songs may seem to be about other topics, but "that is just a reflection of how much dishonesty we have accepted in our daily lives"; they all relate in some way to the album's concept of "a paucity of truth".))
** ''Deface the Music'' is a loose one, as every song is an AffectionateParody of some period of Music/TheBeatles' career, though there is no overarching lyrical theme.
10th Jan '17 3:38:10 PM CassandraLeo
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* AuthorTract: His 1975 album ''Initiation'' was a retort to his fans who wanted him to ditch the synthesizers and Buddhist symbolism that had crept into his crunchy rock sound. Instead, he went on for 68 full minutes about it, telling his fans that he was a "Real Man" "Born to Synthesize", and taunting them to follow him or lose him forever. This ended with the 35-minute synth freakout that closed the album, named after a book by occult author Alice Bailey (who also inspired the Music/VelvetUnderground's "Music/WhiteLightWhiteHeat") and containing movements named after the seven chakras.

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* AuthorTract: AuthorTract:
**
His 1975 album ''Initiation'' was a retort to his fans who wanted him to ditch the synthesizers and Buddhist symbolism that had crept into his crunchy rock sound. Instead, he went on for 68 full minutes about it, telling his fans that he was a "Real Man" "Born to Synthesize", and taunting them to follow him or lose him forever. This ended with the 35-minute synth freakout that closed the album, named after a book by occult author Alice Bailey (who also inspired the Music/VelvetUnderground's "Music/WhiteLightWhiteHeat") and containing movements named after the seven chakras.chakras.
** Every song on ''Liars'' is a ProtestSong about some form of untruth Rundgren feels people have accepted in their daily lives, from gender essentialist views of relationships ("Happy Anniversary") to greed ("Mammon") to the present-day state of the music industry ("Soul Brother") to religion ("God Said") to various political topics. However, this is a clear case of TropesAreNotBad, as it's one of his most loved albums since TheEighties.



*** Notably, the only thing that stops ''Initiation'' and ''A Wizard, a True Star'' from playing this trope completely straight is that they were pressed on one LP each because Rundgren didn't want to break up the continuous song suites he'd built. Both albums were long enough to be double LP sets, and indeed Rundgren's double album ''Todd'', released in between them, ''was'' shorter than ''Initiation'' at 66:51. However, ''Todd'' does not feature markedly different styles between its two discs, so it is arguably not an example of this trope.
** ''Healing'' (running time 53:48) is a particularly strange example, since the vinyl edition contains an LP and a 45 rpm 7" single. The first side contains six different songs; the second side is entirely devoted to the twenty-minute title track, and the 7" contains two additional songs that relate to the LP's themes but are a bit catchier. Perhaps the strangest part of all is that the combined running time of the second side plus the running time of the single (26:40) is actually shorter than the running time of the first side of the album (27:08). Musically, the whole album is of a similar style, but the length of the title track makes it stand out. On CD, the album is included on a single disc, with the single put at the end.

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*** Notably, the only thing that stops ''Initiation'' and ''A Wizard, a True Star'' from playing this trope completely straight is that they were pressed on one LP each because Rundgren didn't want to break up the continuous song suites he'd built. Both albums were long enough to be double LP sets, and indeed Rundgren's double album ''Todd'', released in between them, ''was'' shorter than ''Initiation'' at 66:51. However, ''Todd'' does not feature markedly different styles between its two discs, records (mostly because it features too much GenreRoulette for either record to have a single distinguishing style), so it is arguably not an example of this trope.
** ''Healing'' (running time 53:48) is a particularly strange example, since the vinyl edition contains an LP and a 45 rpm 7" single. The first side contains six different songs; the second side is entirely devoted to the twenty-minute title track, and the 7" contains two additional songs that relate to the LP's themes but are a bit catchier. Perhaps the strangest part of all is that the combined running time of the second side plus the running time of the single (26:40) is actually shorter than the running time of the first side of the album (27:08). It is possible that Rundgren put the last two songs on the single because he wanted to place emphasis on the title track. Musically, the whole album is of a similar style, but the length of the title track makes it stand out. On CD, the album is included on a single disc, with the single put at the end.



** Utopia's "Singring and the Glass Guitar (An Electrified Fairytale)", which exceeds eighteen minutes, is yet another extreme example. However, this is far from being an exhaustive list; on some of his mid-'70s albums, more songs exceeded six minutes than didn't. (On the first Utopia album, only one song was ''less'' than ten minutes long).

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** Utopia's "Singring and the Glass Guitar (An Electrified Fairytale)", which exceeds eighteen minutes, is yet another extreme example. However, this example.
** This
is far from being an exhaustive list; on some of his mid-'70s albums, more songs exceeded six minutes than didn't. (On the first Utopia album, only one song was ''less'' than ten minutes long).long; the album has only four songs despite running for nearly an hour).



* PatterSong: "Song of the Viking", "An Elpee's Worth of Toons", "The Lord Chancellor's Nightmare Song"

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* PatterSong: "Song of the Viking", "An Elpee's Worth of Toons", "The Lord Chancellor's Nightmare Song"Song". The first two of these are tributes to Music/GilbertAndSullivan, who wrote the latter (and are pretty much the TropeCodifier).



* ProtestSong: Todd began moving more into this during TheEighties, with songs like Utopia's cover of "For the Love of Money", "Swing to the Right", "Flesh", "Johnee Jingo", and later on, just about all of ''No World Order'' and ''Liars''.

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* ProtestSong: Todd began moving more into this during TheEighties, with songs like Utopia's cover of "For the Love of Money", "Swing to the Right", "Flesh", "Johnee Jingo", and later on, just about all of ''No World Order'' and ''Liars''.''Liars'', as well as parts of ''Arena'', ''State'', and ''Global''.



* YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe: In the liner notes to ''Music/SomethingAnything'', several lines of "Song of the Viking" are written with added silent Es, even though Vikings don't originate from the British Isles. Rundgren explicitly states in the liner notes that the song is a tribute to Gilbert & Sullivan, who were most definitely British.

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* YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe: In the liner notes to ''Music/SomethingAnything'', several lines of "Song of the Viking" are written with added silent Es, even though Vikings don't originate from the British Isles. Rundgren explicitly states in the liner notes that the song is a tribute to Gilbert & Sullivan, Music/GilbertAndSullivan, who were most definitely British.
10th Jan '17 3:21:32 PM CassandraLeo
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Added DiffLines:

* FadingIntoTheNextSong: All of ''Initiation'' (apart from the LP side break) and ''Liars'' (apart from the Japanese release) and the entire first side of ''A Wizard, a True Star'' and fourth side of ''Music/SomethingAnything'' are gapless. ''Todd''[[note]]("How About a Little Fanfare?"->"I Think You Know"->"The Spark of Life"->"An Elpee's Worth of Tunes", "A Dream Goes On Forever"->"Lord Chancellor's Nightmare Song", "Useless Begging"->"Sidewalk Cafe"->"Izzat Love?"->"Heavy Metal Kids")[[/note]], ''Arena''[[note]]("Mad"->"Afraid"->"Mercenary"->"Gun", "Pissin"->"Today", "Bardo"->"Mountaintop")[[/note]], and the other side of ''A Wizard, a True Star''[[note]]("Does Anybody Love You?"->Motown medley, "Hungry for Love"->"I Don't Want to Tie You Down"->"Is It My Name?")[[/note]] also have a lot of this, but an exhaustive list would probably double the length of this page.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Medley}}: Many, including "Baby Let's Swing"/"The Last Thing You Said"/"Don't Tie My Hands" on ''Runt'', "That's What I Want"/"Messin' with the Kid" on ''Music/SomethingAnything'', and a medley of Motown covers on ''A Wizard, a True Star''. Live he would often perform these as well, including a medley of Music/MarvinGaye covers.
14th Dec '16 12:04:50 PM CassandraLeo
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* IntentionallyAwkwardTitle: "Piss Aaron", "Slut", "When the Shit Hits the Fan/Sunset Blvd.", "Pissin", etc.

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* IntentionallyAwkwardTitle: "Piss Aaron", "Slut", "Rock and Roll Pussy", "When the Shit Hits the Fan/Sunset Blvd.", "Pissin", etc.
14th Dec '16 12:04:09 PM CassandraLeo
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Added DiffLines:

* IntentionallyAwkwardTitle: "Piss Aaron", "Slut", "When the Shit Hits the Fan/Sunset Blvd.", "Pissin", etc.
14th Dec '16 12:00:36 PM CassandraLeo
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* MohsScaleOfRockAndHardness: Can go anywhere from a 1 ("Torch Song", "I Don't Want to Tie You Down") to about a 6 ("Is It My Name?", "Heavy Metal Kids", "The Death of Rock and Roll").

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* MohsScaleOfRockAndHardness: MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness: Can go anywhere from a 1 ("Torch Song", "I Don't Want to Tie You Down") to about a 6 ("Is It My Name?", "Heavy Metal Kids", "The Death of Rock and Roll").
14th Dec '16 11:59:57 AM CassandraLeo
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* AnguishedDeclarationOfLove: "I Don't Want to Tie You Down" and "Couldn't I Just Tell You", amongst others.

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* AnguishedDeclarationOfLove: "I Don't Want to Tie You Down" and "Couldn't I Just Tell You", amongst others.You" provide two very different takes on the trope; the former is a heartfelt ballad declaring that the singer doesn't wish to cause his beloved any inconvenience or hardship, while the latter is an emotionally wrought PowerPop rocker.


Added DiffLines:

* MohsScaleOfRockAndHardness: Can go anywhere from a 1 ("Torch Song", "I Don't Want to Tie You Down") to about a 6 ("Is It My Name?", "Heavy Metal Kids", "The Death of Rock and Roll").
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