History Music / TheWall

11th Oct '17 9:43:17 AM Kurtis
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* DarkerAndEdgier: ''The Wall'' is possibly Pink Floyd's overall darkest album, with a pervasive feeling of cynicism and despair permeating throughout both the lyrics and the music itself.

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* DarkerAndEdgier: ''The Wall'' is possibly arguably Pink Floyd's overall darkest album, album (depending on how you score ''[[{{Music/Animals}} Animals]]'' and ''[[{{Music/The Final Cut}} The Final Cut]]''), with a pervasive feeling of cynicism and despair permeating throughout both the lyrics and the music itself.
18th Sep '17 10:47:17 PM Randomwaffle23
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The album was later adapted into a 1982 feature film entitled ''Pink Floyd -- The Wall'', directed by Alan Parker and featuring Irish musician Bob Geldof as Pink. It set the music and story of Pink to horrific scenes that shifted from live-action to the aforementioned animation by Scarfe. Most memorable were the animated scenes of [[ItMakesSenseInContext marching hammers]] and nightmarish blitz-era London, as well as the film's stunning climax. Scarfe drew upon his bedridden childhood to come up with the grotesque imagery featured prominently in the concerts and film.

The album and movie share the same story, albeit with a few minor differences. The first half of the movie and album introduce us to Pink and [[StartOfDarkness his insanely crap-tastic childhood]]. Events and circumstances in his childhood life--an overbearing/overprotective mum, a father who died in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and authoritarian teachers--cause him to shun human interaction because he's afraid he'll be hurt, every incident that causes him pain serving as just another brick in the "wall" that he is constructing between himself and the outside world. As an adult, Pink becomes a super-famous rock star and fills the "empty spaces" of his wall with the typical vices of the rich and famous: SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll.

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The album was later adapted into a 1982 feature film entitled ''Pink Floyd -- The Wall'', directed by Alan Parker and featuring Irish musician Bob Geldof as Pink. It set the music and story of Pink to horrific scenes that shifted from live-action to the aforementioned animation by Scarfe. Most memorable were the animated scenes of [[ItMakesSenseInContext marching hammers]] and nightmarish blitz-era London, as well as the film's stunning climax. Scarfe drew upon his bedridden childhood to come up with the grotesque imagery featured prominently in the concerts and film.

The album and movie share the same story, albeit with a few minor differences. The first half of the movie and album introduce us to Pink and [[StartOfDarkness his insanely crap-tastic childhood]]. Events and circumstances in his childhood life--an life—an overbearing/overprotective mum, a father who died in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and authoritarian teachers--cause teachers—cause him to shun human interaction because he's afraid he'll be hurt, every incident that causes him pain serving as just another brick in the "wall" that he is constructing between himself and the outside world. As an adult, Pink becomes a super-famous rock star and fills the "empty spaces" of his wall with the typical vices of the rich and famous: SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll.



After Pink finds out that his wife cheated on him, he trashes his hotel room and scares away a groupie before he finally [[HeroicBSOD snaps]] and completes his wall, shutting himself out entirely, and the album and movie take us inside the mind of Pink for the second half. After being revived from a drug coma and forcefully shot up with even ''more'' drugs by his managers to get him on-stage, he imagines that he has become the very same force that started his wall--Fascists (okay, "hammer army")--and begins to order the audience to hate on various minority groups. Eventually, he retreats further into his mind during a moment of brief clarity. Wondering if he's "been guilty all along," Pink puts himself on trial with a literal giant arse as judge and warped visions of his childhood fears as jury, and forces himself to tear down his wall as a result.

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After Pink finds out that his wife cheated on him, he trashes his hotel room and scares away a groupie before he finally [[HeroicBSOD snaps]] and completes his wall, shutting himself out entirely, and the album and movie take us inside the mind of Pink for the second half. After being revived from a drug coma and forcefully shot up with even ''more'' drugs by his managers to get him on-stage, he imagines that he has become the very same force that started his wall--Fascists wall—Fascists (okay, "hammer army")--and army")—and begins to order the audience to hate on various minority groups. Eventually, he retreats further into his mind during a moment of brief clarity. Wondering if he's "been guilty all along," Pink puts himself on trial with a literal giant arse as judge and warped visions of his childhood fears as jury, and forces himself to tear down his wall as a result.



# "Hey You" (4:40) [[note]]A scene for this song was filmed for ''Pink Floyd -- The Wall'', but it was cut out both to conserve running time and because it was thought to be too repetitive (as 80% of its footage already appeared during montage sequences elsewhere in the film)[[/note]]

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# "Hey You" (4:40) [[note]]A scene for this song was filmed for ''Pink Floyd -- The Wall'', but it was cut out both to conserve running time and because it was thought to be too repetitive (as 80% of its footage already appeared during montage sequences elsewhere in the film)[[/note]]



# "The Show Must Go On" (1:36) [[note]]Excluded from ''Pink Floyd -- The Wall''[[/note]]

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# "The Show Must Go On" (1:36) [[note]]Excluded from ''Pink Floyd -- The Wall''[[/note]]



* David Gilmour - guitar, backing and lead vocals, bass, synthesizer, clavinet, rototom, cymbal, mandolin
* Nick Mason - drums, percussion, bass drum, cymbal, guitar
* Music/RogerWaters - lead vocals, bass, guitar, [=VCS3=], synthesizer, clarinet
* Richard Wright - keyboard, synthesizer, vocals, organ, piano, clavinet, bass pedals, accordion

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* David Gilmour - guitar, backing and lead vocals, bass, synthesizer, clavinet, rototom, cymbal, mandolin
* Nick Mason - drums, percussion, bass drum, cymbal, guitar
* Music/RogerWaters - lead vocals, bass, guitar, [=VCS3=], synthesizer, clarinet
* Richard Wright - keyboard, synthesizer, vocals, organ, piano, clavinet, bass pedals, accordion



* AdvancingWallOfDoom: Played horrifically straight in the movie during the animated sequence for "Empty Spaces/What Shall We Do Now?" In the sequence, a wall of personal possessions (cars, stereos, [=TVs=], etc.) turns into a wall of buildings, which turns into the titular white brick wall. The Wall moves across the land at frightening speed, turning flowers into barbed-wire, and babies into skinhead goons. It even ploughs its way through a church, transforming it into a neon-lit casino that spews neon bricks.

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* AdvancingWallOfDoom: Played horrifically straight in the movie during the animated sequence for "Empty Spaces/What Shall We Do Now?" In the sequence, a wall of personal possessions (cars, stereos, [=TVs=], etc.) turns into a wall of buildings, which turns into the titular white brick wall. The Wall moves across the land at frightening speed, turning flowers into barbed-wire, barbed wire, and babies into skinhead goons. It even ploughs its way through a church, transforming it into a neon-lit casino that spews neon bricks.



* BlatantLies: From the newer live tours of the album, we have what seems to be the Hammers' slogan: ''"Everything will be okay--you can trust us."''

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* BlatantLies: From the newer live tours of the album, we have what seems to be the Hammers' slogan: ''"Everything will be okay--you okay—you can trust us."''



* UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire: "Would... would you like to see Britannia rule again?"
** "My friend?"
*** "All you have to do is follow the worms!"



** In fact, Waters went on to write several songs on ''Music/TheFinalCut'' from the teacher's POV, blaming his treatment of his students on his own trauma stemming from - surprise, surprise - WWII. "When you're one of the few/To land on your feet/What do you do to make ends meet?/Teach!"

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** In fact, Waters went on to write several songs on ''Music/TheFinalCut'' from the teacher's POV, blaming his treatment of his students on his own trauma stemming from - surprise, surprise - WWII.from—surprise, surprise—WWII. "When you're one of the few/To land on your feet/What do you do to make ends meet?/Teach!"



* ForcedToWatch: The 1980-81 tours involved the "Surrogate Band," four session musicians who wore life-masks of Pink Floyd's members during "In the Flesh?" and the "fascist rally" set. During those three songs, you realise that the "old" Pink Floyd is being forced to play at the "new" Pink Floyd's concert, and they're playing their instruments rather stiffly and unwillingly, as if they've got guns pointed at them.

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* ForcedToWatch: The 1980-81 1980–81 tours involved the "Surrogate Band," four session musicians who wore life-masks of Pink Floyd's members during "In the Flesh?" and the "fascist rally" set. During those three songs, you realise that the "old" Pink Floyd is being forced to play at the "new" Pink Floyd's concert, and they're playing their instruments rather stiffly and unwillingly, as if they've got guns pointed at them.



* FreudianExcuse: Subverted-while the first pieces of Pink's wall were the result of childhood trauma, the movie, album, and Waters himself make it very clear that it's his fault for maintaining his Wall instead of coming to terms with his world and that his unhappy marriage and cheating wife were implied to have been at least partially his fault.

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* FreudianExcuse: Subverted-while Subverted—while the first pieces of Pink's wall were the result of childhood trauma, the movie, album, and Waters himself make it very clear that it's his fault for maintaining his Wall instead of coming to terms with his world and that his unhappy marriage and cheating wife were implied to have been at least partially his fault.



* HeManWomanHater: A rare example that has a halfway decent FreudianExcuse--Pink has let his experiences with [[MyBelovedSmother his mother]] and [[YourCheatingHeart his wife]] color his view on women on the whole, viewing them all as being either promiscuous liars and deceivers or oppressive, controlling matriarchs. This is best illustrated in "The Trial", wherein his wife is portrayed first as a giant man-eating bug and then as a hideous, Freudian temptress with ''handle bars'' on her waist, while his mother is a borderline literal KnightTemplarParent who tries to drag him back into her womb just to keep him safe.

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* HeManWomanHater: A rare example that has a halfway decent FreudianExcuse--Pink FreudianExcuse—Pink has let his experiences with [[MyBelovedSmother his mother]] and [[YourCheatingHeart his wife]] color his view on women on the whole, viewing them all as being either promiscuous liars and deceivers or oppressive, controlling matriarchs. This is best illustrated in "The Trial", wherein his wife is portrayed first as a giant man-eating bug and then as a hideous, Freudian temptress with ''handle bars'' on her waist, while his mother is a borderline literal KnightTemplarParent who tries to drag him back into her womb just to keep him safe.



* JudicialWig: Pink's trial is presided over by Judge Arse in the film and theatrical versions. He is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin - a giant talking human backside wearing a judge's wig. On the film version, the Judge first appears as a worm, which then turns into a wig.

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* JudicialWig: Pink's trial is presided over by Judge Arse in the film and theatrical versions. He is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin - a ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin—a giant talking human backside wearing a judge's wig. On the film version, the Judge first appears as a worm, which then turns into a wig.



* LimeyGoesToHollywood: InUniverse, Pink himself--the movie makes it fairly clear that this part of the tour is in L.A.

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* LimeyGoesToHollywood: InUniverse, Pink himself--the himself—the movie makes it fairly clear that this part of the tour is in L.A.



* LyricalDissonance: "Mother", "In the Flesh". "Run Like Hell" wins the prize, however - dance the night away to lyrics discussing racial violence and rape.

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* LyricalDissonance: "Mother", "In the Flesh". "Run Like Hell" wins the prize, however - dance however—dance the night away to lyrics discussing racial violence and rape.



*** "Waiting for the Worms" also uses similar vocal techniques to "Corporal Clegg" (clear words, followed by words that sound like they're coming through a megaphone--literally in the case of the latter song), as well as sharing certain structural similarities (aggressive verses driven by heavy guitar riffs, followed by more melodic choruses employing vocal harmonies).

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*** "Waiting for the Worms" also uses similar vocal techniques to "Corporal Clegg" (clear words, followed by words that sound like they're coming through a megaphone--literally megaphone—literally in the case of the latter song), as well as sharing certain structural similarities (aggressive verses driven by heavy guitar riffs, followed by more melodic choruses employing vocal harmonies).



* ANaziByAnyOtherName: Pink's Hammers -''snicker''- take cues from UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini's black shirts, SS troopers, and the KKK/skinheads. "Waiting for the Worms" doesn't really bother to try to disguise the fact that they are neo-Nazis, as the lyrics reference the Holocaust with "the final solution to strengthen the strain" and "waiting to turn on the showers and fire the ovens".

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* ANaziByAnyOtherName: Pink's Hammers -''snicker''- take Hammers—''snicker''—take cues from UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini's black shirts, SS troopers, and the KKK/skinheads. "Waiting for the Worms" doesn't really bother to try to disguise the fact that they are neo-Nazis, as the lyrics reference the Holocaust with "the final solution to strengthen the strain" and "waiting to turn on the showers and fire the ovens".



* RepriseMedley: During the live shows, the band would play a medley called "The Last Few Bricks" between "Another Brick In The Wall Part III" and "Goodbye Cruel World" in order to give the stage-hands time to construct the titular wall. The recording of this medley found on the live album ''Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980-81'' includes material based on instrumental sections from "The Happiest Days Of Our Lives", "Another Brick In The Wall Part I", "Don't Leave Me Now", "Young Lust" and "Empty Spaces".

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* RepriseMedley: During the live shows, the band would play a medley called "The Last Few Bricks" between "Another Brick In The Wall Part III" and "Goodbye Cruel World" in order to give the stage-hands time to construct the titular wall. The recording of this medley found on the live album ''Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980-81'' 1980–81'' includes material based on instrumental sections from "The Happiest Days Of Our Lives", "Another Brick In The Wall Part I", "Don't Leave Me Now", "Young Lust" and "Empty Spaces".



*** Only on the studio version - when played live, "What Shall We Do Now?" follows "Empty Spaces", and "Young Lust" has its own extended intro.

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*** Only on the studio version - when version—when played live, "What Shall We Do Now?" follows "Empty Spaces", and "Young Lust" has its own extended intro.



* ThatManIsDead: After Pink's FreakOut when his wife leaves him, he is forced back on stage to perform - but emerges as a neo-Nazi, and announces his change by claiming to be a new person:

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* ThatManIsDead: After Pink's FreakOut when his wife leaves him, he is forced back on stage to perform - but perform—but emerges as a neo-Nazi, and announces his change by claiming to be a new person:



* YouAreWhatYouHate: A recurring theme. Pink becomes a fascist, the very thing his father had died fighting against, as noted in the later songs "In The Flesh", "Run Like Hell", and "Waiting For The Worms". And he tries to rebel against the conformity of his school by becoming a rock star, only to realize that his teenage fans are so mindlessly devoted to him that they've forgotten how to think for themselves - making him, in his own way, just as oppressive as his [[SadistTeacher teachers]] once were.

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* YouAreWhatYouHate: A recurring theme. Pink becomes a fascist, the very thing his father had died fighting against, as noted in the later songs "In The Flesh", "Run Like Hell", and "Waiting For The Worms". And he tries to rebel against the conformity of his school by becoming a rock star, only to realize that his teenage fans are so mindlessly devoted to him that they've forgotten how to think for themselves - making themselves—making him, in his own way, just as oppressive as his [[SadistTeacher teachers]] once were.
6th Sep '17 5:53:18 PM madius
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''The Wall'' was heavily inspired by the RealLife trials and tribulations of bassist and then-leader Music/RogerWaters, who came up with the idea for the album after the last concert in Montreal during the 1977 ''In The Flesh'' tour in support of the band's album ''Music/{{Animals}}''. During the concert he spat in the face of an unruly fan who was climbing the fence between the crowd and the band. The fan was overjoyed to be spat on. This event caused Waters to realise that he was starting to distance himself from others and that this "wall" was turning him into a cold and destructive person, and he jokingly suggested that the band build a wall between themselves and the fans.

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''The Wall'' was heavily inspired by the RealLife trials and tribulations of bassist and then-leader Music/RogerWaters, who came up with the idea for the album after the last concert in Montreal at Montreal, Canada's Olympic Stadium during the 1977 ''In The Flesh'' tour in support of the band's album ''Music/{{Animals}}''. During the concert he spat in the face of an unruly fan who was climbing the fence between the crowd and the band. The fan was overjoyed to be spat on. This event caused Waters to realise that he was starting to distance himself from others and that this "wall" was turning him into a cold and destructive person, and he jokingly suggested that the band build a wall between themselves and the fans.



* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Pink's childhood is based on Roger Waters' early life, including his father dying in the war and horrible experience in school. Pink's SanitySlippage as an adult is based on Music/SydBarrett's own CreatorBreakdown. He really did shave his eyebrows.

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* RealLifeWritesThePlot: As mentioned previously, the spitting incident on the In the Flesh Tour was the genesis for this album. It's telling that the Fascist Pink concert, as well as the HowWeGotHere moment that starts the album, are both named "In the Flesh." The gigantic stadium seen in the album's gatefold artwork looks like the Montreal Olympic Stadium on steroids.
**
Pink's childhood is based on Roger Waters' early life, including his father dying in the war and horrible experience in school. Pink's SanitySlippage as an adult is based on Music/SydBarrett's own CreatorBreakdown. He really did shave his eyebrows.
6th Sep '17 9:27:31 AM madius
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* EnforcedMethodActing: The infamous phone call that ends "Young Lust" involved Waters prank-calling Mason via a real-life phone operator, telling her that he was Mr. Pink Floyd, attempting to contact his wife. Her exasperated response, "He keeps hanging up, and there's a man answering!" is genuine.
** On several tour stops, the band would replicate the call using real phones on stage. The operators that were dialed were also not in on the bit.
6th Sep '17 9:15:40 AM madius
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The band's tour promoting the album featured giant puppets, DerangedAnimation by political cartoonist Gerald Scarfe and most notably, a giant wall of cardboard bricks that was constructed between the musicians and the audience during the course of the first half of the show. However, the stage show was so expensive, and cost so much to put together, that the tour only had 31 shows in four different cities (London, New York, Dortmund and Los Angeles); a revival tour by Roger Waters in 2010/2011 was ''still'' the most expensive concert tour of all time.

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The band's tour promoting the album featured giant puppets, DerangedAnimation by political cartoonist Gerald Scarfe and most notably, a giant wall of cardboard bricks that was constructed between the musicians and the audience during the course of the first half of the show. However, the stage show was so expensive, and cost so much to put together, that the tour only had 31 shows in four different cities (London, New York, Dortmund and Los Angeles); a revival tour by Roger Waters in 2010/2011 was ''still'' the most expensive concert tour of all time. \n A special one-off performance was staged in Berlin in 1990, on the no man's land space between Potsdamer Platz and the Brandenburg Gate, to commemorate the fall of the UsefulNotes/BerlinWall.



* AluminumChristmasTrees: If the idea of a rock star turning a concert into a neo-fascist rally sounds ridiculous, remember that Music/EricClapton delivered a racist rant on-stage a few years before the album was released. In another parallel with Pink, he was very drunk at the time. Music/DavidBowie had also toyed with fascist imagery in the ''Music/StationToStation'' era with his "Thin White Duke" persona, and once infamously advocated the idea of a Fascist Britain during an in-character interview.

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* AluminumChristmasTrees: If the idea of a rock star turning a concert into a neo-fascist rally sounds ridiculous, remember that Music/EricClapton delivered a racist rant on-stage a few years before the album was released. In another parallel with Pink, he was very drunk at the time. Music/DavidBowie had also toyed with fascist imagery in the ''Music/StationToStation'' era with his "Thin White Duke" persona, and once infamously advocated the idea of a Fascist Britain during an in-character interview. There are also numerous photos of Bowie from that era where he either is or appears to be giving the Nazi Salute.



* BittersweetEnding: Pink gets rid of the mental wall he put up that was utterly destroying him after he puts himself on trial, but that doesn't change what happened for the rest of the album. He's still suffering from issues about his past, his wife left him, he destroyed a hotel room, and [[UnreliableNarrator (if we take his word at face value)]] he [[NiceJobBreakingItHero started a Neo-Nazi revolution in Britain]]. It doesn't help that "Outside The Wall" doesn't explain what happened to Pink after the wall came down.
* BlackComedy: Several of the lyrics show an understated, deadpan sense of humour that either provides momentary relief from or reinforces the album's depressing atmosphere, such as "Mother do you think they'll try to break my balls?" from "Mother", Pink gleefully recounting how the abusive teachers are thrashed "within inches of their lives" every night by their "fat and psychopathic wives" in "The Happiest Days Of Our Lives", Pink's pathetic list of possessions in "Nobody Home", the "little pinprick" in "Comfortably Numb", Pink psychotically ranting about shooting his fans in "In The Flesh", and nearly all of "The Trial".

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* BittersweetEnding: Pink gets rid of the mental wall he put up that was utterly destroying him after he puts himself on trial, but that doesn't change what happened for the rest of the album. He's still suffering from issues about his past, his wife left him, he destroyed a hotel room, and [[UnreliableNarrator (if we take his word at face value)]] he [[NiceJobBreakingItHero started a Neo-Nazi revolution in Britain]]. It doesn't help that "Outside The Wall" doesn't explain what happened to Pink after the wall came down.
down. In the film, a group of children can be seen picking up bricks in the street and running off with them, suggesting that they're starting to build their own walls.
* BlackComedy: Several of the lyrics show an understated, deadpan sense of humour that either provides momentary relief from or reinforces the album's depressing atmosphere, such as as: "Mother do you think they'll try to break my balls?" from "Mother", "Mother"; Pink gleefully recounting how the abusive teachers are thrashed "within inches of their lives" every night by their "fat and psychopathic wives" in "The Happiest Days Of Our Lives", Lives"; Pink's pathetic list of possessions in "Nobody Home", Home"; the "little pinprick" (complete with sparkly sound effect) in "Comfortably Numb", Numb"; Pink psychotically ranting about shooting his fans in "In The Flesh", Flesh"; and nearly all of "The Trial".Trial" for its over-operatic nature.



* TheCoverChangesTheGender: Averted when Sinead O'Connor left the lyrics to "Mother" intact during Roger Waters's 1991 ''The Wall'' concert in Berlin.

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* TheCoverChangesTheGender: Averted when Sinead O'Connor left the lyrics to "Mother" intact during Roger Waters's 1991 1990 ''The Wall'' concert in Berlin.



** Out of universe, the album was inspired by one that Roger Waters had, as listed at the top of the page.



* CreepyCircusMusic:: "The Trial" opens with creepy music, that continues until the judge shows up, to show just how twisted Pink's own psyche has become and how strange and creepy the trial itself is.

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* CreepyCircusMusic:: CreepyCircusMusic: "The Trial" opens with creepy music, that continues until the judge shows up, to show just how twisted Pink's own psyche has become and how strange and creepy the trial itself is.



* DrivenToSuicide: Depends on how one wants to read the line, "I want to go home / Take off this uniform and leave the show," in "Stop". Regardless, he decides not to do so, with the events that follow.



* EnforcedMethodActing: The infamous phone call that ends "Young Lust" involved Waters prank-calling Mason via a real-life phone operator, telling her that he was Mr. Pink Floyd, attempting to contact his wife. Her exasperated response, "He keeps hanging up, and there's a man answering!" is genuine.
** On several tour stops, the band would replicate the call using real phones on stage. The operators that were dialed were also not in on the bit.



* GoodbyeCruelWorld: {{Trope Namer|s}}, though Pink [[ThisIndexIsNotAnExample doesn't commit suicide]]. He does threaten to do it in "One Of My Turns" ("Would you like to learn to fly?/Would you like to see me try?").

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* GoodbyeCruelWorld: {{Trope Namer|s}}, though Pink [[ThisIndexIsNotAnExample doesn't commit suicide]]. He does threaten to do it in "One Of My Turns" ("Would you like to learn to fly?/Would fly? / Would you like to see me try?").try?"), and suggests he might still do it in "Stop" (I want to go home / Take off this uniform and leave the show")



** The album itself takes the final 18 seconds of closing track "Outside the Wall" and places them at the very start of the album, splitting the sentence "Isn't this where we came in?" right down the center.



* JourneyToTheCenterOfTheMind: The second half of the album and movie takes place well inside a very disturbed mind.

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* JourneyToTheCenterOfTheMind: The second half of the album and movie takes place well inside a very disturbed mind.mind with brief glimpses to the outside on "Comfortably Numb", and with the sound effects heard throughout that half.



** The life masks of each band member (shown in the album cover above) were used by the appropriate members of the touring group (e.g. guitarist Snowy White when subbing for David Gilmour) while on stage, up to the point that during during the very first song, and at other certain points of the performance, none of the actual Floyd members are on stage. ''The Wall'' was born partly from Waters's ArtistDisillusionment and the realization that nobody actually knew or cared who the band members were, just that there was some spectacle on stage.

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** The life masks of each band member (shown in the album cover above) were used by the appropriate members of the touring group (e.g. guitarist Snowy White when subbing for David Gilmour) while on stage, up to the point that during during the very first song, and at other certain points of the performance, none of the actual Floyd members are on stage. ''The Wall'' was born partly from Waters's ArtistDisillusionment and the realization that nobody actually knew or cared who the band members were, just that there was some spectacle on stage.stage (though this certainly wasn't helped by the band's stage shows being almost entirely spectacle for a full decade, and their pictures rarely ever appearing in their album artwork.)



* MinimalisticCoverArt: Just a featureless white brick wall. Still, don't judge an album by its outside cover; [[NightmareFuel it's what's inside that counts]].

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* MinimalisticCoverArt: Just a featureless white brick wall. Later pressings included the band name and album title on the front. Still, don't judge an album by its outside cover; [[NightmareFuel it's what's inside that counts]].



* MovieBonusSong: "When The Tigers Broke Free" Parts I and II. The concerts also had instrumental jam "The Last Few Bricks" as the band waited the stage crew to finish the stage wall.

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* MovieBonusSong: "When The Tigers Broke Free" Parts I and II. The concerts also had instrumental jam titled "The Last Few Bricks" Bricks", played as the band waited on the stage crew to finish the stage wall.wall, before "Goodbye Cruel World" started.



** Alan Parker had this reaction after the extras (real skinheads, by the way) really got into the rape scene in "Run Like Hell".



** Pink has a moment like this at the end of "Waiting For The Worms" leading directly to his HeelRealisation in "Stop!"
** Earlier, he has one about his decision to go behind the wall, leading to him crying out for meaningful human contact in "Hey You".

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** Pink has a moment like this at the end of "Waiting For The Worms" leading directly to his HeelRealisation in "Stop!"
** Earlier, he
has one about his decision to go behind the wall, leading to him crying out for meaningful human contact in "Hey You".You".
** Later on, Pink has a second moment like this at the end of "Waiting For The Worms", leading directly to his HeelRealisation in "Stop!"
** Alan Parker had this reaction after the extras (real skinheads, by the way) really got into the rape scene in "Run Like Hell".



** Pink Floyd, to be fair, made Ezrin sign a contract forbidding him from revealing details and plot points about the stage show, which Ezrin violated via a radio interview. This incensed Waters (and to a lesser extent, the other band members) to the point that Bob was not allowed to attend any of the shows, and his credits on the album were taken off for a while. Ezrin himself admitted that he was not "in the best shape emotionally", struggling with marital problems during the recording, and he further annoyed the band with his poor punctuality despite the punishing schedule (Mason found frequent humour in mocking his elaborate and unlikely excuses for lateness), and at one point had a confrontation with Richard Wright that led him to working only at nights. They did patch things up with him to the point that Ezrin was asked to produce Roger's ''Radio K.A.O.S.'' (Ezrin declined as it was taking him away from his family) and eventually did produce Gilmour's Floyd albums (to Waters' disgust) and Gilmour's ''About Face'' solo album.

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** Pink Floyd, to be fair, made Ezrin sign a contract forbidding him from revealing details and plot points about the stage show, which Ezrin violated via a radio interview. This incensed Waters (and to a lesser extent, the other band members) to the point that Bob was not allowed to attend any of the shows, and his credits on the album were taken off for a while. Ezrin himself admitted that he was not "in the best shape emotionally", struggling with marital problems during the recording, and he further annoyed the band with his poor punctuality despite the punishing schedule (Mason found frequent humour in mocking his elaborate and unlikely excuses for lateness), and at one point had a confrontation with Richard Wright that led him Wright to working only at nights. They did patch things up with him to the point that Ezrin was asked to produce Roger's ''Radio K.A.O.S.'' (Ezrin declined as it was taking him away from his family) and eventually did produce Gilmour's Floyd albums (to Waters' disgust) and Gilmour's ''About Face'' solo album.



* StylisticSuck: "Young Lust," "In the Flesh (Part II)," and "Run Like Hell." They're all songs that Pink himself is performing at concerts.

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* StylisticSuck: "Young Lust," "In the Flesh (Part II)," Flesh," and "Run Like Hell." They're all songs that Pink himself is performing at concerts.
21st Aug '17 5:55:18 PM TimeLordVictorious
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!! Another Trope In The Wall:

to:

!! Another Trope In The Wall:
Like Hell:
21st Aug '17 5:52:30 PM TimeLordVictorious
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!! Tropably Numb:

to:

!! Tropably Numb:
Another Trope In The Wall:
19th Aug '17 6:57:04 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition: A boxset of the album was released in 2012 as part of a massive re-release of the band's catalog. It includes a new mix of the album, a new mix of the live ''Is There Anybody Out There'' boxset originally released in 2000, over two hours of early mixes and demos, a DVD comprised of various videos, documentaries, and interviews, a 44-page booklet, and other collectibles.
18th Aug '17 3:34:29 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* BlackWidow: Pink imagines his wife as a praying mantis/dragon hybrid with flaming hair. Some fans have also noted her resemblance to ''Rokurokubi'' from Japanese mythology.

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* BlackWidow: Pink imagines his wife as a praying mantis/dragon hybrid with flaming hair. Some fans have also noted her resemblance to ''Rokurokubi'' from [[Myth/JapaneseMythology Japanese mythology.mythology]].
15th Aug '17 3:31:34 AM Acebrock
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* CherubicChoir / CreepyChildrenSinging: Heard on "Another Brick In The Wall, Part II", "Outside The Wall" and featured in the "Craaazy" refrain from "The Trial."

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* CherubicChoir / CreepyChildrenSinging: CherubicChoir[=/=]CreepyChildrenSinging: Heard on "Another Brick In The Wall, Part II", "Outside The Wall" and featured in the "Craaazy" refrain from "The Trial."


Added DiffLines:

* CreepyCircusMusic:: "The Trial" opens with creepy music, that continues until the judge shows up, to show just how twisted Pink's own psyche has become and how strange and creepy the trial itself is.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Music.TheWall