History Music / Scooter

25th Dec '15 6:22:31 PM FF32
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* DubInducedPlothole: A variation that applied to people in the UK. The line "Scooter! Are you Ratty?" in The Logical Song is a reference to the band's pseudonym Ratty, under which they put out two singles "Sunrise (Here I Am)" and "Living On Video" in 2000, prior to Sheffield coming out. "Sunrise" was a big club hit - made more so by the fact DJs who wouldn't normally play Scooter were playing it. Whilst the band didn't officially indicate their involvement in the Ratty songs at the time, they were subject to a lot of speculation about it. Their connection was confirmed when they issued an alternate mix of Sunrise entitled Sunrise (Ratty's Inferno) on the B-Side of the Scooter single She's The Sun. Now this is relevant because none of the Ratty singles, nor many other Scooter releases were released in the UK, and as a result, everyone in the UK thought the line was "Scooter! Are you ready?".

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* DubInducedPlothole: A variation that applied to people in the UK. The line "Scooter! Are you Ratty?" in The Logical Song is a reference to the band's pseudonym Ratty, under which they put out two singles "Sunrise (Here I Am)" and "Living On Video" in 2000, prior to Sheffield coming out. "Sunrise" was a big club hit - made more so by the fact DJs [=DJs=] who wouldn't normally play Scooter were playing it. Whilst the band didn't officially indicate their involvement in the Ratty songs at the time, they were subject to a lot of speculation about it. Their connection was confirmed when they issued an alternate mix of Sunrise entitled Sunrise (Ratty's Inferno) on the B-Side of the Scooter single She's The Sun. Now this is relevant because none of the Ratty singles, nor many other Scooter releases were released in the UK, and as a result, everyone in the UK thought the line was "Scooter! Are you ready?".
30th Jul '15 10:27:20 AM onionmaster
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* B-Side: The band has included a previously unreleased track as a B-Side on the majority of their German singles. The majority of them are instrumentals. Scooter's B-Sides are a special case because for many fans, they show the creativity of Rick J Jordan that is often overlooked with their singles. Some of them, in particular "Back In Time", "Bramfeld" and "Giant's Causeway" are more popular than some album tracks amongst fans.
17th Jan '15 10:42:22 AM erforce
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[[caption-width-right:500:HARDCORE!]]

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[[caption-width-right:500:HARDCORE!]]
[[caption-width-right:350:HARDCORE!]]
17th Jan '15 3:36:00 AM onionmaster
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Added DiffLines:

* WritersBlock: The band have acknowledged that they had this on the album Sheffield, due to being bored of their previous styles but not sure what to change to. They felt the Scooter name was so associated with happy hardcore that they put out club singles under pseudonyms like Ratty and Guess Who? They also had it more pronounced on We Bring The Noise, where every track is written in a different style precisely for the reason that the band didn't have many ideas in any particular style. This was also why they reintroduced the high pitched voice for Posse (I Need You On The Floor), which turned out to fill that creative gap for over a decade (much to the [[BrokenBase annoyance]] of some of their fanbase).
8th Jan '15 9:47:39 AM onionmaster
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* DubInducedPlothole: A variation that applied to people in the UK. The line "Scooter! Are you Ratty?" in The Logical Song is a reference to the band's pseudonym Ratty, under which they put out two singles "Sunrise (Here I Am)" and "Living On Video" in 2000, prior to Sheffield coming out. "Sunrise" was a big club hit - made more so by the fact DJs who wouldn't normally play Scooter were playing it. Whilst the band didn't officially indicate their involvement in the Ratty songs at the time, they were subject to a lot of speculation about it. Their connection was confirmed when they issued an alternate mix of Sunrise entitled Sunrise (Ratty's Inferno) on the B-Side of the Scooter single She's The Sun. Now this is relevant because everyone in the UK thought the line was "Scooter! Are you ready?".

to:

* DubInducedPlothole: A variation that applied to people in the UK. The line "Scooter! Are you Ratty?" in The Logical Song is a reference to the band's pseudonym Ratty, under which they put out two singles "Sunrise (Here I Am)" and "Living On Video" in 2000, prior to Sheffield coming out. "Sunrise" was a big club hit - made more so by the fact DJs who wouldn't normally play Scooter were playing it. Whilst the band didn't officially indicate their involvement in the Ratty songs at the time, they were subject to a lot of speculation about it. Their connection was confirmed when they issued an alternate mix of Sunrise entitled Sunrise (Ratty's Inferno) on the B-Side of the Scooter single She's The Sun. Now this is relevant because none of the Ratty singles, nor many other Scooter releases were released in the UK, and as a result, everyone in the UK thought the line was "Scooter! Are you ready?".
8th Jan '15 9:46:24 AM onionmaster
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*** They also did a surprisingly good cover of Tuxedomoon's "No Tears", which they called "My Eyes Are Dry". It worked because they added a lot of new instrumental parts to it that fit with the mood of the song, and thankfully, HP used serious vocals and they didn't use any high pitched female vocals in it.

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*** They also did a surprisingly good cover medley of Tuxedomoon's "No Tears", Tears" combined with Marc Almond's "Tears Run Rings" which they called "My Eyes Are Dry". It worked because they added a lot of new instrumental parts to it that fit with the mood of the song, and thankfully, HP used serious vocals and they didn't use any high pitched female vocals in it.it.
* DubInducedPlothole: A variation that applied to people in the UK. The line "Scooter! Are you Ratty?" in The Logical Song is a reference to the band's pseudonym Ratty, under which they put out two singles "Sunrise (Here I Am)" and "Living On Video" in 2000, prior to Sheffield coming out. "Sunrise" was a big club hit - made more so by the fact DJs who wouldn't normally play Scooter were playing it. Whilst the band didn't officially indicate their involvement in the Ratty songs at the time, they were subject to a lot of speculation about it. Their connection was confirmed when they issued an alternate mix of Sunrise entitled Sunrise (Ratty's Inferno) on the B-Side of the Scooter single She's The Sun. Now this is relevant because everyone in the UK thought the line was "Scooter! Are you ready?".



***** Jump That Rock! had the title (Whatever You Want) and the 'vs Status Quo' credit added when Status Quo showed their interest in it.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Their first single Vallée De Larmes was recorded as a project. It is a soundalike instrumental cover of a song by Rene & Gaston from 1993. The style of music is basically French house and not techno at all Its B Side Cosmos was later used but with a spoken voiceover from HP. It was shortly after this single was released that the band were improvising a tune onstage, and HP began rapping spontaneously. This led to their song Hyper Hyper and the sound they would be known for. Apart from a couple of remixes included on compilations, they have entirely omitted "Vallée" from their discography.
** A stereotype of Scooter is that their singles have high pitched female vocals on the choruses. They did this on two songs in 1995 "Friends" and "Endless Summer", but stopped for several years. They tried it again on 2001's "Posse (I Need You On The Floor)" onwards and it became an unexpected hit, and very nearly every single afterwards has used them. So anybody checking out the band's albums from 1996-2000 will be surprised to hear the lack of high pitched vocals on them, instead HP using far more singing. It is no secret that this is regarded as the band's golden period amongst fans.
* EverythingsLouderWithBagpipes: Bagpipes are featured in the main melodies of "The Sound Above My Hair" (single version) and "I'm Your Pusher".

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***** Jump That Rock! had the title (Whatever You Want) and the 'vs Status Quo' credit added when Status Quo showed their interest in it.
it (also, it was a way around getting sued).
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Their first single Vallée De Larmes was recorded as a project. It is a soundalike instrumental cover of a song by Rene & Gaston from 1993. The style of music is basically French house and not techno at all all. Its B Side Cosmos was later used but with a spoken voiceover from HP. It was shortly after this single was released that the band were improvising a tune onstage, and HP began rapping spontaneously. This led to their song Hyper Hyper and the sound they would be known for. Apart from a couple of remixes included on compilations, they have entirely omitted "Vallée" from their discography.
** A stereotype of Scooter is that their singles have high pitched female vocals on the choruses. They did this on two songs in 1995 "Friends" and "Endless Summer", but stopped for several years. They tried it again on 2001's "Posse (I Need You On The Floor)" onwards and it became an unexpected hit, and very nearly every single afterwards has used them. So anybody checking out the band's albums from 1996-2000 will be surprised to hear the lack of high pitched vocals on them, instead HP using far more singing.singing (and when female vocals are used, they are at normal pitch). It is no secret that this is regarded as the band's golden period amongst fans.
* EverythingsLouderWithBagpipes: Bagpipes are featured in the main melodies of "The Sound Above My Hair" (single version) and "I'm Your Pusher". In the latter, Scooter acknowledge the bagpipes by giving a shoutout to their Scotland Posse. The Bagpipes in themselves are probably a reference to the KLF, whose Scottish frontman Bill Drummond was fond of that sort of thing.



* InsistentTerminology: Each incarnation of the band is referred to as a 'chapter', not 'the period when [band member] was in the band'. So for instance, Ferris Bueller's tenure is 'The First Chapter', Axel Coon's is 'The Second Chapter', Jay Frog's 'The Third Chapter' and Michael Simon's 'The Fourth Chapter'.

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* InsistentTerminology: Each incarnation of the band is referred to as a 'chapter', not 'the period when [band member] was in the band'. So for instance, Ferris Bueller's tenure is 'The First Chapter', Axel Coon's is 'The Second Chapter', Jay Frog's 'The Third Chapter' and Michael Simon's 'The Fourth Chapter'.
11th May '14 12:09:39 AM erforce
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* NoExportForYou: You mustn't take it for granted that the newest Scooter album is published very widely in your country (unless you're an Austrian, German or Swiss).
** Despite Scooter being well known in the UK, their albums don't get released there often. This could be to do with the different copyright laws surrounding the amount of songs they blatantly rip off, as they remain very popular (as evidenced by their album Jumping All Over the World getting to number 1 purely because they actually released it in the UK.)



* OfCorpseHesAlive: The music video for "Aiii Shot the DJ" features the band doing this to the killed DJ, parading him around parties and such, in a homage to ''Film/WeekendAtBernies''..
* OldShame: The band feel so strongly about their first single Vallée De Larmes that they don't count it as part of their discography, only including a couple of remixes on late 90s compilations.
** However this is changing - they're including the original and the remix on the 2012 reissue of And The Beat Goes On! Notably they're excluding Percapella version, and the original version of Cosmos, possibly to ensure fans can still make money off the original single.

to:

* OfCorpseHesAlive: The music video for "Aiii Shot the DJ" features the band doing this to the killed DJ, parading him around parties and such, in a homage to ''Film/WeekendAtBernies''..
* OldShame: The band feel so strongly about their first single Vallée De Larmes that they don't count it as part of their discography, only including a couple of remixes on late 90s compilations.
** However this is changing - they're including the original and the remix on the 2012 reissue of And The Beat Goes On! Notably they're excluding Percapella version, and the original version of Cosmos, possibly to ensure fans can still make money off the original single.
''Film/WeekendAtBernies''.



** ''Soultrain'' in ''The Stadium Techno Experience''
** The legendary ''Trance-Atlantic'' in ''Mind the Gap''
** ''Mesmerized'' in ''Who's Got the Last Laugh Now''
** ''Love Is an Ocean'' in ''The Ultimate Aural Orgasm''
** ''Lighten Up the Sky'' in ''Jumping All Over the World''
** ''Metropolis'' in ''Under the Radar Over the Top''
** ''Mashuaia'' in ''The Big Mash Up''

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** ''Soultrain'' "Soultrain" in ''The Stadium Techno Experience''
** The legendary ''Trance-Atlantic'' "Trance-Atlantic" in ''Mind the Gap''
** ''Mesmerized'' "Mesmerized" in ''Who's Got the Last Laugh Now''
** ''Love "Love Is an Ocean'' Ocean" in ''The Ultimate Aural Orgasm''
** ''Lighten "Lighten Up the Sky'' Sky" in ''Jumping All Over the World''
** ''Metropolis'' "Metropolis" in ''Under the Radar Over the Top''
** ''Mashuaia'' "Mashuaia" in ''The Big Mash Up''



** Rock influenced songs like Fire, Faster Harder Scooter or The Revolution
** Evocative ballads like Break It Up, Leave In Silence or Eyes Without A Face
*** New wave covers like Stripped and Second Skin, often played straight.

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** Rock influenced songs like Fire, Faster "Fire", "Faster Harder Scooter Scooter" or The Revolution
"The Revolution"
** Evocative ballads like Break "Break It Up, Leave Up", "Leave In Silence Silence" or Eyes "Eyes Without A Face
Face"
*** New wave covers like Stripped "Stripped" and Second Skin, "Second Skin", often played straight.
19th Dec '13 6:34:49 PM onionmaster
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Frog was replaced with Michael Simon in 2007 (The Fourth Chapter). The band released the album The Ultimate Aural Orgasm with him. Their second album with him, Jumping All Over The World, was released in the UK thanks to their popularity on the Clubland tour, and surprised everyone by making Number 1 in the album charts, especially as it was the first time the band had released anything there since 2003. During this time, the band experience massive [[Flanderization]] , with a constant reliance on female sung choruses with high pitched vocals, often singing cover songs without crediting the original artists, and constantly using bouncy, repetitive rhythms called jumpstyle. This had proved to be successful for them occasionally in the past (Ramp! being the biggest example), but on Jumping All Over The World and beyond it was used on almost every song. There is a pretty obvious BrokenBase because of this. The band have released several more albums, incorporating dubstep and r&b influences and further alienating their old fans, HP even claiming he's in it for the money now.

to:

Frog was replaced with Michael Simon in 2007 (The Fourth Chapter). The band released the album The Ultimate Aural Orgasm with him. Their second album with him, Jumping All Over The World, was released in the UK thanks to their popularity on the Clubland tour, and surprised everyone by making Number 1 in the album charts, especially as it was the first time the band had released anything there since 2003. During this time, the band experience massive [[Flanderization]] {Flanderization} , with a constant reliance on female sung choruses with high pitched vocals, often singing cover songs without crediting the original artists, and constantly using bouncy, repetitive rhythms called jumpstyle. This had proved to be successful for them occasionally in the past (Ramp! being the biggest example), but on Jumping All Over The World and beyond it was used on almost every song. There is a pretty obvious BrokenBase because of this. The band have released several more albums, incorporating dubstep and r&b influences and further alienating their old fans, HP even claiming he's in it for the money now.


Added DiffLines:

** The Sound Above My Hair features bagpipes, the album version does not.
19th Dec '13 6:31:50 PM onionmaster
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Coon was replaced by Jay Frog at the time of Nessaja - both members worked on the song. The Third Chapter began. band released several more singles and the album The Stadium Techno Experience in the UK, with dwindling popularity.

Frog was replaced with Michael Simon in 2007 (The Fourth Chapter), and the band did not release an album or single there for several years, from 2002 until 2008's album Jumping All Over The World, which surprised everyone by making Number 1 in the album charts. During this time, the band experience massive Flanderization, with a constant reliance on female sung choruses with high pitched vocals, often singing cover songs without crediting the original artists, and constantly using bouncy, repetitive rhythms called jumpstyle. This had proved to be successful for them occasionally in the past (Ramp! being the biggest example), but on Jumping All Over The World and beyond it was used on almost every song. There is a pretty obvious BrokenBase because of this. The band have released several more albums, incorporating dubstep and r&b influences and further alienating their old fans, HP even claiming he's in it for the money now.

to:

Coon was replaced by Jay Frog at the time of Nessaja - both members worked on the song. song, beginning The Third Chapter began. Chapter. The band released several more singles and the album The Stadium Techno Experience in the UK, with dwindling popularity.

popularity. After the release of the single Jigga Jigga!, which flopped, the band did not release anything in the UK for several years until 2008.

Frog was replaced with Michael Simon in 2007 (The Fourth Chapter), and the Chapter). The band did not release an released the album or single there for several years, from 2002 until 2008's The Ultimate Aural Orgasm with him. Their second album with him, Jumping All Over The World, which was released in the UK thanks to their popularity on the Clubland tour, and surprised everyone by making Number 1 in the album charts. charts, especially as it was the first time the band had released anything there since 2003. During this time, the band experience massive Flanderization, [[Flanderization]] , with a constant reliance on female sung choruses with high pitched vocals, often singing cover songs without crediting the original artists, and constantly using bouncy, repetitive rhythms called jumpstyle. This had proved to be successful for them occasionally in the past (Ramp! being the biggest example), but on Jumping All Over The World and beyond it was used on almost every song. There is a pretty obvious BrokenBase because of this. The band have released several more albums, incorporating dubstep and r&b influences and further alienating their old fans, HP even claiming he's in it for the money now.



They also released a GreatestHitsAlbum, ''Push the Beat for This Jam (The Singles 98-02)'', also known as ''Push the Beat for This Jam (The Second Chapter)'', in 2002.

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They have also released a GreatestHitsAlbum, several GreatestHits albums, the most successful of which is ''Push the Beat for This Jam (The Singles 98-02)'', also known as a 1CD distillation of the 2CD European compilation ''Push the Beat for This Jam (The Second Chapter)'', in 2002.
19th Dec '13 3:42:07 PM onionmaster
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Added DiffLines:

* RearrangeTheSong: Scooter frequently did single versions of songs that differed from the album versions, of note:
** Friends has two single versions. One has an intro from HP saying "Scooter! Yeah! followed by the synth melody before going into the main track, and the other begins with piano and the chorus vocals moved to the start. There's also editing in the main body of the song.
** Back In Ireland is a version of Back In The UK with the references to the UK replaced by Ireland.
** Rebel Yell has additional synths throughout much of the song.
** We Are The Greatest has HP speaking over the intro.
** Call Me Manana has an intro in Spanish and samples from a song called "James Brown Is Dead".
** Fuck The Millenium has largely different vocals and a happy hardcore section.
** Aiii Shot The DJ is largely different to the album version I Shot The DJ, with new verse lyrics and quite different music. The chorus is the only thing that really stayed the same.
** Maria (I Like It Loud) has additional vocals from Marc Acadipane.
** Suavemente has vocals, the album version does not.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Music.Scooter