History Music / Rammstein

23rd Apr '16 9:20:54 PM darkknight109
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Hard as it is to believe, Rammstein's earliest shows were absent of the pyrotechnics that would quickly become one of the band's defining hallmarks.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Hard as it is to believe, Rammstein's earliest shows were absent of the pyrotechnics ImpressivePyrotechnics that would quickly become one of the band's defining hallmarks.
23rd Apr '16 9:20:24 PM darkknight109
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* EarlyInstalmentWeirdness: Hard as it is to believe, Rammstein's earliest shows were absent of the pyrotechnics that would quickly become one of the band's defining hallmarks.

to:

* EarlyInstalmentWeirdness: EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Hard as it is to believe, Rammstein's earliest shows were absent of the pyrotechnics that would quickly become one of the band's defining hallmarks.
23rd Apr '16 9:19:56 PM darkknight109
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Added DiffLines:

* EarlyInstalmentWeirdness: Hard as it is to believe, Rammstein's earliest shows were absent of the pyrotechnics that would quickly become one of the band's defining hallmarks.
12th Apr '16 11:53:29 AM Jhonny
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* ''Rammstein in Amerika'' (2015) - Contrary to the name, this is actually a composite of live shows in both New York and Montreal, with some additional footage from Mexico City, filmed in 2010 as part of the LIFAD tour.

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* ''Rammstein in Amerika'' (2015) - Contrary to the name, name[[note]]In German usage of the term "Amerika" varies between the Latin America meaning (i.e. all of North and South America) and the Anglo-American meaning (i.e. the USA) which is meant is usually determined by context; note that "Amerikas" is not a commonly used term in German[[/note]], this is actually a composite of live shows in both New York and Montreal, with some additional footage from Mexico City, filmed in 2010 as part of the LIFAD tour.
12th Apr '16 11:50:48 AM Jhonny
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->''Du, du hast, du hast mich.''[[note]]"You, you have, you have me", however the line is also a homophone for "You, you hate, you hate me" in German. This has been one of the biggest sources for confusion and arguments in the Rammstein fanbase.[[/note]]

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->''Du, du hast, du hast mich.''[[note]]"You, you have, you have me", however the line is also a homophone for "You, you hate, you hate me" in German. This has been one of the biggest sources for confusion and arguments in the Rammstein fanbase.[[/note]]
Note that "have" can be used both as a verb meaning possession and as an auxiliary for the perfect tense, just like in English. In this case the latter is the case and the whole sentence (Du hast mich gefragt) would translate as "you have asked me"[[/note]]
11th Mar '16 4:06:49 AM 06tele
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** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference to the single most famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, "Wandrers Nachtlied II" by Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.

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** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference contains references to the single most a famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, "Wandrers Nachtlied II" by Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.poem: see below under SpiritualSuccessor.
11th Mar '16 4:05:19 AM 06tele
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** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference to the single most famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, "Wandrers Nachtlied II" by Creator/JohannWolfgangvonGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.

to:

** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference to the single most famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, "Wandrers Nachtlied II" by Creator/JohannWolfgangvonGoethe.Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.
11th Mar '16 4:04:32 AM 06tele
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** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference to the single most famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanderer's_Nightsong "Wandrers Nachtlied II"]] by Creator/JohannWolfgangvonGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.

to:

** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference to the single most famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanderer's_Nightsong "Wandrers Nachtlied II"]] II" by Creator/JohannWolfgangvonGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.
11th Mar '16 4:03:53 AM 06tele
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** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference to the single most famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanderer's_Nightsong "Wandrers Nachtlied II"]] by Creator/JohannWolfgangvonGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.

to:

** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference to the single most famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanderer's_Nightsong org/wiki/Wanderer's_Nightsong "Wandrers Nachtlied II"]] by Creator/JohannWolfgangvonGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.
11th Mar '16 4:02:30 AM 06tele
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** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference to the single most famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanderer's_Nightsong "Wandrers Nachtlied II"]] by Creator/JohannWolfgangGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.

to:

** The imagery in "Ohne Dich" of the silent forest, the birds no longer singing etc. are a reference to the single most famous poem in German literature, the one that every German schoolkid at least knows of, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanderer's_Nightsong "Wandrers Nachtlied II"]] by Creator/JohannWolfgangGoethe.Creator/JohannWolfgangvonGoethe. In Goethe's original poem the forest is silent because it's peaceful, but in Rammstein's song the silence is oppressive.
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