History Music / BrooksAndDunn

27th Jun '16 5:50:17 PM Twentington
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* OneBookAuthor: "I'll Never Forgive My Heart" is the only writing credit for Ronnie Dunn's wife, Janine.
26th Apr '16 4:23:37 PM Twentington
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In 2009, Kix and Ronnie announced that they would be retiring as Brooks & Dunn. This retirement was led off by a comprehensive ''#1s... and Then Some'' compilation, which included two new low-charting singles. Afterward, both members began solo careers on Arista. Dunn released his self-titled album in 2011 and charted in the Top 10 with "Bleed Red", but abruptly left the label in 2012. Kix's ''New to This Town'' followed later in 2012.

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In 2009, Kix and Ronnie announced that they would be retiring as Brooks & Dunn. This retirement was led off by a comprehensive ''#1s... and Then Some'' compilation, which included two new low-charting singles. Afterward, both members began solo careers on Arista. Dunn released his self-titled album in 2011 and charted in the Top 10 with "Bleed Red", but abruptly left the label in 2012. Kix's ''New to This Town'' followed later in 2012.
2012. Dunn released another solo album in 2014, and signed to Nash Icon Records in 2016, the same year that saw the duo reunite to tour with Music/RebaMcEntire in Las Vegas.
21st Mar '16 4:10:16 PM Twentington
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* FollowTheLeader: Once Brooks & Dunn got hot, the market was suddenly flooded with singer-songwriter duos who were paired willy-nilly by record execs. None of them went anywhere. For all of the 1990s, Brooks & Dunn was untouchable in the Duo category; if any country music award had "Duo" in the name, it invariably went to them (except in 2000 when Montgomery Gentry, who were brand-new at the time, got a Duo of the Year award). Even the few duos that weren't manufactured by record execs (see above) never seemed to catch on — literally no other duo had so much as a Top 5 hit for most of Brooks & Dunn's tenure, so absolutely no one was a threat until Music/{{Sugarland}} lost its third member in 2005 and suddenly caught momentum.
11th Mar '16 12:51:43 PM MarkLungo
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/brooks_and_dunn.jpg]]



-->--Creator/JeffFoxworthy

A long-lasting CountryMusic duo composed of Leon Eric "Kix" Brooks and Ronald Gene "Ronnie" Dunn, Brooks and Dunn is arguably ''the'' definitive country music duo. After several years as [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal struggling solo singer-songwriters]], the two were paired at the suggestion of Arista Records executive Tim [=DuBois=]. And all was good. Their first album, ''Brand New Man'', launched four consecutive #1 hits with its first four singles, and went on to sell five million copies. Those first four songs are still considered among the duo's {{Signature Song}}s, most notably "Boot Scootin' Boogie", which sparked a renewed interest in line dancing.

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-->--Creator/JeffFoxworthy

-->--'''Creator/JeffFoxworthy'''

A long-lasting CountryMusic duo composed of Leon Eric "Kix" Brooks and Ronald Gene "Ronnie" Dunn, Brooks and Dunn is arguably ''the'' definitive country music duo. After several years as [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal struggling solo singer-songwriters]], the two were paired at the suggestion of Arista Records Creator/AristaRecords executive Tim [=DuBois=]. And all was good. Their first album, ''Brand New Man'', launched four consecutive #1 hits with its first four singles, and went on to sell five million copies. Those first four songs are still considered among the duo's {{Signature Song}}s, most notably "Boot Scootin' Boogie", which sparked a renewed interest in line dancing.
11th Apr '15 10:55:12 AM Twentington
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Added DiffLines:

* AlbumTitleDrop: From "You'll Always Be Loved by Me": "Trust is a ''tight rope'' we all have to walk…"
31st Mar '15 5:25:19 PM IlGreven
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* CanonDiscontinuity: None of the singles from ''Tight Rope'', widely considered their weakest album, appeared on their second GreatestHitsAlbum in 2004. This means that the album completely ignores two Top 20 hits and a Top 5, in favor of including "South of Santa Fe", the last single from the album before ''Tight Rope''… which happened to be B & D's only single ''not to even hit Top 40''. This is very likely a JustifiedTrope, as Kix revealed in 2015 that they were seriously considering a breakup after ''Tight Rope'' bombed, because they just felt they had run their course — until the head of their label recommended to them a little song called "Ain't Nothing 'bout You"…

to:

* CanonDiscontinuity: None of the singles from ''Tight Rope'', widely considered their weakest album, appeared on their second GreatestHitsAlbum in 2004. This means that the album completely ignores two Top 20 hits and a Top 5, in favor of including "South of Santa Fe", the last single from the album before ''Tight Rope''… which happened to be B & D's only single ''not to even hit Top 40''.40'' (and thus, the reason it's the last single where Kix Brooks is the lead singer). This is very likely a JustifiedTrope, as Kix revealed in 2015 that they were seriously considering a breakup after ''Tight Rope'' bombed, because they just felt they had run their course — until the head of their label recommended to them a little song called "Ain't Nothing 'bout You"…
8th Mar '15 1:07:57 PM Twentington
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* CanonDiscontinuity: None of the singles from ''Tight Rope'', widely considered their weakest album, appeared on their second GreatestHitsAlbum in 2004. This means that the album completely ignores two Top 20 hits and a Top 5, in favor of including "South of Santa Fe", the last single from the album before ''Tight Rope''… which happened to be B & D's only single ''not to even hit Top 40''.

to:

* CanonDiscontinuity: None of the singles from ''Tight Rope'', widely considered their weakest album, appeared on their second GreatestHitsAlbum in 2004. This means that the album completely ignores two Top 20 hits and a Top 5, in favor of including "South of Santa Fe", the last single from the album before ''Tight Rope''… which happened to be B & D's only single ''not to even hit Top 40''. This is very likely a JustifiedTrope, as Kix revealed in 2015 that they were seriously considering a breakup after ''Tight Rope'' bombed, because they just felt they had run their course — until the head of their label recommended to them a little song called "Ain't Nothing 'bout You"…
31st Dec '14 11:44:37 AM nombretomado
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-->--JeffFoxworthy

to:

-->--JeffFoxworthy
-->--Creator/JeffFoxworthy
22nd Oct '14 5:53:21 AM Twentington
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* FollowTheLeader: Once Brooks & Dunn got hot, the market was suddenly flooded with singer-songwriter duos who were paired willy-nilly by record execs. None of them went anywhere.
* ForegoneConclusion: For all of the 1990s, Brooks & Dunn was untouchable in the Duo category; if any country music award had "Duo" in the name, it invariably went to them (except in 2000 when Montgomery Gentry got Duo of the Year instead). Even the few duos that weren't manufactured by record execs (see above) never seemed to catch on — literally no other duo had so much as a Top 5 hit for most of Brooks & Dunn's tenure, so absolutely no one was a threat until {{Sugarland}} lost its third member in 2005 and suddenly caught momentum.

to:

* FollowTheLeader: Once Brooks & Dunn got hot, the market was suddenly flooded with singer-songwriter duos who were paired willy-nilly by record execs. None of them went anywhere.
* ForegoneConclusion:
anywhere. For all of the 1990s, Brooks & Dunn was untouchable in the Duo category; if any country music award had "Duo" in the name, it invariably went to them (except in 2000 when Montgomery Gentry Gentry, who were brand-new at the time, got a Duo of the Year instead). award). Even the few duos that weren't manufactured by record execs (see above) never seemed to catch on — literally no other duo had so much as a Top 5 hit for most of Brooks & Dunn's tenure, so absolutely no one was a threat until {{Sugarland}} Music/{{Sugarland}} lost its third member in 2005 and suddenly caught momentum.



* NewSoundAlbum: ''Steers & Stripes'' and ''Red Dirt Road'' were both critically acclaimed for their more muscular, energetic production. Over time, though, the sound started to slip back to the slick, commercial sound of the duo's mid-nineties albums.
* NiceHat: Kix frequently wears a cowboy hat.

to:

* NewSoundAlbum: ''Steers & Stripes'' and ''Red Dirt Road'' were both critically acclaimed for their more muscular, energetic production. Over time, though, the sound started to slip back to the slick, commercial sound of the duo's mid-nineties albums.
production.
* NiceHat: Kix frequently wears wore a cowboy hat.



* RecordProducer: The failure of ''Tight Rope'' could be attributed to Don Cook's production getting a little tired (Byron Gallimore, with whom the duo had never worked before, did some production as well). Starting with their critically-acclaimed comeback ''Steers & Stripes'' in 2001, they began working with Mark Wright, so maybe such a change was in order. They switched again to Tony Brown, best known for his work with GeorgeStrait, on their last two albums.

to:

* RecordProducer: The failure of ''Tight Rope'' could be attributed to Don Cook's production getting a little tired (Byron Gallimore, with whom the duo had never worked before, did some production as well). Starting with their critically-acclaimed comeback ''Steers & Stripes'' in 2001, they began working with Mark Wright, so maybe such a change was in order. They switched again to Tony Brown, best known for his work with GeorgeStrait, Music/GeorgeStrait, on their last two albums.



* StepUpToTheMicrophone: Out of 50 singles, Kix got lead on six: "Lost and Found", "Rock My World (Little Country Girl)", "You're Gonna Miss Me When I'm Gone", "Mama Don't Get Dressed Up for Nothing", "Why Would I Say Goodbye" and "South of Santa Fe". The last of these peaked at #41 and was supposedly pulled because program directors didn't want another Kix song.

to:

* StepUpToTheMicrophone: Out of 50 singles, Kix got lead on six: "Lost and Found", "Rock My World (Little Country Girl)", "You're Gonna Miss Me When I'm Gone", "Mama Don't Get Dressed Up for Nothing", "Why Would I Say Goodbye" Goodbye", and "South of Santa Fe". The last of these peaked at #41 and was supposedly pulled because program directors didn't want another Kix song.



* TruckDriversGearChange: Present in the re-recorded version of "Cowgirls Don't Cry" that features a guest vocal from RebaMcEntire. The song comes to a dead stop for a few seconds and jumps up a ''fifth'' for the end; even worse, the music just sounds like it was artificially pitched up on this version. Neither the key change nor the dead stop are present on the original, Brooks & Dunn-only version.

to:

* TruckDriversGearChange: Present in the re-recorded version of "Cowgirls Don't Cry" that features a guest vocal from RebaMcEntire.Music/RebaMcEntire. The song comes to a dead stop for a few seconds and jumps up a ''fifth'' for the end; even worse, the music just sounds like it was artificially pitched up on this version. Neither the key change nor the dead stop are present on the original, Brooks & Dunn-only version.
21st Aug '14 7:34:45 AM Twentington
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Added DiffLines:

* CanonDiscontinuity: None of the singles from ''Tight Rope'', widely considered their weakest album, appeared on their second GreatestHitsAlbum in 2004. This means that the album completely ignores two Top 20 hits and a Top 5, in favor of including "South of Santa Fe", the last single from the album before ''Tight Rope''… which happened to be B & D's only single ''not to even hit Top 40''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Music.BrooksAndDunn