History Main / WrongfullyAttributed

25th Jul '17 12:22:16 AM PaulA
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* Many people assume that any horror film made in Britain in the sixties or seventies must be Film/HammerHorror. ''Dr. Terror's House of Horrors'', ''Tales From the Crypt'', ''The Vault of Horror'', and ''And Now the Screaming Starts'' are by Creator/AmicusProductions, and ''Curse of the Crimson Altar'', ''The Blood Beast Terror'', ''Witchfinder General'', ''Blood on Satan's Claw'', and ''The Creeping Flesh'', are by Creator/TigonBritishFilmProductions.

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* Many people assume that any horror film made in Britain in the sixties or seventies must be Film/HammerHorror. ''Dr. Terror's House of Horrors'', ''Tales From the Crypt'', ''The Vault of Horror'', ''Film/TalesFromTheCrypt'', ''Film/VaultOfHorror'', and ''And Now the Screaming Starts'' are by Creator/AmicusProductions, and ''Curse of the Crimson Altar'', ''The Blood Beast Terror'', ''Witchfinder General'', ''Film/WitchfinderGeneral'', ''Blood on Satan's Claw'', and ''The Creeping Flesh'', are by Creator/TigonBritishFilmProductions.
22nd Jul '17 9:15:53 AM Ccook1956
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'''Radar:''' Aaron Burr?\\

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'''Radar:''' Who's Aaron Burr?\\
22nd Jul '17 4:15:02 AM Ccook1956
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** At the start of the episode "The General Flipped At Dawn," Henry calls his senior officers in for a meeting, right after an exhausted Hawkeye and Trapper come out of the O.R.:
-->'''Trapper:''' (''miffed'') Doesn't he know it's Aaron Burr's birthday?\\
'''Radar:''' Aaron Burr?\\
'''Trapper:''' Aaron Burr. The man who shot John Wilkes Booth!
8th Apr '17 2:16:00 PM pvsage
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* The expression "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence" was popularized by Creator/CarlSagan and is almost universally attributed to him, but various phrasings of this date back to David Hume, who wrote "A wise man ... proportions his belief to the evidence."
2nd Apr '17 8:46:27 AM TFSyndicate
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* ''Series/TheITCrowd'': This exchange
-->'''Roy:''' [[Film/TheGodfather Fredo]], in the film, he was essentially a pimp.
-->'''Moss:''' No. [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings He took the ring to Mordor!]]
19th Mar '17 2:24:39 PM Mineboot45
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* In early ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' there was a running gag about the narrator quoting things and then attributing it to the wrong source. They started out plausible enough if you didn't know your literature but quickly turned ridiculous, e.g., when 'Drop It Like It's Hot' was sourced to 'English romantic poet John Keats'.

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* In early ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' there was a running gag about the narrator quoting things and then attributing it to the wrong source. They started out plausible enough if you didn't know your literature but quickly turned ridiculous, e.g., when 'Drop "[[Music/SnoopDogg Drop It Like It's Hot' Hot]]" was sourced to 'English "English romantic poet John Keats'.Keats".
12th Mar '17 3:29:40 PM Xtifr
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* Some people think that Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar never said ''"Tu quoque, fili?" ("You too, my son?")'' and claim that it was a line Creator/WilliamShakespeare thought up for his play about Caesar. Actually, "Tu quoque, fili?" is taken from chapter 82 of Suetonius' biography of Caesar as something some people reported Caesar said. Suetonius (died ca. 150 A.D.) notes that Caesar was said to have spoken the phrase in Greek ("''kai su, teknon?''"). (Shakespeare actually used the words "Et tu, Brute?" in his play, but he was not the first to use that particular wording either.)

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* Some people think that Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar never said ''"Tu quoque, fili?" ("You too, my son?")'' and claim that it was a line Creator/WilliamShakespeare thought up for his play about Caesar. Actually, "Tu quoque, fili?" is taken from chapter 82 of Suetonius' biography of Caesar as something some people reported Caesar said. Suetonius (died ca. 150 A.D.) notes that Caesar was said to have spoken the phrase in Greek ("''kai su, teknon?''"). (Shakespeare actually used the words "Et tu, Brute?" in his play, but he was not the first to use that particular wording either.)
18th Feb '17 7:23:29 PM Andyroid
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Not to be confused with UsefulNotes/{{Plagiarism}} or TakingTheHeat. Wrongfully Attributed only occurs when a character, a group or the general public has a wrong perception about who did the actual deed. Compare with MistakenIdentity and RecognitionFailure.

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Not to be confused with UsefulNotes/{{Plagiarism}} or TakingTheHeat. Wrongfully Attributed only occurs when a character, a group or the general public has a wrong perception about who did the actual deed. Compare with MistakenIdentity and RecognitionFailure.MistakenIdentity.
18th Feb '17 7:23:02 PM Andyroid
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Not to be confused with UsefulNotes/{{Plagiarism}} or TakingTheHeat. Wrongfully Attributed only occurs when a character, a group or the general public has a wrong perception about who did the actual deed. Compare with MistakenIdentity.

to:

Not to be confused with UsefulNotes/{{Plagiarism}} or TakingTheHeat. Wrongfully Attributed only occurs when a character, a group or the general public has a wrong perception about who did the actual deed. Compare with MistakenIdentity.MistakenIdentity and RecognitionFailure.
11th Feb '17 12:39:37 AM DastardlyDemolition
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* Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein" often has people who haven't read the work think that Frankenstein is the name of the monster, while it is actually the name of the man who created the monster. Of course, your mileage may vary on who is the real monster here - and the monster takes on the last name Frankenstein, too, as his creator is, in a way, his father.

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* Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein" Creator/MaryShelley's ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' often has people who haven't read the work think that Frankenstein "Frankenstein" is the name of the monster, while it is actually the name of the man who created the monster. Of course, your mileage may vary on who is the real monster here - and the monster takes on the last name Frankenstein, too, as his creator is, in a way, his father.
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