History Main / WordSaladTitle

24th Apr '17 11:06:26 PM Kotomikun
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** Dresden Codak is actually the nickname of the comic's author, Aaron Diaz. The title is best thought of as "Comics By Dresden Codak." Sure, the problem is now explaining a Word Salad Name, but Diaz said that it's just the name of the Dresden Codex plus RuleOfCool.

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** Dresden Codak is actually the nickname of the comic's author, Aaron Diaz. The title is best thought of as "Comics By Dresden Codak." Sure, the problem is now explaining a Word Salad Name, but Diaz said that it's just the name of the Dresden Codex plus RuleOfCool. It also avoids using his real name, which he was concerned would [[NamesTheSame cause confusion]] with a certain Latin-American pop star.
1st Apr '17 8:35:27 PM rjd1922
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* ''Series/TheNakedBrothersBand'' has used the TagLine "Real band, real brothers. Not really naked". [[WordOfGod Polly Draper]] has gone on record as stating that they ''did'' "perform" naked as toddlers while she was trying to bathe them. Ladies and gentlemen, the Lifetime Achievement Award [[AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents for Embarrassing Your Children]]!

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* ''Series/TheNakedBrothersBand'' has used the TagLine "Real band, real brothers. Not really naked". [[WordOfGod Polly Draper]] has gone on record as stating that they ''did'' [[SingingInTheShower "perform" naked as toddlers while she was trying to bathe them.them]]. Ladies and gentlemen, the Lifetime Achievement Award [[AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents for Embarrassing Your Children]]!
1st Apr '17 4:28:38 PM ferrelas
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* ''Webcomic/TheDawnChapel'' was originally the name of an unrelated project that the author never got around to starting. When the author began the web comic they had already registered the dawnchapel.com URL, so they decided to use that as the title instead of coming up with a new name and registering another URL.

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* ''Webcomic/TheDawnChapel'' was originally the name of an unrelated project that the author never got around to starting. When the author began the web comic they had already registered the dawnchapel.com URL, domain, so they decided to use that as the title instead of coming up with a new name and registering another URL.domain.
1st Apr '17 3:41:28 PM ferrelas
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* Webcomic/BloodyUrban takes place in an urban environment and is occasionally BloodyHilarious but other than that the title has little to do with the comic.

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* Webcomic/BloodyUrban ''Webcomic/BloodyUrban'' takes place in an urban environment and is occasionally BloodyHilarious but other than that the title has little to do with the comic.
30th Mar '17 10:53:37 AM Hollywood_SN
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**[[IncrediblyLamePun Full Mettle Alchemist]]?
28th Mar '17 5:38:38 PM Prime32
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* The title ''Anime/TransformersArmada'' refers to the eventual team-up of Autobots, Decepticons, and Mini-Cons to form a giant space fleet to fight Unicron... near the end of the series, making the title a total mystery for most of the time that it was in use.
** ''Anime/TransformersSuperGodMasterforce''. "Masterforce" is the [[ByThePowerOfGreyskull transformation phrase]] used by the humans turning into Transformers. "Super-God" is a translation of the Japanese word ''chojin'' (超神). ''Jin'' is how the kanji 人 is pronounced; this sound is present in the Japanese words for both ''human'' and ''android'', and thus symbolises the combination of humans and robots (in this case, Transformers) to form the ultimate lifeform. Thus, a more accurate but less impressive name would be ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}: Super-Human-Robot-Hybrid-Soul Masterforce''. ''Super-God Masterforce'' can also refer to the Godmasters, the aforementioned fusions of human and Transformer.
** Armada's name in Japan is Transformers: Micron Legend. Referring to the ever-prevalent microns (Called Mini-Cons in America).

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* ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'':
* The title ''Anime/TransformersArmada'' refers to the eventual team-up of Autobots, Decepticons, and Mini-Cons to form a giant space fleet to fight Unicron... near the end of the series, making the title a total mystery for most of the time that it was in use.
use. Meanwhile its title in Japan is ''Transformers: Micron Legend'', referring to the Microns (Mini-Cons in the dub) who act as the main {{Mac Guffin}}s of the conflict.
** ''Anime/TransformersSuperGodMasterforce''. "Masterforce" is the [[ByThePowerOfGreyskull transformation phrase]] used by the humans turning into Transformers. "Super-God" is a translation of the Japanese word ''chojin'' (超神). ''Jin'' is how the kanji 人 is pronounced; this sound is present in the Japanese words for both ''human'' and ''android'', and thus symbolises the combination of humans and robots (in this case, Transformers) to form the ultimate lifeform. Thus, a more accurate but less impressive name would be ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}: Super-Human-Robot-Hybrid-Soul Masterforce''. ''Super-God Masterforce'' can also refer to the Godmasters, the aforementioned fusions of human and Transformer.
** Armada's name in Japan
Transformer, whose technology is Transformers: Micron Legend. Referring [[DependingOnTheWriter sometimes]] said to the ever-prevalent microns (Called Mini-Cons in America).come from planet Master.



* Quite a few accompanying English titles from the VideoGame/{{Touhou}} series are like this. For instance, ''Phantasmagoria of Flower's View''. Well, Phantasmagoria means something like a hallucination of some sort so it all boils to seeing flowers that aren't really there, which is somewhere around half-way to what the plot's actually about. And this is just the start and no, ''Shoot The Bullet'' is not about what you think [[ShootTheBullet it is about.]]
** The average ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' game title typically does not make any sense until after beating the game or fighting a certain boss and is rarely as simple as stated. Examples include ''Embodiment of Scarlet Devil'', ''Perfect Cherry Blossom'', ''Subterranean Animism'', and ''Ten Desires''. The few straightforward games include ''Great Fairy War'' and the incredibly flexible ''Mountain of Faith''. Though this has led to many acronyms for the sake of simplicity, the fans love to play it up too (''Concealed the Conclusion'').
*** This led to a curious incident some where Westerners assumed that the fighting game ''Hisoutensoku'' was actually it's translation "Undefined Natural Law/Undefinable by Natural Law" because the latter is such a ZUN-worthy title.
*** Supplemental materials for the series also tend to use such titles.
** Interesting to note, the Japanese part of the titles (e.g Youyoumu, Chireiden) usually contain spoiler for the final boss or the final stage setting. The supplementary materials usually more straightforward (Gumon Kuju = Oral Talks by Hieda).

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* Quite a few accompanying ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'': While the main part of the games' titles usually references the BigBad or final stage in some way, the English titles from subtitles (by which they are better known in the VideoGame/{{Touhou}} series are West) tend to be like this. For instance, ''Phantasmagoria ''Touhou Kaeidzuka[[note]]"Flower-viewing Mound"[[/note]] ~ Phantasmagoria of Flower's Flower View''. Well, Phantasmagoria means something like a hallucination of some sort so it all boils to seeing flowers that aren't really there, which is somewhere around half-way to what the plot's actually about. And this is just the start and - no, ''Shoot The Bullet'' is not about what you think [[ShootTheBullet it is about.]]
about]].
** The average ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' game title typically does not make any sense until after beating the game or fighting a certain boss and is rarely as simple as stated. Examples include ''Embodiment ''Touhou Koumakyou[[note]]"Scarlet Devil Land"[[/note]] ~ the Embodiment of Scarlet Devil'', ''Perfect ''Touhou Youyoumu[[note]]youyou = pronounced "gradual", but replacing the "you" character with the one from {{Youkai}}; mu = "dream"[[/note]] ~ Perfect Cherry Blossom'', ''Subterranean ''Touhou Chireiden[[note]]Palace of the [[FireAndBrimstoneHell Earth Spirits]][[/note]] ~ Subterranean Animism'', and ''Ten ''Touhou Shinreibyou[[note]]Mausoleum of Divine Spirits[[/note]] ~ Ten Desires''. The few straightforward games include ''Great ''Yousei Daisensou[[note]][[Film/TheGreatYokaiWar "The Great Fairy War'' War"]][[/note]] ~ Manga/TouhouSangetsusei'' and the incredibly flexible ''Mountain ''Touhou Fuujinroku[[note]]Wind God Chronicles[[/note]] ~ Mountain of Faith''. Though this has led to many acronyms for the sake of simplicity, the fans love to play it up too (''Concealed the Conclusion'').
***
Faith''.
**
This led to a curious incident some where so many Westerners assumed ''expected'' the game ''Touhou Hisoutensoku ~ Choudokyuu Ginyoru no Nazo o Oe''[[note]]"Unperceiving of Natural Law: Chase the Enigma of the Gargantuan Guignol"[[/note]] to have an English subtitle that for a while a large number of people were convinced it was called "Unthinkable Natural Law", an early translation of the first part of its title (which is actually a {{Pun}} on the previous fighting game ''Hisoutensoku'' was actually it's translation "Undefined Natural Law/Undefinable by Natural Law" because ''Hisouten'' and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gakutensoku Gakutensoku]], the latter is such a ZUN-worthy title.
*** Supplemental materials for the series also tend to use such titles.
** Interesting to note, the
first Japanese part of the titles (e.g Youyoumu, Chireiden) usually contain spoiler for the final boss or the final stage setting. The supplementary materials usually more straightforward (Gumon Kuju = Oral Talks by Hieda).robot).



** That's nothing compared to the MagicalGirl spinoff ''Manga/FateKaleidLinerPrismaIllya''. "Fate" makes sense as the setting, and Illya as she's the main magical girl, and the end of the first series sort of clears up the "kaleid" part, but "Prisma" is a bit unexplained (maybe it's an abbreviation of "prismatic"?) and "liner" is just an [[Franchise/NasuVerse extremely]] ''extremely'' [[Literature/AngelNotes obscure reference.]] Then again, [[AffectionateParody it's not exactly a terribly serious series.]]

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** That's nothing compared to the MagicalGirl spinoff ''Manga/FateKaleidLinerPrismaIllya''. "Fate" makes sense as the setting, and Illya as she's the main magical girl, and the end of the first series sort of clears up the while "kaleid" part, references the [[SecretArt "Kaleidoscope" magic]] that [[AllPowerfulBystander Zelretch]] built into their wands, but "Prisma" is a bit unexplained (maybe it's an abbreviation of "prismatic"?) and "liner" is just an [[Franchise/NasuVerse extremely]] ''extremely'' [[Literature/AngelNotes obscure reference.]] Then again, [[AffectionateParody it's not exactly a terribly serious series.]]



* ''LightNovel/DateALive'': Can be [[JustForFun/XMeetsY described]] as ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' meets ''Manga/TheWorldGodOnlyKnows'', [[WidgetSeries and is as weird as that sounds]]. While dating is sometimes involved, it's more likely to get the main character killed than keep him alive.
* ''Anime/AttackOnTitan''. The title ''almost'' makes sense, but grammatically just doesn't connect to the series. There ''are'' monsters called titans, and the characters ''do'' attack them, but the bizarrely-structured title treats "Titan" like a unique, proper noun, making it sound as though the show is about an assault on the ''moon'' Titan rather than an ongoing war with things called "a titan" or "the titan" when mentioned in singular. The Japanese title translates to "Advancing Giants," which makes infinitely more sense.

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* ''LightNovel/DateALive'': Can be [[JustForFun/XMeetsY described]] as ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' meets ''Manga/TheWorldGodOnlyKnows'', [[WidgetSeries and is as weird as that sounds]]. While dating is sometimes involved, it's more likely to get the main character killed than keep him alive. \n Makes slightly more sense if you follow the Japanese pronunciation, where ''deitoaraibu'' is a clear {{Pun}} on "dead or alive".
* ''Anime/AttackOnTitan''. The title ''almost'' makes sense, but grammatically just doesn't connect to the series. There ''are'' monsters called titans, and the characters ''do'' attack them, but the bizarrely-structured title treats "Titan" like a unique, proper noun, making it sound as though the show is about an assault on the ''moon'' Titan rather than an ongoing war with things called "a titan" or "the titan" when mentioned in singular. The Japanese title ''Shingeki no Kyojin'' translates to "Advancing Giants," Giants" (and later in the series turns out to be [[spoiler:the name of Eren's titan form, "The Vanguard Giant"]]) which makes infinitely more sense. sense.
27th Mar '17 7:47:55 PM ferrelas
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** The ''Choujikyuu'' in the original Japanese title translates as "transcending space-time", as in physical concept, a rather fitting title to a SF show.

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** The ''Choujikyuu'' in the original Japanese title translates as "transcending space-time", as in physical concept, a rather fitting title to a an SF show.
23rd Mar '17 12:21:17 PM DragonRanger
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* ''VideoGame/BravelyDefault: Where the Fairy Flies''. WordOfGod says that "Bravely Default" supposed to mean "Have courage and renounce the promises and responsibilities that are expected of you," and the translation of that used in the English version of the game is "Have the courage to think and act on your own. And have the courage to disobey." It's technically correct English, as "default" can be a verb meaning failing to meet an obligation (even if that definition isn't often used outside of legalese), and the game is encouraging the player to do so ''bravely''. The English version adds another meaning to the title by naming one of the game mechanics after it; "Brave" to take an extra turn and "Default" to skip your turn and save it for later. As for "Where the Fairy Flies", that refers to the heroes' FairyCompanion Airy and late in the game facilitates a spoileriffic SignsOfDisrepair message: ("[[spoiler:Airy Lies]]"). The Japanese version has a slightly different subtitle with the same effect, ''Flying Fairy'' ("[[spoiler:Lying Airy]]"); as well as an UpdatedRerelease with the subtitle ''For the Sequel'' based on how some of the updates were borrowed from the sequel's development.
** The sequel is ''VideoGame/BravelySecond: End Layer''. "Bravely Second" only makes sense ''as'' a sequel to a previous "Bravely" work (there was a "Bravely Second" game mechanic in the first game, but the name barely makes sense there either). The same goes for a planned sequel tentatively titled ''Bravely Third''. As for "End Layer" - [[spoiler:add an S and P, the letters for what you spend to use Bravely Second, and you get "Send Player" - which is what you need to do in order to rewind time.]]

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* ''VideoGame/BravelyDefault: Where the Fairy Flies''. The ''VideoGame/BravelyDefault'' series is full of this:
** First, ''Bravely Default'' itself.
WordOfGod says that "Bravely Default" it's supposed to mean "Have courage and renounce the promises and responsibilities that are expected of you," and the translation of that used in the English version of the game is "Have the courage to think and act on your own. And have the courage to disobey." It's technically correct English, as "default" can be a verb meaning failing to meet an obligation (even if that definition isn't often used outside of legalese), and the game is encouraging the player to do so ''bravely''. The English version adds another meaning to the title by naming one of the game mechanics after it; "Brave" to take an extra turn and "Default" to skip your turn and save it for later. As for "Where later.
** The first game also has
the Fairy Flies", that Japanese subtitle ''Flying Fairy'', which on the surface refers to the heroes' FairyCompanion Airy and late in but also is tied to a late-game spoiler: [[spoiler:by taking away the game facilitates "FF" - a spoileriffic SignsOfDisrepair message: ("[[spoiler:Airy Lies]]"). reference to the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' franchise that ''Bravely Default'' spun off from - it becomes "Lying Airy"]]. The English translation of the subtitle, ''Where the Fairy Flies'', carries much of the same meanings ([[spoiler:"Airy Lies"]]). The Japanese version has a slightly different subtitle with the same effect, ''Flying Fairy'' ("[[spoiler:Lying Airy]]"); as well as also got an UpdatedRerelease with the subtitle ''For the Sequel'' based on how some of the updates were borrowed from the sequel's development.
** The sequel is ''VideoGame/BravelySecond: End Layer''. "Bravely Second" is not only makes sense ''as'' a sequel to a previous "Bravely" the ''second'' work (there was in a ''"Bravely"'' series, but it also refers to a "Bravely Second" game mechanic that debuted in the original game (though it's not clear why the mechanic was named that in the first game, but the name barely makes sense there either). The same goes for a planned sequel tentatively titled ''Bravely Third''. place). As for "End Layer" - [[spoiler:add an S and P, "SP", which stands for the letters for what resource you spend to use the Bravely Second, Second mechanic, and you get "Send Player" - which is what you need to do in order to rewind time.]]
16th Mar '17 2:14:22 PM spiritsunami
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* Jamie Brockett's "[[LongTitle Talkin' Green Beret New Yellow Hydraulic Banana Teenybopper Blues]]"
5th Mar '17 9:06:10 AM wootzits
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* In and of itself, Franchise/{{Pokemon}} sounds nonsensical, but is in fact short for Pocket Monster (or, to directly transliterate from Japanese, Poketto Monsutaa).

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* In and of itself, Franchise/{{Pokemon}} ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' sounds nonsensical, but is in fact short for Pocket Monster ''Pocket Monster'' (or, to directly transliterate from Japanese, Poketto Monsutaa).''Poketto Monsutaa''). And the reason for ''Pocket Monster'' is that Pokemon are kept in devices called Pokeballs that easily fit in the palm of your hand and can be shrunk to an even smaller size, which makes them very easy to carry around.



* ''[[VideoGame/SplinterCell Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow]].'' Parodied in ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' with rejected titles, such as ''Splinter Cell: Peanut Butter Monkey'' and ''Splinter Cell: Puppy Helmet.'' In some circles, Penny Arcade's point was accepted with such vigor that the game was more often referred to as ''Puppy Helmet'' than by its actual name.\\\

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* ''[[VideoGame/SplinterCell Splinter Cell: ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Pandora Tomorrow]].'' Tomorrow''. Parodied in ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' with rejected titles, such as ''Splinter Cell: Peanut Butter Monkey'' and ''Splinter Cell: Puppy Helmet.'' Helmet''. In some circles, Penny Arcade's point was accepted with such vigor that the game was more often referred to as ''Puppy Helmet'' than by its actual name.\\\



* ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger''. Not a disaster movie about blue fire, but one of the names of the ArtifactOfDoom the protagonist possesses. As for the "Calamity Trigger" part; considering it's an ArtifactOfDoom, that would certainly trigger a calamity.[[spoiler: Could also be explained by the fact that said protagonist is a part of an EldritchAbomination that caused TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt in the games backstory, and at the end of his story mode, he is thrown into some sort of time portal into the past with the other half of said Abomination, where she fuses with him against his will to become [[EldritchAbomination the Black Beast]]. Thus, '''Triggering''' a '''Calamity'''. (He gets better....[[StableTimeLoop sorta]].)]]
* ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' is starting to venture into this territory. The first {{Oddly Named Sequel|2ElectricBoogaloo}} subtitle was ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories Chain of Memories]]'', which described Namine's ability to break the links of memories between, and sounded pretty cool even before explanation. After ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', though, there was ''Coded'', which did kinda make sense...and now we have the DS and PSP games ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2 358/2 Days]]'' (phrased "Three-Five-Eight Days Over-Two") and ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep Birth by Sleep]]'' respectively. ''358/2 Days'' is feasibly explained by the game taking place over the course of, well, 358 days for two people. ''Birth by Sleep'' refers to the sleep (coma) of the main character Ventus, which led to the birth (awakening) of Sora as the protagonist of the events in ''Kingdom Hearts''. There's also a TitleDrop in the secret ending, when [[spoiler: Ansem the Wise refers to those waiting for Sora to release them from their various fates as those waiting for 'their new beginning, their birth by sleep'.]]
** The "3D" in ''VideoGame/{{Kingdom Hearts 3D|DreamDropDistance}}'' stands for "Dream Drop Distance", and refers to "how deeply you drop into your dreams" or more clearly, "how far you fall into dreaming". It still pretty much qualifies, chosen principally to provide a SuperTitle64Advance.
** There's also Reverse Rebirth (aka Riku mode) in Chain of Memories. There is a bit of logic to the title when taken separately, (Riku is descending from the top of the castle when Sora was climbing it and the Rebirth part should be obvious) but when you put it together it makes no sense whatsoever. This is a "pun" that got LostInTranslation if you transcribe them into Japanese kana, Reverse and Rebirth can be written the exact same way (リバース, ''ribâsu'', is a proper transliteration for both). Of course, the game uses two different transliteration to make sure it still makes sense, but even then, the Japanese pronunciations are very close if not identical.

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* ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger''. Not a disaster movie about blue fire, but one of the names of the ArtifactOfDoom the protagonist possesses. As for the "Calamity Trigger" part; considering it's an ArtifactOfDoom, that would certainly trigger a calamity.[[spoiler: Could also be explained by the fact that said protagonist is a part of an EldritchAbomination that caused TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt in the games backstory, and at the end of his story mode, he is thrown into some sort of time portal into the past with the other half of said Abomination, where she fuses with him against his will to become [[EldritchAbomination the Black Beast]]. Thus, '''Triggering''' a '''Calamity'''. (He gets better....better...[[StableTimeLoop sorta]].)]]
* ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' is starting to venture into this territory. The first {{Oddly Named Sequel|2ElectricBoogaloo}} subtitle was ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories Chain of Memories]]'', which described Namine's ability to break the links of memories between, and sounded pretty cool even before explanation. After ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', though, there was ''Coded'', which did kinda make sense... and now we have the DS and PSP games ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2 358/2 Days]]'' (phrased "Three-Five-Eight Days Over-Two") and ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep Birth by Sleep]]'' respectively. ''358/2 Days'' is feasibly explained by the game taking place over the course of, well, 358 days for two people. ''Birth by Sleep'' refers to the sleep (coma) of the main character Ventus, which led to the birth (awakening) of Sora as the protagonist of the events in ''Kingdom Hearts''. There's also a TitleDrop in the secret ending, when [[spoiler: Ansem the Wise refers to those waiting for Sora to release them from their various fates as those waiting for 'their new beginning, their birth by sleep'.]]
** The "3D" in ''VideoGame/{{Kingdom Hearts 3D|DreamDropDistance}}'' stands for "Dream Drop Distance", and refers to "how deeply you drop into your dreams" or more clearly, "how far you fall into dreaming". It still pretty much qualifies, was chosen principally mainly to provide a SuperTitle64Advance.
** There's also Reverse Rebirth (aka Riku mode) in Chain ''Chain of Memories.Memories''. There is a bit of logic to the title when taken separately, (Riku is descending from the top of the castle when Sora was climbing it and the Rebirth part should be obvious) but when you put it together it makes no sense whatsoever. This is a "pun" that got LostInTranslation if you transcribe them into Japanese kana, Reverse and Rebirth can be written the exact same way (リバース, ''ribâsu'', is a proper transliteration for both). Of course, the game uses two different transliteration to make sure it still makes sense, but even then, the Japanese pronunciations are very close if not identical.


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* ''VideoGame/TokyoMirageSessionsFE'': It takes place in Tokyo, Mirages are spirits that you team up with or fight against, and Sessions are the combos you initiate when you hit an enemy's weak spot (or fulfill other requirements). The "sharp" symbol is because the story revolves around the IdolSinger business. FE stands for ''Franchise/FireEmblem'', because the game is a crossover between it and ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei''. So why isn't ''SMT'' alluded to in the title? It is, actually; ''Tokyo Mirage Sessions'' can be shortened to ''TMS'', which is ''SMT'' backwards. But without all this context, this game has one hot mess of a title.
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