History Main / WhyWouldAnyoneTakeHimBack

1st Jun '16 4:17:38 PM realshini
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* Note despite Morgan's crush, Guybrush shows no romantic interest in her - he's pretty loyal to his wife, and some dialogue hints that she's actually a good deal younger than he is. And [[spoiler: it's heavily implied Elaine agreed to the undead-ness knowing it's required to kill LeChuck, she just didn't expect the brainwashing that came with it]]
28th May '16 7:50:22 PM Silverblade2
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* ''Film/TheHeartbreakKid'', but at least it [[LampshadeHanging knew it]].

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* %%* ''Film/TheHeartbreakKid'', but at least it [[LampshadeHanging knew it]].



*** To be fair, he hadn't looked at it yet.
28th May '16 12:23:15 AM Silverblade2
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* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'': Would you date a guy who made a sexbot version of you, tried to kill you multiple times, and attempted to rape you? If the answer is yes, you should be a Slayer! And as a GenderFlip: would you remain hopelessly in love with a woman who constantly belittled and beat the crap out of you while leading you on with routine rough sex play? If the answer is yes, you should ''date'' a Slayer! Different than most of these examples, in that the characters in universe call them out on this, and it is ultimately a very destructive, unhealthy relationship, mostly coming out of Buffy's inability to cope with [[spoiler:being pulled out of heaven by her friends.]] Also worth noting that most of the destructive parts of their relationship occurred when Spike was literally a soulless monster, and therefore was incapable of moral reasoning. He later [[spoiler: gets his soul back, and their interactions become much healthier.]]
** It should be noted that a lot of these problems occurred during season six, AKA the season that is so riddled with characters acting like morons for no reason and plot points bordering on melodrama that a lot of fans ignore its existence. While that doesn't stop this trope from coming into play for those that ''do'' watch it, it's more of a case of TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot and could've been a lot better if handled correctly.

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* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'': Would ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
**Would
you date a guy who made a sexbot version of you, tried to kill you multiple times, and attempted to rape you? If the answer is yes, you should be a Slayer! And as a GenderFlip: would you remain hopelessly in love with a woman who constantly belittled and beat the crap out of you while leading you on with routine rough sex play? If the answer is yes, you should ''date'' a Slayer! Different than most of these examples, in that the characters in universe call them out on this, and it is ultimately a very destructive, unhealthy relationship, mostly coming out of Buffy's inability to cope with [[spoiler:being pulled out of heaven by her friends.]] Also worth noting that most of the destructive parts of their relationship occurred when Spike was literally a soulless monster, and therefore was incapable of moral reasoning. He later [[spoiler: gets his soul back, and their interactions become much healthier.]]
** It should be noted that a lot of these problems occurred during season six, AKA the season that is so riddled with characters acting like morons for no reason and plot points bordering on melodrama that a lot of fans ignore its existence. While that doesn't stop this trope from coming into play for those that ''do'' watch it, it's more of a case of TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot and could've been a lot better if handled correctly.
]]
10th May '16 5:01:43 PM MeekGazelle
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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', Amy Pond skips out on fiancee, [[ChildhoodFriendRomance childhood friend]], and all-around DoggedNiceGuy Rory to gallivant around the universe with a dashing young ([[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld looking]]) Gallifreyan. Granted, in a time machine, so she should have no trouble making it [[{{Pun}} back in time]] for the wedding, so that's not TOO bad... until she kisses and attempts to seduce the Doctor. Even this alone wouldn't be quite enough to qualify for this trope-- relationships can survive infidelity-- but Rory has to hear about it from the Doctor, not Amy, and she never apologizes or takes ''any'' responsibility for her attempted dalliance. When confronted, her response is along the lines of, "Well, we never really ''did'' anything." Right...only that's because the Doctor rejected her, not for lack of trying on her part. Rory expresses understandable concern about the lack of loyalty his prospective wife displays, but being the ExtremeDoormat that he is, nothing ever comes of it, and the whole incident is [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness seldom mentioned again]].

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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', Amy Pond skips out on fiancee, [[ChildhoodFriendRomance childhood friend]], and all-around DoggedNiceGuy Rory to gallivant around the universe with a dashing young ([[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld looking]]) Gallifreyan. Granted, in it's a time machine, so she should have no trouble making it [[{{Pun}} back in time]] for the wedding, so that's not TOO bad... until she kisses and attempts to seduce the Doctor. Even this alone wouldn't be quite enough to qualify for this trope-- relationships can survive infidelity-- but Rory has to hear about it from the Doctor, not Amy, and she never apologizes or takes ''any'' responsibility for her attempted dalliance. When confronted, her response is along the lines of, "Well, we never really ''did'' anything." Right...only that's because the Doctor rejected her, not for lack of trying on her part. Rory expresses understandable concern about the lack of loyalty his prospective wife displays, but being the ExtremeDoormat that he is, nothing ever comes of it, and the whole incident is [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness seldom mentioned again]].
8th May '16 6:47:58 PM trixus
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* ''Film/ABronxTale'', featuring a taboo-breaking interracial relationship in the eponymous New York borough in TheSixties, has the white protagonist EasilyForgiven by his black girlfriend for ''calling her brother the n-word''.

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* ''Film/ABronxTale'', featuring a taboo-breaking interracial relationship in the eponymous New York borough in TheSixties, has the white protagonist EasilyForgiven by his black girlfriend for ''calling her brother the n-word''. Sure her brother actively denied that the protagonist avoided him to be beat up by his racist friends and was even saying that he was the one that punched him but that should took more explanation than throwing a slur.
6th May '16 7:28:20 PM quartzhearts
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Note that despite the title, this trope can happen with any gender combination, even if [[TheUnfairSex the majority of examples seem to be a woman taking back a dodgy man]].

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Note that despite the title, this trope can happen with any gender combination, even if [[TheUnfairSex the majority of examples seem to be a woman taking back a dodgy man]].
combination.
15th Mar '16 4:32:41 PM Lemia
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* Toma's good ending in ''[[VideoGame/AmnesiaOtome Amnesia: Memories]]''. Unlike his normal ending in which he is ''not'' EasilyForgiven by the heroine or the rest of the cast for [[spoiler:drugging her repeatedly without her knowledge and ''locking her in a cage'' to "protect" her]], his good ending has the heroine instantly forgive him which gives off ''really'' uncomfortable StockholmSyndrome and LoveMartyr vibes.
27th Feb '16 12:45:21 PM StFan
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* Duncan to Courtney in TotalDramaAction and then vice versa in ''World Tour''.

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* Duncan to Courtney in TotalDramaAction ''WesternAnimation/TotalDrama Action'', and then vice versa in ''World Tour''.



17th Feb '16 3:16:30 PM caringguy
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** As the main entry states, [[GenderFlip Marge isn't safe from this either]]. In a newer episode, Bart and Milhouse try to get Milhouse's parents to split up again by placing one of Marge's bras in Kirk's bed, which Luanne finds and shows Homer who, understandably upset, confronts Marge, who then kicks ''him'' out of his own home. There's also the fact that, any time Homer is involved in a plot where it looks like he may cheat, he's incredibly upset at the prospect, whereas Marge was actually ''contemplating'' cheating on Homer with Jacques.

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** As the main entry states, [[GenderFlip Marge isn't safe from this either]]. In a newer episode, Bart and Milhouse try to get Milhouse's parents to split up again by placing one of Marge's bras in Kirk's bed, which Luanne finds and shows Homer who, understandably upset, confronts Marge, who then kicks ''him'' out of his own home. There's also the fact that, any time Homer is involved in a plot where it looks like he may cheat, he's incredibly upset at the prospect, whereas Marge was actually ''contemplating'' cheating on Homer with Jacques. To be fair, that was in the first season, when the characters that everyone knows today clearly hadn't been fully decided yet.
15th Feb '16 12:09:34 PM WildeOscar
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* Stan in "Film/NightmareAlley" repeatedly rips off and uses everybody he meets, including his girlfriend (and later wife) Molly but she still loves him, despite the fact that by the end of the film, he's a hopeless alcoholic and even a carny geek.
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