History Main / WhatDoYouMeanitsNotPolitical

10th Oct '17 7:35:57 PM Acebrock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/{{Bethesda}}'s tweet about the upcoming ''VideoGame/WolfensteinII'' earned a lot of backlash from right wing groups, due to its phrasing. Special ire was drawn from the phrase "Make America Nazi Free Again," a play on UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's "Make America great Again" slogan. Unsurprisingly, the media made a point about [[https://www.forbes.com/sites/curtissilver/2017/10/10/wolfenstein-make-america-nazi-free-again/#1b54c4132554 how it showed the political atmosphere]] of the time. Bethesda themselves, for what it's worth, said they weren't trying to be political, but just promote their game about killing Nazis.

to:

* Creator/{{Bethesda}}'s tweet about the upcoming ''VideoGame/WolfensteinII'' ''VideoGame/WolfensteinIITheNewColossus'' earned a lot of backlash from right wing groups, due to its phrasing. Special ire was drawn from the phrase "Make America Nazi Free Again," a play on UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's "Make America great Again" slogan. Unsurprisingly, the media made a point about [[https://www.forbes.com/sites/curtissilver/2017/10/10/wolfenstein-make-america-nazi-free-again/#1b54c4132554 how it showed the political atmosphere]] of the time. Bethesda themselves, for what it's worth, said they weren't trying to be political, but just promote their game about killing Nazis.
10th Oct '17 7:35:11 PM Acebrock
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* Creator/{{Bethesda}}'s tweet about the upcoming ''VideoGame/WolfensteinII'' earned a lot of backlash from right wing groups, due to its phrasing. Special ire was drawn from the phrase "Make America Nazi Free Again," a play on UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's "Make America great Again" slogan. Unsurprisingly, the media made a point about [[https://www.forbes.com/sites/curtissilver/2017/10/10/wolfenstein-make-america-nazi-free-again/#1b54c4132554 how it showed the political atmosphere]] of the time. Bethesda themselves, for what it's worth, said they weren't trying to be political, but just promote their game about killing Nazis.
4th Oct '17 6:47:17 AM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Vladimir Nabokov insisted that his dystopian novel ''Bend Sinister'' was not meant to satirize the Soviet Union (or any other totalitarian regime), even though it features a country called Padukgrad and a dictator called Paduk.

to:

* Vladimir Nabokov insisted that his dystopian novel ''Bend Sinister'' ''Literature/BendSinister'' was not meant to satirize the Soviet Union (or any other totalitarian regime), even though it features a country called Padukgrad and a dictator called Paduk.
17th Sep '17 11:48:10 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Some have referred to ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' as [[http://washingtonexaminer.com/why-ghostbusters-is-the-most-libertarian-hollywood-blockbuster-of-all-time/article/2544522 "the most libertarian Hollywood blockbuster of all time"]], because of how every government official is either [[ObstructiveBureaucrat too abrasive]] and/or ineffectual to save the day. It could be argued, though, that this slant approaches PeopleSitOnChairs territory, since any action film featuring vigilante heroes is naturally going to portray the Establishment as incompetent and/or corrupt.

to:

* Some have referred to ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' as [[http://washingtonexaminer.com/why-ghostbusters-is-the-most-libertarian-hollywood-blockbuster-of-all-time/article/2544522 "the most libertarian Hollywood blockbuster of all time"]], because of how every government official is either [[ObstructiveBureaucrat too abrasive]] and/or ineffectual to save the day. It could be argued, though, that this slant approaches PeopleSitOnChairs Administrivia/PeopleSitOnChairs territory, since any action film featuring vigilante heroes is naturally going to portray the Establishment as incompetent and/or corrupt.
26th Aug '17 9:19:40 AM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/DeusExMankindDivided'' takes it in the opposite direction, where those with augmentations are treated as second-class citizens after "The Incident", which was straight-up called "mechanical apartheid" in promotional materials. The phrase "Aug Lives Matter" (a reference to the "Black Lives Matter" movement) also appears in the game, which the game's PR department claimed was an "[[https://www.polygon.com/2016/8/3/12368210/deus-ex-mankind-divided-augs-lives-matter-controversy unfortunate coincidence]]." Jensen can also speak with a policewoman who regrets her profession chosen due to the political climate, saying "If I could do it again, I'd have been a fireman. No one looks into a fire and thinks, 'Shit, does this one really deserve it?'"

to:

* ''VideoGame/DeusExMankindDivided'' takes it in the opposite direction, where those with augmentations are treated as second-class citizens after "The Incident", which was straight-up called "mechanical apartheid" in promotional materials. The phrase "Aug Lives Matter" (a reference to the "Black Lives Matter" movement) also appears in the game, which the game's PR department claimed was an "[[https://www.polygon.com/2016/8/3/12368210/deus-ex-mankind-divided-augs-lives-matter-controversy unfortunate coincidence]]." Jensen can There's also speak a dialogue exchange with a policewoman who regrets her profession chosen due to the political climate, saying "If I could do it again, I'd have been a fireman. No one looks into a fire and thinks, 'Shit, does this one really deserve it?'"
26th Aug '17 9:18:58 AM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/DeusExMankindDivided'' takes it in the opposite direction, where those with augmentations are treated as second-class citizens after "The Incident", which was straight-up called "mechanical apartheid" in promotional materials.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DeusExMankindDivided'' takes it in the opposite direction, where those with augmentations are treated as second-class citizens after "The Incident", which was straight-up called "mechanical apartheid" in promotional materials. The phrase "Aug Lives Matter" (a reference to the "Black Lives Matter" movement) also appears in the game, which the game's PR department claimed was an "[[https://www.polygon.com/2016/8/3/12368210/deus-ex-mankind-divided-augs-lives-matter-controversy unfortunate coincidence]]." Jensen can also speak with a policewoman who regrets her profession chosen due to the political climate, saying "If I could do it again, I'd have been a fireman. No one looks into a fire and thinks, 'Shit, does this one really deserve it?'"
23rd Aug '17 11:10:15 AM abby-anne
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/FreshlyPickedTinglesRosyRupeeland'' has been interpreted as having an anti-capitalist message. Throughout the game, Tingle's progress, friendships, and even life are completely dependant on rupees. The goal of the game is to collect enough rupees to ascend to a materialistic utopia, which turns out to be a lie that Uncle Rupee only made up so that Tingle would continue to give him money. By the end, Uncle Rupee has enough money to ascend into a godlike state and turn everyone into his slaves. He can only be defeated by Tingle blasting him to death with rupees, which destroy him and causes rupees to rain down from the sky across the town.
14th Aug '17 9:30:09 AM Korodzik
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E1TheCutieMapPart1 "The Cutie Map"]], in which the villain rules over a {{dystopia}}n village of brainwashed ponies stripped of their individuality in the name of "equality", was welcomed enthusiastically by some right-wing and conservative viewers who interpreted it as a criticism of [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad political correctness]]. To the point where a certain far-right author, partly for trolling purposes, encouraged his blog's readers to vote the episode into that year's UsefulNotes/HugoAward as part of a campaign against the [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment (alleged or not)]] left-wing bias of the awards.
12th Aug '17 4:38:34 AM ClintEastwood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** At the end of "The War Games", the Time Lords ask the Doctor to choose his own face from a bunch of drawings projected on a screen. One (the one dismissed by the Doctor as 'too old') appears to be Karl Marx. Draw your own conclusions.
** The general line in fan analysis is that "The Web Planet" is a RedScare allegory, because it's about the Zarbi workers rising up against their Menoptera masters. But it's a ''really'' big reach - there's no absolutely no indication the Zarbi are any more intelligent than farm animals, and even though the monster in the story [[OurMonstersAreWeird has the power to control gold]] it doesn't work in any way analogous to any kind of economic system, which seems like it'd be a no-brainer for an anti-communism story. Maybe it's just a PlanetaryRomance {{Xenofiction}} runaround with pretty butterfly people fighting the ant people?
** It's well known "The Sunmakers" is about [[AuthorTract the evils of taxation]] and written by a Thatcher supporter, but, since the actual story presents the issue more as 'untouchable mega-corporations and corrupt bankers have bought out the government and are draining money out of the poorest to boost their own profits while keeping the population constantly afraid via media to distract them', modern critics tend to read it as a satire on the evils of privatization, or Occupy-style anti-capitalist. Privatization was just around the corner in 1977, and the Occupy movement was 35 years away. Is it more likely that Creator/RobertHolmes was secretly hard-left and able to see the future, or that he was ramping up the setting's systemic injustice to the point he accidentally [[BrokenAesop broke his own right-wing aesop]]?
** In the Eighties, the showrunner purposefully tried to avoid political subtext as much as possible for a variety of reasons (lack of desire to offend, lack of desire to make allegorical stories about the real world in favor of interacting with the series' own history as a work of fiction, and several other reasons). This caused some BrokenAesop moments, like when the series bought back the highly political Silurians in an apolitical action story where nothing indicates either side is anything more than just a nasty lizard creature - and of course the politics ended up in there anyway. This restriction ended when the producer stopped caring, freeing the then-script editor to make clearly and transparently political stories about BBC politics ("The Greatest Show in the Galaxy"), Margaret Thatcher ("The Happiness Patrol") and lesbianism ("Survival").

to:

** At the end of "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games", Games]]", the Time Lords ask the Doctor to choose his own face from a bunch of drawings projected on a screen. One (the one dismissed by the Doctor as 'too old') appears to be Karl Marx. Draw your own conclusions.
** The general line in fan analysis is that "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E5TheWebPlanet The Web Planet" Planet]]" is a RedScare allegory, because it's about the Zarbi workers rising up against their Menoptera masters. But it's a ''really'' big reach - there's no absolutely no indication the Zarbi are any more intelligent than farm animals, and even though the monster in the story [[OurMonstersAreWeird has the power to control gold]] it doesn't work in any way analogous to any kind of economic system, which seems like it'd be a no-brainer for an anti-communism story. Maybe it's just a PlanetaryRomance {{Xenofiction}} runaround with pretty butterfly people fighting the ant people?
** It's well known "The Sunmakers" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E4TheSunMakers The Sun Makers]]" is about [[AuthorTract the evils of taxation]] and written by a Thatcher supporter, but, since the actual story presents the issue more as 'untouchable mega-corporations and corrupt bankers have bought out the government and are draining money out of the poorest to boost their own profits while keeping the population constantly afraid via media to distract them', modern critics tend to read it as a satire on the evils of privatization, or Occupy-style anti-capitalist. Privatization was just around the corner in 1977, and the Occupy movement was 35 years away. Is it more likely that Creator/RobertHolmes was secretly hard-left and able to see the future, or that he was ramping up the setting's systemic injustice to the point he accidentally [[BrokenAesop broke his own right-wing aesop]]?
** In the Eighties, the showrunner script editor Eric Saward purposefully tried to avoid political subtext as much as possible for a variety of reasons (lack of desire to offend, lack of desire to make allegorical stories about the real world in favor of interacting with the series' own history as a work of fiction, and several other reasons). This caused some BrokenAesop moments, like when the series bought back the highly political Silurians in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep an apolitical action story where nothing indicates either side is anything more than just a nasty lizard creature creature]] - and of course the politics ended up in there anyway. This restriction ended when the producer Creator/JohnNathanTurner stopped caring, freeing the then-script next script editor Andrew Cartmel to make clearly and transparently political stories about BBC politics ("The ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E4TheGreatestShowInTheGalaxy The Greatest Show in the Galaxy"), Margaret Thatcher ("The Galaxy]]"), UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E2TheHappinessPatrol The Happiness Patrol") Patrol]]") and lesbianism ("Survival").("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E4Survival Survival]]").



** Mark Gatiss is often criticized for reactionary racist/sexist/warmongering {{Family Unfriendly Aesop}}s in his ''Who'' stories, but his real-world political leanings are known as left-wing. A lot of it may be down to bad luck - "The Unquiet Dead" (often read as an allegory for how war refugees should be treated with suspicion and can never assimilate into society) happened to come out at a time when asylum seekers were featured heavily in the news. "Cold War" accidentally portrays mutually assured destruction as good, which might have gone unnoticed had the episode not synced up with the death of Margaret Thatcher. "The Crimson Horror" has Diana Rigg playing the episode's EvilIsSexy NobleDemon star, who (just before it aired) went in the papers saying uninformed [[StrawFeminist things]] about feminists.
** This concept is made fun of in "Blink":

to:

** Mark Gatiss Creator/MarkGatiss is often criticized for reactionary racist/sexist/warmongering {{Family Unfriendly Aesop}}s in his ''Who'' stories, but his real-world political leanings are known as left-wing. A lot of it may be down to bad luck - "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E3TheUnquietDead The Unquiet Dead" Dead]]" (often read as an allegory for how war refugees should be treated with suspicion and can never assimilate into society) happened to come out at a time when asylum seekers were featured heavily in the news. "Cold War" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E8ColdWar Cold War]]" accidentally portrays mutually assured destruction as good, which might have gone unnoticed had the episode not synced up with the death of Margaret Thatcher. "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E11TheCrimsonHorror The Crimson Horror" Horror]]" has Diana Rigg Creator/DianaRigg playing the episode's EvilIsSexy NobleDemon star, who (just before it aired) went in the papers saying uninformed [[StrawFeminist things]] about feminists.
** This concept is made fun of in "Blink":"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink Blink]]":



** "Turn Left", an episode about Donna indirectly causing a racist, fascist government to take over Britain by turning ''right'' at a junction.
** The ''Daily Mirror'' published an article claiming that in "The Beast Below", the Doctor's line "And once every five years, everyone chooses to forget what they've learned. Democracy in action." should be read as a call to the public to re-elect UsefulNotes/GordonBrown's Labour government. If so, it didn't work.
** The central dilemma in "Kill the Moon" was accused of being "an allegory for the abortion debate" by some North American viewers. Notably, viewers in Europe didn't notice such an angle to the problem and were baffled by the [[VocalMinority fixation of a part of the American viewership]] on this accusation. While debates about the morality of abortion occur on both sides of the Atlantic, the American ones generally tend to be more heated and divided, which might have contributed to such a reading of a narrative element in the episode.

to:

** "Turn Left", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E11TurnLeft Turn Left]]", an episode about Donna indirectly causing a racist, fascist government to take over Britain by turning ''right'' at a junction.
** The ''Daily Mirror'' published an article claiming that in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E2TheBeastBelow The Beast Below", Below]]", the Doctor's line "And once every five years, everyone chooses to forget what they've learned. Democracy in action." should be read as a call to the public to re-elect UsefulNotes/GordonBrown's Labour government. If so, it didn't work.
** The central dilemma in "Kill "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E7KillTheMoon Kill the Moon" Moon]]" was accused of being "an allegory for the abortion debate" by some North American viewers. Notably, viewers in Europe didn't notice such an angle to the problem and were baffled by the [[VocalMinority fixation of a part of the American viewership]] on this accusation. While debates about the morality of abortion occur on both sides of the Atlantic, the American ones generally tend to be more heated and divided, which might have contributed to such a reading of a narrative element in the episode.
11th Aug '17 6:40:57 AM nngnna
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

**In Israel where the series was hugely popular, there is a persistent claim that Gargamel is an antisemitic Caricature, and that the smurfs on the other hand represent blue-blooded purity. (not helped by smurfette making an HeelFaceTurn by getting blond hair and a smaller nose).


Added DiffLines:

This list shows the last 10 events of 471. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.WhatDoYouMeanitsNotPolitical