History Main / WhatDoYouMeanitsNotPolitical

18th Mar '17 12:05:32 PM JulianLapostat
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Also note that only rarely is this analysis laudatory. Nine times out of ten, the critic is repulsed by the supposed moral/philosophical/social/whatever point a work is making, and uses their argument to condemn the author. This can even result in a sort of premortem DeathOfTheAuthor if the critic claims that ''everything'' in the work arises from subconscious attitudes the author may or may not have (an unfortunate side effect of the ''auteur'' theory). The argument might even be applied to an entire society of a particular time and place, with the implication that because the audience enjoyed something ''as entertainment'', [[SeriousBusiness they must have applied its values to their daily lives as well]].

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Also note that only rarely is this analysis laudatory. Nine times out of ten, the critic is repulsed by the supposed moral/philosophical/social/whatever point a work is making, and uses their argument to condemn the author. This can even result in a sort of premortem DeathOfTheAuthor if the critic claims that ''everything'' in the work arises from subconscious attitudes the author may or may not have (an unfortunate side effect of the [[UsefulNotes/TheAuteurTheory ''auteur'' theory).theory]]). The argument might even be applied to an entire society of a particular time and place, with the implication that because the audience enjoyed something ''as entertainment'', [[SeriousBusiness they must have applied its values to their daily lives as well]].
16th Mar '17 7:38:25 PM morenohijazo
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* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'': Despite [[TheNapoleon physical]] and [[TheStarscream psychological]] similarities, Iznogoud was ''not'' inspired by French president Nicolas Sarkozy. He did, however, meet Jacques Chirac at one point. Which in no way prevented photoshops of Sarkozy dressed as Iznogoud from appearing on the Internet shortly after his election, mostly with captions on the subject of "Well, he finally succeeded." There was also a Google bombing mixing Sarkozy and Iznogoud.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'': Despite [[TheNapoleon physical]] and [[TheStarscream psychological]] similarities, Iznogoud was ''not'' inspired by French president Nicolas Sarkozy. He [[note]] It would be more remarkable if he were; Nicolas Sarkozy was ''seven years old'' when the first Iznogoud stories were published.[[/note]] (He did, however, meet Jacques Chirac at one point. point.) Which in no way prevented photoshops of Sarkozy dressed as Iznogoud from appearing on the Internet shortly after his election, mostly with captions on the subject of "Well, he finally succeeded." There was also a Google bombing mixing Sarkozy and Iznogoud. Moreover, an ''Iznogoud'' book written after Tabary's death in 2011 made extensive use of the similarity, and Sarkozy also won the 1999 Iznogoud Award, which is presented to the person who made the year's most high-profile failure.
9th Mar '17 9:41:07 AM jsanchez2338
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* ''VideoGame/AssssinsCreedUnity'': It is really, really, hard for a game about the French Revolution to escape this. Especially for a Franchise that has formerly prized itself for historical research and an even handed look at the American Revolution.

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* ''VideoGame/AssssinsCreedUnity'': ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedUnity'': It is really, really, hard for a game about the French Revolution to escape this. Especially for a Franchise that has formerly prized itself for historical research and an even handed look at the American Revolution.
13th Feb '17 6:52:13 PM EricW
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/AssssinsCreedUnity'': It is really, really, hard for a game about the French Revolution to escape this. Especially for a Franchise that has formerly prized itself for historical research and an even handed look at the American Revolution.
** The reaction and charges of "propaganda" and the great number of errors in representation has brought a great deal of criticism as well. Jean-Clement Martin, the historian who has served as a consultant for the game, and a respected member of the Society of Robespierre Studies, while noting that the script had a "royalist" bias feels that the game should be enjoyed as "fantasy" and perhaps if it stokes interest, it could lead players to read history books.
--> ''[[TheRevolutionWillNotBeVilified "The Revolution broke royal power, and rather than deterring populist politics, it encouraged them. If anything]], [[http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/video-games/columns/criticalintel/12676-The-Good-and-Bad-of-Assassin-s-Creed-Unity.3 the game's apparent stance that the Revolution was an Entirely Bad Thing seems nearsighted and one-dimensional."]]''
** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r47yZIYBUzc author/historian David Andress]] who wrote "The Terror" also discussed the historical depiction and he noted that the game was largely counter-revolutionary. More generally, while admiring the largely accurate (if streamlined) reproduction of Paris, he dismisses its portrayal as largely cliche and noted that the Templar ConspiracyTheory instigating the Revolution was a famous right-wing myth that refuses to give credit to the popular movement and pay real attention to its GrayAndGreyMorality.
10th Jan '17 11:38:16 AM ChaoticNovelist
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A subtrope of EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory, when works are interpreted as being allegories for political issues (most often ones of war) at the time of the writing, with no [[WordOfGod prompting from the author]]. Sometimes, this is applied as {{retcon}}, with works written decades before the event being interpreted as allegories for it. (This may be a result of OlderThanTheyThink.) Such interpretations may be instances of HistoryRepeats, [[FunnyAneurysmMoment "Funny Aneurysm" Moments]], HilariousInHindsight, and HarsherInHindsight.

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A subtrope of EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory, when When works are interpreted as being allegories for political issues (most often ones of war) at the time of the writing, with no [[WordOfGod prompting from the author]]. Sometimes, this is applied as {{retcon}}, with works written decades before the event being interpreted as allegories for it. (This may be a result of OlderThanTheyThink.) Such interpretations may be instances of HistoryRepeats, [[FunnyAneurysmMoment "Funny Aneurysm" Moments]], HilariousInHindsight, and HarsherInHindsight.



* It's been suggested that Creator/StanLee intended the two mutant leaders to represent the competing tactics of civil rights leaders MartinLutherKingJr (Professor Xavier) and UsefulNotes/MalcolmX (ComicBook/{{Magneto}}), and the analogy is very frequently mentioned in discussions of the books. More broadly, they represent alternative paths that oppressed people can follow: appeal to the consciences of the oppressors by taking the moral high ground, or defend your rights by force.

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* It's been suggested that Creator/StanLee intended the two mutant leaders to represent the competing tactics of civil rights leaders MartinLutherKingJr (Professor Xavier) and UsefulNotes/MalcolmX (ComicBook/{{Magneto}}), and the analogy is very frequently mentioned in discussions of the books. Another comparison has been gays, or other specific or non-specific minorities, that some fans see it as a "violation" of what the story is supposedly about when a particular plot or character's behaviour does not fit in with their interpretation of choice. Some writers consciously or subconsciously fed this by modeling the mutants' plight in particular storylines on that of real-life minorities, which also led to fans squabbling amongst themselves as to whether the X-Men are more a metaphor for race or for homosexuality, and also to the tendency among some fans to consider "ugly" mutants "truer" mutants than "pretty" mutants. All this often loses sight of the fact that Marvel's mutants started out as a fairly standard science-fiction "super-race" melded with the standard Silver Age superhero conventions. Thus during the first two decades of the X-Men's existence the default was to maintain a SecretIdentity and hide that one was a mutant from the public, which would have caused a different sort of blacklash if the feature had been intended as a metaphor of or a comment on the situation of a minority within society in the real world. More broadly, they represent alternative paths that oppressed people can follow: appeal to the consciences of the oppressors by taking the moral high ground, or defend your rights by force.
6th Jan '17 8:32:10 PM TheJ0ker
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* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'': ''Asterix'' has also interpreted by right wing people, xenophobes and racists as propaganda for an all white, all French, rural, traditionalist France that keeps foreign invaders out of the country. This claim is not in line with the creators. The series' writer Creator/ReneGoscinny was Jewish and survived World War Two, knowing firsthand what it feels like to be persecuted.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'': ''Asterix'' has also interpreted by right wing people, xenophobes and racists as propaganda for an all white, all French, rural, traditionalist France that keeps foreign invaders out of the country. This claim is not in line with the creators. The series' writer Creator/ReneGoscinny was Jewish and survived World War Two, knowing firsthand what it feels like to be persecuted.
6th Jan '17 10:00:13 AM Morgenthaler
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* Music/TheDoors' 1968 song "The Unknown Soldier" is usually taken to be a denunciation of the Vietnam War, which was at its height at the time. This is plausible, especially when Morrison describes the soldier's wife learning of her husband's death on the TV news (Vietnam being the first major war to receive extensive televised news coverage), but the lyrics are worded in such a way that, the television reference notwithstanding, the song could be applied to any war between WorldWarI and today. And the Doors tended to remain silent on political matters, anyway.

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* Music/TheDoors' 1968 song "The Unknown Soldier" is usually taken to be a denunciation of the Vietnam War, which was at its height at the time. This is plausible, especially when Morrison describes the soldier's wife learning of her husband's death on the TV news (Vietnam being the first major war to receive extensive televised news coverage), but the lyrics are worded in such a way that, the television reference notwithstanding, the song could be applied to any war between WorldWarI UsefulNotes/WorldWarI and today. And the Doors tended to remain silent on political matters, anyway.
21st Dec '16 7:37:22 PM Sushi
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* ''Film/IronMan'': With Tony taking the fight to Middle-Eastern terrorists in the [[Film/IronMan1 first film]] and refusing to hand his property over to the government in the second, there are[[http://www.nypost.com/f/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/iron_man_capitalist_hero_nSJtnJhWoMHEkC9D6a6cSN some]] who see him as the ultimate conservative/Republican/Libertarian/Objectivist super hero [[UnfortunateImplications (as if only right-wingers ever fight terrorists or oppose the government)]]. Which actually makes sense, considering that Stan Lee has talked about how he enjoyed the idea of creating a character like Tony Stark in the middle of TheSixties, saying that he wanted to create "the quintessential capitalist," explore Cold War themes, and that "I think I gave myself a dare. It was the height of the Cold War. The readers, the young readers, if there was one thing they hated, it was war, it was the military.... So I got a hero who represented that to the hundredth degree. He was a weapons manufacturer, he was providing weapons for the Army, he was rich, he was an industrialist.... I thought it would be fun to take the kind of character that nobody would like, none of our readers would like, and shove him down their throats and make them like him.... And he became very popular."

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* ''Film/IronMan'': With Tony taking the fight to Middle-Eastern terrorists in the [[Film/IronMan1 first film]] and refusing to hand his property over to the government in the second, there are[[http://www.are [[http://www.nypost.com/f/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/iron_man_capitalist_hero_nSJtnJhWoMHEkC9D6a6cSN some]] who see him as the ultimate conservative/Republican/Libertarian/Objectivist super hero [[UnfortunateImplications (as if only right-wingers ever fight terrorists or oppose the government)]].hero. Which actually makes sense, considering that Stan Lee has talked about how he enjoyed the idea of creating a character like Tony Stark in the middle of TheSixties, saying that he wanted to create "the quintessential capitalist," explore Cold War themes, and that "I think I gave myself a dare. It was the height of the Cold War. The readers, the young readers, if there was one thing they hated, it was war, it was the military.... So I got a hero who represented that to the hundredth degree. He was a weapons manufacturer, he was providing weapons for the Army, he was rich, he was an industrialist.... I thought it would be fun to take the kind of character that nobody would like, none of our readers would like, and shove him down their throats and make them like him.... And he became very popular."
20th Nov '16 12:00:12 PM Chabal2
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* Literature/{{Discworld}} gets a bit of this from time to time. For example: The claims that ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' or ''Discworld/MonstrousRegiment'' are directly about the Iraq war (even though ''Jingo'' was written years before it).

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* Literature/{{Discworld}} gets a bit of this from time to time. For example: The claims that ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' or ''Discworld/MonstrousRegiment'' are directly about the Iraq war (even though ''Jingo'' was written years before it).it), while ''Discworld/SmallGods'' has been described as a critique of Christianity by some people and a ''defense'' thereof by others.
7th Nov '16 10:58:26 AM Malady
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* An in-universe example in ''Literature/It'' by {{Creator/StephenKing}}: when Bill Denbrough is in college in the early 1970s, he takes a writing class with a left-leaning professor who only likes stories that make a political point. For this reason, he dislikes most of Bill's apolitical sci-fi and horror stories. The only story he gives a good grade to is one about an alien conflict that he interprets as having an anti-war message.

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* An in-universe example in ''Literature/It'' ''Literature/{{It}}'' by {{Creator/StephenKing}}: when Bill Denbrough is in college in the early 1970s, he takes a writing class with a left-leaning professor who only likes stories that make a political point. For this reason, he dislikes most of Bill's apolitical sci-fi and horror stories. The only story he gives a good grade to is one about an alien conflict that he interprets as having an anti-war message.
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