History Main / WOODENSHIPSANDIRONMEN

21st Sep '16 6:38:43 PM StarSword
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* David Drake's ''RCN'' series is this trope RecycledInSpace -- ships in FTL are driven by sails that, because of the inability to use electrically-powered motors, are set and reefed by sailors in the rigging.

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* David Drake's ''RCN'' ''Literature/{{RCN}}'' series is this trope RecycledInSpace -- ships in FTL are driven by sails that, because of the inability to use electrically-powered motors, are set and reefed by sailors in the rigging.


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* ''Literature/AlexisCarew'': Well, Thermoplastic and {{Unobtainium}} Ships, but the rest checks out: everything about the workings of space travel is based heavily on the Age of Sail, from the brutal discipline and sexism and classism down to the tiniest terminology of mast and sail sections. The terminology part gets a lampshade when Alexis wonders aloud if "tradition" is some synonym for insanity.
28th Aug '16 6:53:17 PM sgamer82
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* David Weber's ''Literature/SafeHold'' series exists here for a while as Charis has to rely on her navy to fight of the mainland powers. Thanks to [[GivingRadioToTheRomans Merlin's help]] and [[OneManIndustrialRevolution Baron Seamount's inventiveness]]they go from Lepanto style galley's to ships with designs straight from the Age of Sail. As of ''Midst Toil and Tribulation'' it drops off a bit. Partly because the action has switched to land based combat in Siddamark but also because that book has seen the introduction of the Safehold's first steamships with larger, more heavily armed and armoured versions stated being built.

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* In David Weber's ''Literature/SafeHold'' series exists here for a while as ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series, the Kingdom, later Empire, of Charis has to rely on her its navy to fight of off the mainland powers. Thanks to [[GivingRadioToTheRomans Merlin's help]] the TechnologyUplift provided by Merlin Athrawes' knowledge and [[OneManIndustrialRevolution Baron Seamount's inventiveness]]they inventiveness]], they go from Lepanto style galley's galleys to ships with designs straight from the Age of Sail. As of the sixth book, ''Midst Toil and Tribulation'' Tribulation,'' it drops off a bit. Partly because Much of the action has switched switches to land based combat in the Republic of Siddamark but also because and the climax of that book has seen features the introduction of the Safehold's first steamships steam-powered, ironclad river with larger, more heavily armed and armoured versions stated being built.built for use in the open sea.
13th Aug '16 4:26:18 AM Morgenthaler
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** ''RogueTrader'', being about people who go to amazing places, meet interesting people, and fleece them for all they're worth, has this in bucketloads. It's not just life on board, either- spaceship combat is very much inspired by Age of Sail strategies.

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** ''RogueTrader'', ''TabletopGame/RogueTrader'', being about people who go to amazing places, meet interesting people, and fleece them for all they're worth, has this in bucketloads. It's not just life on board, either- spaceship combat is very much inspired by Age of Sail strategies.



** In one of the ''SpaceWolf'' novels Ragnar is dismayed to see that most of the crew of an Inquisition ship are criminals chained to their workstations, in the next book he's glad to see that his chapter's own battle barges are manned by much more enthusiastic Fenrisian serfs, essentially Vikings in space.
* ''SeventhSea'' draws heavily upon this setting for any of its nautical adventures, especially anything involving the Pirate Nations.
* ''FurryPirates''

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** In one of the ''SpaceWolf'' ''Literature/SpaceWolf'' novels Ragnar is dismayed to see that most of the crew of an Inquisition ship are criminals chained to their workstations, in the next book he's glad to see that his chapter's own battle barges are manned by much more enthusiastic Fenrisian serfs, essentially Vikings in space.
* ''SeventhSea'' ''TabletopGame/SeventhSea'' draws heavily upon this setting for any of its nautical adventures, especially anything involving the Pirate Nations.
* ''FurryPirates''''TabletopGame/FurryPirates''
10th Aug '16 10:06:58 PM PaulA
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* James Clavell's ''[[Literature/AsianSaga Shogun]]'' opens up in this setting. By the timeframe of ''Tai-Pan'' and ''Gai-Jin'' (early Steam Age) things had improved only a little.

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* James Clavell's ''[[Literature/AsianSaga Shogun]]'' ''Literature/{{Shogun}}'' opens up in this setting. By the timeframe of ''Tai-Pan'' ''Literature/TaiPan'' and ''Gai-Jin'' ''Literature/GaiJin'' (early Steam Age) things had improved only a little.
15th Jun '16 8:53:25 PM nombretomado
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* The Alexander Kent ''RichardBolitho'' series.

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* The Alexander Kent ''RichardBolitho'' ''Literature/RichardBolitho'' series.



* The ''{{Temeraire}}'' series is basically this, except the ships are [[DragonRider talking dragons.]] There are plenty of the standard type as well. They frequently [[InterserviceRivalry do not get along well]] with the airborne versions, and one of the leads is a navy man adjusting to dragonback service.
* While David Eddings' ''{{Belgariad}}'' depicts life at sea rather romantically, its sequel, ''The Malloreon'', paints a considerably more grim picture of the conditions driving a sailor to desert his captain. It still involves a lot of "[[TalkLikeAPirate mateys]]", though.
* The ''LordRamage'' novels of Dudley Pope.

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* The ''{{Temeraire}}'' ''Literature/{{Temeraire}}'' series is basically this, except the ships are [[DragonRider talking dragons.]] There are plenty of the standard type as well. They frequently [[InterserviceRivalry do not get along well]] with the airborne versions, and one of the leads is a navy man adjusting to dragonback service.
* While David Eddings' ''{{Belgariad}}'' ''Literature/{{Belgariad}}'' depicts life at sea rather romantically, its sequel, ''The Malloreon'', paints a considerably more grim picture of the conditions driving a sailor to desert his captain. It still involves a lot of "[[TalkLikeAPirate mateys]]", though.
* The ''LordRamage'' ''Literature/LordRamage'' novels of Dudley Pope.
16th May '16 12:33:46 PM Eievie
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[[caption-width-right:300:"[[http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2005/10/battle-trafalgar/worrall-text England expects that every man will do his duty.]]"]]

->''"Heart of oak are our ships, jolly tars are our men.''\\
''We always are ready; steady, boys, steady.''\\
''We'll fight and we'll conquer again and again!"''

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[[caption-width-right:300:"[[http://ngm.[[caption-width-right:300:[[http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2005/10/battle-trafalgar/worrall-text England "England expects that every man will do his duty.]]"]]

->''"Heart
"]]]]

->''Heart
of oak are our ships, jolly tars are our men.''\\
''We
\\
We
always are ready; steady, boys, steady.''\\
''We'll
\\
We'll
fight and we'll conquer again and again!"''again!''



Despite spending most of their life on the high seas, [[SuperDrowningSkills only a few sailors from this age could swim]]. Few captains cared to teach swimming to their men[[note]]though for the sake of cleanliness, impromptu shark-proof pools were occasionally rigged from a sail suspended in the water[[/note]], and the vast majority of sailors expected a quick death if falling into the sea - swimming would only serve to draw out their inevitable death if no help was forthcoming, as it often wasn't[[note]]what captain would halt a thousand-man ship-of-the-line-of-battle (something almost impossible to do quickly anyway) to rescue a single enlisted man who'd fallen overboard? Much less in the heat of battle?[[/note]]. The chronicles of 16th century sea-life describe swimming and free-diving as valued skills [[DancingBear because they were so rare]] - something true even in the heyday of this trope in the early nineteenth century. The state of swimming skills remained woeful at least partly because it was believed that teaching one's (largely press-ganged or shanghaied, and much-brutalised) ratings to swim would only encourage them to literally jump ship and desert when close to shore.

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Despite spending most of their life on the high seas, [[SuperDrowningSkills only a few sailors from this age could swim]]. Few captains cared to teach swimming to their men[[note]]though for the sake of cleanliness, impromptu shark-proof pools were occasionally rigged from a sail suspended in the water[[/note]], and the vast majority of sailors expected a quick death if falling into the sea - swimming sea--swimming would only serve to draw out their inevitable death if no help was forthcoming, as it often wasn't[[note]]what wasn't. [[note]]What captain would halt a thousand-man ship-of-the-line-of-battle (something almost impossible to do quickly anyway) to rescue a single enlisted man who'd fallen overboard? Much less in the heat of battle?[[/note]]. battle?[[/note]] The chronicles of 16th century sea-life describe swimming and free-diving as valued skills [[DancingBear because they were so rare]] - something rare]]--something true even in the heyday of this trope in the early nineteenth century. The state of swimming skills remained woeful at least partly because it was believed that teaching one's (largely press-ganged or shanghaied, and much-brutalised) ratings to swim would only encourage them to literally jump ship and desert when close to shore.



[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]
12th Mar '16 5:40:19 AM Mhazard
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Not to be confused with the Avalon Hill BoardGame of the same name, which is [[OlderThanTheyThink where we got the trope name]], or with SchizoTech settings where wood ships coexist with PoweredArmor. The phrase shows up at least as far back as the [[http://books.google.com/books?id=8FACAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA14&dq=wooden+ships+and+iron+men late 19th century]], making it OlderThanRadio.

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Not to be confused with the Avalon Hill BoardGame of the same name, which is [[OlderThanTheyThink where we got the trope name]], or with SchizoTech settings where wood ships coexist with PoweredArmor.PoweredArmor, or with ''ComicBook/IronMan''. The phrase shows up at least as far back as the [[http://books.google.com/books?id=8FACAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA14&dq=wooden+ships+and+iron+men late 19th century]], making it OlderThanRadio.
22nd Feb '16 11:28:35 PM LBHills
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/ThePyrates'' parodies the glorification of the era by taking all its components UpToEleven.
19th Feb '16 10:31:55 AM PaulA
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* ''TreasureIsland'' in most of its incarnations.

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* ''TreasureIsland'' ''Literature/TreasureIsland'' in most of its incarnations.
11th Feb '16 6:28:25 PM jormis29
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* The classic 1956 version of ''Literature/MobyDick'' with Gregory Peck as Ahab.

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* The classic 1956 version of ''Literature/MobyDick'' ''Film/MobyDick'' with Gregory Peck as Ahab.
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