History Main / VindicatedbyHistory

21st Feb '17 3:12:58 AM Anddrix
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* ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog'' had a large {{Hatedom}} back in the day from [[FandomRivalry SatAM fans]], and those who thought it was just bad in general. In the mid-2000s, with the rise of the YoutubePoop and several memes stemming from the show, it is now regarded as a classic due to its silly humor, SoBadItsGood nature, DerangedAnimation, and the crazy antics of Robotnik and his minions Scratch and Grounder. Scratch and Grounder themselves were even the inspiration for henchman robots that Eggman would use in further incarnations or games in the franchise, such as Orbot and Cubot, and [[Anime/SonicX Decoe and Bocoe]].

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* ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog'' had a large {{Hatedom}} hatedom back in the day from [[FandomRivalry SatAM fans]], and those who thought it was just bad in general. In the mid-2000s, with the rise of the YoutubePoop and several memes stemming from the show, it is now regarded as a classic due to its silly humor, SoBadItsGood nature, DerangedAnimation, and the crazy antics of Robotnik and his minions Scratch and Grounder. Scratch and Grounder themselves were even the inspiration for henchman robots that Eggman would use in further incarnations or games in the franchise, such as Orbot and Cubot, and [[Anime/SonicX Decoe and Bocoe]].
21st Feb '17 2:55:51 AM SenorCornholio
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* ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog'' had a large {{Hatedom}} back in the day from [[FandomRivalry SatAM fans]], and those who thought it was just bad in general. In the mid-2000s, with the rise of the YoutubePoop and several memes stemming from the show, it is now regarded as a classic due to its silly humor, SoBadItsGood nature, DerangedAnimation, and the crazy antics of Robotnik and his minions Scratch and Grounder. Scratch and Grounder themselves were even the inspiration for henchman robots that Eggman would use in further incarnations or games in the franchise, such as Orbot and Cubot.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog'' had a large {{Hatedom}} back in the day from [[FandomRivalry SatAM fans]], and those who thought it was just bad in general. In the mid-2000s, with the rise of the YoutubePoop and several memes stemming from the show, it is now regarded as a classic due to its silly humor, SoBadItsGood nature, DerangedAnimation, and the crazy antics of Robotnik and his minions Scratch and Grounder. Scratch and Grounder themselves were even the inspiration for henchman robots that Eggman would use in further incarnations or games in the franchise, such as Orbot and Cubot.Cubot, and [[Anime/SonicX Decoe and Bocoe]].
15th Feb '17 12:08:13 AM LaptopGuy
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* The Wrestling/HulkHogan vs. Wrestling/AndreTheGiant match at ''Wrestling/WrestleMania III'' was panned by critics in 1987, but all of that criticism has since been obscured by its historical importance in wrestling history and for its enormous box-office draw.

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* The Wrestling/HulkHogan vs. Wrestling/AndreTheGiant match at ''Wrestling/WrestleMania III'' was panned by critics in 1987, but all of that criticism has since been obscured by its historical importance in wrestling history and for its enormous box-office draw. The quality of the match itself, however, is still fair game.


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* It's hard to believe that Wrestling/MrFuji was an ''eleven-time'' winner of the Wrestling Observer Newsletter's "Worst Manager" award given he's today universally regarded as one of the greatest heel managers of all time.
9th Feb '17 4:16:28 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Wrestling/JohnCena spent ''years'' vilified by the smarks and hardcore fans for his stale, kiddy-pandering "Superman" gimmick. However, when Cena began to transition into a part-timer role and do other things, Wrestling/RomanReigns effectively got booked into his place with the same character. It didn't fit him. Reigns' push as the new face of the company has gone so terribly that many began to look at Cena and ''his'' push to the top more objectively. Cena was called up as part of the famous OVW class of 2002 (Lesnar, Orton, Batista, and Cena), and out of all his class, he's the one who had the least amount of help from the company. Orton and Batista joined Wrestling/{{Evolution}} with Wrestling/TripleH and Wrestling/RicFlair, while Lesnar got Wrestling/PaulHeyman and was hotshotted to the main event in his first year. Cena was left on his own, floundered, and if it hadn't been for Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon hearing him rap, might have gotten fired. Then he developed the "Doctor of Thuganomics" gimmick and spent time as a midcard heel, who became more and more popular to the point they had no choice but to turn him face and push him to the moon, especially after Lesnar left and Orton's initial face push didn't pan out well. Case in point, Cena got over ''organically'' -- it was his booking after he won his first world title that ruined him for many fans, and even then it was a testament to his talent as a performer that he managed to make such a terrible gimmick bearable and watchable for ''8 years''. When Reigns, with his manufactured push (he was the well-protected "hot tag" guy in Wrestling/TheShield, to build up his popularity) and much more inferior mic skills, got booked in his place as the chosen new face of the company, the fans shunned him to the point that they began to pine for ''Cena'', and realized that Cena was a much more talented performer than they ever gave him credit for.

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* Wrestling/JohnCena Wrestling/JohnCena:
** The wrestler
spent ''years'' vilified by the smarks and hardcore fans for his stale, kiddy-pandering "Superman" gimmick. However, when Cena began to transition into a part-timer role and do other things, Wrestling/RomanReigns effectively got booked into his place with the same character. It didn't fit him. Reigns' push as the new face of the company has gone so terribly that many began to look at Cena and ''his'' push to the top more objectively. Cena was called up as part of the famous OVW class of 2002 (Lesnar, Orton, Batista, and Cena), and out of all his class, he's the one who had the least amount of help from the company. Orton and Batista joined Wrestling/{{Evolution}} with Wrestling/TripleH and Wrestling/RicFlair, while Lesnar got Wrestling/PaulHeyman and was hotshotted to the main event in his first year. Cena was left on his own, floundered, and if it hadn't been for Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon hearing him rap, might have gotten fired. Then he developed the "Doctor of Thuganomics" gimmick and spent time as a midcard heel, who became more and more popular to the point they had no choice but to turn him face and push him to the moon, especially after Lesnar left and Orton's initial face push didn't pan out well. Case in point, Cena got over ''organically'' -- it was his booking after he won his first world title that ruined him for many fans, and even then it was a testament to his talent as a performer that he managed to make such a terrible gimmick bearable and watchable for ''8 years''. When Reigns, with his manufactured push (he was the well-protected "hot tag" guy in Wrestling/TheShield, to build up his popularity) and much more inferior mic skills, got booked in his place as the chosen new face of the company, the fans shunned him to the point that they began to pine for ''Cena'', and realized that Cena was a much more talented performer than they ever gave him credit for.
9th Feb '17 10:41:10 AM Arcana4th
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* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' became one. The game has always been loved by the fans, but all admitted that ''Visualnovel/SuperDanganRonpa2'' was an EvenBetterSequel. However, in later years, with the latest 2 installments of the franchise becoming '''massively''' polarizing(both have their own BrokenBase page) and several events of the sequel being rendered pointless or outright {{Retconned}} by ''Anime/DanganRonpa3'' while various of the survivors of the original game TookALevelInBadass, several fans have taken a new appreciation for the original game.
3rd Feb '17 8:22:19 AM Rowdycmoore
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** When Cena lost the WWE Championship to Brock Lesnar at Summerslam 2014, many hoped he would then go away for good because they didn't want to see him win the world title for a 16th time, tying Ric Flair's record. All of the aforementioned with Reigns happened after that, so when Cena DID win the title again at the 2017 Royal Rumble (in a match vs AJ Styles that many felt stole the show that night), many fans gave him cheers and respect for it.
23rd Jan '17 10:24:34 PM ZombieAladdin
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* ''Pinball/SafeCracker'' was a highly gimmicky machine: It was shorter than usual, with smaller flippers. It had a timer-based system in which once time ran out, draining the ball instantly ended your game. But most importantly, it had a token system in which you could either collect them (with 25 of them in all) or put them back into the machine to play a bonus mode called "Assault on the Vault." All of this came together for a disastrous release, with the unconventional size throwing people off, the timer-based system meaning newcomers would get hosed, and it turned out people preferred to collect tokens, and with Creator/WilliamsElectronics issuing only one run of the tokens due to low sales of the machine itself, the machines quickly ran out of tokens and whatever appeal ''Safe Cracker'' had was lost. Things changed many years later though, when, like with ''The Twilight Zone'', ''Safe Cracker'' machines entered home use. With them set to play for free, there was little loss on games that end quickly, and with these owners dedicating themselves to learning its rules and how to maximize the time bonuses (as well as discovering there were ways to restore time even after it's reached 0), as well as having access to tokens so they could play "Assault on the Vault," the games found themselves a lot more respect. It is still a ravenous and unforgiving quarter-eater though, and because of the tokens system, it is very rare to find a ''Safe Cracker'' for public play.
21st Jan '17 8:45:59 PM ZombieAladdin
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* ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'' came out a year after the well-liked ''Pinball/StarWarsEpisodeI'' and fell into obscurity as victim of a ToughActToFollow. Whereas ''Star Wars: Episode I'' used a monitor, was full of voice clips, displayed live-action footage made just for the machine, and a rather complicated set of rules, ''High Roller Casino'' used an old-fashioned dot-matrix display, the rules were seen as overly simplistic, and the miniature slot machine was unimpressive. On top of that, ''High Roller Casino'' was released in 2001, right at the nadir of modern pinball's popularity, so despite its lower price, few people were interested in putting it up for public display and thus few people had even heard of it. ''High Roller Casino'' machines were then used in competitions in 2013, where it gained new popularity now that the machine can stand on its own merits (as well as pinball players learning the machine exists) and that its rules are not so much simplistic as they are uncluttered. Much demand now exists for ''High Roller Casino'' to be included in the compilation video game ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade'', and it was indeed added in 2014.

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* ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'' came out a year after the well-liked ''Pinball/StarWarsEpisodeI'' and fell into obscurity as victim of a ToughActToFollow. Whereas ''Star Wars: Episode I'' used a monitor, was full of voice clips, displayed live-action footage made just for the machine, and a rather complicated set of rules, ''High Roller Casino'' used an old-fashioned dot-matrix display, the rules were seen as overly simplistic, and the miniature slot machine was unimpressive. On top of that, ''High Roller Casino'' was released in 2001, right at the nadir of modern pinball's popularity, so despite its lower price, few people were interested in putting it up for public display and thus few people had even heard of it. ''High Roller Casino'' machines were then used in competitions in 2013, where it gained new popularity now that the machine can stand on its own merits (as well as pinball players learning the machine exists) and that its rules are not so much simplistic as they are uncluttered. Much demand now exists for ''High Roller Casino'' to be included in the compilation video game ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade'', and it was indeed added in 2014. Meanwhile, ''Star Wars: Episode I'' became DeaderThanDisco due to its monotonous gameplay and corny acting, and it would be near impossible to find a pinball fan nowadays who prefers ''Star Wars: Episode I'' over ''High Roller Casino''.
10th Jan '17 12:35:17 PM TrollBrutal
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10th Jan '17 12:32:57 PM TrollBrutal
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[[folder:Automobiles]]
* Automobiles in general when they were first invented. Initially, people who drove them were greeted with "Get a horse!" (because they were just so expensive, repairs so troublesome, etc.[[note]] There weren't even 9000 motor-vehicles of all types in private use in Imperial Russia, population c.180 million, in 1914 (there being a further 800 military vehicles including motor-bicycles). On the other hand there were at least 2 million horses of all kinds (mounts, draft-horses, show-horses, etc).[[/note]])
* During its time, the [=DeLorean=] was a ButtMonkey and a huge commercial failure that was primarily remembered by the public due to the company's founder, John [=DeLorean=], being caught attempting to sell cocaine to keep it afloat. However, being featured as the hero car in the ''Franchise/BackToTheFuture'' film trilogy inspired a new wave of enthusiast and collector interest, and today it is a highly sought after collectable that has become iconic for TheEighties in American popular culture.
* A similar, more recent example can be how ''Series/BreakingBad'' inspired a new wave of interest and enthusiasm in the Pontiac Aztek due to its new association with the show's anti-hero protagonist, Walter White. ''Breaking Bad'' has turned the Aztek from an automotive ButtMonkey and Pontiac's CreatorKiller to "Heisenberg's Ride." (Though ironically, its Butt Monkey image was the reason why it was chosen for White in the first place). A wrecked, undrivable Aztek used in filming the series sold for $7,500 on eBay: A couple years ago, it would have been a miracle to get that sum for a serviceable Aztek.
* The AMC Pacer owes the collectable status it enjoys today to Film/WaynesWorld.
* The Daewoo Nubira was criticized at the time of launch (June 1997), but and by 2003 at launch it got a slightly better reception. Its replacement, the Lacetti/Nubira, in 2002, got a better reception but was still seen as inferior to the [[TheMinnesotaFats Opel Astra]]. Now its replacement, the Chevrolet Cruze (or the [[MarketBasedTitle Daewoo Lacetti Premiere]] in Asia and Oceania) has been criticised for being somewhat anodyne, the vehicle appears to have been VindicatedByHistory to a degree. So much so it's become an unlikely CoolCar. It probably helps that the Lacetti appeared in ''Series/TopGear'' as their second car used in the Star in a Reasonably Priced Car segments.
* In Australia, the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Escort_%28Europe%29#Australia_2 Ford Escort]] (the [=MkII=] version was the only one sold there) was never popular due to sales of large cars like the Holden Commodore and Toyota Camry, but now with the downsizing trend, it's again been vindicated by history. It's become a CultClassic again (but [[InvertedTrope on a mainstream scale]]).
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_Safrane Renault Safrane]], a luxurious hatchback with "edgy" styling. However, it's the originals (that is the Mk I, 1993-1996, and [=MkII=], 1996-2000) which have now been seen as great, if underrated cars with excellent engineering. The latest Safrane, from 2008, is [[InNameOnly unrelated to this]], and a rebadged Renault Samsung [=SM5=] / Renault Laguna.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vauxhall_Astra#Vauxhall_Astra_Mark_1 Vauxhall Astra MkI]] sold well in its time, and got good reviews, but was seen as being rather anodyne (in looks terms, anyway, given its razor-edge looks). It was similar to, but did ''not'' have the same design as the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opel_Kadett#Kadett_D_.281979.E2.80.931984.29 the Opel Kadett D (Mk4)]] with slightly different styling. It's odd that two similar vehicles with similar styling got radically different opinions by the then-contemporary motoring press. The car is a LongRunner in name terms, 31 years for the Astra name in Europe.
* The Edsel was a marketing catastrophe and, for decades, the butt of jokes and a textbook archetype of a failure. Today, though, surviving Edsels are highly collectible and run in high prices. It featured an immense amount of features, gadgets, and devices which have since become standard on almost all cars. It was simply the wrong type of car in the wrong market at the wrong time.
* Nearly every luxury car of [[TheThirties the vintage years]] was widely hated by [[TheFifties the late 1950s]] and a lot of them suffered the disgrace to be cut and lowered into hot-rods and re-engined by Buick, Packard or Chevrolet engines. The true revival of TheThirties car and the hundred-thousand-bucks restoration has been [[NewerThanTheyThink the post-1990 period]]. There was a complex of reasons behind this: the typical luxury car of the gilded [[TheThirties Thirties]] had been designed with complex maintenance in mind to cope with poor fuels, oils and metallic alloys of the time and it was exclusively sold to people who either were rich enough to employ full-time chauffeurs-mechanics or were enthusiastic enough to live with complex driving techniques and peculiar maintenance: either fixed cylinder heads that needed complete engine removal from car and dismantling to change a valve, or non-synchromesh gearboxes that could be shifted only be double-clutching, or friction dampers adjusted by tightening a nut, or mechanical brakes that required the strength of a bodybuilder, or all of them at once. The typical post-[[TheFifties Fifties]] car had more mass appeal, was easier to drive and far more reliable.
* GM's electric car of the 1990s, the [=EV1=], was deemed a failure by the company and the cars were later pulled of the street and crushed. It didn't help that the car was built in an era of cheap gasoline. The release of the documentary ''Who Killed The Electric Car'' brought much attention to the car, and people believed it was an important technological breakthrough that corporations conspired to stop. Later, the high gas prices of the late 2000s made GM regret not building a car that could have easily withstood a spike in the price of gas.
* Front-wheel-drive cars. Prior to 1960s, these configurations are not a popular choice for car manufacturing due to its serious traction issues, with a very few carmakers managed to build a number. Beginning in the late 60s, it became popular due to it being more compact than most RWD configurations and also didn't require a drivetrain. It also "moved" the trunk/boot to the back of the vehicle, giving more interior configuration possibilities. Because of that, front transverse engine configuration became popular not only in subcompacts, but also became the "default" engine layout for practically any car under 5 meters long. It now provides decent grip and most few performance hot hatches and city cars come with that for same reasons. However, it was rarely used in sports cars, still due to traction issues. Yet, Nissan managed to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_GT-R_LM_Nismo build the most extreme FWD car]], but it [[AwesomeButImpractical failed to compete in racing events]] and thus [[DevelopmentHell the project was abandoned altogether]].

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[[folder:Automobiles]]
[[folder:Comic Books]]
* Automobiles ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' wasn't a particularly strong seller in general when they the 1960s, and in the early 1970s, the title was languishing in reprints... until someone at Marvel noticed that sales were first invented. Initially, people who drove them were greeted with "Get a horse!" (because they were just so expensive, repairs so troublesome, etc.[[note]] There weren't even 9000 motor-vehicles of all types in private use in Imperial Russia, population c.180 million, in 1914 (there being a further 800 military vehicles including motor-bicycles). On going up, and decided to revamp the other hand series. The revamped title became Marvel's biggest seller.
* Creator/JackKirby's ''ComicBook/NewGods'' titles sold poorly (though
there is some controversy about just how good or bad the sales figures were at least 2 million horses of all kinds (mounts, draft-horses, show-horses, etc).[[/note]])
* During its
the time, the [=DeLorean=] was a ButtMonkey and a huge commercial failure how much of that was primarily remembered due to a line-wide price hike and format change). Since then, Kirby's work on ''New Gods'', ''Mister Miracle'' and ''The Forever People'' have become widely-acclaimed as among his very best, with characters who have been used again and again, in multiple media (e.g., ''WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'', ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'', and ''Series/{{Smallville}}''). After all, just try and think of ComicBook/TheDCU without one of its biggest, baddest bads, ComicBook/{{Darkseid}}.
* ''ComicBook/GothamCentral'' sold poorly during its monthly releases (Possibly due to it being a Batman book that rarely featured Batman). Though it has now found popularity being sold in hardcover and trade paperback.
* Back in the early 1960's, Creator/StanLee at Marvel Comics wanted to do a story about a superhero that went directly against the grain of everything that had been done before. The hero would be young enough to qualify as a teenage sidekick, would lose more often than he won, face problems that all teenagers face, get no respect, and oh,
by the public way, his powers would be those of a...''spider''. His publisher replied that no one would buy it, people like to see the heroes win, no one would want to read a comic that had some kid struggling with school and friends, and people didn't like spiders. Lee replied well, we have a comic with weird, off-beat stories that we are getting ready to cancel anyway, so can I put my little story in the last issue just to get it out of my system? The publisher was agreed, the character was featured in the last issue of Amazing Fantasy (issue number 15, in case you're wondering). A few months later, it was noticed that sales for that issue went completely through the roof. Marvel realized that maybe that little story had something to do with it, and the rest is comics history in what we know to this day as ''Franchise/SpiderMan''.
* Creator/CarlBarks who worked anonymously during his active years for Disney. Though his comics were always lucrative, he only received recognition after retiring. Comic book fans noticed that certain DonaldDuck comics were better than others, so they tracked him down and discovered who had made all those masterful comic books over the years. Luckily, Barks would live long enough to see this recognition during his lifetime.
* Some major crossovers, universally panned at first, have gone on to garner popularity. In particular, ''Maximum Carnage'' and ''ComicBook/TheCloneSaga'' have been reappraised as good despite being initially being panned. Part of this is
due to the company's founder, John [=DeLorean=], being caught attempting to sell cocaine to keep it afloat. However, being featured as the hero car in the ''Franchise/BackToTheFuture'' film trilogy inspired a new wave of enthusiast and collector interest, and today it is a highly sought after collectable that has become iconic for TheEighties in American popular culture.
* A similar, more recent example can be how ''Series/BreakingBad'' inspired a new wave of interest and enthusiasm in the Pontiac Aztek due to its new association with the show's anti-hero protagonist, Walter White. ''Breaking Bad'' has turned the Aztek from an automotive ButtMonkey and Pontiac's CreatorKiller to "Heisenberg's Ride." (Though ironically, its Butt Monkey image was the reason why it was chosen for White in the first place). A wrecked, undrivable Aztek used in filming the series sold for $7,500 on eBay: A couple years ago, it would have been a miracle to get that sum for a serviceable Aztek.
* The AMC Pacer owes the collectable status it enjoys today to Film/WaynesWorld.
* The Daewoo Nubira was criticized at the time of launch (June 1997), but and by 2003 at launch it got a
stories working slightly better reception. Its replacement, the Lacetti/Nubira, when read all at once in 2002, got a better reception but was still trade collectible, rather than one at a time over a period of months/years (many of these were written before WritingForTheTrade became a thing).
* Similarly, both ''ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis'' and ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' were given huge boosts while ''ComicBook/SinestroCorpsWar'' and ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk'' were largely treated as filler events. However, both ''Sinestro Corps'' and ''World War Hulk'' are now considered to be classics, whereas as Countdown and Civil War are
seen as inferior two of the worst big events of the 00s.
* At the same time the ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' series was running and had all of the Marvel publicity machine behind it, a small Crisis Crossover event called'' ComicBook/{{Annihilation}}'' was being published that was largely ignored by Marvel and by readers. The event also led to short-lived books for ''Comicbook/{{Nova}}'' and the ''Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', which were both cancelled due to low sales and finished out via ''Comicbook/TheThanosImperative''. While readers may have ignored these books at the time, the fact that the post-''Annihilation'' ''Guardians of the Galaxy'' run was such a huge influence on the mega hit [[Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy movie]] has since led to many people discovering the series for the first time.
* ComicBook/FinalCrisis was incredibly hard to follow back when it was released, due
to the [[TheMinnesotaFats Opel Astra]]. series' "channel flipping" method of storytelling, the ScheduleSlip that affected the essential tie-in Superman Beyond 3D, and significant Executive Meddling (particularly in regards to ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis). Now its replacement, that the Chevrolet Cruze (or the [[MarketBasedTitle Daewoo Lacetti Premiere]] in Asia and Oceania) series has been criticised for being somewhat anodyne, collected properly and the vehicle appears readership has had time to have been VindicatedByHistory to a degree. So much so properly digest it's become an unlikely CoolCar. It probably helps that the Lacetti appeared in ''Series/TopGear'' as their second car used in the Star in a Reasonably Priced Car segments.
* In Australia, the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Escort_%28Europe%29#Australia_2 Ford Escort]] (the [=MkII=] version was the only one sold there) was never popular due to sales of large cars like the Holden Commodore and Toyota Camry, but now with the downsizing trend,
contents, it's again been vindicated by history. It's become a CultClassic again (but [[InvertedTrope on a mainstream scale]]).
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_Safrane Renault Safrane]], a luxurious hatchback
much more well regarded, with "edgy" styling. However, it's the originals (that is the Mk I, 1993-1996, and [=MkII=], 1996-2000) which have now been seen as great, if underrated cars with excellent engineering. The latest Safrane, from 2008, is [[InNameOnly unrelated to this]], and a rebadged Renault Samsung [=SM5=] / Renault Laguna.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vauxhall_Astra#Vauxhall_Astra_Mark_1 Vauxhall Astra MkI]] sold well in its time, and got good reviews, but was seen as being rather anodyne (in looks terms, anyway, given its razor-edge looks). It was similar to, but did ''not'' have the same design as the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opel_Kadett#Kadett_D_.281979.E2.80.931984.29 the Opel Kadett D (Mk4)]] with slightly different styling. It's odd that two similar vehicles with similar styling got radically different opinions by the then-contemporary motoring press. The car is a LongRunner in name terms, 31 years for the Astra name in Europe.
* The Edsel was a marketing catastrophe and, for decades, the butt
number of jokes and readers considering it a textbook archetype of a failure. Today, though, surviving Edsels are highly collectible and modern classic.
* '' Comicbook/BlackPanther'':
** Comicbook/{{Christopher Priest|Comics}}'s
run in high prices. It featured an immense amount of features, gadgets, and devices which have since become standard on almost all cars. It was simply the wrong type of car in the wrong market at the wrong time.
* Nearly every luxury car of [[TheThirties the vintage years]] was widely hated by [[TheFifties the late 1950s]] and a lot of them suffered the disgrace to be cut and lowered into hot-rods and re-engined by Buick, Packard or Chevrolet engines. The true revival of TheThirties car and the hundred-thousand-bucks restoration has been [[NewerThanTheyThink the post-1990 period]]. There was a complex of reasons behind this: the typical luxury car of the gilded [[TheThirties Thirties]] had been designed with complex maintenance in mind to cope with poor fuels, oils and metallic alloys of the time and it was exclusively sold to people who either were rich enough to employ full-time chauffeurs-mechanics or were enthusiastic enough to live with complex driving techniques and peculiar maintenance: either fixed cylinder heads that needed complete engine removal from car and dismantling to change a valve, or non-synchromesh gearboxes that could be shifted only be double-clutching, or friction dampers adjusted by tightening a nut, or mechanical brakes that required the strength of a bodybuilder, or all of them at once. The typical post-[[TheFifties Fifties]] car had more mass appeal, was easier to drive and far more reliable.
* GM's electric car of the 1990s, the [=EV1=], was deemed a failure by the company and the cars were later pulled of the street and crushed. It
didn't help that sell well at the car was built in an era of cheap gasoline. The release time, but today, it's regarded as one of the documentary ''Who Killed The Electric Car'' brought much attention to the car, and people believed it was an important technological breakthrough that corporations conspired to stop. Later, the high gas prices best Marvel books of the late 2000s made GM regret not building a car 90's. Many fans even argue that could have easily withstood a spike in Priest has earned MyRealDaddy status over the price of gas.
* Front-wheel-drive cars. Prior
character at this point, and his depiction is often considered to 1960s, these configurations are not a popular choice for car manufacturing due to its serious traction issues, with a very few carmakers managed to build a number. Beginning in be the late 60s, definitive take on Black Panther.
** Likewise, while
it became popular due to it being more compact than most RWD configurations and also didn't require sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor=]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a drivetrain. major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WorldBuilding for Wakanda and flesh out T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also "moved" introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the trunk/boot first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.
* ComicBook/DeKiekeboes was considered a mere curiosity in its early run and you had to be a hardcore comic book fan to have even heard about it. After ''J. Hoste NV'' (the publisher of the comic book series) crashed the series got owned by ''De Standaard''. They originally did not really have a lot of enthousiasm for selling the comic and for a long time it was one of their least selling properties (often it would be the very final story in ''MEGA'', their comic book compilation). Its sales however continued rising and rising
to the back of the vehicle, giving more interior configuration possibilities. Because of that, front transverse engine configuration became popular not only in subcompacts, but also became the "default" engine layout for practically any car under 5 meters long. It now provides decent grip and most few performance hot hatches and city cars come with point that for same reasons. However, nowadays it was rarely used may as well outrival ComicBook/SuskeEnWiske in sports cars, still due to traction issues. Yet, Nissan managed to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_GT-R_LM_Nismo build the most extreme FWD car]], but it [[AwesomeButImpractical failed to compete in racing events]] and thus [[DevelopmentHell the project was abandoned altogether]].terms of popularity.



[[folder:Computers/Gadgets]]
* Computer sizes in general.
** The mini-computer, because people thought it would be too weak to perform anything useful.
** The personal computer, since computers were still used for business and scientific related fields, people thought that home users wouldn't have a use for one.
** Portable computers (like the 'luggable' and laptops), again, mostly because of lack of performance.
** The PDA, though this was probably from friction due to "analog" planners still being a thing.
** Netbooks, because of lack of performance.
** Tablets, because of [[OverlyLongGag lack of performance]].
* Apple got a lot of flak well into the early [=2010s=] for dropping hardware interfaces it deemed were old because they were no longer needed. A few years later, non-Apple computers start dropping those same interfaces because they were no longer needed. When the [=iPhone=] came out, people mocked at it for lacking certain things that other smartphones at the time had because Jobs said they weren't necessary. "No wireless. Less space than a nomad. Lame.", a description given by Slashdot regarding the [=iPod=], became a popular subject of MemeticMutation.
* The graphical user interface until the early [=90s=], because it used significant system resources for the time and required additional hardware; the appeal of a mouse was somewhat more limited when they cost $50 or more to buy and required a fiddly installation process, to say nothing of the hassle involved in getting an aftermarket video card to work. And even then, it wasn't until just before the turn of the millenium that doing ''everything'' from the GUI and only using a command line for troubleshooting or "power user"-type tasks became the default.
* Interpreted programming languages like Lisp, Smalltalk or Python until the '90s for [[RunningGag performance reasons]] as well. Before that, critical software was either written in assembly language or a compiled language like C. When hardware performance improved, interpreted languages were more widely used because it turned out the ''programmer productivity'' was more valuable than performance. Modern machines are tied up more by the user waiting to do something than by executing code. Interpreted languages don't have a compile cycle and avoid C's memory management bugs.

to:

[[folder:Computers/Gadgets]]
[[folder: Photography]]
* Computer sizes in general.
** The mini-computer, because people thought it would be too weak to perform anything useful.
** The personal computer, since computers were still used for business and scientific related fields, people thought that home users wouldn't have a use for one.
** Portable computers (like the 'luggable' and laptops), again, mostly because of lack of performance.
** The PDA, though this was probably from friction due to "analog" planners still being a thing.
** Netbooks, because of lack of performance.
** Tablets, because of [[OverlyLongGag lack of performance]].
* Apple got a lot of flak well into the early [=2010s=] for dropping hardware interfaces it deemed were old because they were no longer needed. A few years later, non-Apple computers start dropping those same interfaces because they were no longer needed. When the [=iPhone=] came out, people mocked at it for lacking certain things that other smartphones at the time had because Jobs said they weren't necessary. "No wireless. Less space than a nomad. Lame.", a description given by Slashdot regarding the [=iPod=], became a popular subject of MemeticMutation.
* The graphical user interface until the early [=90s=], because it used significant system resources for the time and required additional hardware; the appeal of a mouse was somewhat more limited when they cost $50 or more to buy and required a fiddly installation process, to say nothing of the hassle involved in getting an aftermarket video card to work. And even then, it wasn't
Creator/BettiePage. Almost completely unknown until just before a few decades ago, she has emerged as ''the'' Fifties pinup queen, as well as a highly memetic mascot for the turn neo-rockabilly culture currently popular in Southern California.
* The freakish photos
of the millenium that doing ''everything'' from the GUI and '50s/'60s cult photographer Creator/DianeArbus have gained a reasonably wide following only using a command line for troubleshooting or "power user"-type tasks became in the default.
* Interpreted programming languages like Lisp, Smalltalk
past decade or Python until the '90s for [[RunningGag performance reasons]] as well. Before that, critical software was either written so.
* ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivian_Maier Vivian Maier]]'' lived
in assembly language or a compiled language like C. When hardware performance improved, interpreted languages were more widely used because it turned out the ''programmer productivity'' was more valuable than performance. Modern machines are tied up more by the user waiting to do something than by executing code. Interpreted languages don't have a compile cycle obscurity unknown and avoid C's memory management bugs.unpublished, pursuing a photography as her hobby. Now she is considered a major street photographer of 20th century.



[[folder:Comic Books]]
* ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' wasn't a particularly strong seller in the 1960s, and in the early 1970s, the title was languishing in reprints... until someone at Marvel noticed that sales were going up, and decided to revamp the series. The revamped title became Marvel's biggest seller.
* Creator/JackKirby's ''ComicBook/NewGods'' titles sold poorly (though there is some controversy about just how good or bad the sales figures were at the time, and how much of that was due to a line-wide price hike and format change). Since then, Kirby's work on ''New Gods'', ''Mister Miracle'' and ''The Forever People'' have become widely-acclaimed as among his very best, with characters who have been used again and again, in multiple media (e.g., ''WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'', ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'', and ''Series/{{Smallville}}''). After all, just try and think of ComicBook/TheDCU without one of its biggest, baddest bads, ComicBook/{{Darkseid}}.
* ''ComicBook/GothamCentral'' sold poorly during its monthly releases (Possibly due to it being a Batman book that rarely featured Batman). Though it has now found popularity being sold in hardcover and trade paperback.
* Back in the early 1960's, Creator/StanLee at Marvel Comics wanted to do a story about a superhero that went directly against the grain of everything that had been done before. The hero would be young enough to qualify as a teenage sidekick, would lose more often than he won, face problems that all teenagers face, get no respect, and oh, by the way, his powers would be those of a...''spider''. His publisher replied that no one would buy it, people like to see the heroes win, no one would want to read a comic that had some kid struggling with school and friends, and people didn't like spiders. Lee replied well, we have a comic with weird, off-beat stories that we are getting ready to cancel anyway, so can I put my little story in the last issue just to get it out of my system? The publisher was agreed, the character was featured in the last issue of Amazing Fantasy (issue number 15, in case you're wondering). A few months later, it was noticed that sales for that issue went completely through the roof. Marvel realized that maybe that little story had something to do with it, and the rest is comics history in what we know to this day as ''Franchise/SpiderMan''.
* Creator/CarlBarks who worked anonymously during his active years for Disney. Though his comics were always lucrative, he only received recognition after retiring. Comic book fans noticed that certain DonaldDuck comics were better than others, so they tracked him down and discovered who had made all those masterful comic books over the years. Luckily, Barks would live long enough to see this recognition during his lifetime.
* Some major crossovers, universally panned at first, have gone on to garner popularity. In particular, ''Maximum Carnage'' and ''ComicBook/TheCloneSaga'' have been reappraised as good despite being initially being panned. Part of this is due to the stories working slightly better when read all at once in a trade collectible, rather than one at a time over a period of months/years (many of these were written before WritingForTheTrade became a thing).
* Similarly, both ''ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis'' and ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' were given huge boosts while ''ComicBook/SinestroCorpsWar'' and ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk'' were largely treated as filler events. However, both ''Sinestro Corps'' and ''World War Hulk'' are now considered to be classics, whereas as Countdown and Civil War are seen as two of the worst big events of the 00s.
* At the same time the ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' series was running and had all of the Marvel publicity machine behind it, a small Crisis Crossover event called'' ComicBook/{{Annihilation}}'' was being published that was largely ignored by Marvel and by readers. The event also led to short-lived books for ''Comicbook/{{Nova}}'' and the ''Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', which were both cancelled due to low sales and finished out via ''Comicbook/TheThanosImperative''. While readers may have ignored these books at the time, the fact that the post-''Annihilation'' ''Guardians of the Galaxy'' run was such a huge influence on the mega hit [[Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy movie]] has since led to many people discovering the series for the first time.
* ComicBook/FinalCrisis was incredibly hard to follow back when it was released, due to the series' "channel flipping" method of storytelling, the ScheduleSlip that affected the essential tie-in Superman Beyond 3D, and significant Executive Meddling (particularly in regards to ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis). Now that the series has been collected properly and the readership has had time to properly digest it's contents, it's much more well regarded, with a number of readers considering it a modern classic.
* '' Comicbook/BlackPanther'':
** Comicbook/{{Christopher Priest|Comics}}'s run didn't sell well at the time, but today, it's regarded as one of the best Marvel books of the 90's. Many fans even argue that Priest has earned MyRealDaddy status over the character at this point, and his depiction is often considered to be the definitive take on Black Panther.
** Likewise, while it didn't sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor=]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WorldBuilding for Wakanda and flesh out T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.
* ComicBook/DeKiekeboes was considered a mere curiosity in its early run and you had to be a hardcore comic book fan to have even heard about it. After ''J. Hoste NV'' (the publisher of the comic book series) crashed the series got owned by ''De Standaard''. They originally did not really have a lot of enthousiasm for selling the comic and for a long time it was one of their least selling properties (often it would be the very final story in ''MEGA'', their comic book compilation). Its sales however continued rising and rising to the point that nowadays it may as well outrival ComicBook/SuskeEnWiske in terms of popularity.

to:

[[folder:Comic Books]]
[[folder: Pinball]]
* ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' wasn't The ''Pinball/SouthPark'' pinball machine initially got a particularly strong seller in the 1960s, lot of complaints, both because of its offensive content and in the early 1970s, the title was languishing in reprints... until someone at Marvel noticed because of its layout and rules, so much so that sales were going up, and decided to revamp Creator/{{SEGA}}, the series. The revamped title became Marvel's biggest seller.
* Creator/JackKirby's ''ComicBook/NewGods'' titles sold poorly (though there is some
company that made it, quit the pinball business. Due to changing attitudes, with the controversy about over the show dying down, the ''South Park'' pinball machine now brings in good money when out in public (even where lots of kids are present), is one of the more sought-after ''South Park'' items for collectors, and is genuinely liked by pinball fans who get its numerous {{Shout Out}}s and thus why the machine plays the way it does. (It's a different story altogether for those who dislike or are indifferent to the show, however.)
* ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'' came out a year after the well-liked ''Pinball/StarWarsEpisodeI'' and fell into obscurity as victim of a ToughActToFollow. Whereas ''Star Wars: Episode I'' used a monitor, was full of voice clips, displayed live-action footage made
just how good or bad for the sales figures machine, and a rather complicated set of rules, ''High Roller Casino'' used an old-fashioned dot-matrix display, the rules were seen as overly simplistic, and the miniature slot machine was unimpressive. On top of that, ''High Roller Casino'' was released in 2001, right at the time, nadir of modern pinball's popularity, so despite its lower price, few people were interested in putting it up for public display and how thus few people had even heard of it. ''High Roller Casino'' machines were then used in competitions in 2013, where it gained new popularity now that the machine can stand on its own merits (as well as pinball players learning the machine exists) and that its rules are not so much of simplistic as they are uncluttered. Much demand now exists for ''High Roller Casino'' to be included in the compilation video game ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade'', and it was indeed added in 2014.
* ''Pinball/TheTwilightZone'' is so well-liked among pinball fans
that it may be hard to believe that it was due to a line-wide price hike not that popular when it was new. It currently ranks at or near the top of lists on various pinball sites. The result of Creator/PatLawlor getting ''carte blanche'' privileges after the success of ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'', the machine is crammed full of things and format change). Since then, Kirby's work on ''New Gods'', ''Mister Miracle'' has among the most complicated sets of rules to have ever been in a pinball game, even compared to today's digital pinball. It was this complicatedness, and [[NintendoHard ruthless difficulty]], that scared passers-by away from playing more than a few games before swearing it off. In addition, because it had so many parts, it broke down easily and frequently, the game designed in such a way that if even one thing is slightly below maximum capacity, the game was rendered barely playable. ''The Forever People'' have become widely-acclaimed Twilight Zone'' only started getting respect when large amounts of them started entering private use. As the player can play it as among his very best, with characters who have been used again much as he or she wishes, the complicated rules go from intimidating to a source of tremendous ReplayValue, and again, if it ever breaks, the owner is always on hand to act upon it.
* ''Pinball/IronMan'' was a rather rapid case of this. Released
in multiple media (e.g., ''WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'', ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'', and ''Series/{{Smallville}}''). After all, just try and think 2009, this was Creator/SternPinball's opposite of ComicBook/TheDCU without one ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'': coming off a series of its biggest, baddest bads, ComicBook/{{Darkseid}}.
* ''ComicBook/GothamCentral'' sold poorly during its monthly
mediocre releases (Possibly due to it being a Batman book that rarely featured Batman). Though it has now found popularity being sold in hardcover like ''Pinball/{{NBA}}'' and trade paperback.
* Back in the early 1960's, Creator/StanLee at Marvel Comics wanted to do a story about a superhero that went directly against the grain of everything that had been done before. The hero would be young enough to qualify as a teenage sidekick, would lose more often than he won, face problems that all teenagers face, get no respect, and oh, by the way, his powers would be those of a...''spider''. His publisher replied that no one would buy it,
''24'', people like to see did not think too highly of the heroes win, no one would want to read a comic that had some kid struggling with school straightforward playfield layout of ''Iron Man'', which made operators and friends, and people home buyers alike hesitant to buy ''Iron Man''. It didn't like spiders. Lee replied well, we have a comic with weird, off-beat stories help that we are getting ready to cancel anyway, the build quality was so can I put my poor that the screws would come loose in as little story in the last issue just to get it out of my system? The publisher was agreed, the character was featured in the last issue of Amazing Fantasy (issue number 15, in case you're wondering). A few months later, it was noticed that sales for that issue went completely through the roof. Marvel realized that maybe that little story had something to do with it, and the rest is comics history in what we know to this day as ''Franchise/SpiderMan''.
* Creator/CarlBarks who worked anonymously during his active years for Disney. Though his comics were always lucrative, he only received recognition after retiring. Comic book fans noticed that certain DonaldDuck comics were better than others, so they tracked him down and discovered who had made all those masterful comic books over the years. Luckily, Barks would live long enough to see this recognition during his lifetime.
* Some major crossovers, universally panned at first, have gone on to garner popularity. In particular, ''Maximum Carnage'' and ''ComicBook/TheCloneSaga'' have been reappraised as good despite being initially being panned. Part of this is due to the stories working slightly better when read all at once in a trade collectible, rather than one at a time over a period of months/years (many of these were written before WritingForTheTrade became a thing).
* Similarly, both ''ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis'' and ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' were given huge boosts while ''ComicBook/SinestroCorpsWar'' and ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk'' were largely treated as filler events.
six months. However, both ''Sinestro Corps'' eventually, people modded their ''Iron Man'' machines for increased sturdiness and ''World War Hulk'' are now considered to be classics, whereas as Countdown and Civil War are seen as two of the worst big events of the 00s.
* At the same time the ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' series was running and had all of the Marvel publicity machine behind it, a small Crisis Crossover event called'' ComicBook/{{Annihilation}}'' was being published
found that was largely ignored by Marvel and by readers. The event also led to short-lived books for ''Comicbook/{{Nova}}'' its rules complemented its play-field very well, and the ''Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', which were both cancelled due to low sales and finished out via ''Comicbook/TheThanosImperative''. While readers may have ignored these books at the time, the fact that the post-''Annihilation'' ''Guardians of the Galaxy'' run was such a huge influence on the mega hit [[Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy movie]] has since led to many people discovering the series game eventually became popular enough for the first time.
* ComicBook/FinalCrisis was incredibly hard
Stern to follow back when it was released, due to the series' "channel flipping" method of storytelling, the ScheduleSlip that affected the essential tie-in Superman Beyond 3D, and significant Executive Meddling (particularly issue a re-release in regards to ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis). Now that the series has been collected properly and the readership has had time to properly digest it's contents, it's much more well regarded, with a number of readers considering it a modern classic.
* '' Comicbook/BlackPanther'':
** Comicbook/{{Christopher Priest|Comics}}'s run didn't sell well at the time, but today, it's regarded as one of the best Marvel books of the 90's. Many fans even argue that Priest has earned MyRealDaddy status over the character at this point, and his depiction is often considered to be the definitive take on Black Panther.
** Likewise, while it didn't sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor=]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WorldBuilding for Wakanda and flesh out T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.
* ComicBook/DeKiekeboes was considered a mere curiosity in its early run and you had to be a hardcore comic book fan to have even heard about it. After ''J. Hoste NV'' (the publisher of the comic book series) crashed the series got owned by ''De Standaard''. They originally did not really have a lot of enthousiasm for selling the comic and for a long time it was one of their least selling properties (often it would be the very final story in ''MEGA'', their comic book compilation). Its sales however continued rising and rising to the point that nowadays it may as well outrival ComicBook/SuskeEnWiske in terms of popularity.
2014.



[[folder: Photography]]
* Creator/BettiePage. Almost completely unknown until just a few decades ago, she has emerged as ''the'' Fifties pinup queen, as well as a highly memetic mascot for the neo-rockabilly culture currently popular in Southern California.
* The freakish photos of '50s/'60s cult photographer Creator/DianeArbus have gained a reasonably wide following only in the past decade or so.
* ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivian_Maier Vivian Maier]]'' lived in obscurity unknown and unpublished, pursuing a photography as her hobby. Now she is considered a major street photographer of 20th century.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Pinball]]
* The ''Pinball/SouthPark'' pinball machine initially got a lot of complaints, both because of its offensive content and because of its layout and rules, so much so that Creator/{{SEGA}}, the company that made it, quit the pinball business. Due to changing attitudes, with the controversy over the show dying down, the ''South Park'' pinball machine now brings in good money when out in public (even where lots of kids are present), is one of the more sought-after ''South Park'' items for collectors, and is genuinely liked by pinball fans who get its numerous {{Shout Out}}s and thus why the machine plays the way it does. (It's a different story altogether for those who dislike or are indifferent to the show, however.)
* ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'' came out a year after the well-liked ''Pinball/StarWarsEpisodeI'' and fell into obscurity as victim of a ToughActToFollow. Whereas ''Star Wars: Episode I'' used a monitor, was full of voice clips, displayed live-action footage made just for the machine, and a rather complicated set of rules, ''High Roller Casino'' used an old-fashioned dot-matrix display, the rules were seen as overly simplistic, and the miniature slot machine was unimpressive. On top of that, ''High Roller Casino'' was released in 2001, right at the nadir of modern pinball's popularity, so despite its lower price, few people were interested in putting it up for public display and thus few people had even heard of it. ''High Roller Casino'' machines were then used in competitions in 2013, where it gained new popularity now that the machine can stand on its own merits (as well as pinball players learning the machine exists) and that its rules are not so much simplistic as they are uncluttered. Much demand now exists for ''High Roller Casino'' to be included in the compilation video game ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade'', and it was indeed added in 2014.
* ''Pinball/TheTwilightZone'' is so well-liked among pinball fans that it may be hard to believe that it was not that popular when it was new. It currently ranks at or near the top of lists on various pinball sites. The result of Creator/PatLawlor getting ''carte blanche'' privileges after the success of ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'', the machine is crammed full of things and has among the most complicated sets of rules to have ever been in a pinball game, even compared to today's digital pinball. It was this complicatedness, and [[NintendoHard ruthless difficulty]], that scared passers-by away from playing more than a few games before swearing it off. In addition, because it had so many parts, it broke down easily and frequently, the game designed in such a way that if even one thing is slightly below maximum capacity, the game was rendered barely playable. ''The Twilight Zone'' only started getting respect when large amounts of them started entering private use. As the player can play it as much as he or she wishes, the complicated rules go from intimidating to a source of tremendous ReplayValue, and if it ever breaks, the owner is always on hand to act upon it.
* ''Pinball/IronMan'' was a rather rapid case of this. Released in 2009, this was Creator/SternPinball's opposite of ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'': coming off a series of mediocre releases like ''Pinball/{{NBA}}'' and ''24'', people did not think too highly of the straightforward playfield layout of ''Iron Man'', which made operators and home buyers alike hesitant to buy ''Iron Man''. It didn't help that the build quality was so poor that the screws would come loose in as little as six months. However, eventually, people modded their ''Iron Man'' machines for increased sturdiness and found that its rules complemented its play-field very well, and the game eventually became popular enough for Stern to issue a re-release in 2014.
[[/folder]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 399. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.VindicatedbyHistory