History Main / VideoGameMoviesSuck

31st May '16 7:17:52 AM TheKaizerreich
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. While this isn't by itself an insurmountable problem (it's the same issue faced with every [[TheFilmOfTheBook adaptation of a novel]], for example), it is one more thing that can go wrong. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative.

to:

Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. While this isn't by itself an insurmountable problem (it's the same issue faced with every [[TheFilmOfTheBook adaptation of a novel]], for example), it is one more thing that can go wrong. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative.
narrative (even though it is based on a LightNovel called ''LightNovel/AllYouNeedIsKill'').
2nd Apr '16 3:31:56 PM SSJMagus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative.

to:

Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. While this isn't by itself an insurmountable problem (it's the same issue faced with every [[TheFilmOfTheBook adaptation of a novel]], for example), it is one more thing that can go wrong. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative.
9th Mar '16 3:52:48 PM rjd1922
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Animated adaptations of video games also tend to be received more favorably than their live-action counterparts, perhaps because a medium as focused on zaniness and stylized aesthetics as animation is just better suited to the often eccentric, strange and overall unrealistic kinds of stories and settings of most video games. Also, the fact that animated movies are produced with methods similar to those used for video game cutscenes helps, in that they can -- at the very least -- have the merit of being visually faithful to the source material.

to:

Animated adaptations {{Animated adaptation}}s of video games also tend to be received more favorably than their live-action counterparts, perhaps because a medium as focused on zaniness and stylized aesthetics as animation is just better suited to the often eccentric, strange and overall unrealistic kinds of stories and settings of most video games. Also, the fact that animated movies are produced with methods similar to those used for video game cutscenes helps, in that they can -- at the very least -- have the merit of being visually faithful to the source material.
28th Oct '15 1:51:22 AM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


->''The movie has been "inspired by" the [[VideoGame/{{Doom}} famous video game]]. No, I haven't played it, and I never will, but I know how it feels not to play it, because I've seen the movie. Film/{{Doom}} is like some kid came over and is using your computer and won't let you play.''

to:

->''The
->''"The
movie has been "inspired by" 'inspired by' the [[VideoGame/{{Doom}} famous video game]]. No, I haven't played it, and I never will, but I know how it feels not to play it, because I've seen the movie. Film/{{Doom}} is like some kid came over and is using your computer and won't let you play.''"''
14th Oct '15 12:21:18 PM Soldancer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


There are also filmmakers and directors that know a popular game series but they barely understand ''why'' the series are popular to begin with. Rather than contacting the developers that produced the games to get their advice or even asking the fans themselves for help, the filmmakers decide to just wing it and try to interpret the popularity from their own point of view, which can cause fans who see the final product to groan and face palm as they watch a film that they think was made by someone who has zero knowledge on the subject matter and material. This is usually caused by filmmakers and publishers that just want to cash in on the brand name of a famous series, though not all people do this.

to:

There are also filmmakers and directors that know a popular game series but they barely understand ''why'' the series are is popular to begin with. Rather than contacting the developers that produced the games to get their advice or even asking the fans themselves for help, the filmmakers decide to just wing it and try to interpret the popularity from their own point of view, which can cause fans who see the final product to groan and face palm as they watch a film that they think was made by someone who has zero knowledge on the subject matter and material. This is usually caused by filmmakers and publishers that just want to cash in on the brand name of a famous series, though not all people do this.
24th Sep '15 5:00:49 PM Tightwire
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It's kind of hard to say why. Some would say that video games mostly involve getting from Point A to Point B and thus their plots end up as simplistic, existing just to give the player an [[ExcusePlot excuse]] to go out and fight things. Others would say that video games are essentially just movies that have showmanship sacrificed in favor of control, so sacrificing the control leaves you with a bad movie. Maybe directors just invariably pick the wrong games. After all, if the game itself is bad, then it's not surprising if its adaptation is bad too.

to:

It's kind of hard to say why. Some would say that video games mostly involve getting from Point A to Point B and thus their plots end up as simplistic, existing just to give the player an [[ExcusePlot excuse]] to go out and fight things. Others would say that video games are essentially just movies that have showmanship sacrificed in favor of control, so sacrificing the control leaves you with a bad movie. Maybe directors just invariably pick the wrong games. After all, if the game itself is bad, then it's not surprising if its adaptation is bad too.
too. Maybe there's too much reliance on the popularity of the game to sell the movie, rather than writing quality.
19th May '15 5:29:03 AM REV6Pilot
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Animated adaptations of video games also tend to be received more favorably than their live-action counterparts, perhaps because a medium as focused on zaniness and stylized aesthetics as animation is just better suited to the often eccentric, strange and overall unrealistic kinds of stories and settings of most video games. Also, the fact that animated movies are produced with methods similar to those used for video game cutscenes helps, in that they can -- at the very least -- have the merit of being visually faithful to the source material. Contrast TheProblemWithLicensedGames

to:

Animated adaptations of video games also tend to be received more favorably than their live-action counterparts, perhaps because a medium as focused on zaniness and stylized aesthetics as animation is just better suited to the often eccentric, strange and overall unrealistic kinds of stories and settings of most video games. Also, the fact that animated movies are produced with methods similar to those used for video game cutscenes helps, in that they can -- at the very least -- have the merit of being visually faithful to the source material. Contrast TheProblemWithLicensedGames
material.
7th May '15 6:01:34 AM videogmer314
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[-[[caption-width-right:349: Notice how [[SoOkayItsAverage approval of 50%]] counts as being among "the best". And [[Film/FinalFantasyTheSpiritsWithin one of those]] is even InNameOnly related to a game.]]-]

to:

[-[[caption-width-right:349: Notice how [[SoOkayItsAverage approval of 50%]] 50% approval]] counts as being among "the best". And [[Film/FinalFantasyTheSpiritsWithin [[Anime/FinalFantasyTheSpiritsWithin one of those]] is even InNameOnly them]] is [[InNameOnly only nominally]] related to a game.]]-]
22nd Apr '15 10:09:14 AM igordebraga
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[-[[caption-width-right:349: Notice how [[SoOkayItsAverage approval of 50%]] counts as being among "the best". And [[Film/FinalFantasyTheSpiritsWithin one of those]] is even InNameOnly related to a game.]]-]
22nd Apr '15 10:06:27 AM igordebraga
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative.

to:

Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative.
This list shows the last 10 events of 27. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.VideoGameMoviesSuck