History Main / VideoGameMoviesSuck

25th Oct '17 5:31:28 PM mlsmithca
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The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph setup]] [[AllThereInTheManual in the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with {{multiple endings}} depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse of having a "tournament that decides the fate of humanity" with all playable characters being required to be sympathetic enough for players to want to play as any one of them, with an ending for each one, but movie writers need to pick just one hero and winner out of a dozen, which is going to tick off the other 11 fans.

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The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph setup]] [[AllThereInTheManual in the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with {{multiple endings}} MultipleEndings depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse of having a "tournament 'tournament that decides the fate of humanity" with all humanity', and ALL playable characters being required need to be sympathetic enough for players to want to play as any one of them, with an ending for each one, but movie writers need to pick just one hero and winner out of a dozen, which is going to tick off fans of the other 11 fans.
eleven.
18th Sep '17 8:54:11 AM Mario500
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The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph setup]] [[AllThereInTheManual in the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with {{multiple endings}} depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse 'tournament that decides the fate of humanity', and ALL playable characters need to be sympathetic enough for players to want to play as any one of them, with an ending for each one, but movie writers need to pick just one hero and winner out of a dozen, which is going to tick off the other 11 fans.

to:

The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph setup]] [[AllThereInTheManual in the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with {{multiple endings}} depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse 'tournament of having a "tournament that decides the fate of humanity', and ALL humanity" with all playable characters need being required to be sympathetic enough for players to want to play as any one of them, with an ending for each one, but movie writers need to pick just one hero and winner out of a dozen, which is going to tick off the other 11 fans.
18th Mar '17 2:19:58 PM Tightwire
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It's kind of hard to say why. Some would say that video games mostly involve getting from Point A to Point B and thus their plots end up as simplistic, existing just to give the player an [[ExcusePlot excuse]] to go out and fight things. Others would say that video games are essentially just movies that have showmanship sacrificed in favor of control, so sacrificing the control leaves you with a bad movie. Maybe directors just invariably pick the wrong games. After all, if the game itself is bad, then it's not surprising if its adaptation is bad too. Maybe there's too much reliance on the popularity of the game to sell the movie, rather than writing quality.

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It's kind of hard to say why. Some would say that the plots of most video games mostly involve getting from Point A are just too simplistic to Point B and thus their plots end up as simplistic, translate into a movie, existing just to give the player an [[ExcusePlot excuse]] to go out and fight things. Others would say that video games are essentially just movies that have showmanship sacrificed in favor of control, so sacrificing the control leaves you with a bad movie. Maybe directors just invariably pick the wrong games. After all, if genre - an FPS is exciting but doesn't exactly put effort into CharacterDevelopment when that character is meant to be the game itself is bad, then it's not surprising if its adaptation is bad too.player. Maybe there's too much reliance on the popularity of the game to sell the movie, rather than writing quality.
12th Mar '17 11:46:14 AM KingOdin
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Added DiffLines:

Another possible contributor to the lackluster reception of video-game-based movies is not necessarily that they're bad, as [[CriticalDissonance Critical Dissonance]] demonstrates in a few instances, but that the current generation of movie reviewers and critics didn't grow up with video games (see the Roger Ebert quote above) and thus can't better appreciate said films without experience with their source material, similar to the situation with comic book-based films.
20th Nov '16 4:54:18 PM Tightwire
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The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph setup]] [[AllThereInTheManual in the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with {{multiple endings}} depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse 'tournament that decides the fate of humanity', with an ending for any one of them winning, but the movie writers need to pick just one character of a dozen and mash all the characters' reasons to be there together, somehow.

to:

The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph setup]] [[AllThereInTheManual in the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with {{multiple endings}} depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse 'tournament that decides the fate of humanity', and ALL playable characters need to be sympathetic enough for players to want to play as any one of them, with an ending for any one of them winning, each one, but the movie writers need to pick just one character hero and winner out of a dozen and mash all dozen, which is going to tick off the characters' reasons to be there together, somehow.
other 11 fans.
20th Nov '16 4:48:14 PM Tightwire
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The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph setup]] [[AllThereInTheManual in the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with {{multiple endings}} depending on the player's character, and the writers have to mishmash these various plot threads into a coherent whole.

to:

The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph setup]] [[AllThereInTheManual in the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with {{multiple endings}} depending on the player's character, and the character. Game writers have tend to mishmash these various plot threads into use the excuse 'tournament that decides the fate of humanity', with an ending for any one of them winning, but the movie writers need to pick just one character of a coherent whole.
dozen and mash all the characters' reasons to be there together, somehow.
31st May '16 7:17:52 AM TheKaizerreich
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Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. While this isn't by itself an insurmountable problem (it's the same issue faced with every [[TheFilmOfTheBook adaptation of a novel]], for example), it is one more thing that can go wrong. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative.

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Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. While this isn't by itself an insurmountable problem (it's the same issue faced with every [[TheFilmOfTheBook adaptation of a novel]], for example), it is one more thing that can go wrong. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative.
narrative (even though it is based on a LightNovel called ''LightNovel/AllYouNeedIsKill'').
2nd Apr '16 3:31:56 PM SSJMagus
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Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative.

to:

Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. While this isn't by itself an insurmountable problem (it's the same issue faced with every [[TheFilmOfTheBook adaptation of a novel]], for example), it is one more thing that can go wrong. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative.
9th Mar '16 3:52:48 PM rjd1922
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Animated adaptations of video games also tend to be received more favorably than their live-action counterparts, perhaps because a medium as focused on zaniness and stylized aesthetics as animation is just better suited to the often eccentric, strange and overall unrealistic kinds of stories and settings of most video games. Also, the fact that animated movies are produced with methods similar to those used for video game cutscenes helps, in that they can -- at the very least -- have the merit of being visually faithful to the source material.

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Animated adaptations {{Animated adaptation}}s of video games also tend to be received more favorably than their live-action counterparts, perhaps because a medium as focused on zaniness and stylized aesthetics as animation is just better suited to the often eccentric, strange and overall unrealistic kinds of stories and settings of most video games. Also, the fact that animated movies are produced with methods similar to those used for video game cutscenes helps, in that they can -- at the very least -- have the merit of being visually faithful to the source material.
28th Oct '15 1:51:22 AM eroock
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->''The movie has been "inspired by" the [[VideoGame/{{Doom}} famous video game]]. No, I haven't played it, and I never will, but I know how it feels not to play it, because I've seen the movie. Film/{{Doom}} is like some kid came over and is using your computer and won't let you play.''

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->''The
->''"The
movie has been "inspired by" 'inspired by' the [[VideoGame/{{Doom}} famous video game]]. No, I haven't played it, and I never will, but I know how it feels not to play it, because I've seen the movie. Film/{{Doom}} is like some kid came over and is using your computer and won't let you play.''"''
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