History Main / VideoGameMoviesSuck

27th May '18 6:44:53 PM QuizzicalPieridine
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As of April 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a whopping... 50%. Along with ''Film/TombRaider2018'' (49%), it's the only movie to rank higher than the ones in [[http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/117/1170228/Video-Game-Movies-01_1306370375.jpg our page image]].

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As of April May 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a whopping... 50%.52%. Along with ''Film/TombRaider2018'' (49%), it's the only movie to rank higher than the ones in [[http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/117/1170228/Video-Game-Movies-01_1306370375.jpg our page image]].
5th May '18 7:03:13 PM RacattackForce
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The situation is similar to what was the case with superhero movies and shows: poor understanding of the comics led to poor adaptations, until the people who actually grew up reading the comics got good standing in the movie business and helped drive the current train of popular and critically acclaimed superhero films.

So far, no one's nominating video game movies for Oscars. If you hear new, exciting rumors about an upcoming film (like the rumored Creator/JohnWoo-directed ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' movie), tread carefully, or you may be crushed beneath the {{descending ceiling}} of bad writing.

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The situation is similar to what was the case with most superhero movies and shows: films prior to ''Film/SpiderMan'': poor understanding of the comics led to poor adaptations, until the people who actually grew up reading the comics got good standing in the movie business and helped drive the current train of popular and critically acclaimed superhero films.

So far, no one's nominating video game movies for Oscars. If you hear new, exciting rumors about an upcoming film (like the rumored once-rumored Creator/JohnWoo-directed ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' movie), tread carefully, or you may be crushed beneath the {{descending ceiling}} of bad writing.
5th May '18 6:52:22 PM RacattackForce
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The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus many don't require plot within the games themselves outside [[ExcusePlot a few minutes of setup]] that may even be hidden [[AllThereInTheManual within the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} may offer an hour or two of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature enough hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with MultipleEndings depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse of a 'tournament that decides the fate of humanity', and ALL playable characters need to be sympathetic enough for players to want to play as any one of them, with an ending for each one, but movie writers need to pick just one hero and winner out of a dozen, which is going to tick off fans of the other eleven.

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The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus many don't require plot within the games themselves outside [[ExcusePlot a few minutes of setup]] that (that may even be hidden [[AllThereInTheManual within the manual]] in older games) and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), ending]], so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} may offer an hour or two of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature enough hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with MultipleEndings depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse of a 'tournament that decides the fate of humanity', and ALL playable characters need to be sympathetic enough for players to want to play as any one of them, with an ending for each one, but movie writers need to pick just one hero and winner out of a dozen, which is going to tick off fans of the other eleven.
23rd Apr '18 11:29:34 PM RacattackForce
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The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph setup]] [[AllThereInTheManual in the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with MultipleEndings depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse of a 'tournament that decides the fate of humanity', and ALL playable characters need to be sympathetic enough for players to want to play as any one of them, with an ending for each one, but movie writers need to pick just one hero and winner out of a dozen, which is going to tick off fans of the other eleven.

Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. While this isn't by itself an insurmountable problem (it's the same issue faced with every [[TheFilmOfTheBook adaptation of a novel]], for example), it is one more thing that can go wrong. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative (the author of source material ''LightNovel/AllYouNeedIsKill'' admitted he wrote it inspired by his gaming experiences). ''Film/JumanjiWelcomeToTheJungle'' was another film with significant videogame elements such as finite lives that fared well commercially and critically.

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The reality? Well, it tends to vary. [[PlatformGame Platform games]] tend to be about getting from A to B, and thus many don't require plot within the games themselves (maybe outside [[ExcusePlot a three paragraph few minutes of setup]] that may even be hidden [[AllThereInTheManual in within the manual]] and a [[AWinnerIsYou two minute ending]]), so the writers need to improvise. The average {{first person shooter}} has a few minutes may offer an hour or two of narrative cinematics, but even the more cerebral examples of the genre will, [[NecessaryWeasel by definition]], feature enough hours of [[MoreDakka plot-free gunplay]] to rival the dumbest {{summer blockbuster}}. [[FightingGame Fighting games]] tend to have a similarly flimsy plot with MultipleEndings depending on the player's character. Game writers tend to use the excuse of a 'tournament that decides the fate of humanity', and ALL playable characters need to be sympathetic enough for players to want to play as any one of them, with an ending for each one, but movie writers need to pick just one hero and winner out of a dozen, which is going to tick off fans of the other eleven.

Conversely, the only video game genres that consistently pay much attention to plot ([[RolePlayingGame RPGs]], {{action adventure}} and {{adventure game}}s) tend to have far ''too much'' plot to squeeze into a two hour flick without [[CompressedAdaptation leaving a ton out]]. While this isn't by itself an insurmountable problem (it's the same issue faced with every [[TheFilmOfTheBook adaptation of a novel]], for example), it is one more thing that can go wrong. Additionally, there is the problem of translating a story from the interactive medium of video games into the non interactive medium of film. In video games, a story is told [[SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration through the player's own choices and interactions with the game]]. By nature, films do not tell stories in this way, which causes great confusion for screenwriters who are tasked with somehow translating seemingly "plotless gameplay" into a linear narrative. Some Not that this is impossible, as some [[http://www.wired.com/2014/06/edge-of-tomorrow-review/ even praised]] ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' for successfully translating video game features such as RespawnPoint and TrialAndErrorGameplay into a film narrative (the author of source material ''LightNovel/AllYouNeedIsKill'' admitted he wrote it inspired by his gaming experiences). ''Film/JumanjiWelcomeToTheJungle'' was another film with significant videogame elements such as finite lives that fared well commercially and critically.
18th Apr '18 3:02:07 PM igordebraga
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As of April 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a whopping... 50%.

to:

As of April 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a whopping... 50%. Along with ''Film/TombRaider2018'' (49%), it's the only movie to rank higher than the ones in [[http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/117/1170228/Video-Game-Movies-01_1306370375.jpg our page image]].
15th Apr '18 1:49:43 PM Saveelich
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As of April 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a whopping... 50%. It is slightly followed by the ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' reboot, 49%.

to:

As of April 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a whopping... 50%. It is slightly followed by the ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' reboot, 49%.
13th Apr '18 8:21:52 PM igordebraga
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For some reasons (such as less risk-taking/far-fetched plot than other genres or a high immunity to {{gameplay and story segregation}} effect), [[DatingSim Dating sim]] movies (rare as they may be) seem exempt from this, although as with anything, there are exceptions.

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For some reasons (such as less risk-taking/far-fetched plot than other genres or a high immunity to {{gameplay and story segregation}} effect), [[DatingSim Dating sim]] DatingSim movies (rare as they may be) seem exempt from this, although as with anything, there are exceptions.



Another possible contributor to the lackluster reception of video-game-based movies is not necessarily that they're bad, as [[CriticalDissonance Critical Dissonance]] demonstrates in a few instances, but that the current generation of movie reviewers and critics didn't grow up with video games (see the Roger Ebert quote above) and thus can't better appreciate said films without experience with their source material, similar to the situation with comic book-based films. Or, in some cases, said generation outright developed bias against video games, seing them as the lowest common denominator in the entertainment industry, ranging from "they're decerebrating" to "they encourage violent behaviours".

As of March 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is the ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' reboot with a whopping... 50%. It was later topped by ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a 53% score on Rotten Tomatoes as of April 2018.

to:

Another possible contributor to the lackluster reception of video-game-based movies is not necessarily that they're bad, as [[CriticalDissonance Critical Dissonance]] CriticalDissonance demonstrates in a few instances, but that the current generation of movie reviewers and critics didn't grow up with video games (see the Roger Ebert quote above) and thus can't better appreciate said films without experience with their source material, similar to the situation with comic book-based films. Or, in some cases, said generation outright developed bias against video games, seing them as the lowest common denominator in the entertainment industry, ranging from "they're decerebrating" to "they encourage violent behaviours".

As of March April 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is the ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' reboot ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a whopping... 50%. It was later topped is slightly followed by ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a 53% score on Rotten Tomatoes as of April 2018.the ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' reboot, 49%.
12th Apr '18 7:14:05 PM QuizzicalPieridine
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As of March 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is the ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' reboot with a whopping... 50%.

to:

As of March 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is the ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' reboot with a whopping... 50%. It was later topped by ''Film/{{Rampage|2018}}'', with a 53% score on Rotten Tomatoes as of April 2018.
28th Mar '18 5:47:28 AM AndyLA
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As of March 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' with a whopping... 50%.

to:

As of March 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is the ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' reboot with a whopping... 50%.
21st Mar '18 3:22:53 PM darkchiefy
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As of March 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' with a whopping... 51%.

to:

As of March 2018, the highest-rated video game movie by Rotten Tomatoes is ''Film/{{Tomb Raider|2018}}'' with a whopping... 51%.50%.
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