History Main / UriahGambit

23rd Sep '16 4:08:23 AM Morgenthaler
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* In Creator/AgathaChristie's ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'', General John [=MacArthur=] had used a similar method to dispose of his wife Leslie's lover Arthur Richmond (who also was his NumberTwo) during WorldWarI. Afterward he avoided attending church whenever the David and Bathsheba story was scheduled to be read, and Leslie later succumbed to DeathByDespair. Otherwise, it went so well that even Scotland Yard detectives, told afterwards that murder is involved, cannot be sure that it really is. [[spoiler: Too bad a certain HangingJudge ''and'' MagnificentBastard got notice of it and decided to murder him, alongside other {{Karma Houdini}}s.]]

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* In Creator/AgathaChristie's ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'', General John [=MacArthur=] had used a similar method to dispose of his wife Leslie's lover Arthur Richmond (who also was his NumberTwo) during WorldWarI.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Afterward he avoided attending church whenever the David and Bathsheba story was scheduled to be read, and Leslie later succumbed to DeathByDespair. Otherwise, it went so well that even Scotland Yard detectives, told afterwards that murder is involved, cannot be sure that it really is. [[spoiler: Too bad a certain HangingJudge ''and'' MagnificentBastard got notice of it and decided to murder him, alongside other {{Karma Houdini}}s.]]
10th Sep '16 2:58:35 PM Astaroth
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* The demon lord Belial makes use of this trope in ''Videogame/DiabloIII'', using his influence over the government of Caldeum to arrange pointless and dangerous missions in the desert for the Iron Wolves, the Emperor's PraetorianGuard, then replaces those who do not return with his own agents. He also baits a trap for the heroes with one of his own minions, who feels UndyingLoyalty to him but [[YouHaveFailedMe frustrates him with constant failures]], apparently not caring whether or not she survives.
10th Sep '16 11:54:24 AM Discar
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* A massive one forms the climax of ''Literature/TheWayOfKings'', where [[SmugSnake Sadeas]] [[spoiler:arranges a joint operation with Dalinar using his own bridges to cross the chasms, and then retreats and leaves Dalinar's army to die]]. Fortunately [[BadassCrew Bridge Four]] is on hand with a [[TheMagicComesBack secret weapon]], and the gambit backfires.

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* ''Literature/TheWayOfKings'' (first book of ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive''): A massive one forms the climax of ''Literature/TheWayOfKings'', climax, where [[SmugSnake Sadeas]] [[spoiler:arranges a joint operation with Dalinar using his own bridges to cross the chasms, and then retreats and leaves Dalinar's army to die]]. Fortunately [[BadassCrew Bridge Four]] is on hand with a [[TheMagicComesBack secret weapon]], and the gambit backfires.
3rd Sep '16 6:34:01 PM Grobi
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* In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic II'', you find out that the Battle of Malachor V was like this too, at least according to HK-47. Revan stacked the fleet with Jedi and soldiers who might oppose his upcoming rise to power. [[PlayerCharacter The Exile]] was the only Jedi came out of the battle alive and returned to the Jedi Order to face trial.

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* In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic II'', ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords'', you find out that the Battle of Malachor V was like this too, at least according to HK-47. Revan stacked the fleet with Jedi and soldiers who might oppose his upcoming rise to power. [[PlayerCharacter The Exile]] was the only Jedi came out of the battle alive and returned to the Jedi Order to face trial.
3rd Sep '16 12:18:46 PM kazokuhouou
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** On the ''Conquest'' path of ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' Garon sends the Avatar on a mission to wipe out the Ice Tribe to either get them killed or broken, since realizing that the Avatar now knows their true origins and that Garon had kidnapped them. He's often instigated and aided by Iago, who wants the Avatar dead just because he doesn't like them. [[spoiler: The Avatar also strongly suspects that Garon giving them Ganglari was also one of these, due to the sword exploding, which would have killed them had Mikoto not [[TakingTheBullet taken the hit.]]]]
28th Aug '16 6:17:57 AM TSBasilisk
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* The myth of the Greek hero Perseus killing Medusa was because the King of Serifos, Polydectes, ordered him to do it so he could marry Perseus' mother. Backfires massively when Perseus learns that he has snagged Danae, thus he rushes back home to save his mom and shows Polydectes Medusa's head, turning him and his court into stone as punishment.
* Also from Myth/GreekMythology, Bellerophon. He refused the advances of the queen of Tiryns, who then [[WoundedGazelleGambit tricked her husband Proetus into believing that Bellerophon had tried to rape her]]. Bound by SacredHospitality not to kill his guest, Proetus sends Bellerophon to his father-in-law Iobates, King of Lycia, [[PleaseShootTheMessenger bearing a missive detailing what Proetus thought Bellerophon had done and asking the recipient of the message--i.e. Iobates--to kill its bearer--i.e. Bellerophon]]. However, before reading the missive, Iobates had feasted well with Bellerophon, and after he actually bothered to read his son-in-law's letter, Iobates realized that simply killing Bellerophon [[SacredHospitality might bring divine wrath upon the kingdom]]. Instead, Iobates repeatedly sent Bellerophon on suicidal missions where he continuously succeeded. Unfortunately, this continued success [[{{Pride}} got to Bellerophon's head]], earning him the wrath of Zeus, who [[BoltOfDivineRetribution struck him down]].
* Most of Hercules' Labors were attempts to get him killed. They failed since Hercules was the WorldsStrongestMan and a [[GuileHero cle]][[IndyPloy ver]] one too. The labor of cleaning the Augean Stables (which had never been cleaned since ''ever'') was unique in that it was meant to humiliate Hercules instead of kill him. Backfired when Hercules ''diverted a river into the Stables''.
** Though that backfired on Hercules, since technically the river did the cleaning for him, so it didn't count, so he had another labor added.

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* Greek mythology has many examples that predate the TropeNamer.
**
The myth of the Greek hero Perseus killing Medusa was because the King of Serifos, Polydectes, ordered him to do it so he could marry Perseus' mother. Backfires massively when Perseus learns that he has snagged Danae, thus he rushes back home to save his mom and shows Polydectes Medusa's head, turning him and his court into stone as punishment.
* Also from Myth/GreekMythology, Bellerophon. He ** Bellerophon refused the advances of the queen of Tiryns, who then [[WoundedGazelleGambit tricked her husband Proetus into believing that Bellerophon had tried to rape her]]. Bound by SacredHospitality not to kill his guest, Proetus sends Bellerophon to his father-in-law Iobates, King of Lycia, [[PleaseShootTheMessenger bearing a missive detailing what Proetus thought Bellerophon had done and asking the recipient of the message--i.e. Iobates--to kill its bearer--i.e. Bellerophon]]. However, before reading the missive, Iobates had feasted well with Bellerophon, and after he actually bothered to read his son-in-law's letter, Iobates realized that simply killing Bellerophon [[SacredHospitality might bring divine wrath upon the kingdom]]. Instead, Iobates repeatedly sent Bellerophon on suicidal missions where he continuously succeeded. Unfortunately, this continued success [[{{Pride}} got to Bellerophon's head]], earning him the wrath of Zeus, who [[BoltOfDivineRetribution struck him down]].
* ** Most of Hercules' Labors were attempts to get him killed. They failed since Hercules was the WorldsStrongestMan and a [[GuileHero cle]][[IndyPloy ver]] one too. The labor of cleaning the Augean Stables (which had never been cleaned since ''ever'') was unique in that it was meant to humiliate Hercules instead of kill him. Backfired when Hercules ''diverted a river into the Stables''.
** *** Though that backfired on Hercules, since technically the river did the cleaning for him, so it didn't count, so he had another labor added.



* And another from Greek mythology - Jason. Went to claim his throne back from EvilUncle Pelias. Pelias agrees to give him the throne if he sets sail to bring back the Golden Fleece. The Fleece rests in Colchis (modern day Georgia) with plenty of life-threatening obstacles in the way. Ironically it works but in a different way - Jason realises he doesn't want the throne after returning home, though this still has bad effects for Pelias since Jason's wife Medea kills him in an attempt to get the throne for herself.

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* And another from Greek mythology - Jason. Went to claim his throne back from ** Jason's EvilUncle Pelias. Pelias agrees agreed to give him Jason the throne if he sets set sail to bring back the Golden Fleece. The Fleece rests in Colchis (modern day Georgia) with plenty of life-threatening obstacles in the way. Ironically it works but in a different way - Jason realises realizes he doesn't want the throne after returning home, though this still has bad effects for Pelias since Jason's wife Medea kills him in an attempt to get the throne for herself.
24th Aug '16 5:44:24 PM mkmckoy
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* In the novel ''Literature/{{Fatherland}}'' the Gestapo chief Globus sends the cadet Jost to the Eastern front, after Jost witnessed Globus dumping the corpse of a former high-ranking Nazi official into a lake.
14th Aug '16 7:02:16 PM PaulA
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* In ''The Memoirs of SherlockHolmes'' story "''The Adventure of the Crooked Man''", the victim was overheard arguing with his wife, and she was heard to say the name David. It turned out that she was alluding to the Biblical story described above. [[spoiler:The eponymous Crooked Man was the victim of her husband's Uriah Gambit some thirty years earlier, and she had found him in the homeless shelter where she volunteered]].

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* In ''The Memoirs of SherlockHolmes'' Literature/SherlockHolmes'' story "''The "The Adventure of the Crooked Man''", Man", the victim was overheard arguing with his wife, and she was heard to say the name David. It turned out that she was alluding to the Biblical story described above. [[spoiler:The eponymous Crooked Man was the victim of her husband's Uriah Gambit some thirty years earlier, and she had found him in the homeless shelter where she volunteered]].
14th Aug '16 7:01:40 PM PaulA
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* In ''[[Literature/VorkosiganSaga Shards of Honour]]'' by LoisMcMasterBujold, the (failed) invasion of Escobar is a ''massive'' Uriah Gambit on the part of Emperor Ezar to [[OffingTheOffspring dispose]] of his SketchySuccessor [[TheCaligula Crown Prince Serg]] and Serg's worst enablers, and weaken the faction supporting him. Cordelia, putting the pieces of the plan together, describes it as "put all the bad eggs in one basket... and then drop the basket."

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* In ''[[Literature/VorkosiganSaga Shards of Honour]]'' ''Literature/ShardsOfHonor'' by LoisMcMasterBujold, the Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold:
** The
(failed) invasion of Escobar is a ''massive'' Uriah Gambit on the part of Emperor Ezar to [[OffingTheOffspring dispose]] of his SketchySuccessor [[TheCaligula Crown Prince Serg]] and Serg's worst enablers, and weaken the faction supporting him. Cordelia, putting the pieces of the plan together, describes it as "put all the bad eggs in one basket... and then drop the basket."



* [[spoiler:The Sign of the Broken Sword]] by Creator/GKChesterton. An interesting twist on both tropes: The murderer, [[spoiler:General St. Claire, [[UnfriendlyFire killed]] his victim first, and then planned otherwise pointless assault so that it would happen at exactly the same spot, thus hiding his victim among other casualties.]]

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* [[spoiler:The The Literature/FatherBrown mystery "[[spoiler:The Sign of the Broken Sword]] Sword]]" by Creator/GKChesterton. An interesting twist on both tropes: The murderer, [[spoiler:General St. Claire, [[UnfriendlyFire killed]] his victim first, and then planned otherwise pointless assault so that it would happen at exactly the same spot, thus hiding his victim among other casualties.]]
13th Aug '16 9:02:51 PM DrFraud
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[[folder:Comicbooks]]

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* In "Story of the King Who Would Be Stronger Than Fate" the title monarch orders Nur Mahomed to join the army and then has him repeatedly sent on dangerous missions in the hope that he'll be killed instead of fulfilling his destiny to marry the king's daughter.
* In "The Plaisham" a middle-aged woman tries to get rid of her husband by convincing a local lord to order him to accomplish {{Impossible Task}}s or be executed.
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