History Main / UberWald

17th Jul '16 7:05:40 PM WillKeaton
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** "Treehouse of Horror IV" depicts '''Penn'''sylvania this way, with Mr. Burns taking the part of Dracula. Out of all the states, though, Pennsylvania actually fits, outside Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. The culture is heavily Central/Eastern European, especially German and Czech, and conservative. The population is largely farmers (many of whom maintain hex signs) including the Amish, and yes, there [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey_Towers_Castle are]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fonthill_(house) castles]].

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** "Treehouse of Horror IV" depicts '''Penn'''sylvania this way, with Mr. Burns taking the part of Dracula. Out of all the states, though, Pennsylvania actually fits, outside Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. The culture is heavily Central/Eastern European, especially German and Czech, and conservative. The population is largely farmers (many of whom maintain hex signs) including the Amish, and yes, there [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey_Towers_Castle are]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fonthill_(house) castles]].castles.]]
17th Jul '16 7:04:48 PM WillKeaton
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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgOtB9XksgI "Carpathia"]], by The Vision Bleak:

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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgOtB9XksgI "Carpathia"]], "Carpathia,"]] by The Vision Bleak:
13th Jul '16 3:59:19 AM tigerstar
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheBigKnights'' has the Land of the Vampires, which follows this trope to a tee.
22nd Jun '16 4:51:27 AM AgProv
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** In Pratchett's conception, Überwald is mainly Bavaria, Switzerland and Austria with a Discworld gloss, although he has introduced Far Überwald, where a language suspiciously like Russian is spoken; other locally born characters, such as vampire iconographer Otto Chriek, appear to have a possibly-Czech, possibly Polish, "Slavonic" identity to them. [[note]]In extremes of emotion, Otto's swearing is represented in a cod-Slavonic language made up of nonsense syllables which to an English-speaking reader has a Czech/Slovak/Polish look to them; "Russian" characters in the Discworld have identifiably Russian vocabulary given in Cyrillic characters.[[/note]] Überwald maps to a sort of Eastern Europe which would fit the pre-1945 political and ethnic reality on this planet: principally German with widely mixed and scattered language groups owing to centuriesd of ethnic mixing. The double-headed bat emblem of the old Dark Empire is deliberately based on the Imperial Eagle of the Austro-Hungariam Empire on our world.

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** In Pratchett's conception, Überwald is mainly Bavaria, Switzerland and Austria with a Discworld gloss, although he has introduced Far Überwald, where a language suspiciously like Russian is spoken; other locally born characters, such as vampire iconographer Otto Chriek, appear to have a possibly-Czech, possibly Polish, "Slavonic" identity to them. [[note]]In extremes of emotion, Otto's swearing is represented in a cod-Slavonic language made up of nonsense syllables which to an English-speaking reader has a Czech/Slovak/Polish look to them; "Russian" characters in the Discworld have identifiably Russian vocabulary given in Cyrillic characters.[[/note]] Überwald maps to a sort of Eastern Europe which would fit the pre-1945 political and ethnic reality on this planet: principally German Germany, with widely mixed and scattered language groups owing to centuriesd centuries of ethnic mixing. The double-headed bat emblem of the old Dark Empire is deliberately based on the Imperial Eagle of the Austro-Hungariam Austro-Hungarian Empire on our world.
22nd Jun '16 4:50:09 AM AgProv
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Added DiffLines:

** In Pratchett's conception, Überwald is mainly Bavaria, Switzerland and Austria with a Discworld gloss, although he has introduced Far Überwald, where a language suspiciously like Russian is spoken; other locally born characters, such as vampire iconographer Otto Chriek, appear to have a possibly-Czech, possibly Polish, "Slavonic" identity to them. [[note]]In extremes of emotion, Otto's swearing is represented in a cod-Slavonic language made up of nonsense syllables which to an English-speaking reader has a Czech/Slovak/Polish look to them; "Russian" characters in the Discworld have identifiably Russian vocabulary given in Cyrillic characters.[[/note]] Überwald maps to a sort of Eastern Europe which would fit the pre-1945 political and ethnic reality on this planet: principally German with widely mixed and scattered language groups owing to centuriesd of ethnic mixing. The double-headed bat emblem of the old Dark Empire is deliberately based on the Imperial Eagle of the Austro-Hungariam Empire on our world.
10th Jun '16 3:37:51 AM thatmadork
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* In ''VideoGame/TotalWarWarhammer'', having a high level of Vampiric Corruption in a province causes it to turn from a lush {{Arcadia}} into this trope. The trees wither as the forests become haunted, crops fail as the soil goes black with blight, green balefires begin to dot the landscape, and screams of terror and anguish can be heard as you zoom in closer.
6th Jun '16 4:38:11 PM Doug86
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* ''Film/VanHelsing'', being mostly set in Transylvania, and parodying both {{Hammer Horror}} and {{Universal Horror}}.

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* ''Film/VanHelsing'', being mostly set in Transylvania, and parodying both {{Hammer Horror}} Film/HammerHorror and {{Universal Horror}}.Franchise/UniversalHorror.
30th May '16 9:50:09 AM btravern
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Invented by Frederick Marryat (for a werewolf short story "The White Wolf of the Hartz Mountains" in ''The Phantom Ship''; he also wrote ''Mr. Midshipman Easy'') Creator/BramStoker and Creator/MaryShelley (though Shelley's novel explicitly takes place in Ingolstadt, Germany and Switzerland), codified by the Franchise/UniversalHorror movies of the 1930s and 1940s, and carried on into the 1950s and 60s by Film/HammerHorror. Often regarded as a bit kitsch nowadays and played for laughs, to the point of being an UndeadHorseTrope. Can also get you into [[UnfortunateImplications trouble]] now that there are a lot more Eastern European people in the English-speaking world. Of course, there's always LovecraftCountry, CampbellCountry, and SouthernGothic as alternatives.

''Überwald'' (spelled with an umlaut or as "Ueberwald" for those lacking a German keyboard), is [[TropeNamers named after]] the Literature/{{Discworld}} country; there is also an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%9Cberwald Überwald]] region in UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, located within the Odenwald region where the eponymous Frankenstein castle resides. A direct translation would be "Over Forest" or perhaps "[[WhenTreesAttack Super Woods]]", yet the word is a German translation of ''"Transylvania"'' (a.k.a. Transsylvania in some spellings), "trans silvania" being Latin for "beyond the forest". Since medieval times, Transylvania has been home to three major population groups - Romanians, Hungarians (Székely) and Germans ("Siebenbürgen Saxons"), and thus most towns and places come with a German, Hungarian and Romanian name attached. Originally, it belonged to UsefulNotes/{{Hungary}}, up until World War I, and it had a lot of German settlers. In the treaty of Trianon it was transferred to UsefulNotes/{{Romania}} (the Hungarian name of Transylvania is ''Erdély'', coming from ''Erdő-elve'' meaning the same thing as the Latin; the Romanian is either the more traditional ''Ardeal'' or just ''Transilvania'').

Compare with DontGoInTheWoods, TheLostWoods, WildWilderness and other TropesOfNature locations.

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Invented by Frederick Marryat (for a werewolf short story "The White Wolf of the Hartz Mountains" in ''The Phantom Ship''; he also wrote ''Mr. Midshipman Easy'') Creator/BramStoker Easy''), Creator/BramStoker, and Creator/MaryShelley (though Shelley's novel explicitly takes place in Ingolstadt, Germany and Switzerland), codified by the Franchise/UniversalHorror movies of the 1930s and 1940s, and carried on into the 1950s and 60s by Film/HammerHorror. Often regarded as a bit kitsch nowadays and played for laughs, to the point of being an UndeadHorseTrope. Can also get you into [[UnfortunateImplications trouble]] now that there are a lot more Eastern European people in the English-speaking world. Of course, there's always LovecraftCountry, CampbellCountry, and SouthernGothic as alternatives.

''Überwald'' (spelled with an umlaut or as "Ueberwald" for those lacking a German keyboard), is [[TropeNamers named after]] the Literature/{{Discworld}} country; there is also an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%9Cberwald Überwald]] region in UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}, located within the Odenwald region where the eponymous Frankenstein castle resides. A direct translation would be "Over Forest" or perhaps "[[WhenTreesAttack Super Woods]]", yet the word is a German translation of ''"Transylvania"'' (a.k.a. Transsylvania in some spellings), "trans silvania" being Latin for "beyond the forest". Since medieval times, Transylvania has been home to three major population groups - Romanians, Hungarians (Székely) (Székely), and Germans ("Siebenbürgen Saxons"), and thus most towns and places come with a German, Hungarian and Romanian name attached. Originally, it belonged to UsefulNotes/{{Hungary}}, up until World War I, and it had a lot of German settlers. In the treaty of Trianon it was transferred to UsefulNotes/{{Romania}} (the Hungarian name of Transylvania is ''Erdély'', coming from ''Erdő-elve'' meaning the same thing as the Latin; the Romanian is either the more traditional ''Ardeal'' or just ''Transilvania'').

Compare with DontGoInTheWoods, TheLostWoods, WildWilderness WildWilderness, and other TropesOfNature locations.



* Some of SolomonKane's adventures took place in the Black Forest, such as "Death's Black Riders", "The Rattle of Bones" and "The Castle of the Devil". Although the Black Forest is actually a few hundred miles to the west of most portrayals of this trope, the 16th-early 17th century setting justifies it.

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* Some of SolomonKane's adventures took place in the Black Forest, such as "Death's Black Riders", "The Rattle of Bones" Bones", and "The Castle of the Devil". Although the Black Forest is actually a few hundred miles to the west of most portrayals of this trope, the 16th-early 17th century setting justifies it.
6th May '16 10:10:11 AM FungusFromYuggoth
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* The foremost advocate of the Überwald was Film/{{Hammer|Horror}} Films. They set most of their many versions of ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' and ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'', along with several other movie horrors, in some Victorian never-never-land, not quite Germany, not quite Transylvania, not quite anywhere else between France and Russia. Hammer didn't make all this up. In the 19th Century, much of eastern Europe had German-speaking upper classes with peasants, villagers, and travelers who could be Germans, Slavs, Magyars, Turks, Jews or Gypsies.

to:

* The foremost advocate of the Überwald was Film/{{Hammer|Horror}} Films. They set most of their many versions of ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' and ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'', along with several other movie horrors, in some Victorian never-never-land, not quite Germany, not quite Transylvania, not quite anywhere else between France and Russia. Hammer didn't make all this up. In the 19th Century, much of eastern Europe had German-speaking upper classes with peasants, villagers, and travelers who could be Germans, Slavs, Magyars, Turks, Jews or Gypsies.Romani.
6th May '16 10:09:25 AM FungusFromYuggoth
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* The foremost advocate of the Überwald was Film/{{Hammer|Horror}} Films. They set most of their many versions of ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' and ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'', along with several other movie horrors, in some Victorian never-never-land, not quite Germany, not quite Transylvania, not quite anywhere else between France and Russia. Hammer didn't make all this up. In the 19th Century, much of eastern Europe had German-speaking upper classes with peasants, villagers, and travelers who could be Germans, Slavs, Magyars, Turks, or Gypsies.

to:

* The foremost advocate of the Überwald was Film/{{Hammer|Horror}} Films. They set most of their many versions of ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' and ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'', along with several other movie horrors, in some Victorian never-never-land, not quite Germany, not quite Transylvania, not quite anywhere else between France and Russia. Hammer didn't make all this up. In the 19th Century, much of eastern Europe had German-speaking upper classes with peasants, villagers, and travelers who could be Germans, Slavs, Magyars, Turks, Jews or Gypsies.



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