History Main / TwoDecadesBehind

6th Jul '16 2:03:37 PM MsChibi
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** Bart and Lisa (and all the other kids in Springfield) watching the Krusty the Klown show, a SaturdayMorningKidsShow, as well as MerchandiseDriven {{Saturday Morning Cartoon}}s. Neither of those sort of shows are on TV on Saturday mornings anymore, at least in the US. The last SaturdayMorningCartoon marathon went off the air in 2014.
1st Jul '16 10:37:19 AM DavidDelony
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* A lot of Windows installations in businesses are at least one generation behind the latest version. Many companies held onto Windows XP for a long time until Microsoft finally dropped support in 2014. Even when XP was first introduced, a lot of businesses were still rolling out Windows 2000. The simple reason is similar to the NASA example: most corporate IT departments favor reliability over novelty.
** Standard IT answer if a user wants to know when the company's upgrading to the brand new OS? It won't even be '''considered''' until about 6 months after the first Service Pack is released.

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* A lot of Windows installations in businesses are at least one generation behind the latest version. Many companies held onto Windows XP for a long time until Microsoft finally dropped support in 2014. Even when XP was first introduced, a lot of businesses were still rolling out Windows 2000. The simple reason is similar to the NASA example: most corporate IT departments favor reliability over novelty.
** Standard
novelty and newer OS versions will have more bugs that need to be worked out than the tried-and-tested older version. Case in point: the standard IT answer if a user wants to know when the company's upgrading to the brand new OS? It won't even be '''considered''' until about 6 months after the first Service Pack service pack is released.
1st Jul '16 9:38:18 AM Jasin_Moridin
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** Standard IT answer if a user wants to know when the company's upgrading to the brand new OS? It won't even be '''considered''' until about 6 months after the first Service Pack is released.
27th Jun '16 10:10:47 AM arsepoetica
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There's also one other reason why this persists in fiction today: the mere existence of smartphones and ubiquitous access to the modern internet are often enough to interfere with a story. Seriously, imagine a Chandleresque gumshoe tale taking place in a world of Iphones, laptop computers, and GPS. At a certain point, it just becomes easier to set the story in the past and not worry about all that.
11th Jun '16 9:23:47 PM DebbieOppenheimer
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** Another one depicts Chip's room with posters of Music/BobDylan, Music/TheWho, and Music/LedZeppelin. As the Comics Curmudgeon commentary puts it, this guy is not the mom's son, but her ''dad'' with those musical tastes. Most modern teenagers would not be fans of 40 and 50 year old music, so this trope is invoked.


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** The writing staff of the show are mostly Baby Boomers, including Creator/MattGroening himself, which explains the countless 1960s and 1970s references on the show, especially targeting hippies, UsefulNotes/RichardNixon, the original Series/StarTrek, Music/TheBeatles, UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar and old TV series that are no longer in syndication and thus completely lost on younger audiences.
7th Jun '16 8:25:36 AM dominicmgm
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++ In the UK, the Top-Up logo is still an old late 90s/mid 2000s phone with an antenna. Strange, given that most phones in the UK as of 2016 are smartphones.
4th Jun '16 7:54:25 PM gewunomox
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* As noted above, the tendency of the "dominant" generation, once in their forties and fifties, to drive "nostalgia booms" where a musical genre from their youth is resurrected. The punk rock era of the middle-late 1970's also saw a resurgence in 1950's rock'n'roll styled artistes, who could appear on the same ''Series/TopOfThePops'' billing as the punk rockers. Acts like Darts and Showaddywaddy, in DA quiffs and the full teddy-boy rigs performing Fifties-themed songs, looked oddly anachronistic next to music/TheClash and Music/{{Buzzcocks}}.

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* As noted above, the tendency of the "dominant" generation, once in their forties and fifties, to drive "nostalgia booms" where a musical genre from their youth is resurrected. The punk rock era of the middle-late 1970's also saw a resurgence in 1950's rock'n'roll styled artistes, who could appear on the same ''Series/TopOfThePops'' billing as the punk rockers. Acts like Darts and Showaddywaddy, in DA quiffs and the full teddy-boy rigs performing Fifties-themed songs, looked oddly anachronistic next to music/TheClash Music/TheClash and Music/{{Buzzcocks}}.
4th Jun '16 6:57:24 PM WhatArtThee
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEiFIKBPUq8 This M&M's commercial]] was filmed in 2010 and on rare occasions, you can see it on TV. In the middle of TheNewTens.



* ''ComicStrip/HiAndLois'':
** A 2012 strip (in which Dad indulges in a little in-my-day lecturing to teenage son Chip [[WhatAreRecords while listening to old vinyl records]]) prompted some discussion on Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon about how implausible such a gag is in 2012, since vinyl stopped being the dominant music format some three decades prior, which should make Dad a lot older than the fortyish guy he's depicted as to have amassed such a collection in his youth.
** Another one depicts Chip's room with posters of Music/BobDylan, Music/TheWho, and Music/LedZeppelin. The room's cleanliness prompts his mother to ask him "Have ''you'' seen my son?!" but as the Comics Curmudgeon commentary puts it, "This guy is your ''Dad''."

to:

* ''ComicStrip/HiAndLois'':
**
A 2012 ''ComicStrip/HiAndLois'' strip (in which Dad indulges in a little in-my-day lecturing to teenage son Chip [[WhatAreRecords while listening to old vinyl records]]) prompted some discussion on Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon about how implausible such a gag is in 2012, since vinyl stopped being the dominant music format some three decades prior, which should make Dad a lot older than the fortyish guy he's depicted as to have amassed such a collection in his youth.
** Another one depicts Chip's room with posters of Music/BobDylan, Music/TheWho, and Music/LedZeppelin. The room's cleanliness prompts his mother to ask him "Have ''you'' seen my son?!" but as the Comics Curmudgeon commentary puts it, "This guy is your ''Dad''."
youth.



* Check out some of the Disney live-action comedies from the 1970s, where it's Still The Fifties: milk is still delivered to doorsteps; women are still housewives; and the chances of seeing any hippies, punks, or glam rockers are slim to none. Heck, in many cases [[SeventiesHair the sideburns on the male characters aren't even that long]]! Occasionally the writers would slip in something TotallyRadical, but that worked about as well as you'd expect. This trope applies to the actual subject matter of the Disney films in question as well as their trappings: Disney didn't release its first PG-rated film (''Film/TheBlackHole'') until 1979, more than a decade after the current G-to-R rating system was introduced. Children who watch these films (and remember, these are some of the first live-action films they see) often end up [[ModernStasis assuming that hardly any big change happened in the '60s and '70s]]. This still happens (or, until the mid-2000s, still happened), but by then it was intentional and often an AffectionateParody of the phenomenon. One reason given for this is that Creator/WaltDisney and his immediate successors were very old-fashioned (aka conservative) and were always a step or two behind the rest of Hollywood.

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* Check out some of the Disney live-action comedies from the 1970s, where it's Still The Fifties: milk is still delivered to doorsteps; women are still housewives; and the chances of seeing any hippies, punks, or glam rockers are slim to none. Heck, in many cases [[SeventiesHair the sideburns on the male characters aren't even that long]]! Occasionally the writers would slip in something TotallyRadical, but that worked about as well as you'd expect. This trope applies to the actual subject matter of the Disney films in question as well as their trappings: Disney didn't release its first PG-rated film (''Film/TheBlackHole'') until 1979, more than a decade after the current G-to-R rating system was introduced. Children who watch these films (and remember, these are some of the first live-action films they see) often end up [[ModernStasis assuming that hardly any big change happened in the '60s and '70s]]. This still happens (or, until the mid-2000s, still happened), but by then it was intentional and often an AffectionateParody of the phenomenon. One reason given for this is that Creator/WaltDisney and his immediate successors were very old-fashioned (aka conservative) and were always a step or two behind the rest of Hollywood.



* ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'', a 1980s comedy in which Ferris and his friends create a sing-and-dance routine in the middle of the city where the song of choice is the 1960s song ''Twist & Shout''.



* Many family sitcoms, well into the early-'90s (case in point: just about any TGIF show on ABC), continued to play into cultural tropes and stereotypes that were more-or-less obsolete by then. Such as the old "rock and roll teenager versus bitter/culturally unaware parent" conflict of the '60s and early-'70s (see also ''Rock: It's Your Decision'', above). By the early '90s, most real-life children had baby boomer parents who were every bit as "rockin'!" as they were. And from the 2000s onward, Baby Boomers were old enough to be grandparents -- which meant the new "timely" generation clash was to give the teenager {{Amazingly Embarrassing|Parents}} HippieParents.
* This actually got a {{lampshade|Hanging}} on ''Series/FullHouse'', of all places. In one episode Danny said he wanted to impress DJ and her schoolmates by performing Music/TheWho's "My Generation", which he described as an anthem of teenage rebellion. Jesse agreed, and then pointed out that it was also a teenage rebellion song ''in the '60s''.

to:

* Many family sitcoms, well into the early-'90s (case in point: just about any TGIF show on ABC), continued to play into cultural tropes and stereotypes that were more-or-less obsolete by then. Such as the old "rock and roll teenager versus bitter/culturally unaware parent" conflict of the '60s and early-'70s (see also ''Rock: It's Your Decision'', above). By the early '90s, most real-life children had baby boomer parents who were every bit as "rockin'!" as they were. And from the 2000s onward, Baby Boomers were old enough to be grandparents -- which meant the new "timely" generation clash was to give the teenager {{Amazingly Embarrassing|Parents}} HippieParents.
* This actually got a {{lampshade|Hanging}} on ''Series/FullHouse'', of all places. In one episode Danny said he wanted to impress DJ and her schoolmates by performing Music/TheWho's "My Generation", which he described as an anthem of teenage rebellion. Jesse agreed, and then pointed out that it was also a teenage rebellion song ''in the '60s''.
HippieParents..



** This may be because older songs from the 70's and 80's are more widely known and established than more contemporary songs. Even among people who are otherwise great at keeping up with modern day pop culture, songs that are already-established standards are usually easier to spot than songs that are only a few years old. A lot of sitcoms and dramas are also very conservative about referencing more recent music for the exact same reason.

to:

** This may be because older songs media from the 70's and 80's are more widely known and established than more contemporary songs. media. Even among people who are otherwise great at keeping up with modern day pop culture, songs works that are already-established standards are usually easier to spot than songs works that are only a few years old. A lot of sitcoms and dramas are also very conservative about referencing more recent music media for the exact same reason.



* Oldies and classic rock stations draw a surprisingly large number of teenagers and college students. This is most likely because, unlike the genres it succeeded (BigBand, brassy wartime music, etc.), rock and roll never garnered any kind of backlash from the generations its proponents birthed; of course, rock and roll also never ''ended'', so any backlash against it wouldn't have achieved much. Music/TheBeatles, in particular, have gone on to almost-equally appeal to just about every generation from the boomers onward.
* Most current-hits stations play a modified playlist during the noon hour on weekdays when teens are assumed to be in school without access to a radio while college students and working-age adults are tuning in during lunch. It's usually stuff not ''quite'' old enough to make the jump to classic/oldies formats. Also, old rock songs are still heard everywhere, from commercials, TV episodes to films, and thus many youngsters are more familiar with them than big band jazz. Most of them would probably be amazed how old some of these pop songs already are.



** The writing staff of the show are mostly baby boomers, including Creator/MattGroening himself, which explains the countless 1960s and 1970s references on the show, especially targeting hippies, Nixon, the original Series/StarTrek, Music/TheBeatles, Vietnam War and old TV series that are no longer in syndication and thus completely lost on younger audiences. References to other decades also occur, but not in the same instantly notable quantitudes.



** In all honesty: Bart, Lisa and their school friends still play outside and enjoy activities like slingshots, comic strips, building treehouses, holding soapbox derbies... that are more in line with children's games and hobbies from before television became dominant. If they would just sit in their rooms and waste their lives in front of a computer game as most kids have done since the late 1980s and early 1990s it would be a very boring show to watch.
* Before ''The Simpsons'', this happened to the Creator/WarnerBros cartoons, many aspects of which pay homage to other aspects of 1940s pop culture, yet were still used decades after the original source material was forgotten. Foghorn Leghorn, for instance, is based on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senator_Claghorn Senator Beauregard Claghorn]], a character Kenny Delmar created for Fred Allen's radio show in the late 1940s. How people respond to those shorts today -- indeed, how many tropers here responded to them as children in the '70s or '80sócould tell us a lot about how ''The Simpsons'' will be appreciated come mid-century.
1st Jun '16 11:36:09 AM Charsi
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1st Jun '16 2:18:32 AM DebbieOppenheimer
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* American TV in general lags about two decades behind mainstream American culture's acceptance of [[GetBackInTheCloset LGBT people]], [[StayInTheKitchen feminism]] and [[ButNotTooBlack racial issues]]. Take for instance many TV sitcoms from the 1950s and 1960s. The characters were still using basic concepts that were popular stock clichés in radio comedies from the 1930s and 1940s (the nagging wife, the threat of the mother-in-law coming to visit...) and new trends from the decade itself like rock 'n' roll, rebellious teenagers, the Afro-American civil rights movement, the Cold War and Playboy Magazine are literally never spoken of. (An exception was ''The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet'', on which they eventually ''had'' to discuss rock music because Ricky was playing it semi-regularly -- and they did, albeit only perfunctorily.) Indeed, if a sitcom is about black people, it's almost guaranteed there will be a racism-themed episode, or several, and the racist will generally be shown to be fairly open about it, or at least making assumptions about black people that few people if any hold anymore. If the sitcom is gay-themed, at least once if not multiple times, the gay character will run into an openly intolerant person, a [[TheFundamentalist crazed fundamentalist]] or have a family member express confusion or intolerance, again, openly. Feminists are a bit of a mixed bag. Some shows with a female lead still behave as if sexist rules of society still exist (such as a woman being turned down for a promotion because of her sex, something which would today lead to an easily won gender discrimination lawsuit) but others make fun of feminists themselves, portraying them as rabid harpies who behave as though gender equality hasn't advanced in over a century. Neither approach shows male-female relations in a great light.

to:

* American TV in general lags about two decades behind mainstream American culture's acceptance of [[GetBackInTheCloset LGBT people]], [[StayInTheKitchen feminism]] and [[ButNotTooBlack racial issues]]. Take for instance many TV sitcoms from the 1950s and 1960s. The characters were still using basic concepts that were popular stock clichés in radio comedies from the 1930s and 1940s (the nagging wife, the threat of the mother-in-law coming to visit...) and new trends from the decade itself like rock 'n' roll, rebellious teenagers, the Afro-American civil rights movement, the Cold War and Playboy Magazine are literally never spoken of. (An exception was ''The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet'', on which they eventually ''had'' to discuss rock music because Ricky was playing it semi-regularly -- and they did, albeit only perfunctorily.) Indeed, if a sitcom is about black people, it's almost all but guaranteed there will be a racism-themed episode, or several, and the racist will generally be shown to be fairly open about it, or at least making assumptions about black people that few people if any hold anymore. If the sitcom is gay-themed, at least once if not multiple times, the gay character will run into an openly intolerant person, a [[TheFundamentalist crazed fundamentalist]] or have a family member express confusion or intolerance, again, openly. Feminists are a bit of a mixed bag. Some shows with a female lead still behave as if sexist rules of society still exist (such as a woman being turned down for a promotion because of her sex, something which would today lead to an easily won gender discrimination lawsuit) but others make fun of feminists themselves, portraying them as rabid harpies who behave as though gender equality hasn't advanced in over a century. Neither approach shows male-female relations in a great light.
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