History Main / TwoDecadesBehind

15th Jun '17 2:05:31 AM DebbieOppenheimer
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* Representations of [[TheCheerleader high school cheerleading]] tend to be stuck in the 70's or 80's, when all cheerleaders did was chant and wave pompoms. Nowadays, cheerleading is a highly athletic sport, and tryouts will involve a lot of tumbling, stunting, and complex dance choreography. But a lot of modern high school sitcoms will still have tryouts that consist of shouting a random chant you made up and waving your arms around, and the physical conditioning needed to be on a modern cheer squad will never be brought up.

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* Representations of [[TheCheerleader high school cheerleading]] tend to be stuck in the 70's 1970s or 80's, 1980s, when all cheerleaders did was chant and wave pompoms. Nowadays, cheerleading is a highly athletic sport, and tryouts will involve a lot of tumbling, stunting, and complex dance choreography. But a lot of modern high school sitcoms will still have tryouts that consist of shouting a random chant you made up and waving your arms around, and the physical conditioning needed to be on a modern cheer squad will never be brought up.up.
**There are a number of reasons for this:
*** 40 to 60 something writers who are unfamiliar with modern high school.
*** most teenage ([[DawsonCasting and twenty-something]]) female actresses are not trained athletes.
*** showing complex stunting and dance routines would take away much of the valuable 21-22 minutes of story a modern tv episode has to play with.
11th Jun '17 5:24:58 PM DavidDelony
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* A lot of expats can find themselves out of sync with the culture of their home countries when they return, though the Internet makes it easier to keep in touch with what's going on much more easily these days.

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* A lot of expats can find themselves out of sync with the culture of their home countries when they return, though the Internet makes it easier to keep in touch with what's going on back home much more easily these days.
10th Jun '17 7:44:18 PM Cailleach
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Added DiffLines:

* Representations of [[TheCheerleader high school cheerleading]] tend to be stuck in the 70's or 80's, when all cheerleaders did was chant and wave pompoms. Nowadays, cheerleading is a highly athletic sport, and tryouts will involve a lot of tumbling, stunting, and complex dance choreography. But a lot of modern high school sitcoms will still have tryouts that consist of shouting a random chant you made up and waving your arms around, and the physical conditioning needed to be on a modern cheer squad will never be brought up.
8th Jun '17 10:54:47 PM DanielCase
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* Some of the portrayals of out-of-touch seniors in ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'''s [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvT_gqs5ETk Amazon Echo Silver ad parody]] seem a little out-of-date themselves ... like Kenan Thompson wanting to know how many people Satchel Paige[[note]]dead since 1982[[/note]] struck out the night before and Echo playing swing when another character says he wants to hear "black jazz". Those would have been funnier in the 1980s, not the 2010s.[[note]]Of course, it doesn't help that most of the actors aren't made to look "Greatest Generation" age as the bit claims[[/note]]
28th May '17 7:52:59 PM SpukiKitty
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** Also; Stuff like Big Band hasn't really aged well whereas Baby Boomer rock music may sound "cooler" and have a more cross-generational appeal. It's just funnier to see the "out-of-touch" granny doin' the Jitterbug to Big Band stuff than rockin' out to Led Zeppelin.
28th May '17 7:29:32 PM SpukiKitty
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** Heck; All the generic rock music used is clearly in the style of early 70s Classic Rock. In RealLife, Jeff would more likely be listening to stuff like [=VanHalen=], DefLeppard, TheCars, {{Devo}} or even The J Giels Band.
** At one point; The turned-religious-bloward Jeff laments that the average age of a person buy a {{KISS}} album is twelve....By 1982, {{KISS}} was DeaderThanDisco to most people.

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** Heck; All the generic rock music used is clearly in the style of early 70s Classic Rock. In RealLife, Jeff would more likely be listening to stuff like [=VanHalen=], DefLeppard, TheCars, {{Devo}} or even The J Giels Band. \n At one point; He even talks about "getting entranced" by the music coming from a store in the mall....a CatStevens sound-a-like. A 1980s teen is NOT going to be listening to CatStevens!
** At one point; The turned-religious-bloward now-turned-religious-blowhard Jeff laments that the average age of a person buy a {{KISS}} album is twelve....By 1982, {{KISS}} was DeaderThanDisco to most people.
28th May '17 7:21:55 PM SpukiKitty
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** Heck; All the generic rock music used is clearly in the style of early 70s Classic Rock. In RealLife, Jeff would more likely be listening to [=VanHalen=] or Def Leopard.
** At one point; Jeff laments that the average age of a person buy a {{KISS}} album is twelve....By 1982, {{KISS}} was DeaderThanDisco to most people.

to:

** Heck; All the generic rock music used is clearly in the style of early 70s Classic Rock. In RealLife, Jeff would more likely be listening to [=VanHalen=] stuff like [=VanHalen=], DefLeppard, TheCars, {{Devo}} or Def Leopard.
even The J Giels Band.
** At one point; The turned-religious-bloward Jeff laments that the average age of a person buy a {{KISS}} album is twelve....By 1982, {{KISS}} was DeaderThanDisco to most people.
28th May '17 7:16:49 PM SpukiKitty
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Added DiffLines:

** Heck; All the generic rock music used is clearly in the style of early 70s Classic Rock. In RealLife, Jeff would more likely be listening to [=VanHalen=] or Def Leopard.
** At one point; Jeff laments that the average age of a person buy a {{KISS}} album is twelve....By 1982, {{KISS}} was DeaderThanDisco to most people.
21st May '17 1:36:35 PM merotoker
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* Averted in this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clZBO_kBgUM Taco Bell commercial.]] This guy's been stuck in [[TheEighties 1984]] and decides to get with the times.

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* Averted in this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clZBO_kBgUM a Taco Bell commercial.]] This guy's commercial with a guy who has been stuck in [[TheEighties 1984]] and decides to get with the times.



* In the Chicagoland area, there is [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fM5K5jK840 this commercial]] for Victory Autowreckers, which was filmed in the ''very'' early 1980s and continued airing on television well into the 2000s. For those who lived in Chicago during the 80s and 90s, this is a commercial they know by heart.
** It was finally [[https://youtu.be/tsBrlDMRGGI updated]]--in 2016.

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* In the Chicagoland area, there is [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fM5K5jK840 this commercial]] for Victory Autowreckers, which was filmed in the ''very'' early 1980s and continued airing on television well into the 2000s. For those who lived in Chicago during the 80s and 90s, this is a commercial they know by heart.
**
heart. It was finally [[https://youtu.be/tsBrlDMRGGI updated]]--in 2016.



* A [[http://womenwriteaboutcomics.com/2016/10/19/jsc_one/ poor quality]] DarkAge pinup-style ''ComicBook/IronHeart'' variant cover garnered many complaints for the way it drew a 15-year-old girl as a HotterAndSexier 20-something woman, and several more complaints suggesting it was the dated fashion that made it come across as so sexualised. One commentator [[https://twitter.com/shoomlah/status/788799168911245312 suggested]] that many comic book artists get stuck on late-90s/early-00s fashion due to it being what sexy women wore when they were learning to draw, and called it the equivalent of 'drawing characters with flip phones'.
* ''Kronblom'', a Swedish comic still running [[LongRunners since 1927]] in a case of ComicBookTime gone made, is now at least ''four'' decades behind. There will be occasional references to a modern technology, popular culture and changes in society. But it mostly feels like the characters still live in the 1970s, or perhaps even the 1950s. The clothes and the women's hairstyles are very old-fashioned, and it seems like life in the Swedish countryside hardly has changed at all in the last ''forty years''. Most notably, they still have a (very old-fashioned) store in the village. That has become more and more inplausible for each decade since the 1960s, even if the writers occasionaly put some realism in it by letting the store-keeper complain, that he soon will have to close the store, because people have started to do most of their shopping at the supermarkets in town...

to:

* A [[http://womenwriteaboutcomics.com/2016/10/19/jsc_one/ poor quality]] DarkAge Dark Age pinup-style ''ComicBook/IronHeart'' variant cover garnered many complaints for the way it drew a 15-year-old girl as a HotterAndSexier 20-something woman, and several more complaints suggesting it was the dated fashion that made it come across as so sexualised. One commentator [[https://twitter.com/shoomlah/status/788799168911245312 suggested]] that many comic book artists get stuck on late-90s/early-00s fashion due to it being what sexy women wore when they were learning to draw, and called it the equivalent of 'drawing characters with flip phones'.
* ''Kronblom'', a Swedish comic still running [[LongRunners since 1927]] in a case of ComicBookTime gone made, is now at least ''four'' decades behind. There will be occasional references to a modern technology, popular culture and changes in society. But it mostly feels like the characters still live in the 1970s, or perhaps even the 1950s. The clothes and the women's hairstyles are very old-fashioned, and it seems like life in the Swedish countryside hardly has changed at all in the last ''forty years''. Most notably, they still have a (very old-fashioned) store in the village. That has become more and more inplausible implausible for each decade since the 1960s, even if the writers occasionaly occasionally put some realism in it by letting the store-keeper complain, that he soon will have to close the store, because people have started to do most of their shopping at the supermarkets in town...



* Check out some of the Disney live-action comedies from the 1970s, where it's Still The Fifties: milk is still delivered to doorsteps; women are still housewives; and the chances of seeing any hippies, punks, or glam rockers are slim to none. Heck, in many cases [[SeventiesHair the sideburns on the male characters aren't even that long]]! Occasionally the writers would slip in something TotallyRadical, but that worked about as well as you'd expect. Children who watch these films (and remember, these are some of the first live-action films they see) often end up [[ModernStasis assuming that hardly any big change happened in the '60s and '70s]]. This still happens (or, until the mid-2000s, still happened), but by then it was intentional and often an AffectionateParody of the phenomenon. One reason given for this is that Creator/WaltDisney and his immediate successors were very old-fashioned (aka conservative) and were always a step or two behind the rest of Hollywood.

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* Check out some of the Disney Creator/{{Disney}} live-action comedies from the 1970s, where it's Still The Fifties: milk is still delivered to doorsteps; women are still housewives; and the chances of seeing any hippies, punks, or glam rockers are slim to none. Heck, in many cases [[SeventiesHair the sideburns on the male characters aren't even that long]]! Occasionally the writers would slip in something TotallyRadical, but that worked about as well as you'd expect. Children who watch these films (and remember, these are some of the first live-action films they see) often end up [[ModernStasis assuming that hardly any big change happened in the '60s and '70s]]. This still happens (or, until the mid-2000s, still happened), but by then it was intentional and often an AffectionateParody of the phenomenon. One reason given for this is that Creator/WaltDisney and his immediate successors were very old-fashioned (aka conservative) and were always a step or two behind the rest of Hollywood.



* In ''Literature/{{Harry Potter}}'', it appears that the wizarding world - or at least the wizarding UK, even in the "modern era" of the 1990's - is a few decades behind the Muggle world and Muggle trends in terms of fashion, ideals, morals, technology, and other areas. Not only does the wizarding world, likely due to its small size, lack many features standard of modern Muggle society, but outright rejects many Muggle concepts, believing magic and wizarding culture to be superior. Based on the designs for Diagon Alley at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which was in turn based on the film set, as well as the books' description, plus wizarding newspaper depictions in the films, the wizarding world itself seems to still appear quite Victorian or Edwardian (1800's-1914) in terms of style; dress in robes and wield wands, the same as witches and wizards a thousand years prior; listen to radio instead of watching television; and more. According to a later explanation by author J.K. Rowling, the reason for wizards culture remaining relatively unchanged, even across centuries, is due to wizards' "condescending [attitude]" towards Muggle technology, such as the Internet, and trends. Wizards and witches treat Muggle objects and culture as a "curiosity" and an "amusement", not really seeing the "terribly exciting" nature, or need, for technology when they have magic. Attitudes, prejudice, and persecution against magic from Muggles have hardly helped, either, with witches and wizards having previously suffered from centuries of Muggle "witch hunts" and "witch trials". Likewise, the British Ministry of Magic has refused to allow the broadcasting of wizarding material on any Muggle device, which would (it was felt) almost guarantee serious breaches of the International Statute of Secrecy. Wizarding radio, however, is allowed on the grounds that the "radio-listening Muggle population seems altogether more tolerant, gullible, or less convinced of their own good sense".

to:

* In ''Literature/{{Harry Potter}}'', ''Literature/HarryPotter'', it appears that the wizarding world - or at least the wizarding UK, even in the "modern era" of the 1990's - is a few decades behind the Muggle world and Muggle trends in terms of fashion, ideals, morals, technology, and other areas. Not only does the wizarding world, likely due to its small size, lack many features standard of modern Muggle society, but outright rejects many Muggle concepts, believing magic and wizarding culture to be superior. Based on the designs for Diagon Alley at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which was in turn based on the film set, as well as the books' description, plus wizarding newspaper depictions in the films, the wizarding world itself seems to still appear quite Victorian or Edwardian (1800's-1914) in terms of style; dress in robes and wield wands, the same as witches and wizards a thousand years prior; listen to radio instead of watching television; and more. According to a later explanation by author J.K. Rowling, the reason for wizards culture remaining relatively unchanged, even across centuries, is due to wizards' "condescending [attitude]" towards Muggle technology, such as the Internet, and trends. Wizards and witches treat Muggle objects and culture as a "curiosity" and an "amusement", not really seeing the "terribly exciting" nature, or need, for technology when they have magic. Attitudes, prejudice, and persecution against magic from Muggles have hardly helped, either, with witches and wizards having previously suffered from centuries of Muggle "witch hunts" and "witch trials". Likewise, the British Ministry of Magic has refused to allow the broadcasting of wizarding material on any Muggle device, which would (it was felt) almost guarantee serious breaches of the International Statute of Secrecy. Wizarding radio, however, is allowed on the grounds that the "radio-listening Muggle population seems altogether more tolerant, gullible, or less convinced of their own good sense".



* Children's and YoungAdult books from the 1980s and early 1990s sometimes feel this way. In many cases, the social mores seem more in line with the 1950s-1960s than the time in which the books take place. For example, many books from that time period will have characters shocked by divorce, or have people be shocked by a mother working outside the home.

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* Children's and YoungAdult {{Young Adult|Literature}} books from the 1980s and early 1990s sometimes feel this way. In many cases, the social mores seem more in line with the 1950s-1960s than the time in which the books take place. For example, many books from that time period will have characters shocked by divorce, or have people be shocked by a mother working outside the home.



* The Dowager Countess in ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' seems to dress this way... that is, one or two decades behind the show's 1910s setting. When the second series wraps up at the brink of the RoaringTwenties (with Lady Mary mentioning "the boy's haircuts they're wearing in Paris"), the Dowager is finally catching up to the fashions from the beginning of the show (in 1912).

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* The Dowager Countess in ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' seems to dress this way... that is, one or two decades behind the show's 1910s setting. When the second series wraps up at the brink of the RoaringTwenties TheRoaringTwenties (with Lady Mary mentioning "the boy's haircuts they're wearing in Paris"), the Dowager is finally catching up to the fashions from the beginning of the show (in 1912).



* Guy Fieri, host of Creator/TheFoodNetwork's ''Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives'', seems to have just gotten off the bus from 1995.

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* Guy Fieri, host of Creator/TheFoodNetwork's ''Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives'', Creator/FoodNetwork's ''Series/DinersDriveInsAndDives'', seems to have just gotten off the bus from 1995.



* Wrestling/AlexanderRusev is Bulgarian, but achieves most of his heel heat thanks to his manager, Lana. Billed from Moscow (though she's really from Florida), the two of them combined make a textbook example of a Cold War-era ForeignWrestlingHeel, and were modelled after Ivan and Ludmilla Drago of ''Rocky IV'' to really drive the point home. Unfortunately, a lot of things have changed since then, and they've had trouble connecting with audiences (it likely doesn't help that he didn't debut until after the 2014 Sochi Olympics, and with the TroubledProduction of that event still fresh in people's minds, all of Lana's claims of Russian superiority fall a little flat.) Rusev and Lana later broke up, and now Rusev is back to billing himself as Bulgarian - which isn't too bad, since Americans don't tend to associate Bulgaria with any particular time period.

to:

* Wrestling/AlexanderRusev [[Wrestling/RusevAndLana Alexander Rusev]] is Bulgarian, but achieves most of his heel heat thanks to his manager, Lana. Billed from Moscow (though ([[FakeNationality though she's really from Florida), Florida]]), the two of them combined make a textbook example of a Cold War-era ForeignWrestlingHeel, and were modelled after Ivan and Ludmilla Drago of ''Rocky IV'' ''Film/RockyIV'' to really drive the point home. Unfortunately, a lot of things have changed since then, and they've had trouble connecting with audiences (it likely doesn't help that he didn't debut until after the 2014 Sochi Olympics, and with the TroubledProduction of that event still fresh in people's minds, all of Lana's claims of Russian superiority fall a little flat.) Rusev and Lana later broke up, and now Rusev is back to billing himself as Bulgarian - which isn't too bad, since Americans don't tend to associate Bulgaria with any particular time period.



* Wiki/{{Wikipedia}}'s formality and "Verifiability, not truth" policy often leaves its pages on slang terms empty and out of date. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_burner , their page on rice burners, and compare to [[RiceBurner that of]] ThisVeryWiki.

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* Wiki/{{Wikipedia}}'s formality and "Verifiability, not truth" policy often leaves its pages on slang terms empty and out of date. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_burner , their page on rice burners, and compare to [[RiceBurner that of]] ThisVeryWiki.[[Wiki/TVTropes This Very Wiki]].



* The 2004 ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' short "My Generation G-G-Gap" is an almost literal example of this trope. Not only does it depict music and fashions that seem straight out of 1984, but it suggests that rock and roll is still somehow controversial among parents and MoralGuardians, even though it hadn't been controversial since probably the mid-late 1980's at the latest.
** Even worse, your average grandparent nowadays was growing up when rock and roll was becoming popular, making the episode ''two generations'' behind.

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* The 2004 ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' short "My Generation G-G-Gap" is an almost literal example of this trope. Not only does it depict music and fashions that seem straight out of 1984, but it suggests that rock and roll is still somehow controversial among parents and MoralGuardians, even though it hadn't been controversial since probably the mid-late 1980's at the latest. \n** Even worse, your average grandparent nowadays was growing up when rock and roll was becoming popular, making the episode ''two generations'' behind.



** ''ComicBook/TheSmurfs'' were introduced in 1958 and a big hit in Europe by the 1970s. Only when Hanna & Barbera turned it into an animated TV series in 1981 did the blue people became huge in the U.S.A. as well.

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** ''ComicBook/TheSmurfs'' were introduced in 1958 and a big hit in Europe by the 1970s. Only when Hanna & Barbera turned it into [[WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs an animated TV series series]] in 1981 did the blue people became huge in the U.S.A. as well.



* Often teenage girls are shown "crushing" on actors/singers that haven't been considered "young and sexy" for twenty years or so. Modern teens still apparently think Tom Cruise or Brad Pitt are hot (both are now in their 50's) while teen girls in the 80's still thought Donnie Osmond was a dream boat.

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* Often teenage girls are shown "crushing" on actors/singers that haven't been considered "young and sexy" for twenty years or so. Modern teens still apparently think Tom Cruise or Brad Pitt are hot (both are now in their 50's) while teen girls in the 80's still thought Donnie Osmond was a dream boat.dreamboat.
14th May '17 4:27:04 PM DragonBallZ
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* In ''Literature/{{Harry Potter}}'', it appears that the wizarding world - or at least the wizarding UK, even in the "modern era" of the 1990's - is a few decades behind the Muggle world and Muggle trends in terms of fashion, ideals, morals, technology, and other areas. Not only does the wizarding world, likely due to its small size, lack many features standard of modern Muggle society, but outright rejects many Muggle concepts, believing magic and wizarding culture to be superior. Based on the designs for Diagon Alley at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which was in turn based on the film set, as well as the books' description, plus wizarding newspaper depictions in the films, the wizarding world itself seems to still appear quite Victorian or Edwardian (1800's-1914) in terms of style; dress in robes and wield wands, the same as witches and wizards a thousand years prior; listen to radio instead of watching television; and more. According to a later explanation by author J.K. Rowling, the reason for wizards culture remaining relatively unchanged, even across centuries, is due to wizards' "condescending [attitude]" towards Muggle technology, such as the Internet, and trends. Wizards and witches treat Muggle objects and culture as a "curiosity" and an "amusement", not really seeing the "terribly exciting" nature, or need, for technology when they have magic. Attitudes, prejudice, and persecution against magic from Muggles have hardly helped, either, with witches and wizards having previously suffered from centuries of Muggle "witch hunts" and "witch trials". Likewise, the British Ministry of Magic has refused to allow the broadcasting of wizarding material on any Muggle device, which would (it was felt) almost guarantee serious breaches of the International Statute of Secrecy. Wizarding radio, however, is allowed on the grounds that "radio-listening Muggle population seems altogether more tolerant, gullible, or less convinced of their own good sense".

to:

* In ''Literature/{{Harry Potter}}'', it appears that the wizarding world - or at least the wizarding UK, even in the "modern era" of the 1990's - is a few decades behind the Muggle world and Muggle trends in terms of fashion, ideals, morals, technology, and other areas. Not only does the wizarding world, likely due to its small size, lack many features standard of modern Muggle society, but outright rejects many Muggle concepts, believing magic and wizarding culture to be superior. Based on the designs for Diagon Alley at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which was in turn based on the film set, as well as the books' description, plus wizarding newspaper depictions in the films, the wizarding world itself seems to still appear quite Victorian or Edwardian (1800's-1914) in terms of style; dress in robes and wield wands, the same as witches and wizards a thousand years prior; listen to radio instead of watching television; and more. According to a later explanation by author J.K. Rowling, the reason for wizards culture remaining relatively unchanged, even across centuries, is due to wizards' "condescending [attitude]" towards Muggle technology, such as the Internet, and trends. Wizards and witches treat Muggle objects and culture as a "curiosity" and an "amusement", not really seeing the "terribly exciting" nature, or need, for technology when they have magic. Attitudes, prejudice, and persecution against magic from Muggles have hardly helped, either, with witches and wizards having previously suffered from centuries of Muggle "witch hunts" and "witch trials". Likewise, the British Ministry of Magic has refused to allow the broadcasting of wizarding material on any Muggle device, which would (it was felt) almost guarantee serious breaches of the International Statute of Secrecy. Wizarding radio, however, is allowed on the grounds that the "radio-listening Muggle population seems altogether more tolerant, gullible, or less convinced of their own good sense".
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