History Main / TwoDecadesBehind

17th May '16 11:07:54 PM DeltaDart
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[Website/{{Wikipedia}} Wikipedia's]] formality and "Verifiability, not truth" policy often leaves its pages on slang terms empty and out of date. See [[en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_burner]]'their page on rice burners, and compare to that of ThisVeryWiki.

to:

* [[Website/{{Wikipedia}} Wikipedia's]] formality and "Verifiability, not truth" policy often leaves its pages on slang terms empty and out of date. See [[en.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_burner]]'their org/wiki/Rice_burner , their page on rice burners, and compare to [[RiceBurner that of of]] ThisVeryWiki.
17th May '16 11:05:12 PM DeltaDart
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* [[Website/{{Wikipedia}} Wikipedia's]] formality and "Verifiability, not truth" policy often leaves its pages on slang terms empty and out of date. See [[en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_burner]]'their page on rice burners, and compare to that of ThisVeryWiki.
11th May '16 8:52:30 PM DanielCase
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The Court's justification for letting the Paula Jones lawsuit that ultimately led to Bill Clinton's impeachment and trial was that "it is unlikely to take up much of the President's time." That was written in the mid-1990s by Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who had last practiced law in the early 1960s; whatever they thought of Clinton and the lawsuit, lawyers of the era who were familiar with what litigation had become could not help but laugh at that statement.
11th May '16 8:46:28 PM DanielCase
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Many expats working in Japan or China would complain of antiquated office equipment such as fax machines, the inaccessibility of [=ATMs=] during certain hours, or the nonuniversal nature of some cards [=ATMs=] won't accept, especially foreign ones, and extremely slow internet despite Japan being a technological mecca. China has restrictive banking of bureaucratic stamping, analog police records, and use pen and paper, and in rural China some farmers continue to use old Stalin-era tractors. More rural places don't have [=ATMs=] and everything is done with cash, or even old bronze aged merchant scales. Some Chinese live in ancient mud huts that have existed since Jesus. Shanghai's Bund apartments are still inhabitable.

to:

* Many expats working in Japan or China would complain of antiquated office equipment such as fax machines, the inaccessibility of [=ATMs=] during certain hours, or the nonuniversal nature of some cards [=ATMs=] won't accept, especially foreign ones, and extremely slow internet despite Japan being a technological mecca. China has restrictive banking of bureaucratic stamping, analog police records, and use pen and paper, and in rural China some farmers continue to use old Stalin-era tractors. More rural places don't have [=ATMs=] and everything is done with cash, or even old bronze aged merchant scales. Some Chinese live in ancient mud huts that have existed since Jesus. Shanghai's UsefulNotes/Shanghai's Bund apartments are still inhabitable.


Added DiffLines:

* Due to the advanced age of many of the justices, U.S. Supreme Court decisions often reflect an outdated understanding of how things happen:
** In his dissent from ''[[https://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=7116241821647881014 United States v. Thirty-Seven Photographs]]'', a 1971 case about the Customs Service's confiscation of the titular objects as obscene, Justice Hugo Black writes that "it gives little comfort to an American bringing a book home to Colorado or Alabama for personal reading to be informed without explanation that a 74-day delay at New York harbor is not 'undue.'" By that era Americans were returning from trips overseas via planes, not ships.
** At the end of that decade, ''[[http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-supreme-court/442/735.html Smith v. Maryland]]'' held that it was constitutional for police to collect what we would today call telephone metadata (basically, at the time, length of calls and number called) without a warrant, since, as Chief Justice Warren Burger wrote, "it is doubtful that telephone users have any expectation of privacy over the numbers they dial." While he was correct that the technology that made billing possible at the time meant that users had to be able to infer that at least the long-distance numbers they called were recorded, his understanding might have been colored by having grown up in the era when human operators always answered whenever you picked up--someone who grew up in a dial-tone era might have been less likely to infer this.
29th Apr '16 4:01:20 AM aye_amber
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* As noted above, the tendency of the "dominant" generation, once in their forties and fifties, to drive "nostalgia booms" where a musical genre from their youth is resurrected. The punk rock era of the middle-late 1970's also saw a resurgence in 1950's rock'n'roll styled artistes, who could appear on the same ''Series/TopOfThePops'' billing as the punk rockers. Acts like Darts and Showaddywaddy, in DA quiffs and the full teddy-boy rigs performing Fifties-themed songs, looked oddly anachronistic next to music/TheClash and Music/Buzzcocks.

to:

* As noted above, the tendency of the "dominant" generation, once in their forties and fifties, to drive "nostalgia booms" where a musical genre from their youth is resurrected. The punk rock era of the middle-late 1970's also saw a resurgence in 1950's rock'n'roll styled artistes, who could appear on the same ''Series/TopOfThePops'' billing as the punk rockers. Acts like Darts and Showaddywaddy, in DA quiffs and the full teddy-boy rigs performing Fifties-themed songs, looked oddly anachronistic next to music/TheClash and Music/Buzzcocks.Music/{{Buzzcocks}}.
29th Apr '16 3:53:59 AM aye_amber
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* As noted above, the tendency of the "dominant" generation, once in their forties and fifties, to drive "nostalgia booms" where a musical genre from their youth is resurrected. The punk rock era of the middle-late 1970's also saw a resurgence in 1950's rock'n'roll styled artistes, who could appear on the same ''Series/TopOfThePops'' billing as the punk rockers. Acts like Darts and Showaddywaddy, in DA quiffs and the full teddy-boy rigs performing Fifties-themed songs, looked oddly anachronistic next to music/TheClash and Music/TheBuzzcocks.

to:

* As noted above, the tendency of the "dominant" generation, once in their forties and fifties, to drive "nostalgia booms" where a musical genre from their youth is resurrected. The punk rock era of the middle-late 1970's also saw a resurgence in 1950's rock'n'roll styled artistes, who could appear on the same ''Series/TopOfThePops'' billing as the punk rockers. Acts like Darts and Showaddywaddy, in DA quiffs and the full teddy-boy rigs performing Fifties-themed songs, looked oddly anachronistic next to music/TheClash and Music/TheBuzzcocks. Music/Buzzcocks.
27th Apr '16 5:41:23 AM twilicorn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Pick any feel-good Christmas special out there, set anywhere near to the present day, in any supposed geographic area. In terms of scenery, dress, manners of speaking, and toys, you will immediately be transported to A: Mid 1800's London a la Creator/CharlesDickens with carolers, long scarves, and lovable chimney sweeps, B: 1950's New York City with picturesque store front windows to look in through and sidewalks to stroll down merrily, C: 1950's New England with rolling hills, stone walls, and early snowfall for sledding, or D: A combination of all 3. A fourth locale -- a small town in the Colorado Rockies with snow-dusted fir trees and CountryMusic on the soundtrack, set in some vague period between 1970 and 1995 -- also seems to have gained traction in recent decades.
** This is more due to the fact that Christmas specials are usually gunning for the appeal of works such as ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'', ''Film/MiracleOnThirtyFourthStreet'' and ''Film/ItsAWonderfulLife'' -- and, increasingly, 1980s Christmas specials hosted by the likes of John Denver and Dolly Parton. Probably also due to the fact that Christmas specials have to try their absolute damnedest to be as close to timeless as possible. Since Christmas movies are only shown for a short window in December and are then shoved into the mothballs for 11 months, their most viable way of becoming profitable is to try and be played year after year. Unfortunately, this makes them incredibly vulnerable to TechnologyMarchesOn, as any kind of expensive toy or gadget the kids are desperate for can easily become laughably antiquated in that time span. To avoid making a Christmas special look like it's [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece past its sell by date,]] most specials try to remove as many of their modern trappings as they can, and instead aim for a retro-nostalgia feel, even if it does take place in the then-modern day.

to:

* Pick any feel-good Christmas special out there, set anywhere near to the present day, in any supposed geographic area. In terms of scenery, dress, manners of speaking, and toys, you will immediately be transported to A: Mid 1800's London a la Creator/CharlesDickens with carolers, long scarves, and lovable chimney sweeps, B: 1950's New York City with picturesque store front windows to look in through and sidewalks to stroll down merrily, C: 1950's New England with rolling hills, stone walls, and early snowfall for sledding, or D: A combination of all 3. three. [[TakeAThirdOption A fourth locale locale]] -- a small town in the Colorado Rockies with snow-dusted fir trees and CountryMusic on the soundtrack, set in some vague period between 1970 and 1995 -- also seems to have gained traction in recent decades.
starting around the TurnOfTheMillennium.
** This is more due to the fact that Christmas specials are usually gunning for the appeal of works such as ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'', ''Film/MiracleOnThirtyFourthStreet'' and ''Film/ItsAWonderfulLife'' -- and, (and, increasingly, 1980s 70's and 80's Christmas specials hosted by the likes of John Denver Denver, Music/DollyParton, Creator/BobHope and Dolly Parton.Music/BingCrosby). Probably also due to the fact that Christmas specials have to try their absolute damnedest to be as close to timeless as possible. Since Christmas movies are only shown for a short window in between November and December and are then shoved into the mothballs for 10 to 11 months, their most viable way of becoming profitable is to try and be played year after year. Unfortunately, this makes them incredibly vulnerable to TechnologyMarchesOn, as any kind of expensive toy or gadget the kids are desperate for can easily become laughably antiquated in that time span. To avoid making a Christmas special look like it's [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece past its sell by date,]] most specials try to remove as many of their modern trappings as they can, and instead aim for a retro-nostalgia feel, even if it does take place in the then-modern day.
23rd Apr '16 1:58:24 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Lampshaded in a ''ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}'' comic:
--> 1978!Garfield: I hear a lot has happened since 1978.
--> 2003!Garfield: Like what?
--> 1978!Garfield: I hear Disco died.

to:

* Lampshaded in a 2003 ''ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}'' comic:
comic where [[MeetYourEarlyInstallmentWeirdness the then-current Garfield meets his 1978 incarnation]]:
--> 1978!Garfield: '''1978!Garfield''': I hear a lot has happened since 1978.
--> 2003!Garfield: '''2003!Garfield''': Like what?
--> 1978!Garfield: '''1978!Garfield''': I hear Disco died.



--> 2003!Garfield: Not in '''this''' house!

to:

--> 2003!Garfield: '''2003!Garfield''': Not in '''this''' house!
15th Apr '16 1:36:51 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Take a look at the specifications of the electronic hardware (CPU power, resolution of the CCDs of their camera(s), etc) used by spacecrafts, manned or not, and you'll find they look outdated even by the standards of the epoch of their launch. The reason of this is two-fold: 1) Since space is one of the harshest environments known[[note]]If not ''the'' harshest[[/note]] and you cannot (yet) send a technician to, say, Mars to fix something that has broken the most resilient, thoroughly tested, and reliable, not the latest, hardware is used, and 2) Manufacturing an -upgraded or not- instrument ''ex-profeso'' for a space mission costs ''a lot'' of (very scant) money, takes time, and would require a redesign of the spacecraft, its software, etc, that means even more money and time.

to:

* Take a look at the specifications of the electronic hardware (CPU power, resolution of the CCDs [=CCDs=] of their camera(s), etc) used by spacecrafts, manned or not, and you'll find they look outdated even by the standards of the epoch of their launch. The reason of this is two-fold: 1) Since space is one of the harshest environments known[[note]]If not ''the'' harshest[[/note]] and you cannot (yet) send a technician to, say, Mars to fix something that has broken the most resilient, thoroughly tested, and reliable, not the latest, hardware is used, and 2) Manufacturing an -upgraded or not- instrument ''ex-profeso'' for a space mission costs ''a lot'' of (very scant) money, takes time, and would require a redesign of the spacecraft, its software, etc, that means even more money and time.
15th Apr '16 1:36:10 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The oldest songs that modern CountryMusic stations will play are generally from the '90s, with the new material almost indistinguishable from the old. In fact, the nostalgia is a big selling point of the music, with longing for a simpler time a common lyrical theme. There's also another reason for this; in the early '90s there was a massive shift of pop performers over to country while the previously separate Southern Rock was rolled in and the linked Western genre was almost completely abandoned. This changed the entire sound of the Top 40 part of the genre. Go back further than that and the music is completely different.

to:

* The oldest songs that modern CountryMusic stations will play are generally from the '90s, with the new material almost indistinguishable from the old. Likewise, "classic country" formats rarely venture beyond the end of TheEighties, outside a handful of chestnuts. In fact, the nostalgia is a big selling point of the music, with longing for a simpler time a common lyrical theme. There's also another reason for this; in the early '90s there was a massive shift of pop performers over to influence in country while the previously separate Southern Rock was rolled in and the linked Western genre was almost completely abandoned. This changed the entire sound of the Top 40 part of the genre. Go back further than that and the music is completely different.
This list shows the last 10 events of 563. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TwoDecadesBehind