History Main / TwoDecadesBehind

5th Feb '16 12:01:09 PM DavidDelony
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* A lot of expats can find themselves out of sync with the culture of their home countries when they return, though the Internet makes it easier to keep in touch with what's going on much more easily these days.
29th Jan '16 4:38:06 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' seems to be stuck in the late '80s/early '90s, judging by the technology (the crude graphics on the video games and the old Windows 95-esque computer), despite the fact the show started in the 2010s. Eventually, it was revealed that [=DVDs=] and higher tech do exist -- Benson is just cheap, and Mordecai and Rigby are {{hipsters}}. Their temporary replacements do use modern smartphones.
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* ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' seems to be stuck in the late '80s/early '90s, judging by the technology (the crude graphics on the video games and the old Windows 95-esque computer), despite the fact the show started in the 2010s. Eventually, it was revealed that [=DVDs=] and higher tech do exist -- Benson is just cheap, and Mordecai and Rigby are {{hipsters}}.{{hipster}}s. Their temporary replacements do use modern smartphones.
24th Jan '16 8:47:22 AM mlsmithca
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Three. Years. THREE. YEARS. There is NO excuse not to know this now. Go to the Permanent Red Link Club. Read the very first entry on the page. And please never do that again.
The twenty year (or more) lag between reality and TV-land. Shows that first ran in TheNineties often reminisced TheSeventies, shows in TheEighties carry a lot of cultural baggage from TheSixties, shows that first ran in TheSeventies hark back to TheFifties, and shows in TheFifties and TheSixties had its nostalgic setups between TheGayNineties and TheRoaringTwenties (probably because the '30s and '40s [[TheGreatDepression hadn't featured many things]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII people wanted to be nostalgic about]]). At the start of the 21st century, this can be seen in how some works seem to suggest that they took place in TheEighties and steadily into TheNineties when they are supposed to be set in the present-day or a little earlier. In such settings, the "cool kids" still rap and skateboard and the lingo is still TotallyRadical JiveTurkey (even in cases where it was not relevant to begin with). In many cases, it's clear that someone [[DidNotDoTheResearch hasn't done the research.]]
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The twenty year (or more) lag between reality and TV-land. Shows that first ran in TheNineties often reminisced TheSeventies, shows in TheEighties carry a lot of cultural baggage from TheSixties, shows that first ran in TheSeventies hark back to TheFifties, and shows in TheFifties and TheSixties had its nostalgic setups between TheGayNineties and TheRoaringTwenties (probably because the '30s and '40s [[TheGreatDepression hadn't featured many things]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII people wanted to be nostalgic about]]). At the start of the 21st century, this can be seen in how some works seem to suggest that they took place in TheEighties and steadily into TheNineties when they are supposed to be set in the present-day or a little earlier. In such settings, the "cool kids" still rap and skateboard and the lingo is still TotallyRadical JiveTurkey (even in cases where it was not relevant to begin with). In many cases, it's clear that someone [[DidNotDoTheResearch hasn't done the research.]] with).
19th Jan '16 4:29:22 PM Luigifan
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The twenty year (or more) lag between reality and TV-land. Shows that first ran in TheNineties often reminisced TheSeventies, shows in TheEighties carry a lot of cultural baggage from TheSixties, shows that first ran in TheSeventies hark back to TheFifties, and shows in TheFifties and TheSixties had its nostalgic setups between TheGayNineties and TheRoaringTwenties (probably because the '30s and '40s [[TheGreatDepression hadn't featured many things]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII people wanted to be nostalgic about]]). At the start of the 21st century, this can be seen in how some works seem to suggest that they took place in TheEighties and steadily into TheNineties when they are supposed to be set in the present-day or a little earlier. In such settings, the "cool kids" still rap and skateboard and the lingo is still TotallyRadical JiveTurkey (even in cases where it was not relevant to begin with). In many cases, it's clear that someone hasn't done the research.
to:
The twenty year (or more) lag between reality and TV-land. Shows that first ran in TheNineties often reminisced TheSeventies, shows in TheEighties carry a lot of cultural baggage from TheSixties, shows that first ran in TheSeventies hark back to TheFifties, and shows in TheFifties and TheSixties had its nostalgic setups between TheGayNineties and TheRoaringTwenties (probably because the '30s and '40s [[TheGreatDepression hadn't featured many things]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII people wanted to be nostalgic about]]). At the start of the 21st century, this can be seen in how some works seem to suggest that they took place in TheEighties and steadily into TheNineties when they are supposed to be set in the present-day or a little earlier. In such settings, the "cool kids" still rap and skateboard and the lingo is still TotallyRadical JiveTurkey (even in cases where it was not relevant to begin with). In many cases, it's clear that someone [[DidNotDoTheResearch hasn't done the research. research.]]
27th Dec '15 10:28:23 PM merotoker
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The twenty year (or more) lag between reality and TV-land. Shows that first ran in TheNineties often reminisced TheSeventies, shows in TheEighties carry a lot of cultural baggage from TheSixties, shows that first ran in TheSeventies hark back to TheFifties, and shows in TheFifties and TheSixties had its nostalgic setups between TheGayNineties and TheRoaringTwenties (probably because the '30s and '40s [[TheGreatDepression hadn't featured many things]] [[WorldWarII people wanted to be nostalgic about]]). At the start of the 21st century, this can be seen in how some works seem to suggest that they took place in TheEighties and steadily into TheNineties when they are supposed to be set in the present-day or a little earlier. In such settings, the "cool kids" still rap and skateboard and the lingo is still TotallyRadical JiveTurkey (even in cases where it was not relevant to begin with). In many cases, it's clear that someone hasn't done the research.
to:
The twenty year (or more) lag between reality and TV-land. Shows that first ran in TheNineties often reminisced TheSeventies, shows in TheEighties carry a lot of cultural baggage from TheSixties, shows that first ran in TheSeventies hark back to TheFifties, and shows in TheFifties and TheSixties had its nostalgic setups between TheGayNineties and TheRoaringTwenties (probably because the '30s and '40s [[TheGreatDepression hadn't featured many things]] [[WorldWarII [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII people wanted to be nostalgic about]]). At the start of the 21st century, this can be seen in how some works seem to suggest that they took place in TheEighties and steadily into TheNineties when they are supposed to be set in the present-day or a little earlier. In such settings, the "cool kids" still rap and skateboard and the lingo is still TotallyRadical JiveTurkey (even in cases where it was not relevant to begin with). In many cases, it's clear that someone hasn't done the research.

While television shows of the 90s, 2000s and 2010s are generally better at portraying their respective time periods than shows from the 50s-80s (no doubt due to how much easier it became to find information during the late-80s/early-90s, as well as the relaxation of censorship described just above), they still aren't without their fair share of dated slang and cultural tropes. Modern-day kid shows, in particular, still seem to fall victim to this. Even though information about modern-day kid culture is quite easy to obtain now, with all the books and websites devoted to it (not to mention networks like Nickelodeon).
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While television shows of the 90s, 2000s and 2010s are generally better at portraying their respective time periods than shows from the 50s-80s (no doubt due to how much easier it became to find information during the late-80s/early-90s, as well as the relaxation of censorship described just above), they still aren't without their fair share of dated slang and cultural tropes. Modern-day kid shows, in particular, still seem to fall victim to this. Even though information about modern-day kid culture is quite easy to obtain now, with all the books and websites devoted to it (not to mention networks like Nickelodeon). Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}).

* A 1995 commercial for Eggo Cinnamon Toast Waffles exemplifies this trope to a tee. In it, a kid suggests combining his school with a music video. What follows is a school with its kids dressed at least a decade out of date, wearing spandex and ridiculous amounts of hairspray, topped off with a voiceover by a [[Music/TheRamones Joey Ramone]] soundalike. If the advertisers did their research regarding what was hip when the ad came out, the boys would've all had Music/KurtCobain haircuts and dirty clothes. The girls, meanwhile, would've either cut their hair really short or dressed like [[Film/{{Clueless}} Cher Horowitz]]. Of course, these styles were in the mid-1990s still popular in many parts of the American Midwest, which is supposedly where the "average" American consumer lives; hell, in some cases those styles are still popular in the Midwest ''today''.
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6XygCEcHeY A 1995 commercial for Eggo Cinnamon Toast Waffles Waffles]] exemplifies this trope to a tee. In it, a kid suggests combining his school with a music video. What follows is a school with its kids dressed at least a decade out of date, wearing spandex and ridiculous amounts of hairspray, topped off with a voiceover by a [[Music/TheRamones Joey Ramone]] soundalike. If the advertisers did their research regarding what was hip when the ad came out, the boys would've all had Music/KurtCobain haircuts and dirty clothes. The girls, meanwhile, would've either cut their hair really short or dressed like [[Film/{{Clueless}} Cher Horowitz]]. Of course, these styles were in the mid-1990s still popular in many parts of the American Midwest, which is supposedly where the "average" American consumer lives; hell, in some cases those styles are still popular in the Midwest ''today''.

* Captain Birdseye has used the same old-fashioned grey bearded sea captain for decades on their logo. For a short while during the 1990s they gave the character a more trendy, updated look and replaced him by a much younger man. The make-over didn't catch on and they soon [[StatusQuoIsGod returned to the old captain]] again.
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* Captain Birdseye has used the same old-fashioned grey bearded sea captain for decades on their logo. For a short while during the 1990s they gave the character a more trendy, updated look and replaced him by with a much younger man. The make-over didn't catch on and they soon [[StatusQuoIsGod returned to the old captain]] again.

* Marvel Comics' disco-themed ComicBook/{{Dazzler}} (a.k.a., sometimes "The Disco Dazzler") got her solo series in 1981... by which point disco was considered, well, DeaderThanDisco.
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* Marvel Comics' Creator/MarvelComics' disco-themed ComicBook/{{Dazzler}} (a.k.a., sometimes "The Disco Dazzler") got her solo series in 1981... by which point disco was considered, well, DeaderThanDisco.

* A common criticism of Creator/DCComics's ''ComicBook/{{New 52}}'' (2011) is how much is reminded some readers of the early 1990s [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age]]. The talent on most ''New 52'' books was and remains heavy on 1990s stalwarts like Creator/JimLee, Creator/ScottLobdell, Creator/FabianNicieza, Creator/BrettBooth, and even Creator/RobLiefeld. Special mention should go to Creator/GeorgePerez, whose work on "World's Finest" didn't look so hot due to his clearly not taking modern digital inking and coloring into account. Not to mention incorporating Wildstorm characters into the DC Universe, such as Zealot, Voodoo, Fairchild and Grifter. Another example is that many of the costumes have more of a uniform and armored look (despite the separate origins of Justice League members, the members all have similar collars), Superman and Wonder Woman are far more aggressive, and everyone appears more youthful.
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* A common criticism of Creator/DCComics's ''ComicBook/{{New 52}}'' (2011) is how much is it reminded some readers of the early 1990s [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age]]. The talent on most ''New 52'' books was and remains heavy on 1990s stalwarts like Creator/JimLee, Creator/ScottLobdell, Creator/FabianNicieza, Creator/BrettBooth, and even Creator/RobLiefeld. Special mention should go to Creator/GeorgePerez, whose work on "World's Finest" didn't look so hot due to his clearly not taking modern digital inking and coloring into account. Not to mention incorporating Wildstorm Creator/{{Wildstorm}} characters into the DC Universe, such as Zealot, Voodoo, Fairchild and Grifter. Another example is that many of the costumes have more of a uniform and armored look (despite the separate origins of Justice League members, the members all have similar collars), Superman and Wonder Woman are far more aggressive, and everyone appears more youthful.

* Check out some of the Disney live-action comedies from the 1970s, where it's Still The Fifties: milk is still delivered to doorsteps; women are still housewives; and the chances of seeing any hippies, punks, or glam rockers are slim to none. Heck, in many cases [[SeventiesHair the sideburns on the male characters aren't even that long]]! Occasionally the writers would slip in something TotallyRadical, but that worked about as well as you'd expect. This trope applies to the actual subject matter of the Disney films in question as well as their trappings: Disney didn't release its first PG-rated film (''Film/TheBlackHole'') until 1979, more than a decade after the current G-to-R rating system was introduced. Children who watch these films (and remember, these are some of the first live-action films they see) often end up [[ModernStasis assuming that hardly any big change happened in the '60s and '70s]]. This still happens (or, until the mid-2000s, still happened), but by then it was intentional and often an AffectionateParody of the phenomenon. One reason given for this is that WaltDisney and his immediate successors were very old-fashioned (aka conservative) and were always a step or two behind the rest of Hollywood.
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* Check out some of the Disney live-action comedies from the 1970s, where it's Still The Fifties: milk is still delivered to doorsteps; women are still housewives; and the chances of seeing any hippies, punks, or glam rockers are slim to none. Heck, in many cases [[SeventiesHair the sideburns on the male characters aren't even that long]]! Occasionally the writers would slip in something TotallyRadical, but that worked about as well as you'd expect. This trope applies to the actual subject matter of the Disney films in question as well as their trappings: Disney didn't release its first PG-rated film (''Film/TheBlackHole'') until 1979, more than a decade after the current G-to-R rating system was introduced. Children who watch these films (and remember, these are some of the first live-action films they see) often end up [[ModernStasis assuming that hardly any big change happened in the '60s and '70s]]. This still happens (or, until the mid-2000s, still happened), but by then it was intentional and often an AffectionateParody of the phenomenon. One reason given for this is that WaltDisney Creator/WaltDisney and his immediate successors were very old-fashioned (aka conservative) and were always a step or two behind the rest of Hollywood.

* It's unclear what year the film ''Film/{{Hesher}}'' is set in (the film itself was released in 2010). But the clothing, dialogue, and automobiles make it feel like it's set in either the late 1980s or early 1990s.
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* It's unclear what year the film ''Film/{{Hesher}}'' is set in (the film itself was released in 2010). But the clothing, dialogue, and automobiles make it feel like it's set in either the late 1980s or early 1990s.

* [[{{Retraux}} Used intentionally]] in "Last Friday Night" by Music/KatyPerry. The people in the video look like they're straight out of the very 1980s RevengeOfTheNerds... spreading the word via very 2010s social media, giving an example of the 20 year rule of coolness..
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* [[{{Retraux}} Used intentionally]] in "Last Friday Night" by Music/KatyPerry. The people in the video look like they're straight out of the very 1980s RevengeOfTheNerds...''Film/RevengeOfTheNerds''... spreading the word via very 2010s social media, giving an example of the 20 year rule of coolness..

* ''Franchise/MetalGear'''s vision of TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture (and even TheSixties and TheSeventies, to some extent) is mostly based on late Eighties and Nineties sci-fi movies -- things like ''Film/TotalRecall1990'', ''MaxHeadroom'' and ''Film/BladeRunner''. The visual aesthetic, the fashionable clothes and body types (not to mention [[EightiesHair the hairstyles on the men]]), the politics, the themes, the {{Shout Out}}s and the sense of humour are all based on that tradition. Part of this is ZeerustCanon and is why ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' moved away from the aesthetic a little, but ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' goes back the other way and invokes it as deliberate {{Zeerust}}.
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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'''s vision of TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture (and even TheSixties and TheSeventies, to some extent) is mostly based on late Eighties and Nineties sci-fi movies -- things like ''Film/TotalRecall1990'', ''MaxHeadroom'' ''Series/MaxHeadroom'' and ''Film/BladeRunner''. The visual aesthetic, the fashionable clothes and body types (not to mention [[EightiesHair the hairstyles on the men]]), the politics, the themes, the {{Shout Out}}s and the sense of humour are all based on that tradition. Part of this is ZeerustCanon and is why ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' moved away from the aesthetic a little, but ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' goes back the other way and invokes it as deliberate {{Zeerust}}.

* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy'' where the three main characters go to a old folks' home for monsters. {{Dracula}}, Film/{{Blacula}}, [[Film/TheWolfMan1941 the Wolf Man]] and the Film/BrideOfFrankenstein are all treated as "Classic" monsters (fair enough) but the "New, Modern" monsters are [[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet Freddy]] and [[Franchise/FridayThe13th Jason]]. The episode aired in 2005, after several generations of horror fads had come and gone since the old supernatural slashers of the 1980s. Altough this may be partially justified in that they were portrayed more as the new classic movie monsters, and the fact that they're in the old folks's home in the first place acknowledges their age.
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* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy'' where the three main characters go to a an old folks' home for monsters. {{Dracula}}, Film/{{Blacula}}, [[Film/TheWolfMan1941 the Wolf Man]] and the Film/BrideOfFrankenstein are all treated as "Classic" monsters (fair enough) but the "New, Modern" monsters are [[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet Freddy]] and [[Franchise/FridayThe13th Jason]]. The episode aired in 2005, after several generations of horror fads had come and gone since the old supernatural slashers of the 1980s. Altough this may be partially justified in that they were portrayed more as the new classic movie monsters, and the fact that they're in the old folks's home in the first place acknowledges their age.

** The episode where Music/TheWho guest starred the writers also included drummer Keith Moon, despite the fact that he had already died in 1979. They were aware of this, though, and just included him as a homage to the original group. This also explains why he has no lines.
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** The In the episode where Music/TheWho guest starred the writers also included drummer Keith Moon, despite the fact that he had already died in 1979. They were aware of this, though, and just included him as a homage to the original group. This also explains why he has no lines.

** In of the audio commentaries to ''South Park'', Parker and Stone noted that the fact that Stan still phones Kyle by using a regular phone shows how old-fashioned they really are.
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** In one of the audio commentaries to ''South Park'', Parker and Stone noted that the fact that Stan still phones Kyle by using a regular phone shows how old-fashioned they really are.

** This is more due to the fact that Christmas specials are usually gunning for the appeal of works such as ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'', ''Film/MiracleOn34thStreet'' and ''Film/ItsAWonderfulLife'' -- and, increasingly, 1980s Christmas specials hosted by the likes of John Denver and Dolly Parton. Probably also due to the fact that Christmas specials have to try their absolute damnedest to be as close to timeless as possible. Since Christmas movies are only shown for a short window in December and are then shoved into the mothballs for 11 months, their most viable way of becoming profitable is to try and be played year after year. Unfortunately, this makes them incredibly vulnerable to TechnologyMarchesOn, as any kind of expensive toy or gadget the kids are desperate for can easily become laughably antiquated in that time span. To avoid making a Christmas special look like it's [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece past its sell by date,]] most specials try to remove as many of their modern trappings as they can, and instead aim for a retro-nostalgia feel, even if it does take place in the then-modern day.
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** This is more due to the fact that Christmas specials are usually gunning for the appeal of works such as ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'', ''Film/MiracleOn34thStreet'' ''Film/MiracleOnThirtyFourthStreet'' and ''Film/ItsAWonderfulLife'' -- and, increasingly, 1980s Christmas specials hosted by the likes of John Denver and Dolly Parton. Probably also due to the fact that Christmas specials have to try their absolute damnedest to be as close to timeless as possible. Since Christmas movies are only shown for a short window in December and are then shoved into the mothballs for 11 months, their most viable way of becoming profitable is to try and be played year after year. Unfortunately, this makes them incredibly vulnerable to TechnologyMarchesOn, as any kind of expensive toy or gadget the kids are desperate for can easily become laughably antiquated in that time span. To avoid making a Christmas special look like it's [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece past its sell by date,]] most specials try to remove as many of their modern trappings as they can, and instead aim for a retro-nostalgia feel, even if it does take place in the then-modern day.

** The latter could be justified by SmallReferencePools and ViewersAreMorons; you don't want all your viewers scratching their heads over some "obscure" pop-culture icon. (Noted in a fairly recent ''Mad'' Magazine spoof of Halloween in which a kid goes trick-or-treating as WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants and is annoyed that one middle-aged man giving him candy refers to him as [[BuffySpeak "Little Yellow Thing."]])
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** The latter could be justified by SmallReferencePools and ViewersAreMorons; you don't want all your viewers scratching their heads over some "obscure" pop-culture icon. (Noted in a fairly recent ''Mad'' Magazine spoof of Halloween in which a kid goes trick-or-treating as WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants WesternAnimation/{{SpongeBob SquarePants}} and is annoyed that one middle-aged man giving him candy refers to him as [[BuffySpeak "Little Yellow Thing."]])

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20th Dec '15 1:06:58 PM ChesterPolarbear
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* The Volusia County, Florida [[TheSheriff Sheriff's Office]] has put out [[http://www.volusiasheriff.org/900.htm this warning]] about calling 1-900 phone numbers. 900 numbers disappeared in the [[TheNineties late nineties]].
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* The Volusia County, Florida [[TheSheriff Sheriff's Office]] Morris, Minnesota Police Department has put out [[http://www.volusiasheriff.org/900.htm ci.morris.mn.us/pd/Safety.shtml#1900TelephoneNumbers this warning]] about calling 1-900 phone numbers. 900 numbers disappeared in the [[TheNineties late nineties]].
20th Dec '15 1:01:24 PM AlucardSX
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** Invoked in the episode where the characters go to Staten Island for the night, to some function where they dance to disco classics. Carrie's closing voiceover says it reminds her of going to Europe because all the music is at least twenty years old. What's really strange is, if you assume that Carrie Bradshaw is no older than Sarah Jessica Parker (born 1965), she'd be too young to really remember the disco craze. Also, the idea that Europe is that far behind also shows the characters' ignorance.
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** Invoked in the episode where the characters go to Staten Island for the night, to some function where they dance to disco classics. Carrie's closing voiceover says it reminds her of going to Europe because all the music is at least twenty years old. What's really strange is, if you assume that Carrie Bradshaw is no older than Sarah Jessica Parker (born 1965), she'd be too young to really remember the disco craze. Also, the idea that Europe is that far behind also shows the characters' character's ignorance.
20th Dec '15 12:59:57 PM AlucardSX
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** Invoked in the episode where the characters go to Staten Island for the night, to some function where they dance to disco classics. Carrie's closing voiceover says it reminds her of going to Europe because all the music is at least twenty years old. What's really strange is, if you assume that Carrie Bradshaw is no older than Sarah Jessica Parker (born 1965), she'd be too young to really remember the disco craze. Also, the idea that Europe is that much decades behind also shows the characters's ignorance.
to:
** Invoked in the episode where the characters go to Staten Island for the night, to some function where they dance to disco classics. Carrie's closing voiceover says it reminds her of going to Europe because all the music is at least twenty years old. What's really strange is, if you assume that Carrie Bradshaw is no older than Sarah Jessica Parker (born 1965), she'd be too young to really remember the disco craze. Also, the idea that Europe is that much decades far behind also shows the characters's characters' ignorance.
8th Dec '15 7:45:26 AM jokergirl
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* Take a look at the specifications of the electronic hardware (CPU power, resolution of the CCDs of their camera(s), etc) used by spacecrafts, manned or not, and you'll find they look outdated even by the standards of the epoch of their launch. The reason of this is two-fold: 1) Since space is one of the harshest environments known[[note]]If not ''the'' harshest[[/note]] and you cannot (yet) send a technician to, say, Mars to fix something that has broken the most resilient and reliable, not the latest, hardware is used, and 2) Manufacturing an -upgraded or not- instrument ''ex-profeso'' for a space mission costs ''a lot'' of (very scant) money, takes time, and would require a redesign of the spacecraft, its software, etc, that means even more money and time.
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* Take a look at the specifications of the electronic hardware (CPU power, resolution of the CCDs of their camera(s), etc) used by spacecrafts, manned or not, and you'll find they look outdated even by the standards of the epoch of their launch. The reason of this is two-fold: 1) Since space is one of the harshest environments known[[note]]If not ''the'' harshest[[/note]] and you cannot (yet) send a technician to, say, Mars to fix something that has broken the most resilient resilient, thoroughly tested, and reliable, not the latest, hardware is used, and 2) Manufacturing an -upgraded or not- instrument ''ex-profeso'' for a space mission costs ''a lot'' of (very scant) money, takes time, and would require a redesign of the spacecraft, its software, etc, that means even more money and time.

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* Any kind of official signage. Railway crossing warning signs depicted a steam train for decades, and "No cellphone"-signs still show 1990s-era bricks with actual buttons and antennas instead of smartphones. (Granted, modern bullet trains and smartphones might not be as iconic, either.)
7th Dec '15 6:08:40 PM WillKeaton
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* Averted in this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clZBO_kBgUM Taco Bell commercial]]. This guy's been stuck in [[TheEighties 1984]] and decides to get with the times.
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* Averted in this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clZBO_kBgUM Taco Bell commercial]]. commercial.]] This guy's been stuck in [[TheEighties 1984]] and decides to get with the times.
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