History Main / TrialAndErrorGameplay

18th May '16 11:40:07 AM ZombieAladdin
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* Every single PlatformHell game and Mario hack ever created. Miss that perfect jump between two walls of spikes while dodging numerous Bullet Bills and spin jumping off a conveniently timed enemy? Instant death to the character. ''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy'', ''The Unfair Platformer'', ''Syobon Action'' and ''[[VideoGame/KaizoMarioWorld Kaizo Mario]]'' (and every game based off the latter) are common users of this trope.

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* Every single PlatformHell game and Mario hack ever created. Miss that perfect jump between two walls of spikes while dodging numerous Bullet Bills and spin jumping off a conveniently timed enemy? Instant death to the character. ''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy'', ''The Unfair Platformer'', ''Syobon Action'' and ''[[VideoGame/KaizoMarioWorld Kaizo Mario]]'' (and every game based off the latter) are common users of this trope. The official course-building game, ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker'', is no exception, and may have more trial-and-error courses than any Mario hack due to its high public visibility.
13th May '16 6:36:29 AM supergod
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* ''VideoGame/DivinityIIEgoDraconis'' holds the belief that the modern gamer has no developed sense of inference or observation, and can only learn from repeated killings pointed at the face. Worse, it's a very engrossing game, so players often forget to [[SaveScumming save regularly]] before this trope rears its drooling head.

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* %% ''VideoGame/DivinityIIEgoDraconis'' holds the belief that the modern gamer has no developed sense of inference or observation, and can only learn from repeated killings pointed at the face. Worse, it's a very engrossing game, so players often forget to [[SaveScumming save regularly]] before this trope rears its drooling head.
13th May '16 6:35:35 AM supergod
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* In the ''BaldursGate'' series, many enemies will seem near-invincible and ridiculously unfair until you figure out what exactly you're supposed to do with them. Basilisks, beholders, vampires and the like will all give you trouble until you figure out how exactly how you need to prepare in order to defend yourself from them as well as defeat them.
13th May '16 5:26:43 AM supergod
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* ''VideoGame/DivinityIIEgoDraconis'' holds the belief that the modern gamer has no developed sense of inference or observation, and can only learn from repeated killings pointed at the face. Worse, it's a very engrossing game, so players often forget to [[SaveScumming save regularly]] before this trope rears its drooling head.



* The [[Creator/TellTaleGames TellTale]] games are notorious for this.
** A notable example is in ''VideoGame/TheWolfAmongUs'', where the Woodsman has just gotten an emotional weight off his chest by revealing to Wolf that when he saved Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother, it was by mere chance; he was actually planning to rob them, and only saved them in hopes of getting a reward. After he finishes, one of the response options is to "Glass Him." Given the context of the previous scene, combined with the fact that they are in a bar, many players assumed that this meant Wolf buying the Woodsman a drink. Instead, it has Wolf abruptly crack a shot glass against the Woodsman's head, prompting many-a-shocked game player to reload the section.



* The [[Creator/TellTaleGames TellTale]] games are notorious for this.
** A notable example is in ''VideoGame/TheWolfAmongUs'', where the Woodsman has just gotten an emotional weight off his chest by revealing to Wolf that when he saved Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother, it was by mere chance; he was actually planning to rob them, and only saved them in hopes of getting a reward. After he finishes, one of the response options is to "Glass Him." Given the context of the previous scene, combined with the fact that they are in a bar, many players assumed that this meant Wolf buying the Woodsman a drink. Instead, it has Wolf abruptly crack a shot glass against the Woodsman's head, prompting many-a-shocked game player to reload the section.





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* ''VideoGame/DivinityIIEgoDraconis'' holds the belief that the modern gamer has no developed sense of inference or observation, and can only learn from repeated killings pointed at the face. Worse, it's a very engrossing game, so players often forget to [[SaveScumming save regularly]] before this trope rears its drooling head.
14th Apr '16 5:43:48 PM DarkHunter
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* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls''. The infamous Bed of Chaos boss, the source of huge amounts of FakeDifficulty in a game normally absent of it. It's the only PuzzleBoss in the entire game, so first you need to figure out how to damage it. Then, BottomlessPits open up in the floor without warning, instantly killing you if you happen to be there. Fortunately, the boss does not reset when you die, so previously collapsed floor sections stay that way, and the boss retains its HP level.
** The Capra Demon is arguably another example. You must pass through a fog gate to get to bosses, and the Capra Demon and two rabid dogs attack you without warning, even before the fog gate stops obscuring your vision. Many players get instantly killed a few times without even finding out what's attacking them.
** ''Dark Souls'' does feature some aspects of this trope with many bosses. Granted, a skilled player can survive and win almost anything, but all bosses still require unique strategies and fast reflexes to determine and circumvent their attacks. What's more, many come without foreshadowing about their [[ElementalRockPaperScissors elemental weaknesses]].
* ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsII'' features this trope with its Ancient Dragon boss encounter. The first time the player encounters this fight they will have no way of knowing that practically any attack suffered will cause instant death to the player. If the player tries to block with any shield other than the Gyrm's Greatshield, almost maxed out with max stamina, then all fire attacks will break the players guard and instantly kill them. Alternatively the boss's flying, fire breath attack tracks the player for the first 30% of the attack and has massive AOE (area of effect) damage that will instantly kill the player. As a result if the player is not under 25% weight encumbrance they simply are not fast enough to always dodge the breath attack.

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* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls''. ''Franchise/DarkSouls'' has some elements of this: there are many traps and powerful enemies, and players need to be cautious and observant in order to survive them all. Even a highly skilled player is likely be to killed if they're ever caught off-guard. Players can leave messages to one another to warn about upcoming dangers, but beware, for {{Trolls}} like leaving fake messages as well.
**
The infamous Bed of Chaos boss, the source of huge amounts of FakeDifficulty in a game normally absent of it. It's the only PuzzleBoss in the entire game, so first you need to figure out how to damage it. Then, BottomlessPits open up in the floor without warning, instantly killing you if you happen to be there. Fortunately, the boss does not reset when you die, so previously collapsed floor sections stay that way, and the boss retains its HP level.
** The Capra Demon is arguably another example. You must pass through a fog gate to get to bosses, and the Capra Demon and two rabid dogs attack you without warning, even before the fog gate stops obscuring your vision. Many players get instantly killed a few times without even finding out what's attacking them.
** ''Dark Souls'' does feature some aspects of this trope with many bosses. Granted, a skilled player can survive and win almost anything, but all bosses still require unique strategies and fast reflexes to determine and circumvent their attacks. What's more, many come without foreshadowing about their [[ElementalRockPaperScissors elemental weaknesses]].
*
''VideoGame/DarkSoulsII'' features this trope with its Ancient Dragon boss encounter. The first time the player encounters this fight they will have no way of knowing that practically any attack suffered will cause instant death to the player. If the player tries to block with any shield other than the Gyrm's Greatshield, almost maxed out with max stamina, then all fire attacks will break the players guard and instantly kill them. Alternatively the boss's flying, fire breath attack tracks the player for the first 30% of the attack and has massive AOE (area of effect) damage that will instantly kill the player. As a result if the player is not under 25% weight encumbrance they simply are not fast enough to always dodge the breath attack.
3rd Apr '16 8:32:03 PM Prfnoff
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* ''[=SkyRoads=]'' often contronts the player with a choice of paths, not making it clear which one isn't fatal until too late. The worst are the tunnels which completely conceal deadly burning red squares from the player's view.
3rd Apr '16 8:28:06 PM Prfnoff
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* Notoriously bad Adventure Game/Rail-Shooter ''Cyberia'' (Not to be confused with ''VideoGame/{{Syberia}}'') is outrageous about this during the adventure game segments. Open a door, shot in the face. Don't lock the door behind you, shot in the back of the head. Don't walk towards the cover to peek around it, shot from the side. Push a seemingly random button on a wall, trapdoor opens up. At least it's good with checkpoints.

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* Notoriously bad Adventure Game/Rail-Shooter ''Cyberia'' (Not to be confused with ''VideoGame/{{Syberia}}'') ''VideoGame/{{Cyberia}}'' is outrageous about this during the adventure game segments. Open a door, shot in the face. Don't lock the door behind you, shot in the back of the head. Don't walk towards the cover to peek around it, shot from the side. Push a seemingly random button on a wall, trapdoor opens up. At least it's good with checkpoints.



* In the very first race of ''MidnightClub'', there is absolutely no way to tell that you need to use a certain rock as a ramp to reach the finish point. The only way to possibly discover this is to watch one of the computer racers do it, which by definition means placing 2nd or worst. Of course, you need to place 1st in order to proceed in the game, so you ''must'' fail the mission at least once just to see how it's done.

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* In the very first race of ''MidnightClub'', ''VideoGame/MidnightClub'', there is absolutely no way to tell that you need to use a certain rock as a ramp to reach the finish point. The only way to possibly discover this is to watch one of the computer racers do it, which by definition means placing 2nd or worst. Of course, you need to place 1st in order to proceed in the game, so you ''must'' fail the mission at least once just to see how it's done.



* ''WanganMidnight Maximum Tune 3'' 's Ghost Battle mode. When you select a ghost to battle, you are only told the starting ramp, and not what route the ghost take, which gets annoying if, say, you select a ghost that starts on one of the faster routes (i.e. Wangan or Yokohane), and thus put all your tuning points into power and leave nothing for handling, but the race ends on the curvier C1 loop and you keep crashing into walls because your car has no handling whatsoever. The only way to know the route for sure is to have already battled the ghost or watch someone else race it.

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* ''WanganMidnight Maximum Tune ''VideoGame/WanganMidnightMaximumTune 3'' 's Ghost Battle mode. When you select a ghost to battle, you are only told the starting ramp, and not what route the ghost take, which gets annoying if, say, you select a ghost that starts on one of the faster routes (i.e. Wangan or Yokohane), and thus put all your tuning points into power and leave nothing for handling, but the race ends on the curvier C1 loop and you keep crashing into walls because your car has no handling whatsoever. The only way to know the route for sure is to have already battled the ghost or watch someone else race it.
30th Mar '16 1:19:30 PM Soldancer
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* ''VideoGame/RememberMe'' has the stand-out memory remix sequences, where you have to alter events in a person's memory in order to reach a different outcome than what actually happened in real life. These are largely driven by trial and error, and making some decisions creates meory states that are totally not what the player is trying to achieve.
25th Mar '16 1:40:41 PM Morgenthaler
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* A particularly bad example can be found in ''CommandAndConquerRedAlert 3: Uprising''. The final Allied mission has you going up against an Empire commander after choosing one of two locations to build your base on, no big deal. The northeast position looks far, far more defensible and has closer ore nodes, so most players will probably pick it on their first playthrough. However... [[spoiler:As soon as you kill off the Empire commander, the real Big Bad reveals himself and comes gunning for you. The map expands to accommodate his base and guess what - it's DIRECTLY north of the earlier mentioned starting position. Which before marked the edge of the map, so you probably have no defenses there whatsoever. And he starts out with a ridiculously huge and well-equipped strike force already rushing to attack you. Hell, there is a good chance his longer-ranged units will be shelling you before the cutscene even ends. If you didn't know this was coming you are basically GUARANTEED to die, and even when you're prepared it's a difficult battle.]]
* ''FinalFantasyTactics'' has shades of this, since you're never given a clue as to what sort of situation you're getting into before a battle. You just have the (very basic) layout of your team's immediate starting area, so if you unwittingly put your team of melee combatants into a map against, say, a whole team of archers and mages on the other side of a valley or river, you're in trouble.

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* A particularly bad example can be found in ''CommandAndConquerRedAlert 3: ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert3: Uprising''. The final Allied mission has you going up against an Empire commander after choosing one of two locations to build your base on, no big deal. The northeast position looks far, far more defensible and has closer ore nodes, so most players will probably pick it on their first playthrough. However... [[spoiler:As soon as you kill off the Empire commander, the real Big Bad reveals himself and comes gunning for you. The map expands to accommodate his base and guess what - it's DIRECTLY north of the earlier mentioned starting position. Which before marked the edge of the map, so you probably have no defenses there whatsoever. And he starts out with a ridiculously huge and well-equipped strike force already rushing to attack you. Hell, there is a good chance his longer-ranged units will be shelling you before the cutscene even ends. If you didn't know this was coming you are basically GUARANTEED to die, and even when you're prepared it's a difficult battle.]]
* ''FinalFantasyTactics'' ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'' has shades of this, since you're never given a clue as to what sort of situation you're getting into before a battle. You just have the (very basic) layout of your team's immediate starting area, so if you unwittingly put your team of melee combatants into a map against, say, a whole team of archers and mages on the other side of a valley or river, you're in trouble.



* ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander'' and its standalone expansion, ''ForgedAlliance'', rely heavily on scripted events and changing objectives during the singleplayer campaign, often meaning you're screwed unless you took every possible precaution or knew what was coming. Huge enemy armies have a habit of popping up at the edge of the map when you least expect them, the map itself can expand in unexpected directions, you may suddenly receive objectives that are impossible to complete in your current state, and so on. The missions are actually fairly easy once you know what's about to happen, because you generally have unlimited time to prepare (despite the game [[ContinueYourMissionDammit nagging you to hurry up)]], but trying to pass a mission on the first try can be an exercise in frustration.

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* ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander'' and its standalone expansion, ''ForgedAlliance'', ''VideoGame/ForgedAlliance'', rely heavily on scripted events and changing objectives during the singleplayer campaign, often meaning you're screwed unless you took every possible precaution or knew what was coming. Huge enemy armies have a habit of popping up at the edge of the map when you least expect them, the map itself can expand in unexpected directions, you may suddenly receive objectives that are impossible to complete in your current state, and so on. The missions are actually fairly easy once you know what's about to happen, because you generally have unlimited time to prepare (despite the game [[ContinueYourMissionDammit nagging you to hurry up)]], but trying to pass a mission on the first try can be an exercise in frustration.
11th Mar '16 2:54:53 PM StFan
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* The ''Film/MissionImpossible'' video game (which predates [=MGS=] by a few months) was particularly bad about this, due to a combination of CheckpointStarvation, extreme linearity, and some rather vague mission objectives. For example, in one mission, one of your objectives is to eliminate an assassin at a tea party. The only problem? You're neither told who she is (other than her name) nor what she looks like. So the solution is arrived at purely by dumb luck.

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* The ''Film/MissionImpossible'' ''VideoGame/{{Mission Impossible|1997}}'' video game (which predates [=MGS=] by a few months) was particularly bad about this, due to a combination of CheckpointStarvation, extreme linearity, and some rather vague mission objectives. For example, in one mission, one of your objectives is to eliminate an assassin at a tea party. The only problem? You're neither told who she is (other than her name) nor what she looks like. So the solution is arrived at purely by dumb luck.
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