History Main / TrialAndErrorGameplay

30th Nov '16 1:42:40 AM LordKelvin
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* ''Franchise/DarkSouls'' has some elements of this: there are many traps and powerful enemies, and players need to be cautious and observant in order to survive them all. Even a highly skilled player is likely be to killed if they're ever caught off-guard. Players can leave messages to one another to warn about upcoming dangers, but beware, for {{Trolls}} like leaving fake messages as well.
** The infamous Bed of Chaos boss, the source of huge amounts of FakeDifficulty in a game normally absent of it. It's the only PuzzleBoss in the entire game, so first you need to figure out how to damage it. Then, BottomlessPits open up in the floor without warning, instantly killing you if you happen to be there. Fortunately, the boss does not reset when you die, so previously collapsed floor sections stay that way, and the boss retains its HP level.
** The Capra Demon is another example. You must pass through a fog gate to get to bosses, and the Capra Demon and two rabid dogs attack you without warning, even before the fog gate stops obscuring your vision. Many players get instantly killed a few times without even finding out what's attacking them.
** ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsII'' features this trope with its Ancient Dragon boss encounter. The first time the player encounters this fight they will have no way of knowing that practically any attack suffered will cause instant death to the player. If the player tries to block with any shield other than the Gyrm's Greatshield, almost maxed out with max stamina, then all fire attacks will break the players guard and instantly kill them. Alternatively the boss's flying, fire breath attack tracks the player for the first 30% of the attack and has massive AOE (area of effect) damage that will instantly kill the player. As a result if the player is not under 25% weight encumbrance they simply are not fast enough to always dodge the breath attack.

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* ''Franchise/DarkSouls'' ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' has some elements of this: there are many traps and powerful enemies, and players need to be cautious and observant in order to survive them all. As well, the player is ''expected'' to die to bosses on their first (several) attempts, as the game uses death itself as a learning mechanic: get killed by a boss's attack, learn its telegraph, dodge it the next time only to be killed by a different attack, rinse and repeat. Even a highly skilled player who is playing through the game a second time is likely be to killed if they're ever caught off-guard. Players can leave messages to one another to warn about upcoming dangers, but beware, for {{Trolls}} like leaving fake messages as well.
** ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsI'', the first in the series, was notable for a few very problematic areas, above even the normal progression of the game.
*** The Hellkite Dragon/Bridge Wyvern/Red Drake at the cusp of Undead Parish, after defeating the Taurus Demon. At the level that it is encountered at, it can kill the player in a mere one or two attacks, and blocks the way into the Parish. And unless you [[RunOrDie make a break for]] [[CorridorCubbyholeRun the safe spot in the middle of the bridge]] before it gets a chance to roast the length of the bridge, chances are you'll die and have to go through the entire Upper Undead Burg all over again just to unlock the shortcut back to the bonfire. And this isn't even getting into actually fighting the creature itself.
*** The Capra Demon at the end of Lower Undead Burg is notorious for ending most first-timers' runs. You must pass through a fog gate to get to bosses, and the Capra Demon and two rabid dogs attack you without warning, even before the fog gate stops obscuring your vision. Many players get instantly killed a few times without even finding out what's attacking them, and take many more attempts before finding the precise order of actions to take in order to get enough space to kill those two dogs and stand a fighting chance against the Capra Demon itself.
*** Blighttown. The descent down to the bottom is otherwise rather painless, were it not for the almost perfectly-camouflaged blowdart snipers with uncanny range and accuracy who inflict severe Toxic, enough to kill most players in mere seconds if they don't have Toxic curing consumables. In order to survive the level, players will have to equip a poison-blocking shield (that's a missable pick-up), immunize themselves with Dung Pies (which gives them the Toxic status effect but drains HP much more slowly), or try to find and counter-snipe them (which requires having enough Strength/Dexterity to use a bow). Thankfully, the snipers don't respawn, so killing them just once is enough.
*** Sen's Fortress is one of the most notorious areas in the entire game. Not only is it filled to the brim with extremely lethal traps (from swinging blades to pressure-plate traps to rolling boulders), but is also guarded by snake-men that are extremely resistant to physical damage, only becoming easier to defeat once the player finds a specific elemental weapon that's dropped by a specific enemy partway through the dungeon. In the meantime, players will have to learn (the hard way) how to avoid all the traps and beat all the enemies, with each death sending the player back to the start, and the '''only''' bonfire in the entire level being accessible through a hidden drop-down.
***
The infamous Bed of Chaos boss, the source of huge amounts of FakeDifficulty in a game normally absent of it. It's the only PuzzleBoss in the entire game, so first you need to figure out how to damage it. Then, BottomlessPits open up in the floor without warning, instantly killing you if you happen to be there. Fortunately, the boss does not reset when you die, so previously collapsed floor sections stay that way, and the boss retains its HP level.
** The Capra Demon is another example. You must pass through a fog gate to get to bosses, and the Capra Demon and two rabid dogs attack you without warning, even before the fog gate stops obscuring your vision. Many players get instantly killed a few times without even finding out what's attacking them.
** ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsII'' features this trope also has its share of GuideDangIt moments.
*** The Dark Stalkers in No-Man's Wharf can be a pain to deal
with its unless you know what their weakness is ahead of time. They're long-reaching, hard-hitting and their attacks will build up your bleed bar even if blocked. What isn't immediately apparent is that if you shine a light in their faces, they'll recoil and back away, allowing you to cut them down with minimal resistance.
*** The Lost Sinner can be one of the harder early-game bosses to beat without proper preparations. When fighting her head-on, the poor lighting in the room will reduce the player's lock-on range, making it easy for her to simply jump over you, break target lock and bring her greatsword into your back while you're wondering where the hell she went. So you'll have to light the torches outside of the arena first, which proves impossible without the Bastille Key (which, in the original PS3/360/DX9 version, requires beating an optional boss to get).
*** Dragon Aerie can prove to be plain impossible to get through without learning the real trick to getting to the end. While the enemies are certainly not insurmountable, the entire level is littered with dragon eggs that seem to serve no purpose other than to be destructible objects; destroy any number of them, and the dragons will get '''pissed''' at you, to the point where if you try to leave to go to the next area, ''they will swoop down on you and destroy the bridge you're standing on, dropping you immediately to your death''. Unless you know that these dragon eggs are the source of your problems, you're likely to just keep trying to run through the level and dying at the end because you didn't know to leave them alone.
*** The (optional)
Ancient Dragon boss encounter.is widely considered one of the most frustrating bosses to beat in the base game. The first time the player encounters this fight they will have no way of knowing that practically any attack suffered will cause instant death to the player. If the player tries to block with any shield other than the Gyrm's Greatshield, almost maxed out with max stamina, then all fire attacks will break the players guard and instantly kill them. Alternatively the boss's flying, fire breath attack tracks the player for the first 30% of the attack and has massive AOE (area of effect) damage that will instantly kill the player. As a result if the player is not under 25% weight encumbrance they simply are not fast enough to always dodge the breath attack.attack.
*** [[spoiler:King Vendrick]] can prove nearly insurmountable without the right items on hand. Unless the player knows to collect Giant Souls (only three of which make themselves readily available to the player, with the remaining two hidden behind optional enemies), he'll have an absurd amount of damage resistance, causing two-handed strong attacks with a maxed-out ultra greatsword to deal chip damage to him and rendering any attempt to defeat him futile ([[MarathonBoss unless you're extremely persistent]]).
** ''VideoGame/BloodBorne'' has moments of this like in previous Souls games. Of note is a couple of the chalice dungeon bosses.
*** The Bloodletting Beast often starts the fight launching a difficult to avoid punch that can easily one-hit kill the player. Its easy to see the charge up but almost impossible to know the exact timing of the punch until he is fought a few times meaning the likelihood of many deaths. Also many of his standard attacks can instantly kill low HP builds without forewarning.
*** Pthumerian Descendant has many combos that can instantly kill lower HP builds that come out of seemingly nowhere and are fast to boot. Also he covers an insane distance which will often catch a first time fighters off guard leading to being combo'd to death.
** ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsIII'' learned a lot of lessons from its predecessors, but doesn't quite avoid this trope.
*** Cathedral of the Deep is perhaps one of the most well-designed levels in the game, however it is also one of the more frustrating areas to navigate due to checkpointing and difficulty. The rooftops are full of crossbow archers who launch multiple volleys at the player from range, the inside of the cathedral proper is guarded by two giant slaves whose attacks can easily shave off half a player's health bar in one hit, the lower floors are guarded by extremely tough Cathedral Knights and riddled with all sorts of poison traps, and there is only '''one''' bonfire in the entire cathedral, requiring the player to progressively unlock shortcuts back to the main chapel area.
*** Irithyll Dungeon has earned a deserved reputation as pain incarnate. Beyond the layout of the dungeon itself, it's filled with Jailer enemies that will reduce quickly your health just by looking at you (read: not deal continuous damage to you, but ''lower the maximum number so that you can't heal it back''. If you're not careful and run headfirst into a Jailer, expect him to stun-lock you with his branding iron, and then proceed to kill you in one hit thanks to having reduced your HP down to double digits after chasing you down, sending you back to start.
*** Yhorm the Giant can be this due to the mechanic required to defeat him in a timely manner. As the biggest Lord of Cinder, and as a proper giant, he takes ScratchDamage from almost all of the Ashen One's attacks, unless they're targeted on his arms and head (staggering him will allow the player to perform a visceral-like attack that takes off a big chunk of his health). However, even with this, Yhorm is still a MarathonBoss who can end players in a few successful attacks, unless you take the time to search the boss room and [[spoiler:find the Storm Ruler near his throne, and then equip it and shave off huge swathes of his HP bar at a time using the weapon art]].



* ''VideoGame/BloodBorne'' has moments of this like in previous Souls games. Of note is a couple of the chalice dungeon bosses.
** The Bloodletting Beast often starts the fight launching a difficult to avoid punch that can easily one-hit kill the player. Its easy to see the charge up but almost impossible to know the exact timing of the punch until he is fought a few times meaning the likelihood of many deaths. Also many of his standard attacks can instantly kill low HP builds without forewarning.
** Pthumerian Descendant has many combos that can instantly kill lower HP builds that come out of seemingly nowhere and are fast to boot. Also he covers an insane distance which will often catch a first time fighters off guard leading to being combo'd to death.
2nd Nov '16 6:52:18 PM Eon-the-Dragon
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* ''SCP-087-B'', the game that came before ''VideoGame/SCPContainmentBreach'', is rife with this. Since the maps are randomly generated there is one type of hallway, the "forked path," where one of the paths leads to instant death. There's no hint on which path is correct, and since the player has to go through 130 floors the player is always going to come across this room at some point and it will always set the player back to the beginning.
28th Oct '16 10:07:11 AM Amenohi
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** In ''VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma'', there's a decision game in Team C's route that requires them to roll 3 dice and have them all end in 1, them being excecuted if even one of the die ends up in a different number. There's no trick or alternate solution at all; the game does expect you to roll three dice and have them all land in 1 in one try. Probablity is not in your favour, and you'll more than likely die in your first tries. [[spoiler:Subverted in two different ways: first, you have a roughly 1/3 chance to get the roll right as opposed to the actual probability, and you're basically guaranteed to get all dice land in 1 on your third or fourth try. Secondly, the timeline where Team C loses the roll is fundamental to get the GoldenEnding.]]
12th Sep '16 9:16:30 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' downloadable content ''Dead Money'' includes a number of sequences having the player advance through an area before nearby radio signals set off the explosive collar that they are forced to wear for the duration of the expansion. These segments can be made easier by destroying the signal emitters (radios, PA systems), but the emitters are often hard to see in the dark and hazy environments of Dead Money, and at times simply cannot be destroyed at all, often making the player resort to a [[LeeroyJenkins disorienting charge]], often resulting in repeated deaths and frustration. There are also a number of instant-death explosive booby traps that are difficult to see the first time around.

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* ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' downloadable content ''Dead Money'' includes a number of sequences having the player advance through an area before nearby radio signals set off the explosive collar that they are forced to wear for the duration of the expansion. These segments can be made easier by destroying the signal emitters (radios, PA systems), but the emitters are often hard to see in the dark and hazy environments of Dead Money, the ruins of the Sierra Madre casino, and at times simply cannot be destroyed at all, all [[note]]These speakers are marked with a red light instead of the regular blue. Seeing how these speaker are very often out of the way don't be surprised you can't find them as your collar beeps loudly and all outdoor speakers lock after you trigger the Gala event, cutting you off from everything before.[[/note]], often making the player resort to a [[LeeroyJenkins disorienting charge]], often resulting in repeated deaths and frustration. There are also a number of instant-death explosive booby traps that are difficult to see the first time around. These along with the Ghost People, poison gas, and lack of supplies makes ''Dead Money'' a [[NintendoHard very difficult]] and [[LoveItOrHateIt divisive]] experience.
1st Sep '16 1:36:17 AM WhosAsking
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* Featured in a couple of castle levels in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1'', including the final dungeon. You have to choose the correct routes through the dungeon to progress or you'll be forced back to the last checkpoint to choose another. Other than by memorising the right and wrong ways there's no way of knowing the right paths without a guide.

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* Featured in a couple of castle levels in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1'', including the final dungeon. You have to choose the correct routes through the dungeon to progress or you'll be forced back to the last checkpoint to choose another. Other than by memorising the right and wrong ways there's no way of knowing the right paths without a guide. Castle 8 was even trickier because not only does the correct path involve locating and taking pipes, but some of the pipes go ''backwards'' back to the first chamber while some of the correct pipe choices are easy to overlook. At least the maze only goes as far as the underwater section.
1st Sep '16 1:28:08 AM WhosAsking
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* ''[[VideoGame/MegaMan3 3]]'' nails you with this one time. In the second trip through Shock Man's stage, just after you beat Doc Robot the first time, you must slide (meaning you can't call the Rush Jet for this) into a pretty long (about three screens) drop down a weaving shaft lined with spikes, meaning you have to control your fall to avoid instant destruction. Because you're falling, your reaction time is darn near zero unless you already know what's coming.
30th Aug '16 5:48:34 AM WhosAsking
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** During the first part of ''VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland,'' part of the player's training in swordplay involves learning snide insults to throw opponents off-guard; without these insults and witty comebacks, the player can't win a swordfight. These quips are learned by hearing other pirates use them in fights; thus, the player is required to repeatedly enter fights with other pirates and lose, trying out new insults and weak come-backs until finally gaining enough to win a fight. The frustration of this is lessened, however, by the fact that the player can't actually die.

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** During the first part of ''VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland,'' part of the player's training in swordplay involves learning snide insults to throw opponents off-guard; without these insults and witty comebacks, the player can't win a swordfight. These quips are learned by hearing other pirates use them in fights; thus, the player is required to repeatedly enter fights with other pirates and lose, trying out new insults and weak come-backs until finally gaining enough to win a fight. The frustration of this is lessened, however, by the fact that the player can't actually die.[[note]]The retorts are actually more important than the insults, as you're limited to retorts against the Sword Master, who always opens (and you need to figure out which retorts you can use against her unique insults; the connections are more obscure), but you need the insults to eventually have pirates retort them.[[/note]]
25th Aug '16 8:58:00 AM PKMN37
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A popular variety of FakeDifficulty, Trial And Error Gameplay is what happens when a game developer decides the best way to punish a player's incorrect action is to to kill his character, end the mission in failure, or otherwise force him to repeat that part from the beginning again. And, in the most {{egregious}} manner possible, this occurs whether or not it was even possible to know in advance that it was a bad move at all. In the end, the only thing the player can do about it is reload the area and/or savepoint, play through that section again, and remember not to do that next time. In essence, Trial-and-Error Gameplay is whenever it is necessary for the player to fail before realizing what is necessary to succeed.

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A popular variety of FakeDifficulty, Trial And Error Gameplay is what happens when a game developer decides the best way to punish a player's incorrect action is to to kill his character, end the mission in failure, or otherwise force him to repeat that part from the beginning again. And, in the most {{egregious}} manner possible, this occurs whether or not it was even possible to know in advance that it was a bad move at all. In the end, the only thing the player can do about it is reload the area and/or savepoint, play through that section again, and remember not to do that next time. In essence, Trial-and-Error Gameplay is whenever it is necessary for the player to fail before realizing what is necessary to succeed.
8th Aug '16 4:58:16 PM Roxolan
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Compare TryEverything and CharacterSelectForcing.

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Compare TryEverything and CharacterSelectForcing.
CharacterSelectForcing. This trope is ubiquitous in [[GroundhogDayLoop Groundhog Day Loop]] stories.
8th Aug '16 8:34:36 AM anza_sb
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* This is the point of ''TheImpossibleQuiz''. '''WRONG!''' -1 LIFE

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* This is the point of ''TheImpossibleQuiz''.''VideoGame/TheImpossibleQuiz''. '''WRONG!''' -1 LIFE
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