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-->-- '''Drazi ambassador''' to Tirk, whose name apparently means "Don't touch me, I'm not having another child after this ever again", ''Series/BabylonFive: The Legend of the Rangers''

to:

-->-- '''Drazi ambassador''' to (to Tirk, whose name apparently means "Don't touch me, I'm not having another child after this ever again", again."), ''Series/BabylonFive: The Legend of the Rangers''



[[folder: Adverts]]
* An advert for a Japanese brand of air-conditioning units shown in Greece and possibly other western countries showed two (Japanese) actors dressed as cowboys having a fight. One of them kills the other and then starts speaking for several seconds, stopping to take breaths a few times. The subtitle shows "I got you, worm!"
** The tagline was "We may not be known for our westerns, but we are known for our AC units".

to:

[[folder: Adverts]]
[[folder:Advertising]]
* An advert for a Japanese brand of air-conditioning units shown in Greece and possibly other western countries showed two (Japanese) actors dressed as cowboys having a fight. One of them kills the other and then starts speaking for several seconds, stopping to take breaths a few times. The subtitle shows "I got you, worm!"
**
worm!" The tagline was is "We may not be known for our westerns, but we are known for our AC units".units."



[[folder: Anime and Manga]]
* Lampshaded in the English dub of ''Manga/BoboboboBobobo'' after an obviously wordy title is described in no more than two words. "It says a lot more than that in Japanese!"
* ''Manga/{{Eyeshield 21}}'':

to:

[[folder: Anime and [[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* Lampshaded in the English dub of ''Manga/BoboboboBobobo'' ''Manga/BoboboboBobobo'', after an obviously wordy title is described in no more than two words. "It says a lot more than that in Japanese!"
* ''Manga/{{Eyeshield 21}}'':''Manga/Eyeshield21'':



* VideoGame/PokemonRanger: Vatonage roughly translates into "to bring light to that which is shrouded in darkness."

to:

* VideoGame/PokemonRanger: ''VideoGame/PokemonRanger'': Vatonage roughly translates into "to bring light to that which is shrouded in darkness."



[[folder:Comedy]]
* In an early stand-up routine, Creator/RobinWilliams did this gag, imitating a Soviet (this was 1978) ballet dancer being interviewed on American TV about being in New York for a performance. As the host, he asks "Did you like your time in New York?" He then goes into a 2-minute bout of the dancer speaking rapidly in Russian while pantomiming drinking, drug use, and random sexual encounters (complete with graphic pelvic thrusting motions). He then has the Soviet translator begin arguing with her, getting into a shouting match, then hitting her, both of them settling down, and finally telling the host "She say 'Yes!'" with a broad smile as if nothing were amiss. At the time it was as much a commentary on the ludicrous degree to which the Soviets would whitewash events to present themselves as morally superior to the West, while everyone else knew the truth.
* For Kevin Johnson, ventriloquist from Legoland, CA, one of his acts is called "Godzilla Theater" where he and his friends Clyde (a vulture) and Matilda (a cockatoo) all move their mouths randomly so as not to sync up with their English words (an obvious play on questionable English dubs of Japanese movies). After being told that they have to get out near the end of the act, Clyde rapidly moves his beak for nearly five seconds (confusing the other two) before saying simply, "No!"
* In a Creator/StanFreberg sketch about a choir director prompting his choir with the words for "I've Got You Under My Skin", there's a bit where he's speaking faster and faster to get the whole line in:
-->'''Freberg:''' ''[vaguely comprehensible gibberish]''\\
'''Choir:''' I'd sacrifice anything come what might for the sake of having you near...\\
'''Freberg:''' ''[vaguely comprehensible gibberish]''\\
'''Choir:''' In spite of the warning voice that comes in the night and repeats and repeats in my...\\
'''Freberg:''' ''[long string of gibberish]''\\
'''Choir:''' Ear...
[[/folder]]



* SelfDemonstrating/{{Lobo}}'s name means "one who devours your entrails and thoroughly enjoys it." [[LampshadeHanging More than one character]] has thought it meant "wolf" like one would expect.
** It should perhaps be pointed out that [[FridgeBrilliance these are not mutually-exclusive]].

to:

* SelfDemonstrating/{{Lobo}}'s ComicBook/{{Lobo}}'s name means "one who devours your entrails and thoroughly enjoys it." [[LampshadeHanging More than one character]] has thought it meant "wolf" like one would expect.
**
expect. It should perhaps be pointed out that [[FridgeBrilliance these are not mutually-exclusive]].mutually exclusive]].



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* A variant occurs near the end of ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', where Stitch is trying to convince Jumba and Pleakley to help him rescue Lilo from Captain Gantu.
-->'''Jumba:''' ''What?!'' After all you put me through, you expect me to help you just like that? ''Just like that?!''
-->'''Stitch:''' Ih.
-->'''Jumba:''' Fine!
-->'''Pleakley:''' "Fine"? You're doing what he says?
-->'''Jumba:''' He's very persuasive.
** We later learn that "Ih" [[SubvertedTrope just means]] [[BluntYes "yes"]], making it funnier.
* Inverted in the ''WesternAnimation/VeggieTales'' parody of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', where a six-or-so character inscription above a door turns out to be a really long riddle.
-->'''Leg 'O Lamb:''' It said all that?
-->'''Randolf:''' It's a highly efficient tongue. You can fit a whole book on a napkin.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Balto}}'': Muk's translations of Luk's whimpering are usually longer than the sounds Luk makes. But taking the cake is when Luk makes one, short whimper, which Muk translates as: "Oh, the shame of the polar bear who fears the water! No wonder we are shunned by our fellow bear. Woe is us!"
* ''Disney/SaludosAmigos'': Jose speaks a long array of Portuguese language, which causes Donald to be up to his neck in translation dictionaries trying to keep up with him. Jose finishes by saying "Or as they say in America, let's go see the town!".

to:

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
[[folder:Fan Works]]
* A variant occurs near Used in an episode of the end ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'' GagSub "The Adventures of ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', Yuki Nagato" by ''[[http://www.youtube.com/user/ChiefProphetOfYukism Chief Prophet Of Yukiism]]''. Moreover, the word where Stitch this trope is trying to convince Jumba and Pleakley to help him rescue Lilo from Captain Gantu.
-->'''Jumba:''' ''What?!'' After all you put me through, you expect me to help you just like that? ''Just like that?!''
-->'''Stitch:''' Ih.
-->'''Jumba:''' Fine!
-->'''Pleakley:''' "Fine"? You're doing what he says?
-->'''Jumba:''' He's very persuasive.
** We later learn that "Ih" [[SubvertedTrope just means]] [[BluntYes "yes"]], making it funnier.
* Inverted in the ''WesternAnimation/VeggieTales'' parody of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', where a six-or-so character inscription above a door turns out to be a really long riddle.
-->'''Leg 'O Lamb:''' It said all that?
-->'''Randolf:''' It's a highly efficient tongue. You can fit a whole book on a napkin.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Balto}}'': Muk's translations of Luk's whimpering are usually longer than the sounds Luk makes. But taking the cake is when Luk makes one, short whimper, which Muk
applied to, "Yahoo", translates as: "Oh, the shame into a lampshade of the polar bear who fears trope.
* At
the water! No wonder we are shunned by our fellow bear. Woe start of episode 9 of ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'', a scene from the Spanish dub is us!"
* ''Disney/SaludosAmigos'': Jose speaks
shown and a particularly long array quote of Portuguese language, which causes Donald Bakura's is subbed simply as "Yes". In case you're wondering, the phrase is ''Tienes algo que yo deseo, Yugi, y pienso quitártelo'' (You have something that I want, Yugi, and I plan to be up to take it from you.)
* When Naruto falls down a tree and hurts himself in ''WebVideo/NarutoTheAbridgedComedyFandubSpoofSeriesShow'', this happens:
-->'''Naruto:''' ''(rolling on the ground, clutching
his neck in translation dictionaries trying to keep up with him. Jose finishes by saying "Or as they say in America, let's go see the town!".head)'' Itatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatata!\\
'''[[WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries Yami Yugi]]:''' That was Japanese for, "Ouch!"



[[folder:Films -- Animation]]
* A variant occurs near the end of ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', where Stitch is trying to convince Jumba and Pleakley to help him rescue Lilo from Captain Gantu. [[spoiler:We later learn that "Ih" [[SubvertedTrope just means]] [[BluntYes "yes"]], making it funnier.]]
-->'''Jumba:''' ''What?!'' After all you put me through, you expect me to help you just like that? ''Just like that?!''\\
'''Stitch:''' Ih.\\
'''Jumba:''' Fine!\\
'''Pleakley:''' "Fine"? You're doing what he says?\\
'''Jumba:''' He's very persuasive.
* Inverted in the ''WesternAnimation/VeggieTales'' parody of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', where a six-or-so character inscription above a door turns out to be a really long riddle.
-->'''Leg 'O Lamb:''' It said all that?\\
'''Randolf:''' It's a highly efficient tongue. You can fit a whole book on a napkin.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Balto}}'': Muk's translations of Luk's whimpering are usually longer than the sounds Luk makes. But taking the cake is when Luk makes one, short whimper, which Muk translates as: "Oh, the shame of the polar bear who fears the water! No wonder we are shunned by our fellow bear. Woe is us!"
* ''Disney/SaludosAmigos'': Jose speaks a long array of Portuguese language, which causes Donald to be up to his neck in translation dictionaries trying to keep up with him. Jose finishes by saying "Or as they say in America, let's go see the town!"
[[/folder]]



* ''Film/KungPowEnterTheFist'' did it as part of its GagDub. There are a few parts where the actor's mouths move for a very long time, but the dub says something really short.

to:

* ''Film/KungPowEnterTheFist'' did does it as part of its GagDub. There are a few parts where the actor's mouths move for a very long time, but the dub says something really short.



-->'''Captain''': What took her so long?!
-->'''Kaye''': Stutters.

to:

-->'''Captain''': -->'''Captain:''' What took her so long?!
-->'''Kaye''':
long?!\\
'''Kaye:'''
Stutters.



** Earlier in the movie, Hynkel is delivering a speech, commented on by an English speaking narrator. Some passages are translated word by word (like 'liberty is abolished'), while others -- like Hynkel's rambling about the beauty of the Tomanian women -- are paraphrased with a lot of details. Then, one very long passage of Hynkel screaming, shaking his fists and growling is paraphrased only as: 'His excellency has just referred to the Jewish population'.

to:

** Earlier in the movie, Hynkel is delivering a speech, commented on by an English speaking narrator. Some passages are translated word by word (like 'liberty "liberty is abolished'), abolished"), while others -- like Hynkel's rambling about the beauty of the Tomanian women -- are paraphrased with a lot of details. Then, one very long passage of Hynkel screaming, shaking his fists and growling is paraphrased only as: 'His "His excellency has just referred to the Jewish population'.population."



-->'''Kahmunrah:''' They didn't call me Kahmunrah the Trustworthy for nothing, all right? They ''didn't'' call me Kahmunrah the Trustworthy! They called me Kahmunrah the Bloodthirsty who kills whoever doesn't give Kahmunrah exactly what he wants in the moment that he wants it, which is ''right now'' when I had also better get the combination and the tablet!
-->'''Larry:''' That's what they called you?
-->'''Kahmunrah:''' It was shorter in Egyptian.

to:

-->'''Kahmunrah:''' They didn't call me Kahmunrah the Trustworthy for nothing, all right? They ''didn't'' call me Kahmunrah the Trustworthy! They called me Kahmunrah the Bloodthirsty who kills whoever doesn't give Kahmunrah exactly what he wants in the moment that he wants it, which is ''right now'' when I had also better get the combination and the tablet!
-->'''Larry:'''
tablet!\\
'''Larry:'''
That's what they called you?
-->'''Kahmunrah:'''
you?\\
'''Kahmunrah:'''
It was shorter in Egyptian.



* A Communist functionary from the SovietUnion travels to Red China to a give a speech. After he has spoken for several minutes, he remembers to let the translator do his job. To his surprise, the Chinese guy says but one word: "Ping!" But nobody seems to mind, so he continues his speech. When he stops again, the translator says "Ling ping!" He wonders again, but finishes his speech, after which the translator says "Ling ping ching!" Later, back in the Soviet Union, he asks a professor for Chinese what these three sentences could mean. The professor says: "I am not sure whether you are pronouncing it right, but it could well mean 'Bullshit', 'big bullshit' and 'big bullshit over'..."
* A sheriff catches a crook who only speaks some foreign language, and so the sheriff says to the translator "Tell him that unless he tells us where he hid all the money he stole, we're going to execute him." The translator relays this message, and the criminal sobs and gives the translator a detailed description of the exact location where he buried the loot. The translator turns to the sheriff and says "He says 'Over my dead body.'".
** The joke also frequently has the translator be not a professional interpreter but a [[EvilLawyerJoke bilingual lawyer]].
** Another version makes the interrogator a New York Mafioso, the victim a recent Russian immigrant, and the punch line has the translator say, "Boss, he says you don't have the balls to shoot him."

to:

* A Communist functionary from the SovietUnion UsefulNotes/SovietUnion travels to Red China to a give a speech. After he has spoken for several minutes, he remembers to let the translator do his job. To his surprise, the Chinese guy says but one word: "Ping!" But nobody seems to mind, so he continues his speech. When he stops again, the translator says "Ling ping!" He wonders again, but finishes his speech, after which the translator says "Ling ping ching!" Later, back in the Soviet Union, he asks a professor for Chinese what these three sentences could mean. The professor says: "I am not sure whether you are pronouncing it right, but it could well mean 'Bullshit', 'big bullshit' and 'big bullshit over'..."
* A sheriff catches a crook who only speaks some foreign language, and so the sheriff says to the translator "Tell him that unless he tells us where he hid all the money he stole, we're going to execute him." The translator relays this message, and the criminal sobs and gives the translator a detailed description of the exact location where he buried the loot. The translator turns to the sheriff and says "He says 'Over my dead body.'".
**
'". The joke also frequently has the translator be not a professional interpreter but a [[EvilLawyerJoke bilingual lawyer]].
**
lawyer]]. Another version makes the interrogator a New York Mafioso, the victim a recent Russian immigrant, and the punch line has the translator say, "Boss, he says you don't have the balls to shoot him."






* Both versions are used a lot in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels. In ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'', "Aagragaah" in troll literally means [[OhCrap "der time when you see dem little pebbles and you jus' know dere's gonna be a great big landslide on toppa you and it already too late to run"]], but is more usefully translated as "forebodings".
** Trollish does a good deal of this. Granny Weatherwax has a Trollish nickname approximately translating as "she who should be avoided"

to:

* Both versions are used a lot in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels. novels.
**
In ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'', "Aagragaah" in troll literally means [[OhCrap "der time when you see dem little pebbles and you jus' know dere's gonna be a great big landslide on toppa you and it already too late to run"]], but is more usefully translated as "forebodings".
** Trollish does a good deal of this. Granny Weatherwax has a Trollish nickname approximately translating as "she who should be avoided"avoided".



** The Nac Mac Feegles' "Crivens!" can be translated as anything from "My goodness!" to "I've just lost my temper and there is going to be trouble (for you)," depending on usage.
*** It's actually a fairly stereotypical [[https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/crivens (mild) Scots swearword]], so in the UK, it doesn't really need translation.

to:

** The Nac Mac Feegles' "Crivens!" can be translated as anything from "My goodness!" to "I've just lost my temper and there is going to be trouble (for you)," depending on usage.
***
usage. It's actually a fairly stereotypical [[https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/crivens (mild) Scots swearword]], so in the UK, it doesn't really need translation.



** ''Discworld/EqualRites'' features the word "p'ch'zarni'chiwkov" used by the small tribe of the K'turni, which means: "the nasty little sound of a sword being unsheathed right behind one at just the point when one thought one had disposed of one's enemies".

to:

** ''Discworld/EqualRites'' features the word "p'ch'zarni'chiwkov" used by the small tribe of the K'turni, which means: "the "The nasty little sound of a sword being unsheathed right behind one at just the point when one thought one had disposed of one's enemies".enemies."



** Umnian is an entirely contextual language, meaning that there isn't a single word that won't have a different meaning when used in a different sentence. [[spoiler: Thusly the "Ten Gold Golems" that the Golem trust had excavated and directed to Ankh Morpork turned out to be "Ten ''Thousand'' Golems"..]]
** An interesting English to English translation, quite a bit of time in ''Discworld/UnseenAcademicals'' is devoted to an extremely long, flowery love poem from Trev to Juliet -- both of whom are somewhat ... less-than-literate. The message is translated, with the help of Nutt, from Trev's original, "I think you're really fit. I really fancy you. Can we have a date? No hanky panky, I promise" to said long poem. Of course, once Juliet gets it, Glenda has to translate the poem back for her. [[StrangeMindsThinkAlike Naturally]], she translates it as, "He really fancies you, thinks you're really fit, how about a date, no hanky panky, he promises." In fact Nutt had forseen this, and the long version doubles as a poem from him to Glenda.
* In the ''{{Malloreon}}'', Toth, a [[TheVoiceless mute]] GentleGiant, can communicate elaborately with Durnik using nothing more than a vague gesture or two. [[spoiler: As it turns out, the sign language is only a pretense: the real communication is via a form of telepathy.]]

to:

** Umnian is an entirely contextual language, meaning that there isn't a single word that won't have a different meaning when used in a different sentence. [[spoiler: Thusly [[spoiler:Thusly the "Ten Gold Golems" that the Golem trust had excavated and directed to Ankh Morpork turned out to be "Ten ''Thousand'' Golems"..]]
** An interesting English to English translation, quite a bit of time in ''Discworld/UnseenAcademicals'' is devoted to an extremely long, flowery love poem from Trev to Juliet -- both of whom are somewhat ...somewhat... less-than-literate. The message is translated, with the help of Nutt, from Trev's original, "I think you're really fit. I really fancy you. Can we have a date? No hanky panky, I promise" to said long poem. Of course, once Juliet gets it, Glenda has to translate the poem back for her. [[StrangeMindsThinkAlike Naturally]], she translates it as, "He really fancies you, thinks you're really fit, how about a date, no hanky panky, he promises." In fact Nutt had forseen foreseen this, and the long version doubles as a poem from him to Glenda.
* In the ''{{Malloreon}}'', ''Literature/TheMalloreon'', Toth, a [[TheVoiceless mute]] GentleGiant, can communicate elaborately with Durnik using nothing more than a vague gesture or two. [[spoiler: As it turns out, the sign language is only a pretense: the real communication is via a form of telepathy.]]



* In ''Literature/DaveBarrySleptHere'', a "convenient interpreter" helps Columbus introduce himself to the Native Americans:
-->'''Columbus''': You guys are Indians, right?\\
'''Tribal Chief''': K'ham anonoda jawe. ("No. We came over from Asia about twenty thousand years ago via the Land Bridge.")
** Creator/DaveBarry also likes to claim that German is like this; the German translation of "Go Brits!" in ''Literature/DaveBarrySleptHere'' is "Wannfahrtdersugab ein Umwievieluhrkommteran!" Another time he claims that the German word for "subway" is "Goenundergroundenpayenfairenandridearoundintrainen".

to:

* In ''Literature/DaveBarrySleptHere'', a ''Literature/DaveBarrySleptHere'':
** A
"convenient interpreter" helps Columbus introduce himself to the Native Americans:
-->'''Columbus''': --->'''Columbus:''' You guys are Indians, right?\\
'''Tribal Chief''': Chief:''' K'ham anonoda jawe. ("No. We came over from Asia about twenty thousand years ago via the Land Bridge.")
** Creator/DaveBarry also likes to claim that German is like this; the German translation of "Go Brits!" in ''Literature/DaveBarrySleptHere'' is "Wannfahrtdersugab ein Umwievieluhrkommteran!" Another time he claims that the German word for "subway" is "Goenundergroundenpayenfairenandridearoundintrainen".



* OlderThanSteam; used by Creator/{{Moliere}} in his play ''The Bourgeois Gentleman''. The title character is duped by people pretending to be Turks. They speak in [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign a combination of nonsense and the original ''linga franca''- a combination of French, Spanish, Italian, and some Arabic]] and their speech is "translated" to him.
-->'''Cleonte (disguised as a Turkish prince):''' Bel men.\\
'''Covielle:''' He says will you please accompany him immediately to be prepared for the ceremony, so that you may both proceed subsequently with all speed to meet your daughter, and so expedite the solemnification of his marriage to her.\\
'''M Jordan:''' He said all that in two words?\\
'''Covielle:''' That's the Turkish language for you. A couple of words and you've said it all.



** Also shows up in ''Literature/TheBaroqueCycle'', where a character sends off a letter composed of 40 000 Qwghlmian runes to be translated and receives a 400 000-words text in return.
* In ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'', part of the function of NewSpeak is to fit complex concepts into single words. For example, the sentence "Oldthinkers unbellyfeel Ingsoc" roughly translates as "Those whose ideas were formed before the Revolution cannot have a full emotional understanding of the principles of English Socialism".
** Interestingly, the whole point is, in fact, [[LanguageEqualsThought to obfuscate, or eliminate, the more complex thoughts]].
* In ''Agaton Sax'' we have Graelic (which seems to be a NoCelebritiesWereHarmed of Gaelic), which can say lots in just a few words, and Brosnian (supposedly a Slavic language) which is the exact opposite. This becomes a RunningGag because the hero is an omniglot, and several villains speak these languages - DiabolicalMastermind professor Julius Mosca uses Graelic as a secret language in his organisation because it is so rare, and his colleague doctor Anaxagoras Frank uses Brosnian in ''his'' organisation because he is Brosnian, and so are his chief henchmen.

to:

** * Also shows up in ''Literature/TheBaroqueCycle'', where a character sends off a letter composed of 40 000 40,000 Qwghlmian runes to be translated and receives a 400 000-words 400,000-words text in return.
* In ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'', part of the function of NewSpeak is to fit complex concepts into single words. For example, the sentence "Oldthinkers unbellyfeel Ingsoc" roughly translates as "Those whose ideas were formed before the Revolution cannot have a full emotional understanding of the principles of English Socialism".
**
Socialism". Interestingly, the whole point is, in fact, [[LanguageEqualsThought to obfuscate, or eliminate, the more complex thoughts]].
* In ''Agaton Sax'' we have Graelic (which seems to be a NoCelebritiesWereHarmed of Gaelic), which can say lots in just a few words, and Brosnian (supposedly a Slavic language) which is the exact opposite. This becomes a RunningGag because the hero is an omniglot, and several villains speak these languages - -- DiabolicalMastermind professor Julius Mosca uses Graelic as a secret language in his organisation because it is so rare, and his colleague doctor Anaxagoras Frank uses Brosnian in ''his'' organisation because he is Brosnian, and so are his chief henchmen.



* The gnomes of [[Literature/{{Dragonlance}} Krynn]] speak Common, but their names for people, places, and things are absurdly long and tend to be interrupted. Sometimes the interruption becomes the new name. Hence, Mount Nevermind.
** Inspired by the human race's gift for brevity, they began to shorten their proverbs (usually long enough to require several hours to quote one) to much shorter form, such as "A gear" or "hydrodynamics." This practice is said to bring tears of joy to the gnomish elders, awestruck by such skill in verbal shortform.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'': The gnomes of [[Literature/{{Dragonlance}} Krynn]] Krynn speak Common, but their names for people, places, and things are absurdly long and tend to be interrupted. Sometimes the interruption becomes the new name. Hence, Mount Nevermind.
**
Nevermind. Inspired by the human race's gift for brevity, they began to shorten their proverbs (usually long enough to require several hours to quote one) to much shorter form, such as "A gear" or "hydrodynamics." This practice is said to bring tears of joy to the gnomish elders, awestruck by such skill in verbal shortform.



[[folder: Live Action TV]]

to:

[[folder: Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]



* One ''Series/{{MADtv}}'' sketch parodying a badly-translated Korean soap opera had a character utter a single syllable, while the subtitles for the one-syllable sentence filled up the whole screen.

to:

* One ''Series/{{MADtv}}'' ''Series/MadTV'' sketch parodying a badly-translated Korean soap opera had a character utter a single syllable, while the subtitles for the one-syllable sentence filled up the whole screen.



[[folder: Professional Wrestling]]

to:

[[folder: Professional [[folder:Pro Wrestling]]



[[folder:Recorded and Stand-Up Comedy]]
* In an early stand-up routine, Creator/RobinWilliams did this gag, imitating a Soviet (this was 1978) ballet dancer being interviewed on American TV about being in New York for a performance. As the host, he asks "Did you like your time in New York?" He then goes into a 2-minute bout of the dancer speaking rapidly in Russian while pantomiming drinking, drug use, and random sexual encounters (complete with graphic pelvic thrusting motions). He then has the Soviet translator begin arguing with her, getting into a shouting match, then hitting her, both of them settling down, and finally telling the host "She say 'Yes!'" with a broad smile as if nothing were amiss. At the time it was as much a commentary on the ludicrous degree to which the Soviets would whitewash events to present themselves as morally superior to the West, while everyone else knew the truth.
* For Kevin Johnson, ventriloquist from Legoland, CA, one of his acts is called "Godzilla Theater" where he and his friends Clyde (a vulture) and Matilda (a cockatoo) all move their mouths randomly so as not to sync up with their English words (an obvious play on questionable English dubs of Japanese movies). After being told that they have to get out near the end of the act, Clyde rapidly moves his beak for nearly five seconds (confusing the other two) before saying simply, "No!"
* In a Creator/StanFreberg sketch about a choir director prompting his choir with the words for "I've Got You Under My Skin", there's a bit where he's speaking faster and faster to get the whole line in:
-->'''Freberg:''' ''[vaguely comprehensible gibberish]''\\
'''Choir:''' I'd sacrifice anything come what might for the sake of having you near...\\
'''Freberg:''' ''[vaguely comprehensible gibberish]''\\
'''Choir:''' In spite of the warning voice that comes in the night and repeats and repeats in my...\\
'''Freberg:''' ''[long string of gibberish]''\\
'''Choir:''' Ear...

to:

[[folder:Recorded [[folder:Theater]]
* OlderThanSteam; used by Creator/{{Moliere}} in his play ''The Bourgeois Gentleman''. The title character is duped by people pretending to be Turks. They speak in [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign a combination of nonsense
and Stand-Up Comedy]]
* In an early stand-up routine, Creator/RobinWilliams did this gag, imitating a Soviet (this was 1978) ballet dancer being interviewed on American TV about being in New York for a performance. As
the host, he asks "Did you like your time in New York?" He then goes into original]] ''linga franca'' -- a 2-minute bout combination of the dancer speaking rapidly in Russian while pantomiming drinking, drug use, French, Spanish, Italian, and random sexual encounters (complete with graphic pelvic thrusting motions). He then has the Soviet translator begin arguing with her, getting into a shouting match, then hitting her, both of them settling down, some Arabic -- and finally telling the host "She say 'Yes!'" with a broad smile as if nothing were amiss. At the time it was as much a commentary on the ludicrous degree to which the Soviets would whitewash events to present themselves as morally superior to the West, while everyone else knew the truth.
* For Kevin Johnson, ventriloquist from Legoland, CA, one of his acts is called "Godzilla Theater" where he and his friends Clyde (a vulture) and Matilda (a cockatoo) all move
their mouths randomly so speech is "translated" to him.
-->'''Cleonte:''' ''[disguised
as not to sync up with their English words (an obvious play on questionable English dubs of Japanese movies). After being told that they have to get out near the end of the act, Clyde rapidly moves his beak for nearly five seconds (confusing the other two) before saying simply, "No!"
* In
a Creator/StanFreberg sketch about a choir director prompting his choir with the words for "I've Got You Under My Skin", there's a bit where he's speaking faster and faster to get the whole line in:
-->'''Freberg:''' ''[vaguely comprehensible gibberish]''\\
'''Choir:''' I'd sacrifice anything come what might for the sake of having you near...
Turkish prince]'' Bel men.\\
'''Freberg:''' ''[vaguely comprehensible gibberish]''\\
'''Choir:''' In spite of
'''Covielle:''' He says will you please accompany him immediately to be prepared for the warning voice ceremony, so that comes in you may both proceed subsequently with all speed to meet your daughter, and so expedite the night and repeats and repeats in my...solemnification of his marriage to her.\\
'''Freberg:''' ''[long string '''Mr. Jordan:''' He said all that in two words?\\
'''Covielle:''' That's the Turkish language for you. A couple
of gibberish]''\\
'''Choir:''' Ear...
words and you've said it all.



[[folder: Video Games]]

to:

[[folder: Video [[folder:Video Games]]



-->'''Maria''': ...Ef teda shan estino?
-->'''Worker''': Ton pon bwasse.
-->'''Maria''': ...He says it's about a two-hour walk from here.
-->'''[=Kaisap112=]''': He said that in three words?

to:

-->'''Maria''': ...-->'''Maria:''' ...Ef teda shan estino?
-->'''Worker''':
estino?\\
'''Worker:'''
Ton pon bwasse.
-->'''Maria''': ...
bwasse.\\
'''Maria:''' ...
He says it's about a two-hour walk from here.
-->'''[=Kaisap112=]''':
here.\\
'''[=Kaisap112=]:'''
He said that in three words?



[[folder: Visual Novels]]

to:

[[folder: Visual [[folder:Visual Novels]]



[[folder: Webcomics]]
* In [[http://www.requestcomics.com/comic/275.html this]] ''Request Comics,'' a person gets a Chinese character tattoo, but doesn't know what it means. It turns out to mean "The guy who wrote this doesn't know Chinese. He just thought it looked cool."
--> "That's a single character in Chinese?"
--> "It comes up a lot."
* In [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/1213.html this]] ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' strip the Ubese phrase "Ay yoto" apparently means "With this! A holovid of the final charity performance of the traditional Gungan creation legend, to raise money for the Naboo refugee crisis, prior to the destruction of the Gungan race."
* Lillian from ''GoGetARoomie'' [[http://www.gogetaroomie.com/comic/the-little-one-makes-a-friend tells a story]] in which "Blop" is translated as first "You're Beautiful" and then "Thank-you it means a lot to me, and you're just as beautiful"

to:

[[folder: Webcomics]]
[[folder:Web Animation]]
* In an episode of ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'', O'Malley orders his robot army to hurry up but, since they were built by Lopez who speaks in Spanish, O'Malley has to ask Lopez how to say "hurry up" in spanish. Lopez decides to mess with him:
-->'''O'Malley:''' ''[speaking in Spanish]'' [[MyHovercraftIsFullOfEels Hey everyone! I'm a purple jerk who likes to drink motor oil!]] ''[in English]'' That seemed awfully long for just "hurry up".\\
'''Lopez:''' '[in Spanish]'' It's a very poetic language.
:: Try not to think too hard about how O'Malley can perfectly understand Lopez -- who only speaks Spanish -- yet has no idea what he just said.
* In ''WebAnimation/BeeAndPuppycat'', it takes
[[http://www.requestcomics.com/comic/275.html this]] ''Request Comics,'' a person gets a Chinese character tattoo, but doesn't know what it means. It turns out to mean "The guy who wrote this doesn't know Chinese. He just thought it looked cool."
--> "That's a single character in Chinese?"
--> "It comes up a lot."
* In [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/1213.html this]] ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' strip the Ubese phrase "Ay yoto" apparently means "With this! A holovid of the final charity performance of the traditional Gungan creation legend, to raise money
youtube.com/watch?v=lOG_UtLxh58&t=3m30s noticeably longer]] for the Naboo refugee crisis, prior Puppycat to the destruction of the Gungan race."
* Lillian from ''GoGetARoomie'' [[http://www.gogetaroomie.com/comic/the-little-one-makes-a-friend tells a story]] in which "Blop" is translated as first "You're Beautiful" and then "Thank-you
say "Why not?" than it means a lot does to me, and you're just as beautiful"say "Hello Peon. Bow to me."



[[folder: Web Original]]
* Done in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBO5dh9qrIQ&feature=player_embedded This Episode]] of ''HeyShipwreck''. For example, translating "What the f* ck" as "I do not understand why logic seems to be avoided at all cost for some reason, and I'm just very frustrated at the fact that we have been unable to let go of certain practices, that although have become routine, are not as beneficial as other options that have become available to us."
* In an episode of ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'', O'Malley orders his robot army to hurry up but, since they were built by Lopez who speaks in Spanish, O'Malley has to ask Lopez how to say "hurry up" in spanish. Lopez decids to mess with him:
--> '''O'Malley (speaking in Spanish):''' [[MyHovercraftIsFullOfEels Hey everyone! I'm a purple jerk who likes to drink motor oil!]] '''(in English)''' That seemed awfully long for just "hurry up".
-->'''Lopez (in Spanish):''' It's a very poetic language.
** Try not to think too hard about how O'Malley can perfectly understand Lopez--who only speaks Spanish--yet has no idea what he just said.
* Used in an episode of the ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'' GagSub "The Adventures of Yuki Nagato" by ''[[http://www.youtube.com/user/ChiefProphetOfYukism Chief Prophet Of Yukiism]]''. Moreover, the word where this trope is applied to, "Yahoo", translates into a lampshade of the trope.
* In ''WebAnimation/BeeAndPuppycat'', it takes [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOG_UtLxh58&t=3m30s noticeably longer]] for Puppycat to say "Why not?" than it does to say "Hello Peon. Bow to me."
* At the start of episode 9 of ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'', a scene from the Spanish dub is shown and a particularly long quote of Bakura's is subbed simply as "Yes". In case you're wondering, the phrase is ''Tienes algo que yo deseo, Yugi, y pienso quitártelo'' (You have something that I want, Yugi, and I plan to take it from you.)
* When Naruto falls down a tree and hurts himself in ''WebVideo/NarutoTheAbridgedComedyFandubSpoofSeriesShow'', this happens:
-->'''Naruto:''' ''(rolling on the ground, clutching his head)'' Itatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatata!\\
'''[[WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries Yami Yugi]]:''' That was Japanese for, "Ouch!"

to:

[[folder: Web Original]]
[[folder:Web Comics]]
* Done in In [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBO5dh9qrIQ&feature=player_embedded This Episode]] of ''HeyShipwreck''. For example, translating "What the f* ck" as "I do not understand why logic seems requestcomics.com/comic/275.html this]] ''Request Comics'', a person gets a Chinese character tattoo, but doesn't know what it means. It turns out to be avoided at all cost for some reason, and I'm mean "The guy who wrote this doesn't know Chinese. He just very frustrated at the fact that we have been unable to let go of certain practices, that although have become routine, are not as beneficial as other options that have become available to us.thought it looked cool."
* In an episode of ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'', O'Malley orders his robot army to hurry -->"That's a single character in Chinese?"\\
"It comes
up but, since they were built by Lopez who speaks in Spanish, O'Malley has to ask Lopez how to say "hurry up" in spanish. Lopez decids to mess with him:
--> '''O'Malley (speaking in Spanish):''' [[MyHovercraftIsFullOfEels Hey everyone! I'm
a purple jerk who likes to drink motor oil!]] '''(in English)''' That seemed awfully long for just "hurry up".
-->'''Lopez (in Spanish):''' It's a very poetic language.
** Try not to think too hard about how O'Malley can perfectly understand Lopez--who only speaks Spanish--yet has no idea what he just said.
* Used in an episode of the ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'' GagSub "The Adventures of Yuki Nagato" by ''[[http://www.youtube.com/user/ChiefProphetOfYukism Chief Prophet Of Yukiism]]''. Moreover, the word where this trope is applied to, "Yahoo", translates into a lampshade of the trope.
* In ''WebAnimation/BeeAndPuppycat'', it takes [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOG_UtLxh58&t=3m30s noticeably longer]] for Puppycat to say "Why not?" than it does to say "Hello Peon. Bow to me.
lot."
* At In [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/1213.html this]] ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' strip the start Ubese phrase "Ay yoto" apparently means "With this! A holovid of episode 9 the final charity performance of ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'', a scene the traditional Gungan creation legend, to raise money for the Naboo refugee crisis, prior to the destruction of the Gungan race."
* Lillian
from the Spanish dub ''Webcomic/GoGetARoomie'' [[http://www.gogetaroomie.com/comic/the-little-one-makes-a-friend tells a story]] in which "Blop" is shown translated as first "You're Beautiful" and then "Thank-you it means a particularly long quote of Bakura's is subbed simply as "Yes". In case lot to me, and you're wondering, just as beautiful"
* ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'': The bonus art [[http://www.giantitp.com/Images/CafePress2013/DrowHandSigns.png "Common Drow Hand Signs"]] veers into this. A single gesture can mean "literally dripping in poison", and a female drow pointing at her chest is "If we lives in a matriarchy, why do we always dress like this?" On
the phrase is ''Tienes algo que yo deseo, Yugi, y pienso quitártelo'' (You have something that I want, Yugi, and I plan to take it from you.)
* When Naruto falls down a tree and hurts himself in ''WebVideo/NarutoTheAbridgedComedyFandubSpoofSeriesShow'', this happens:
-->'''Naruto:''' ''(rolling on the ground, clutching his head)'' Itatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatatata!\\
'''[[WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries Yami Yugi]]:''' That was Japanese for, "Ouch!"
other hand, "soup" require several full-body moves.



[[folder: Western Animation]]

to:

[[folder: Western [[folder:Web Original]]
* Done in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBO5dh9qrIQ This Episode]] of ''WebVideo/HeyShipwreck''. For example, translating "What the f*ck" as "I do not understand why logic seems to be avoided at all cost for some reason, and I'm just very frustrated at the fact that we have been unable to let go of certain practices, that although have become routine, are not as beneficial as other options that have become available to us."
* JustForFun/TVTropesWillRuinYourVocabulary.
** The biggest offender seems to be {{Zeerust}}. Which upon translation into plain English, approximately means "the {{Narm}}-inducing phenomenon in which a work created in the past had its own sense of futurism which, to modern audiences, ironically makes the work seem dated." Oh wait, I need to explain {{Narm}} first!
** {{Narm}} in plain English is "an attempted serious moment or scene in a film or other media, which due to the absurd nature or poor execution of said moment, instead makes the scene unintentionally comical."
* MemeticMutation in the sense that we define it here also runs on this, in that a short phrase or scene from a work takes on a whole set of connotations for fans of that work that might be completely opaque to non-fans who don't get the context.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western
Animation]]



--> '''Mark:''' (Hesitantly) Sssuck my balls. (Mr. Calametti slaps him) Ah!
--> '''Mr. Calametti:''' You ''just'' called my father a coward!
--> '''Mark:''' (Cheerily) Suck my... balls!
--> '''Mr. Calametti:''' [[{{Facepalm}} Now you're asking for salad]].

to:

--> '''Mark:''' (Hesitantly) -->'''Mark:''' ''[hesitantly]'' Sssuck my balls. (Mr. ''[Mr. Calametti slaps him) Ah!
-->
him]'' Ah!\\
'''Mr. Calametti:''' You ''just'' called my father a coward!
-->
coward!\\
'''Mark:''' (Cheerily) ''[cheerily]'' Suck my... balls!
-->
balls!\\
'''Mr. Calametti:''' [[{{Facepalm}} Now you're asking for salad]].



[[folder: Real Life]]

to:

[[folder: Real [[folder:Real Life]]







[[folder: Meta]]

* JustForFun/TVTropesWillRuinYourVocabulary.
** The biggest offender seems to be {{Zeerust}}. Which upon translation into plain English, approximately means "the {{Narm}}-inducing phenomenon in which a work created in the past had its own sense of futurism which, to modern audiences, ironically makes the work seem dated." Oh wait, I need to explain {{Narm}} first!
** {{Narm}} in plain English is "an attempted serious moment or scene in a film or other media, which due to the absurd nature or poor execution of said moment, instead makes the scene unintentionally comical".
* MemeticMutation in the sense that we define it here also runs on this, in that a short phrase or scene from a work takes on a whole set of connotations for fans of that work that might be completely opaque to non-fans who don't get the context.
[[/folder]]
14th Aug '17 11:25:17 AM BreadBull
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** Many full (as in family and given) Japanese names can be written with just four characters while having fairly long pronunciations. For example, 豊臣秀吉 is Toyotomi Hideyoshi - four times as long in the Roman alphabet.
** Yojijukugo, or "four character phrases" are frequently something of a pseudo-example. Even while most are only four to eight syllables long, being idiomatic expressions, they usually can't be meaningfully translated in less than a dozen words.

to:

** Many full (as in family and given) Japanese names can be written with just four characters a single character while having fairly long pronunciations. For example, 豊臣秀吉 is Toyotomi Hideyoshi Minamoto - four times as long in the Roman alphabet.
** Yojijukugo, Sìzìchéngyǔ(Chinese)/Yojijukugo(Japanese), or "four character phrases" are frequently something of a pseudo-example. Even while most are only four to eight syllables long, being idiomatic expressions, they usually can't be meaningfully translated in less than a dozen words. As an example, 瓜田李下 translates to "Don't kneel down to tie your shoe in a melon field; nor adjust your hat under a pear tree, to avoid people misunderstanding it as you trying to steal something."
14th Aug '17 11:19:14 AM BreadBull
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* In the Madrid metro, they have a vocal announcement that says, "Atención, estación en curva. Al salir, tengan cuidado para no introducir el pie entre coche y andén." Literal translation: "Warning, curved station. When disembarking, take care not to insert your foot between the train car and the platform." Or as they say in London, "Mind the gap." On the other hand, "Please allow other patrons to disembark before embarking" translates to "Dejen salir"[[note]]"Let people out"[[/note]].

to:

* In the Madrid metro, they have a vocal announcement that says, "Atención, estación en curva. Al salir, tengan cuidado para no introducir el pie entre coche y andén." Literal translation: "Warning, curved station. When disembarking, take care not to insert your foot between the train car and the platform." Or as they say in London, "Mind the gap." On "[[note]]This came about because computers and recordings were super costly at the time and they had to come up with the shortest phrase they could. Nowadays it's lengthened to "Please mind the gap between the train and the platform.[[/note]]
**On
the other hand, "Please allow other patrons to disembark before embarking" translates to "Dejen salir"[[note]]"Let people out"[[/note]].
16th Jul '17 2:14:34 PM Gosicrystal
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* Many languages do not actually have the words "yes" and "no." Instead one responds to a yes/no question by ''repeating'' the question or key verb, but in the positive or negative. For example, in Irish Gaelic, if you are asked "Ar mhaith leat x?" (Do you like x?), one would respond either "Is maith liom" ("I like") or "Nior maith liom" ("I do not like").
** Mandarin Chinese is the same way. The closest thing they have is "是 (shi)" which means "It is" [[note]]They also have "對(Dui)" which means "Correct"[[/note]] and "不是(Bu Shi)" meaning "It is not." Otherwise they just put "不(bu)" in front of the verb like they do in Gaelic. This is the cause of the infamous RecursiveTranslation that rendered Darth Vader's BigNo from ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' as "do not want" in ''JustForFun/BackstrokeOfTheWest''. AndNowYouKnow.

to:

* Many languages do not actually have the words "yes" and "no." Instead one responds to a yes/no question by ''repeating'' the question or key verb, but in the positive or negative. For example, in negative:
** In
Irish Gaelic, if you are asked "Ar mhaith leat x?" (Do you like x?), one would respond either "Is maith liom" ("I like") or "Nior maith liom" ("I do not like").
** In Mandarin Chinese is Chinese, the same way. The closest thing they have is "是 (shi)" which means "It is" [[note]]They also have "對(Dui)" which means "Correct"[[/note]] and "不是(Bu Shi)" meaning "It is not." Otherwise they just put "不(bu)" in front of the verb like they do in Gaelic. This is the cause of the infamous RecursiveTranslation that rendered Darth Vader's BigNo from ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' as "do not want" in ''JustForFun/BackstrokeOfTheWest''. AndNowYouKnow.



* According to Website/{{Cracked}}, the Pascuense (the language spoken in Easter Island) word "tingo" means "to remove every object from a person's house one by one until nothing is left."
** Also referred to by QI in the book [[CaptainObvious ''The Meaning of Tingo'']]

to:

* According to Website/{{Cracked}}, the Pascuense (the language spoken in Easter Island) word "tingo" means "to remove every object from a person's house one by one until nothing is left."
**
" Also referred to by QI in the book [[CaptainObvious ''The Meaning of Tingo'']]



* In the Madrid metro, they have a vocal announcement that says, "Atención, estación en curva. Al salir, tengan cuidado para no introducir el pie entre coche y andén." Literal translation: "Warning, curved station. When disembarking, take care not to insert your foot between the train car and the platform." Or as they say in London, "Mind the gap."
** On the other hand, "Please allow other patrons to disembark before embarking" translates to "Dejen salir"[[note]]"Let people out"[[/note]].

to:

* In the Madrid metro, they have a vocal announcement that says, "Atención, estación en curva. Al salir, tengan cuidado para no introducir el pie entre coche y andén." Literal translation: "Warning, curved station. When disembarking, take care not to insert your foot between the train car and the platform." Or as they say in London, "Mind the gap."
**
" On the other hand, "Please allow other patrons to disembark before embarking" translates to "Dejen salir"[[note]]"Let people out"[[/note]].
10th Jul '17 2:45:47 PM SomberCaelifera
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* One ''Franchise/DoctorWho'' novel says that 'Gallifrey' (the name of the Doctor's homeworld) translates to 'They that walk in the shadows'.
8th Jul '17 4:19:17 PM nombretomado
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While we commonly expect short phrases in one language to be equally short in another, sometimes short phrases are translated into surprisingly long ones: however, many shows parody this completely by having a single word become a long phrase in English, or a ridiculously long phrase to a single English word, often the word 'Yes'. This is mild TruthInTelevision, as there are words in other languages for highly specific cases which take some explaining in English, such as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zugzwang Zugzwang]] which means "a situation [in a game, especially TabletopGame/{{Chess}}] where one player is put at a disadvantage because he has to make a move when he would prefer to pass and make no move" (from TheOtherWiki)."[[note]]Technically, the word's literal translation (in German) is simply "compulsion to move".[[/note]]

to:

While we commonly expect short phrases in one language to be equally short in another, sometimes short phrases are translated into surprisingly long ones: however, many shows parody this completely by having a single word become a long phrase in English, or a ridiculously long phrase to a single English word, often the word 'Yes'. This is mild TruthInTelevision, as there are words in other languages for highly specific cases which take some explaining in English, such as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zugzwang Zugzwang]] which means "a situation [in a game, especially TabletopGame/{{Chess}}] where one player is put at a disadvantage because he has to make a move when he would prefer to pass and make no move" (from TheOtherWiki).Wiki/TheOtherWiki)."[[note]]Technically, the word's literal translation (in German) is simply "compulsion to move".[[/note]]
26th Jun '17 2:24:18 PM Korodzik
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* Used in a serious way in Creator/StanislawLem's ''Imaginary Magnitude'', with the future science of "prognolinguistics" which tries to reconstruct future languages. The more advanced a language is, the higher is its information density. In a "level 2" language, a short sentence is the equivalent of a long encyclopedia article, while a similarly short sentence in a "level 3" language would take 140 years to read aloud when translated to a modern-day language.

to:

* Used in a serious way in Creator/StanislawLem's ''Imaginary Magnitude'', with the future science of "prognolinguistics" which tries to reconstruct (preconstruct?) future languages. The more advanced a language is, the higher is its information density. In a "level 2" language, a short sentence is the equivalent of a long encyclopedia article, while a similarly short sentence in a "level 3" language would take 140 years to read aloud when translated to a modern-day language.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/{{Somewhither}}'': The Ursprache includes a lot of brief words for [[LanguageEqualsThought specific, complex types of crimes and torture]]. For example, "hamhattapars'h" means "a family murder-suicide where a mother kills all her children starting with the youngest, and then herself, on a holy day".
13th May '17 6:24:04 PM luisedgarf
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** ''Alcahuete'': Taking advantage of a particular situation, by doing nothing if that person thinks it can benefit him/her later by his innaction. It aslo stands for a person (a strawman) who helps to cover illicit actions. Oddly enough, the word came from Arabic "al-qawwed" and it's also used in Spanish theater slang for a curtain used to indicate that the intermission would be very short.

to:

** ''Alcahuete'': Taking advantage of a particular situation, by doing nothing if that person thinks it can benefit him/her later by his innaction. It aslo stands for a person (a strawman) who helps to cover illicit actions. Basically, it's AccompliceByInaction, albeit this is even more damning in Mexico than anywhere else. Oddly enough, the word came from Arabic "al-qawwed" and it's also used in Spanish theater slang for a curtain used to indicate that the intermission would be very short.
8th May '17 1:18:40 PM luisedgarf
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** ''Acomedirse'': Doing something selflessly and without expecting anything in return, and without being ordered beforehand. In a Catholic country like Mexico, this is a ''very important'' value expected from people, expecially younger ones.

to:

** ''Acomedirse'': Doing something selflessly and without expecting anything in return, and without being ordered beforehand. In a Catholic country like Mexico, this is a ''very important'' value expected from people, expecially especially younger ones.
8th May '17 1:18:13 PM luisedgarf
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Added DiffLines:

* Mexican Spanish has lots of words, especially slang and idioms, who can stand for especially complex actions:
** ''Acomedirse'': Doing something selflessly and without expecting anything in return, and without being ordered beforehand. In a Catholic country like Mexico, this is a ''very important'' value expected from people, expecially younger ones.
** ''Alcahuete'': Taking advantage of a particular situation, by doing nothing if that person thinks it can benefit him/her later by his innaction. It aslo stands for a person (a strawman) who helps to cover illicit actions. Oddly enough, the word came from Arabic "al-qawwed" and it's also used in Spanish theater slang for a curtain used to indicate that the intermission would be very short.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TranslationYes