History Main / Tragedy

22nd Oct '17 12:27:56 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/BertoltBrecht's ''Theatre/MotherCourageAndHerChildren'', as well as ''Measures Taken''. {{Catharsis}} is withheld in order to demand revolutionary action from the audience.

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* Creator/BertoltBrecht's ''Theatre/MotherCourageAndHerChildren'', as well as ''Measures Taken''. {{Catharsis}} Catharsis is withheld in order to demand revolutionary action from the audience.
27th Aug '17 10:43:00 AM karstovich2
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To [[SubvertedTrope subvert]] a tragedy is complex. It's not enough to try for ''GrandGuignol'' and stuff it up with {{Satire}} and [[BlackComedy dead babies]], tack on a happy ending, or pull on heartstrings with [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth dead babies]]. To subvert tragedy for real, you have to get into the cycle of [[EmotionalTorque catharsis]] and break one of the literary elements of greatness, [[{{Pride}} hubris]], [[FallenHero downfall]], or change, which is easier said than done; even the great Creator/ArthurMiller couldn't really do it (by his own admission, ''Theatre/DeathOfASalesman'', while excellent, failed at subverting the greatness element of tragedy). Or, just make it a {{Comedy}}, which is basically the whole thing PlayedForLaughs. Though that's not really a subversion, just an interesting detail about comedy.

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To [[SubvertedTrope subvert]] a tragedy is complex. It's not enough to try for ''GrandGuignol'' and stuff it up with {{Satire}} and [[BlackComedy dead babies]], tack on a happy ending, or pull on heartstrings with [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth dead babies]]. To subvert tragedy for real, you have to get into the cycle of [[EmotionalTorque catharsis]] and break one of the literary elements of greatness, [[{{Pride}} hubris]], [[FallenHero downfall]], or change, which is easier said than done; even the great Creator/ArthurMiller couldn't really do it (by his own admission, ''Theatre/DeathOfASalesman'', while excellent, nonetheless failed at in subverting the greatness element of tragedy).the tragic form). Or, just make it a {{Comedy}}, which is basically the whole thing PlayedForLaughs. Though that's not really a subversion, just an interesting detail about comedy.
27th Aug '17 10:41:52 AM karstovich2
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To [[SubvertedTrope subvert]] a tragedy is complex. It's not enough to try for ''GrandGuignol'' and stuff it up with {{Satire}} and [[BlackComedy dead babies]], tack on a happy ending, or pull on heartstrings with [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth dead babies]]. To subvert tragedy for real, you have to get into the cycle of [[EmotionalTorque catharsis]] and break one of the literary elements of greatness, [[{{Pride}} hubris]], [[FallenHero downfall]], or change. Or, just make it a {{Comedy}}, which is basically the whole thing PlayedForLaughs. Though that's not really a subversion, just an interesting detail about comedy.

to:

To [[SubvertedTrope subvert]] a tragedy is complex. It's not enough to try for ''GrandGuignol'' and stuff it up with {{Satire}} and [[BlackComedy dead babies]], tack on a happy ending, or pull on heartstrings with [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth dead babies]]. To subvert tragedy for real, you have to get into the cycle of [[EmotionalTorque catharsis]] and break one of the literary elements of greatness, [[{{Pride}} hubris]], [[FallenHero downfall]], or change.change, which is easier said than done; even the great Creator/ArthurMiller couldn't really do it (by his own admission, ''Theatre/DeathOfASalesman'', while excellent, failed at subverting the greatness element of tragedy). Or, just make it a {{Comedy}}, which is basically the whole thing PlayedForLaughs. Though that's not really a subversion, just an interesting detail about comedy.



* Arthur Miller's ''Theatre/DeathOfASalesman''. Willy Loman is a middle-class indebted salesman who delusionally believes that the right attitude and personality can spell success. This leads to disaster in his life and the lives of his children, especially Biff, and Willy Loman is never able to understand the cause of his misfortune and dies unaware. Miller subverts a classical tragedy by making a middle class man the subject of his play and making the protagonist never understand reality because of his blind spot at any point which ultimately [[spoiler: leads to his death]].

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* Arthur Miller's ''Theatre/DeathOfASalesman''. Willy Loman is a middle-class indebted salesman who delusionally believes that the right attitude and personality can spell success. This leads to disaster in his life and the lives of his children, especially Biff, and Willy Loman is never able to understand the cause of his misfortune and dies unaware. Miller subverts a classical tragedy by making a middle class man the subject of his play and making the protagonist never understand reality because of his blind spot at any point which ultimately [[spoiler: leads to his death]]. By his own admission, Miller didn't really make the subversion of tragedy work out, as Loman is kind of a pathetic figure.
29th Jul '17 2:37:39 PM WillKeaton
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* LightNovel/FateZero doesn't have complete closure due to being a prequel to the earlier VisualNovel/FateStayNight (which does provide a proper conclusion to the consequences of ''Zero''), but is a spectacular tragedy in and of itself, and one that fans of the Nasuverse ''know'' [[ForegoneConclusion didn't end well]]. It is filled to the brim with GreyAndGreyMorality, with the Masters either being in the fight for at least arguably selfish reasons (Tokiomi, Kayneth, Waver, Kirei), have genuinely good intentions but will do incredibly questionable things to achieve their goals (Kiritsugu, Kariya) or are just plain evil (Ryuunosuke, [[spoiler:Kirei later on]]). The Servants either have little choice in the whole matter or are no better than the Masters. And by the end, it gets ''ugly''. The only Master who doesn't end up dead, in despair or evil at the end is the one who actually grew positively as a person. [[spoiler:That person is Waver, who managed to get away with a happy ending. The only other two masters who survive are Kiritsugu, who is arguably the main human protagonist, and Kirei, who ends up being the end villain alongside Gilgamesh. Ryuunosuke is shot dead, Kayneth is also shot dead alongside his fiancee (even after sacrificing his own Servant for their lives), Tokiomi is stabbed in the back by Kirei, and despite his best efforts, poor Kariya also dies, only deepening Sakura's despair. Kiritsugu, despite surviving, ends up a broken man as all his sacrifices end up being for nothing, and his dream forever out of his reach.]] The only silver lining is [[spoiler:Shirou Emiya being saved from the fire by Kiritsugu, and later vowing to take up his adoptive father's dream of becoming a hero.]] That silver lining is the direct catalyst for its sequel bringing the tragedy to its final closure in the sequel.

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* LightNovel/FateZero ''LightNovel/FateZero'' doesn't have complete closure due to being a prequel to the earlier VisualNovel/FateStayNight (which does provide a proper conclusion to the consequences of ''Zero''), but is a spectacular tragedy in and of itself, and one that fans of the Nasuverse ''know'' [[ForegoneConclusion didn't end well]]. It is filled to the brim with GreyAndGreyMorality, with the Masters either being in the fight for at least arguably selfish reasons (Tokiomi, Kayneth, Waver, Kirei), have genuinely good intentions but will do incredibly questionable things to achieve their goals (Kiritsugu, Kariya) or are just plain evil (Ryuunosuke, [[spoiler:Kirei later on]]). The Servants either have little choice in the whole matter or are no better than the Masters. And by the end, it gets ''ugly''. The only Master who doesn't end up dead, in despair or evil at the end is the one who actually grew positively as a person. [[spoiler:That person is Waver, who managed to get away with a happy ending. The only other two masters who survive are Kiritsugu, who is arguably the main human protagonist, and Kirei, who ends up being the end villain alongside Gilgamesh. Ryuunosuke is shot dead, Kayneth is also shot dead alongside his fiancee (even after sacrificing his own Servant for their lives), Tokiomi is stabbed in the back by Kirei, and despite his best efforts, poor Kariya also dies, only deepening Sakura's despair. Kiritsugu, despite surviving, ends up a broken man as all his sacrifices end up being for nothing, and his dream forever out of his reach.]] The only silver lining is [[spoiler:Shirou Emiya being saved from the fire by Kiritsugu, and later vowing to take up his adoptive father's dream of becoming a hero.]] That silver lining is the direct catalyst for its sequel bringing the tragedy to its final closure in the sequel.
21st Jul '17 11:22:21 AM Tapol
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* The new ''Franchise/StarWars'' prequel trilogy is a rare modern mainstream example. Anakin Skywalker's potential is identified as a young age, and it is speculated he may be TheChosenOne who will bring balance to the force. However, Yoda also foresees Anakin's fatal flaw, which is that he dreads and will do anything to prevent losing those he loves no matter what the consequences. This is first evident with his premonition of his mother's death, and becomes stronger when he has nightmares of his wife Padmé dying. Anakin turns to TheDarkSide out of desperation to change the fate that Yoda counsels him he cannot avoid, but by destroying everything he ever loved with his own hands he makes it a self-fulfilling prophecy.

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* The new ''Franchise/StarWars'' prequel trilogy trilogy, particularly Episode III ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' is a rare modern mainstream example. In Episode I Anakin Skywalker's potential is identified as a young age, and it is speculated he may be TheChosenOne who will bring balance to the force. However, Yoda also foresees Anakin's fatal flaw, which is that he dreads and will do anything to prevent losing those he loves no matter what the consequences. This is first evident in Episode II with his premonition of his mother's death, and becomes death. Then in Episode III they stronger when he has nightmares of his wife Padmé dying. Anakin turns to TheDarkSide out of desperation to change the fate that Yoda counsels him he cannot avoid, but by destroying everything he ever loved with his own hands he makes it a self-fulfilling prophecy.
18th Jul '17 12:20:34 PM Tapol
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* The French films directed by Claude Berri ''JeanDeFlorette'' and it's sequel ''ManonDesSources'' based on a story by MarcelPagnol.

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* The French films directed by Claude Berri ''JeanDeFlorette'' and it's sequel ''ManonDesSources'' based on a story by MarcelPagnol.''ManonDesSources''.
18th Jul '17 12:19:51 PM Tapol
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* The French films ''JeanDeFlorette'' and it's sequel ''ManonOfTheSpring''.

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* The French films directed by Claude Berri ''JeanDeFlorette'' and it's sequel ''ManonOfTheSpring''.''ManonDesSources'' based on a story by MarcelPagnol.
18th Jul '17 12:16:54 PM Tapol
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* The French films ''JeanDeFlorette'' and it's sequel ''ManonOfTheSpring''.
3rd Jun '17 3:13:06 PM Az_Tech341
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* Ian [=McEwan=]'s ''{{Literature/Atonement}}'' follows a privileged upper class preteen called Briony Tallis. She essentially ruins several people's lives because of her arrogance and ignorance. Years later when she finally realises the full extent of what she's done [[spoiler: it's too late to make amends or fix her mistakes, because the affected parties have died partly due to her actions]].

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* Ian [=McEwan=]'s ''{{Literature/Atonement}}'' follows a privileged upper class preteen called Briony Tallis. She essentially ruins several people's lives because of her arrogance and ignorance. Years later later, when she finally realises realizes the full extent of what she's done done, [[spoiler: it's too late to make amends or fix her mistakes, because the affected parties have died partly due to her actions]].



* ''Literature/ThePrimeOfMissJeanBrodie'' when [[AnachronicOrder the events are arranged chronologically]] (the stage and film adaptations change things to a more linear structure). The protagonist is a respected teacher at a conservative school with her own special club of girls she motivates. Although the headmistress tries to dismiss her, Jean Brodie is almost untouchable. She also has two men pining after her. But due to her own arrogance and desire to teach what she wants, she ends up wrecking her students' lives - she grooms one girl to have an affair with a teacher, one ends up running off to Spain and dying in the Civil War and another eventually dies in a fire because she's too emotionally stunted from the bullying she received. Jean's faithful pupil Sandy eventually betrays her and she ends up dismissed, and her two suitors end up with other women - fed up of her mind games.

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* ''Literature/ThePrimeOfMissJeanBrodie'' qualifies when [[AnachronicOrder the events are arranged chronologically]] (the stage and film adaptations change things to a more linear structure). The protagonist is a respected teacher at a conservative school with her own special club of girls she motivates. Although the headmistress tries to dismiss her, Jean Brodie is almost untouchable. She also has two men pining after her. But But, due to her own arrogance and desire to teach what she wants, she ends up wrecking her students' lives - she grooms one girl to have an affair with a teacher, one ends up running off to Spain and dying in the Civil War War, and another eventually dies in a fire because she's too emotionally stunted from the bullying she received. Jean's faithful pupil Sandy eventually betrays her and she ends up dismissed, and her two suitors end up with other women - fed up of her mind games.
3rd Jun '17 10:15:57 AM fearlessnikki
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/ThePrimeOfMissJeanBrodie'' when [[AnachronicOrder the events are arranged chronologically]] (the stage and film adaptations change things to a more linear structure). The protagonist is a respected teacher at a conservative school with her own special club of girls she motivates. Although the headmistress tries to dismiss her, Jean Brodie is almost untouchable. She also has two men pining after her. But due to her own arrogance and desire to teach what she wants, she ends up wrecking her students' lives - she grooms one girl to have an affair with a teacher, one ends up running off to Spain and dying in the Civil War and another eventually dies in a fire because she's too emotionally stunted from the bullying she received. Jean's faithful pupil Sandy eventually betrays her and she ends up dismissed, and her two suitors end up with other women - fed up of her mind games.


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* Neil [=LaBute=]'s ''{{Theatre/Bash}}'' is a SettingUpdate of three Greek tragedies, examining how everyday people are capable of committing great evil just to save themselves.
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