History Main / Tragedy

3rd Jun '17 3:13:06 PM Az_Tech341
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Ian [=McEwan=]'s ''{{Literature/Atonement}}'' follows a privileged upper class preteen called Briony Tallis. She essentially ruins several people's lives because of her arrogance and ignorance. Years later when she finally realises the full extent of what she's done [[spoiler: it's too late to make amends or fix her mistakes, because the affected parties have died partly due to her actions]].

to:

* Ian [=McEwan=]'s ''{{Literature/Atonement}}'' follows a privileged upper class preteen called Briony Tallis. She essentially ruins several people's lives because of her arrogance and ignorance. Years later later, when she finally realises realizes the full extent of what she's done done, [[spoiler: it's too late to make amends or fix her mistakes, because the affected parties have died partly due to her actions]].



* ''Literature/ThePrimeOfMissJeanBrodie'' when [[AnachronicOrder the events are arranged chronologically]] (the stage and film adaptations change things to a more linear structure). The protagonist is a respected teacher at a conservative school with her own special club of girls she motivates. Although the headmistress tries to dismiss her, Jean Brodie is almost untouchable. She also has two men pining after her. But due to her own arrogance and desire to teach what she wants, she ends up wrecking her students' lives - she grooms one girl to have an affair with a teacher, one ends up running off to Spain and dying in the Civil War and another eventually dies in a fire because she's too emotionally stunted from the bullying she received. Jean's faithful pupil Sandy eventually betrays her and she ends up dismissed, and her two suitors end up with other women - fed up of her mind games.

to:

* ''Literature/ThePrimeOfMissJeanBrodie'' qualifies when [[AnachronicOrder the events are arranged chronologically]] (the stage and film adaptations change things to a more linear structure). The protagonist is a respected teacher at a conservative school with her own special club of girls she motivates. Although the headmistress tries to dismiss her, Jean Brodie is almost untouchable. She also has two men pining after her. But But, due to her own arrogance and desire to teach what she wants, she ends up wrecking her students' lives - she grooms one girl to have an affair with a teacher, one ends up running off to Spain and dying in the Civil War War, and another eventually dies in a fire because she's too emotionally stunted from the bullying she received. Jean's faithful pupil Sandy eventually betrays her and she ends up dismissed, and her two suitors end up with other women - fed up of her mind games.
3rd Jun '17 10:15:57 AM fearlessnikki
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/ThePrimeOfMissJeanBrodie'' when [[AnachronicOrder the events are arranged chronologically]] (the stage and film adaptations change things to a more linear structure). The protagonist is a respected teacher at a conservative school with her own special club of girls she motivates. Although the headmistress tries to dismiss her, Jean Brodie is almost untouchable. She also has two men pining after her. But due to her own arrogance and desire to teach what she wants, she ends up wrecking her students' lives - she grooms one girl to have an affair with a teacher, one ends up running off to Spain and dying in the Civil War and another eventually dies in a fire because she's too emotionally stunted from the bullying she received. Jean's faithful pupil Sandy eventually betrays her and she ends up dismissed, and her two suitors end up with other women - fed up of her mind games.


Added DiffLines:

* Neil [=LaBute=]'s ''{{Theatre/Bash}}'' is a SettingUpdate of three Greek tragedies, examining how everyday people are capable of committing great evil just to save themselves.
3rd Jun '17 10:08:01 AM fearlessnikki
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Ian [=McEwan=]'s ''{{Literature/Atonement}}'' follows a privileged upper class preteen called Briony Tallis. She essentially ruins several people's lives because of her arrogance and ignorance. Years later when she finally realises the full extent of what she's done [[spoiler: it's too late to make amends or fix her mistakes, because the affected parties have died partly due to her actions]].
26th May '17 9:37:58 PM Az_Tech341
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In a sentence, you could say that Tragedy concerns itself with the [[FallenHero fall]] of a great [[MostWritersAreMale man]] due to [[TragicMistake his own mistakes]] and/or [[FatalFlaw flaws.]]

to:

In a sentence, you could say that Tragedy concerns itself with the [[FallenHero fall]] of a great [[MostWritersAreMale man]] [[TheProtagonist protagonist]] due to [[TragicMistake his their own mistakes]] and/or [[FatalFlaw flaws.]]
flaws]].



As you can guess from the above facetiousness, Tragedy is also as clingy as Irony and as difficult to define and apply. It's not enough to be on [[SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism the deeply cynical end]] and have a [[TwistEnding Twist]] or DownerEnding with plenty of [[TrueArtIsAngsty artsy angst]] along the way, or have the hero's [[TooHappyToLive happy home life destroyed]] with a [[RapeAsDrama girlfriend raped]] and [[CynicismCatalyst a dead little sister]]; it has to be of an epic scope with inexorable and self-inflicted pain brought about for past sins. And despite all that, it also has to give the viewer closure.

This last one is perhaps the hardest to capture correctly. After all is said and done, the audience should not feel impotent rage, [[FanonDisContinuity denial]], confusion or [[DeusAngstMachina having been cheated]]. They should feel that the ending is a natural outcome to the hero's actions, and that in having faced punishment for those actions they [the audience] are purged of anxiety and worry. The world ''does'' make sense, the guilty ''[[KarmaHoudini are]]'' punished.

to:

As you can guess from the above facetiousness, Tragedy is also as clingy as Irony and as difficult to define and apply. It's not enough to be on [[SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism the deeply cynical end]] and have a [[TwistEnding Twist]] or DownerEnding with plenty of [[TrueArtIsAngsty artsy angst]] along the way, or have the hero's [[TooHappyToLive happy home life destroyed]] with a [[RapeAsDrama girlfriend raped]] and [[CynicismCatalyst a dead little sister]]; it has to be of an epic scope with inexorable and self-inflicted pain brought about for past sins. And And, despite all that, it also has to give the viewer closure.

This last one is perhaps the hardest to capture correctly. After all is said and done, the audience should not feel impotent rage, [[FanonDisContinuity denial]], confusion confusion, or [[DeusAngstMachina having been cheated]]. They should feel that the ending is a natural outcome to the hero's actions, and that in having faced punishment for those actions they [the audience] are purged of anxiety and worry. The world ''does'' make sense, the guilty ''[[KarmaHoudini are]]'' punished.



To borrow a simplifying example from ''Theatre/EducatingRita'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' is generally considered a tragedy in literary terms because throughout the play, Macbeth is warned time and time again by numerous parties (including the universe itself) that his actions will bring nothing but doom and misery upon himself and his family, but because he is blinded by his greed and ambition he ignores these warnings and proceeds regardless until it is much too late. In other words, Macbeth's terrible fate ''could'' have been avoided but is ultimately inevitable because his own character flaws have made it so. On the other hand, a man who suddenly and unexpectedly gets hit and killed by a falling tree while going about his daily business ''isn't'' usually considered a tragedy in the literary sense (although it will likely be tragic for his family), because the man's fate isn't preordained or a result of his own character flaws; if he'd known that being at that precise spot at that precise moment in advance would have killed him, he'd have likely chosen to take a different route. In the first example, the main character cannot escape his fate due to the circumstances he exists in and his own flaws, while in the second the main character's fate would have been entirely avoidable and likely avoided had he known about it in advance.

to:

To borrow a simplifying example from ''Theatre/EducatingRita'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' is generally considered a tragedy in literary terms because because, throughout the play, Macbeth is warned time and time again by numerous parties (including the universe itself) that his actions will bring nothing but doom and misery upon himself and his family, but but, because he is blinded by his greed and ambition ambition, he ignores these warnings and proceeds regardless until it is much too late. In other words, Macbeth's terrible fate ''could'' have been avoided but is ultimately inevitable because his own character flaws have made it so. On the other hand, a man who suddenly and unexpectedly gets hit and killed by a falling tree while going about his daily business ''isn't'' usually considered a tragedy in the literary sense (although it will likely be tragic for his family), because the man's fate isn't preordained or a result of his own character flaws; if he'd known that being at that precise spot at that precise moment in advance would have killed him, he'd have likely chosen to take a different route. In the first example, the main character cannot escape his fate due to the circumstances he exists in and his own flaws, while while, in the second second, the main character's fate would have been entirely avoidable and likely avoided had he known about it in advance.



To [[SubvertedTrope subvert]] a tragedy is complex. It's not enough to try for ''GrandGuignol'' and stuff it up with {{Satire}} and [[BlackComedy dead babies]], tack on a happy ending, or pull on heartstrings with [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth dead babies]]. To subvert tragedy for real, you have to get into the cycle of [[EmotionalTorque catharsis]] and break one of the literary elements of greatness, [[{{Pride}} hubris]], [[FallenHero downfall]] or change. Or, just make it a {{Comedy}}, which is basically the whole thing PlayedForLaughs. Though that's not really a subversion, just an interesting detail about comedy.

to:

To [[SubvertedTrope subvert]] a tragedy is complex. It's not enough to try for ''GrandGuignol'' and stuff it up with {{Satire}} and [[BlackComedy dead babies]], tack on a happy ending, or pull on heartstrings with [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth dead babies]]. To subvert tragedy for real, you have to get into the cycle of [[EmotionalTorque catharsis]] and break one of the literary elements of greatness, [[{{Pride}} hubris]], [[FallenHero downfall]] downfall]], or change. Or, just make it a {{Comedy}}, which is basically the whole thing PlayedForLaughs. Though that's not really a subversion, just an interesting detail about comedy.



** Averted with Creator/{{Sophocles}}'s ''Theatre/OedipusTheKing'', in which Oedipus doesn't die. In the same playwright's ''Theatre/{{Antigone}}'', there's some ambiguity about who the protagonist actually is: basically, the confusion comes from the misconception that the hero of a play is identical with its protagonist.[[note]]The hero of ''Antigone'' is Antigone herself, who does die, but the main protagonist is Creon, who is a VillainProtagonist and who doesn't.[[/note]]

to:

** Averted with Creator/{{Sophocles}}'s ''Theatre/OedipusTheKing'', in which Oedipus doesn't die. In the same playwright's ''Theatre/{{Antigone}}'', there's some ambiguity about who the protagonist actually is: basically, the confusion comes from the misconception that the hero of a play is identical with its protagonist.[[note]]The hero of ''Antigone'' is Antigone herself, who does die, dies, but the main protagonist is Creon, who is a VillainProtagonist and who doesn't.[[/note]]



* ATragedyOfImpulsiveness: Dammit, if the protagonists had thought things through before they acted, the tragedy could have been avoided.

to:

* ATragedyOfImpulsiveness: Dammit, Like NiceJobBreakingItHero, if the protagonists had thought things through before they acted, the tragedy could have been avoided.



* TwistEnding: Surprise! It failed! Or, whatever the protagonists did, or even why they did it, was rendered utterly pointless. Or, it worked; but screwed something ''else'' up in some other, unforeseen way. Anyway, it's ended, whatever it was. Hitting the wall is an option.
* WhatTheHellHero: The hero's tragic flaw often leads him to do rather...unheroic things.

to:

* TwistEnding: Surprise! It failed! Or, whatever the protagonists did, or even why they did it, was rendered utterly pointless. Or, it worked; but screwed something ''else'' up in some other, unforeseen way. Anyway, it's ended, whatever it was. Hitting the wall is an option.
was.
* WhatTheHellHero: The hero's tragic flaw often leads him to do rather... unheroic things.
21st May '17 4:50:17 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WeissKreuz is a tragedy, set in a world of hell - implied by Hidaka Ken - where villains are free to get what they want at the expense of the innocent lives, and without getting punished by laws. The heroes, Weiss, are themselves bloody, murderous monsters as well, and are determined to live a life full of guilt in order to provide the innocent better tomorrows.

to:

* WeissKreuz ''Anime/WeissKreuz'' is a tragedy, set in a world of hell - implied by Hidaka Ken - where villains are free to get what they want at the expense of the innocent lives, and without getting punished by laws. The heroes, Weiss, are themselves bloody, murderous monsters as well, and are determined to live a life full of guilt in order to provide the innocent better tomorrows.
11th May '17 7:25:34 PM Clipperwhiz1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In recent hindsight, ''Theatre/LittleShopofHorrors'' also qualifies due to having several motifs of the Greek tragedy archetype - the singers Crystal, Chiffon, and Ornette representing the classic Greek chorus, and Seymour's arc mirrors that of several tragic Greek protagonists - to achieve his dreams, he first sacrifices his enemy Orin Scrivello), then his father figure (Mr. Mushnik), then his love (Audrey) - and finally, when everything starts crashing down around him, himself.

to:

* In recent hindsight, ''Theatre/LittleShopofHorrors'' ''Theatre/LittleShopOfHorrors'' also qualifies due to having several motifs of the Greek tragedy archetype - the singers Crystal, Chiffon, and Ornette representing the classic Greek chorus, and Seymour's arc mirrors that of several tragic Greek protagonists - to achieve his dreams, he first sacrifices his enemy Orin Scrivello), then his father figure (Mr. Mushnik), then his love (Audrey) - and finally, when everything starts crashing down around him, himself.
11th May '17 7:24:50 PM Clipperwhiz1
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In recent hindsight, ''Theatre/LittleShopofHorrors'' also qualifies due to having several motifs of the Greek tragedy archetype - the singers Crystal, Chiffon, and Ornette representing the classic Greek chorus, and Seymour's arc mirrors that of several tragic Greek protagonists - to achieve his dreams, he first sacrifices his enemy Orin Scrivello), then his father figure (Mr. Mushnik), then his love (Audrey) - and finally, when everything starts crashing down around him, himself.
9th May '17 8:24:32 PM Clipperwhiz1
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

[[/folder]]




to:

[[/folder]]
9th May '17 8:21:14 PM Clipperwhiz1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[/folder]]

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
* WASP's rock opera ''Music/TheCrimsonIdol'' qualifies due to the protagonist's desire to return to his parents' good graces - after they heartlessly disowned him - leads to a long trail of self-destruction fueled by drugs and hollow fame, culminating in his suicide.
9th May '17 8:13:42 PM Clipperwhiz1
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''ChirinNoSuzu'' is of the classic revenge variety, in which the protagonist's desire to avenge his mother's murder winds up ruining him: becoming a monster that is not wolf nor sheep, being shunned by his sheep brethren because of this, killing his mentor/father figure - who was ALSO his mother's murderer, and dying alone.
This list shows the last 10 events of 196. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Tragedy