History Main / Tragedy

26th Feb '17 7:03:49 AM DukeofFinland
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* HeelFaceDoorSlam: If the protagonist does notice his flaws, it's already too late.
8th Feb '17 4:49:51 AM Dravencour
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* Similarly to the film above, Film/Scarface1983 stars Creator/AlPacino as a ruthless, albeit sympathetic gangster, whose own flaws eventually lead to the destruction of his criminal empire and everyone he ever cared about ending up either dead or hating his guts.

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* Similarly to the film above, Film/Scarface1983 stars Creator/AlPacino as a ruthless, albeit sympathetic gangster, whose own flaws eventually lead to the destruction of his criminal empire and everyone he ever cared about ending up either dead or hating his guts.guts, as well as his own death at the hands of someone he screwed over.



* A textbook classical tragedy would be ''Theatre/OedipusTheKing''. The hero, Oedipus (of the famous [[OedipusComplex complex]], though he does not necessarily possess it), is a heroic[[note]]when used by the Greeks, "heroic" does not describe a character's morality but rather their PowerLevels. Anyone demi-human, transhuman or superhuman was a "hero"--Medusa, for instance.[[/note]] and generally admirable man who ruled Thebes wisely. However, it is struck by a strange drought that no one can explain. Sages say that [[FisherKing since the land and king are one]], the king has done something to poison the land, and [[ProphecyTwist only he]] can [[FigureItOutYourself ferret out that mistake]]. Despite warnings from sages and wise men that Oedipus [[YouDoNotWantToKnow won't like what he discovers]], he learns that the previous king heard a [[SelfFulfillingProphecy prophecy]] that his son would kill him and marry his mother, so the king had his son [[NoOneCouldSurviveThat bound and abandoned in a forest]] and he went into hiding to avoid being killed. However, the son survived and killed him for cutting him off in traffic, and afterward killed the Sphinx [[RiddleOfTheSphinx (of the riddles)]] and was rewarded with the kingship of Thebes, including the widowed queen. [[DramaticPause ...]] [[{{Squick}} Yep.]] His mother-wife commits suicide in shame, and he blinds himself in sorrow.

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* A textbook classical tragedy would be ''Theatre/OedipusTheKing''. The hero, Oedipus (of the famous [[OedipusComplex complex]], though he does not necessarily possess it), is a heroic[[note]]when used by the Greeks, "heroic" does not describe a character's morality but rather their PowerLevels. Anyone demi-human, transhuman or superhuman was a "hero"--Medusa, for instance.[[/note]] and generally admirable man who ruled Thebes wisely. However, it is struck by a strange drought that no one can explain. Sages say that [[FisherKing since the land and king are one]], the king has done something to poison the land, and [[ProphecyTwist only he]] can [[FigureItOutYourself ferret out that mistake]]. Despite warnings from sages and wise men that Oedipus [[YouDoNotWantToKnow won't like what he discovers]], he learns that the previous king heard a [[SelfFulfillingProphecy prophecy]] that his son would kill him and marry his mother, so the king had his son [[NoOneCouldSurviveThat bound and abandoned in a forest]] and he went into hiding to avoid being killed. However, the son survived and killed him unrecognized for cutting him off in traffic, and afterward killed the Sphinx [[RiddleOfTheSphinx (of the riddles)]] and was rewarded with the kingship of Thebes, including the widowed queen. [[DramaticPause ...]] [[{{Squick}} Yep.]] His mother-wife commits suicide in shame, and he blinds himself in sorrow.



%%* ''VideoGame/MafiaII''

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%%* ''VideoGame/MafiaII''* ''VideoGame/MafiaII'' follows two best friends who join the mob and get involved in the criminal underworld.
20th Dec '16 10:12:42 PM DoctorNemesis
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To borrow a simplifying example from ''Theatre/EducatingRita'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' is generally considered a tragedy in literary terms because throughout the play, Macbeth is warned time and time again by numerous parties that his actions will bring nothing but doom and misery upon himself and his family, but because he is blinded by his greed and ambition he ignores these warnings and proceeds regardless until it is much too late. In other words, Macbeth's terrible fate ''could'' have been avoided but is ultimately inevitable because his own character flaws have made it so. On the other hand, a man who suddenly and unexpectedly gets hit and killed by a falling tree while going about his daily business ''isn't'' usually considered a tragedy in the literary sense (although it will likely be tragic for his family), because the man's fate isn't preordained or a result of his own character flaws; if he'd known that being at that precise spot at that precise moment in advance would have killed him, he'd have likely chosen to take a different route. In the first example, the main character cannot escape his fate due to the circumstances he exists in and his own flaws, while in the second the main character's fate would have been entirely avoidable and likely avoided had he known about it in advance.

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To borrow a simplifying example from ''Theatre/EducatingRita'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' is generally considered a tragedy in literary terms because throughout the play, Macbeth is warned time and time again by numerous parties (including the universe itself) that his actions will bring nothing but doom and misery upon himself and his family, but because he is blinded by his greed and ambition he ignores these warnings and proceeds regardless until it is much too late. In other words, Macbeth's terrible fate ''could'' have been avoided but is ultimately inevitable because his own character flaws have made it so. On the other hand, a man who suddenly and unexpectedly gets hit and killed by a falling tree while going about his daily business ''isn't'' usually considered a tragedy in the literary sense (although it will likely be tragic for his family), because the man's fate isn't preordained or a result of his own character flaws; if he'd known that being at that precise spot at that precise moment in advance would have killed him, he'd have likely chosen to take a different route. In the first example, the main character cannot escape his fate due to the circumstances he exists in and his own flaws, while in the second the main character's fate would have been entirely avoidable and likely avoided had he known about it in advance.
20th Dec '16 10:06:46 PM DoctorNemesis
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To borrow a simplifying example from ''Theatre/EducatingRita'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' is generally considered a tragedy in literary terms because throughout the play, Macbeth is warned time and time again by numerous parties that his actions will bring nothing but doom and misery upon himself and his family, but he ignores these warnings and proceeds regardless until it is much too late; Macbeth's fate is inevitable because his own character flaws have made it so. On the other hand, a man who suddenly and unexpectedly gets hit and killed by a falling tree while going about his daily business ''isn't'' usually considered a tragedy in the literary sense (although it will likely be tragic for his family), because the man's fate isn't preordained or a result of his own character flaws; if he'd known that being at that precise spot at that precise moment in advance would have killed him, he'd have likely chosen to take a different route. In the first example, the main character cannot escape his fate due to the circumstances he exists in and his own flaws, while in the second the main character's fate would have been entirely avoidable and likely avoided had he known about it in advance.

to:

To borrow a simplifying example from ''Theatre/EducatingRita'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' is generally considered a tragedy in literary terms because throughout the play, Macbeth is warned time and time again by numerous parties that his actions will bring nothing but doom and misery upon himself and his family, but because he is blinded by his greed and ambition he ignores these warnings and proceeds regardless until it is much too late; late. In other words, Macbeth's terrible fate ''could'' have been avoided but is ultimately inevitable because his own character flaws have made it so. On the other hand, a man who suddenly and unexpectedly gets hit and killed by a falling tree while going about his daily business ''isn't'' usually considered a tragedy in the literary sense (although it will likely be tragic for his family), because the man's fate isn't preordained or a result of his own character flaws; if he'd known that being at that precise spot at that precise moment in advance would have killed him, he'd have likely chosen to take a different route. In the first example, the main character cannot escape his fate due to the circumstances he exists in and his own flaws, while in the second the main character's fate would have been entirely avoidable and likely avoided had he known about it in advance.
15th Dec '16 1:24:51 PM DukeofFinland
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* Similarly to the film above, Film/Scarface1983 stars Creator/AlPacino as a ruthless, albeit sympathetic gangster, whose own flaws eventually lead to the destruction of his criminal empire and everyone he ever cared about ending up either dead or hating his guts.
7th Dec '16 5:19:31 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''MissSaigon'', a SettingUpdate of Puccini's ''MadameButterfly''; most of his other works were tragic as well.

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* ''MissSaigon'', ''Theatre/MissSaigon'', a SettingUpdate of Puccini's ''MadameButterfly''; ''Theatre/MadameButterfly''; most of his other works were tragic as well.
27th Nov '16 3:13:53 AM Morgenthaler
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* Tom Stoppard's ''RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead.'' Despite their flashes of GenreSavvy and occasional (dark) comedy, the ending features a complete lack of awareness on the character's part. The futility of their project is laid bare, they die accomplishing nothing except discover their names (and that's still iffy). The downfall being external (but necessary). The minor status of the ''protagonists'' to "incidental" characters like Theatre/{{Hamlet}}.

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* Tom Stoppard's ''RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead.''Theatre/RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead.'' Despite their flashes of GenreSavvy and occasional (dark) comedy, the ending features a complete lack of awareness on the character's part. The futility of their project is laid bare, they die accomplishing nothing except discover their names (and that's still iffy). The downfall being external (but necessary). The minor status of the ''protagonists'' to "incidental" characters like Theatre/{{Hamlet}}.



* ''WaitingForGodot'' is a low and existential tragedy.

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* ''WaitingForGodot'' ''Theatre/WaitingForGodot'' is a low and existential tragedy.
24th Aug '16 3:45:08 AM calufrax
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* ''Series/SteptoeAndSon'' sees working class rag-and-bone men Albert Steptoe and his son Harold plying a dying trade in 1960s and '70s London, with Harold's attempts to break away from his life continually thwarted.
3rd Aug '16 11:31:35 PM Kervinle2500
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* ''[[Film/{{Gojira}} Godzilla]]'' is a tragedy in a form of a {{Kaiju}} {{Horror}} film. While it does focus on the tragedy of the human characters, alas, ''Godzilla himself'' is revealed to be a TragicMonster, having his powers given to him by circumstances beyond his control. And he and TheHero die at the very end.
8th Jun '16 10:26:34 AM Morgenthaler
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* ChinuaAchebe's ''Literature/ThingsFallApart'' was imagined from the very beginning as a classical tragedy. The hero, Okonkwo, is a strong and prosperous man in his Igbo village, with big fields of big yams and a big, well-maintained compound and three wives. He is very proud of his achievements and of his manliness--but his manliness and pride cause him to act rashly, eventually getting him exiled for manslaughter (when his FiringInTheAirALot kills someone), lead his son to abandon him, and ultimately causes his suicide.

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* ChinuaAchebe's Creator/ChinuaAchebe's ''Literature/ThingsFallApart'' was imagined from the very beginning as a classical tragedy. The hero, Okonkwo, is a strong and prosperous man in his Igbo village, with big fields of big yams and a big, well-maintained compound and three wives. He is very proud of his achievements and of his manliness--but his manliness and pride cause him to act rashly, eventually getting him exiled for manslaughter (when his FiringInTheAirALot kills someone), lead his son to abandon him, and ultimately causes his suicide.



* Several of ThomasHardy's novels are borderline examples, but ''The Mayor of Casterbridge'' unquestionably qualifies, to the extent that it's been read as a reworking of Aristotle's principles in nineteenth-century rural England. The novel begins with Michael Henchard selling his wife and child in a drunken rage, after which he [[TheAtoner gives up drinking and manages to turn his life around for a few years]]. Ultimately, though, his [[FatalFlaw pride and quick temper]] cause him to lose everyone he cares about, and he dies alone.

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* Several of ThomasHardy's Creator/ThomasHardy's novels are borderline examples, but ''The Mayor of Casterbridge'' unquestionably qualifies, to the extent that it's been read as a reworking of Aristotle's principles in nineteenth-century rural England. The novel begins with Michael Henchard selling his wife and child in a drunken rage, after which he [[TheAtoner gives up drinking and manages to turn his life around for a few years]]. Ultimately, though, his [[FatalFlaw pride and quick temper]] cause him to lose everyone he cares about, and he dies alone.



* "HouseOfCardsUS" features [[TheCorruptible Peter Russo]], a Democratic Congressman from Pennsylvania, in a story that has the elements of a tragedy. He is a man of status with the potential for greatness, and genuinely wants to take care of his constituents, his girlfriend, and his kids. However, his fatal weakness for [[TheAlcoholic alcohol]], [[HookersAndBlow women, and drugs]] enables [[VillainProtagonist Francis Underwood]] to manipulate him into [[ForcedIntoEvil compromising his principles]] while serving as his [[UnwittingPawn pawn]]. [[spoiler: Once Peter is [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness no longer useful]] to him, Francis orchestrates the [[OffTheWagon fall from the wagon]] that destroys both his career and private life and then kills him as a cruel form of "mercy" while he wallows in [[DespairEventHorizon despair]].]]

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* "HouseOfCardsUS" ''Series/HouseOfCardsUS'' features [[TheCorruptible Peter Russo]], a Democratic Congressman from Pennsylvania, in a story that has the elements of a tragedy. He is a man of status with the potential for greatness, and genuinely wants to take care of his constituents, his girlfriend, and his kids. However, his fatal weakness for [[TheAlcoholic alcohol]], [[HookersAndBlow women, and drugs]] enables [[VillainProtagonist Francis Underwood]] to manipulate him into [[ForcedIntoEvil compromising his principles]] while serving as his [[UnwittingPawn pawn]]. [[spoiler: Once Peter is [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness no longer useful]] to him, Francis orchestrates the [[OffTheWagon fall from the wagon]] that destroys both his career and private life and then kills him as a cruel form of "mercy" while he wallows in [[DespairEventHorizon despair]].]]
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