History Main / ThematicRoguesGallery

13th Apr '18 8:27:10 PM merotoker
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Finally, depending on the hero, his or her RoguesGallery may have ''multiple'' themes. Not all of Franchise/SpiderMan's enemies fit the AnimalMotifs theme, but the ones that don't tend to be the results of science gone bad. Indeed, some spider-villains (Doctor Octopus, the Lizard, the Scorpion) fit '''both''' themes. This is pretty much destined to happen in well established and long running series, so most superhero comics fit this.

to:

Finally, depending on the hero, his or her RoguesGallery may have ''multiple'' themes. Not all of Franchise/SpiderMan's enemies fit the AnimalMotifs theme, but the ones that don't tend to be the results of science gone bad. Indeed, some spider-villains (Doctor Octopus, (ComicBook/DoctorOctopus, the Lizard, the Scorpion) fit '''both''' themes. This is pretty much destined to happen in well established and long running series, so most superhero comics fit this.



* There's nary a ''Comicbook/GhostRider'' villain who isn't a demon or demonically powered.
** And if they aren't either of those, they have a wicked sick awesome vehicle. This and the above occasionally overlap. The few who don't fit either category are artifacts from his days as a more normal superhero, where none of his villains would've looked out of place fighting Captain America or the Fantastic Four. Granted, guys like the Water Wizard and the Orb weren't exactly the greatest threats the world has ever seen...
** Archangels have also been added to his rogues gallery.

to:

* There's nary a ''Comicbook/GhostRider'' villain who isn't a demon or demonically powered.
**
powered. And if they aren't either of those, they have a wicked sick awesome vehicle. This and the above occasionally overlap. The few who don't fit either category are artifacts from his days as a more normal superhero, where none of his villains would've looked out of place fighting Captain America or the Fantastic Four. Granted, guys like the Water Wizard and the Orb weren't exactly the greatest threats the world has ever seen...
**
seen... Archangels have also been added to his rogues gallery.



*** Most of Spider-Man's enemies either had AnimalMotifs and/or were the results of science gone bad. More generally than that, several villains who became {{Rogues Gallery Transplant}}s when it became clear they were outmatched by their original adversaries (Boomerang vs. the Hulk, anyone?) mean that almost all of Spidey's rogues (with the exceptions of Doctor Octopus and the Green Goblin) are street-level villains.

to:

*** Most of Spider-Man's enemies either had AnimalMotifs and/or were the results of science gone bad. More generally than that, several villains who became {{Rogues Gallery Transplant}}s when it became clear they were outmatched by their original adversaries (Boomerang vs. the Hulk, anyone?) mean that almost all of Spidey's rogues (with the exceptions of Doctor Octopus and the [[ComicBook/NormanOsborn Green Goblin) Goblin]]) are street-level villains.



** It's also worth noting that Spider-Man's main villain, [[ComicBook/NormanOsborn the Green Goblin]], has inspired a [[LegacyCharacter legacy]] of his own and a couple {{Jack The Ripoff}}s. Then you have Comicbook/{{Venom}}, who keeps spawning, so that Peter's rogue gallery can basically be summed up as about 50% animal, a bunch of {{Puppeteer Parasite}} aliens, assorted goblins and a few, like [[ShockAndAwe Electro]] and [[DishingOutDirt Sandman]], who are just kind of "other."

to:

** It's also worth noting that Spider-Man's main villain, [[ComicBook/NormanOsborn the Green Goblin]], Goblin, has inspired a [[LegacyCharacter legacy]] of his own and a couple {{Jack The the Ripoff}}s. Then you have Comicbook/{{Venom}}, who keeps spawning, so that Peter's rogue gallery can basically be summed up as about 50% animal, a bunch of {{Puppeteer Parasite}} aliens, assorted goblins and a few, like [[ShockAndAwe Electro]] and [[DishingOutDirt Sandman]], who are just kind of "other."



** And this isn't counting the list of Bat Rogues who are essentially [[EvilCounterpart "Batman, except at this causal fork in his life, Bruce went one way, and this guy went the other".]] To illustrate. Oswald Cobblepot is also the orphan of rich parents, except Bruce's parents loved him and wanted him to not value material possessions. Tommy Eliot is in the same boat as The Penguin, except that Hush actually killed his parents to get to their inheritance faster, and then trained himself into a Jack of All Trades of Batman-like proportions for... some reason. Roman Sionis's parents were good friends of the Waynes, only they put on a show of being charitable philanthropists while being greedy dicks in private, the duality leading to Sionis's obsession with masks. Also, Jason Todd is an official Batman-trained caped crusader... who kills (as a way to stop the [[CardboardPrison revolving door policy of Arkham]]), etc.
** One could also potentially argue that there is a much more secondary, but still fairly common theme among many of Batman's foes. Specifically, they seem to fit classic horror tropes such as MonsterClown (The Joker), monster (Clayface and Killer Croc), mad doctor (Hugo Strange, Professor Pyg), zombies (Solomon Grundy), bats (Batman himself and Man-Bat), and less obvious ones like killer plants (Poison Ivy), living dolls (Scarface) and living scarecrows (Scarecrow).

to:

** And this isn't counting the list of Bat Rogues who are essentially [[EvilCounterpart "Batman, except at this causal fork in his life, Bruce went one way, and this guy went the other".]] To illustrate. [[ComicBook/ThePenguin Oswald Cobblepot Cobblepot]] is also the orphan of rich parents, except Bruce's parents loved him and wanted him to not value material possessions. Tommy Eliot is in the same boat as The Penguin, except that Hush actually killed his parents to get to their inheritance faster, and then trained himself into a Jack of All Trades of Batman-like proportions for... some reason. Roman Sionis's parents were good friends of the Waynes, only they put on a show of being charitable philanthropists while being greedy dicks in private, the duality leading to Sionis's obsession with masks. Also, Jason Todd is an official Batman-trained caped crusader... who kills (as a way to stop the [[CardboardPrison revolving door policy of Arkham]]), etc.
** One could also potentially argue that there is a much more secondary, but still fairly common theme among many of Batman's foes. Specifically, they seem to fit classic horror tropes such as MonsterClown (The Joker), monster (Clayface and Killer Croc), mad doctor (Hugo Strange, Professor Pyg), zombies (Solomon Grundy), bats (Batman himself and Man-Bat), and less obvious ones like killer plants (Poison Ivy), (ComicBook/PoisonIvy), living dolls (Scarface) and living scarecrows (Scarecrow).



* Most Comicbook/IncredibleHulk villains are big and very strong - heck, many of them are even green. Those who aren't, like Leader and MODOK, tend to be exact opposites: small, weak but very intelligent, with lots of high-tech to help them. But still often green. And then, that whole strong and green thing is because several have a similar origin. In ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'', Leader and the Abomination actually got their powers ''from'' the Hulk, and Doc Samson likely would have too.

to:

* Most Comicbook/IncredibleHulk villains are big and very strong - heck, many of them are even green. Those who aren't, like Leader and MODOK, ComicBook/{{MODOK}}, tend to be exact opposites: small, weak but very intelligent, with lots of high-tech to help them. But still often green. And then, that whole strong and green thing is because several have a similar origin. In ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'', Leader and the Abomination actually got their powers ''from'' the Hulk, and Doc Samson likely would have too.



* Averted by ComicBook/TheMightyThor, oddly enough. While Goldilocks did fight divine villains from Asgard (most notably his evil half-brother [[ArchEnemy Loki]] and the seductive [[FemmeFatale Amora]], also called the Enchantress), Thor also quickly gained a rogues gallery of recurring mortal villains that could just as easily have been enemies of Spider-Man or the Hulk, including the Wrecker, the Absorbing Man, the Grey Gargoyle, Mister Hyde, and the Cobra. Many of these guys would also become {{Rogues Gallery Transplant}}s when they branched out and started tangling with other mortal heroes.

to:

* Averted by ComicBook/TheMightyThor, oddly enough. While Goldilocks did fight divine villains from Asgard (most notably his evil half-brother [[ArchEnemy Loki]] ComicBook/{{Loki}} and the seductive [[FemmeFatale Amora]], also called the Enchantress), ComicBook/TheEnchantress), Thor also quickly gained a rogues gallery of recurring mortal villains that could just as easily have been enemies of Spider-Man or the Hulk, including the Wrecker, the Absorbing Man, the Grey Gargoyle, Mister Hyde, and the Cobra. Many of these guys would also become {{Rogues Gallery Transplant}}s when they branched out and started tangling with other mortal heroes.



* Comicbook/FantasticFour villains tend to be of the "EvilGenius bent on world conquest" mold, (like Doctor Doom, the Mad Thinker, the Wizard, Diablo, Maximus the Mad, the Red Ghost and his Super-Apes, even Mole Man...) or alien would-be {{Galactic Conqueror}}s (like Blastaar and son, Annihilus...)

to:

* Comicbook/FantasticFour villains tend to be of the "EvilGenius bent on world conquest" mold, (like Doctor Doom, ComicBook/DoctorDoom, the Mad Thinker, the Wizard, Diablo, Maximus the Mad, the Red Ghost and his Super-Apes, even Mole Man...) or alien would-be {{Galactic Conqueror}}s (like Blastaar and son, Annihilus...)



* Franchise/GreenLantern has a lot of enemies who can--like him--create weapons and monsters out of thin air: Tattooed Man, Star Sapphire, Evil Star, Effigy, etc. The grandaddy is of course Sinestro, a former Green Lantern with a yellow power ring. Played even straighter with the introduction of entire Corps to oppose the GL Corps who use power rings of different colors, such as red, orange, and black. Sinestro even starts his own Yellow Corps as well. Also inverted by giving Green Lantern some new allies who also use power rings of different colors, such as blue and indigo.

to:

* Franchise/GreenLantern has a lot of enemies who can--like him--create weapons and monsters out of thin air: Tattooed Man, Star Sapphire, Evil Star, Effigy, etc. The grandaddy granddaddy is of course Sinestro, a former Green Lantern with a yellow power ring. Played even straighter with the introduction of entire Corps to oppose the GL Corps who use power rings of different colors, such as red, orange, and black. Sinestro even starts his own Yellow Corps as well. Also inverted by giving Green Lantern some new allies who also use power rings of different colors, such as blue and indigo.



* The Comicbook/DoomPatrol specialize in weird cases and opponents.
** For just a few examples: the sentient transgender street, a Cloudcuckoolander Dadaist turned CorruptCorporateExecutive, a woman made of porcelain nanomachines, a sentient and infectious face-and-mind-eating black hole, and Ambush Bug.

to:

* The Comicbook/DoomPatrol specialize in weird cases and opponents. \n** For just a few examples: the sentient transgender street, a Cloudcuckoolander Dadaist turned CorruptCorporateExecutive, a woman made of porcelain nanomachines, a sentient and infectious face-and-mind-eating black hole, and Ambush Bug.ComicBook/AmbushBug.



* Despite his rep as a poster-boy for anti-Communism (in the novels, true enough), Film/JamesBond most commonly fought corrupt capitalists (Film/{{Goldfinger}}, [[Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe Karl Stromberg]], [[Film/{{Moonraker}} Hugo Drax]], [[Film/AViewToAKill Max Zorin]], [[Film/TomorrowNeverDies Carver]], [[Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough Elektra King]]) or apolitical spies, ex-spies, traitors, criminals and terrorists ([[NebulousEvilOrganization SPECTRE]], [[Film/LiveAndLetDie Kananga / Mr Big]], [[Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun Francisco Scaramanga]], [[Film/ForYourEyesOnly Kristatos]], [[Film/{{Octopussy}} Kamal Khan]], [[Film/TheLivingDaylights Brad Whitaker]], [[Film/LicenceToKill Franz Sanchez]], [[Film/GoldenEye Alec Trevelyan]], [[Film/CasinoRoyale2006 Le Chiffre]]). The most common motives are profit, revenge or simply pure ego and megalomania, or some combination of the above. The Red Menace ''is'' present but it is usually in the background, either Red China quietly pulling the strings (''Film/DrNo, Film/{{Goldfinger}}, Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice'') or the Soviet Union as incidental players, or even victims of the bad guys themselves. [[Film/FromRussiaWithLove Rose Klebb]], [[Film/{{Octopussy}} Orlov]], [[Film/AViewToAKill Zorin]] and [[Film/TheLivingDaylights Koskov]] are all rogue Soviet or ex-Soviet agents, and a few henchmen work or used to work for the Reds, but Bond never fights the Russians or Chinese head-on and usually avoids them completely.

to:

* Despite his rep as a poster-boy for anti-Communism (in the novels, true enough), Film/JamesBond most commonly fought corrupt capitalists (Film/{{Goldfinger}}, [[Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe Karl Stromberg]], [[Film/{{Moonraker}} Hugo Drax]], [[Film/AViewToAKill Max Zorin]], [[Film/TomorrowNeverDies Carver]], [[Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough Elektra King]]) or apolitical spies, ex-spies, traitors, criminals and terrorists ([[NebulousEvilOrganization ([[NebulousEvilOrganisation SPECTRE]], [[Film/LiveAndLetDie Kananga / Mr Big]], [[Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun Francisco Scaramanga]], [[Film/ForYourEyesOnly Kristatos]], [[Film/{{Octopussy}} Kamal Khan]], [[Film/TheLivingDaylights Brad Whitaker]], [[Film/LicenceToKill Franz Sanchez]], [[Film/GoldenEye Alec Trevelyan]], [[Film/CasinoRoyale2006 Le Chiffre]]). The most common motives are profit, revenge or simply pure ego and megalomania, or some combination of the above. The Red Menace ''is'' present but it is usually in the background, either Red China quietly pulling the strings (''Film/DrNo, Film/{{Goldfinger}}, Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice'') or the Soviet Union as incidental players, or even victims of the bad guys themselves. [[Film/FromRussiaWithLove Rose Klebb]], [[Film/{{Octopussy}} Orlov]], [[Film/AViewToAKill Zorin]] and [[Film/TheLivingDaylights Koskov]] are all rogue Soviet or ex-Soviet agents, and a few henchmen work or used to work for the Reds, but Bond never fights the Russians or Chinese head-on and usually avoids them completely.



* Since ''Franchise/MetalGear'' is a military-themed series, one could reasonably expect every game to pit the protagonist against an army (and not, for instance, on any other sort of black ops mission). But beyond that, every game features an oddly-themed SuperSoldier QuirkyMinibossSquad with an assortment of unique fighting styles. Except for the B&B Unit in ''[=MGS4,=]'' who were all sexy women in robotic battle suits named after a combination of the names ''[=MGS1=]'' and ''[=MGS3=]'' villains.

to:

* Since ''Franchise/MetalGear'' ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' is a military-themed series, one could reasonably expect every game to pit the protagonist against an army (and not, for instance, on any other sort of black ops mission). But beyond that, every game features an oddly-themed SuperSoldier QuirkyMinibossSquad with an assortment of unique fighting styles. Except for the B&B Unit in ''[=MGS4,=]'' who were all sexy women in robotic battle suits named after a combination of the names ''[=MGS1=]'' and ''[=MGS3=]'' villains.



* Generally averted in the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' animated series, considering the sheer range of bizarre villains it featured. Even the general theme of quirky harmless villains didn't really hold up--there was very little amusing about Slade, Trigon, or the Brotherhood of Evil, for example. That said, enemies that would face a single Titan primarily were often tailored to them--Robin often faced evil or amoral martial artists (Slade, Red X, Katarou), Starfire aliens (Blackfire, the Gordanians, the Chrysalis eater), and Raven supernatural beings or events (Malchior, Trigon, and her own repressed demon nature), for example. Just to round out the list: Beast Boy faces empowered teen archetypes (The geeky Control Freak, the wannabe Adonis, or the rebel Punk Rocket) and Cyborg deals with tech villains (Atlas, Fixit, Gizmo and Brother Blood, who turned himself into one by copying Cyborg's own tech.)
* Most of ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'''s major enemies are aliens or alien-related in some way, partially because the fact he wears the most powerful weapon in the Universe stuck on his wrist makes him a primary target for all the psychos from outer space who would like to get their hand on it. Notably, this ''isn't'' a hard-and-fast rule-- his RoguesGallery does also include other types of villains, such as Dr Animo (an EvilutionaryBiologist of human origin), Hex and Charmcasters (two dark mages), and an EldritchAbomination.
** Technically however, said dark mages are more his cousin Gwen's enemies than his, so you could argue Ben fight mostly aliens and scifi-themed villains, while Gwen faces mostly magic-related ones.

to:

* Generally averted in the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' animated series, ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', considering the sheer range of bizarre villains it featured. Even the general theme of quirky harmless villains didn't really hold up--there was very little amusing about Slade, Trigon, or the Brotherhood of Evil, for example. That said, enemies that would face a single Titan primarily were often tailored to them--Robin often faced evil or amoral martial artists (Slade, Red X, Katarou), Starfire aliens (Blackfire, the Gordanians, the Chrysalis eater), and Raven supernatural beings or events (Malchior, Trigon, and her own repressed demon nature), for example. Just to round out the list: Beast Boy faces empowered teen archetypes (The geeky Control Freak, the wannabe Adonis, or the rebel Punk Rocket) and Cyborg deals with tech villains (Atlas, Fixit, Gizmo and Brother Blood, who turned himself into one by copying Cyborg's own tech.)
* Most of ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'''s major enemies are aliens or alien-related in some way, partially because the fact he wears the most powerful weapon in the Universe stuck on his wrist makes him a primary target for all the psychos from outer space who would like to get their hand on it. Notably, this ''isn't'' a hard-and-fast rule-- his RoguesGallery does also include other types of villains, such as Dr Animo (an EvilutionaryBiologist of human origin), Hex and Charmcasters (two dark mages), and an EldritchAbomination. \n** Technically however, said dark mages are more his cousin Gwen's enemies than his, so you could argue Ben fight mostly aliens and scifi-themed villains, while Gwen faces mostly magic-related ones.



* Largely {{Averted}} on ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}''--due to its [[GenreBuster Genre Busting]] mix of sci-fi and fantasy elements, their enemies can consist of everything from {{Corrupt Corporate Executive}}s ([[XanatosGambit Xanatos]]), TheFairFolk (many during the World Tour arc), an animal-themed team of {{Cyborg}}s and a mutant ([[QuirkyMinibossSquad the Pack]]), wizards ([[EvilSorcerer the Archmage]]), Shakespeare characters ([[AntiVillain Macbeth]]) and a [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot cyborg zombie gargoyle possessed by three different gargoyle ghosts]] ([[SharingABody Coldstone]]). It's worth noting that their BigBad, [[KillAllHumans Demona]], is another gargoyle, albeit one with various magical enhancements.

to:

* Largely {{Averted}} {{averted|Trope}} on ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}''--due to its [[GenreBuster Genre Busting]] GenreBusting mix of sci-fi and fantasy elements, their enemies can consist of everything from {{Corrupt Corporate Executive}}s ([[XanatosGambit Xanatos]]), TheFairFolk (many during the World Tour arc), an animal-themed team of {{Cyborg}}s and a mutant ([[QuirkyMinibossSquad the Pack]]), wizards ([[EvilSorcerer the Archmage]]), Shakespeare characters ([[AntiVillain Macbeth]]) and a [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot cyborg zombie gargoyle possessed by three different gargoyle ghosts]] ([[SharingABody Coldstone]]). It's worth noting that their BigBad, [[KillAllHumans Demona]], is another gargoyle, albeit one with various magical enhancements.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' all their recurring villains are witches and warlocks; Gargamel, Hogatha, Balthazar and Chlorhydris, and all have animals as accomplices.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'': all their recurring villains are witches and warlocks; Gargamel, Hogatha, Balthazar and Chlorhydris, and all have animals as accomplices.
21st Feb '18 3:37:38 PM Gravidef
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Captain Planet|AndThePlaneteers}}'' villains are all polluters, poachers and other haters of ecology (appropriately-called "eco-villains").

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Captain Planet|AndThePlaneteers}}'' villains are all polluters, poachers and other haters of ecology (appropriately-called "eco-villains"). More specifically, the recurring villains each represent a particular type of eco-crime: Hoggish Greedly is a [[MeaningfulName pig-like]] FatBastard who symbolizes overuse and exploitation of natural resources; Dr. Blight is an [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate evil scientist]] who stands for unethical experimentation and advancing dangerous technologies in the name of science; Looten Plunder is a CorruptCorporateExecutive whose evil acts always focus on unchecked capitalism and exploitation of the world for profit; and so on.
** The show occasionally went DarkerAndEdgier with enemies like Zarm, a former Spirit of the Earth who [[FaceHeelTurn quit the job]] to conquer other worlds. Villains like Zarm were largely representations of the powers of hatred, which was considered just as dangerous and corrupting as things like toxic waste and air pollution.
19th Feb '18 1:37:31 PM Psychadelico
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** For just a few examples: the sentient transgender street, a Cloudcuckoolander Dadaist turned CorruptCorporateExecutive, a woman made of porcelain nanomachines, a sentient and infectious face-and-mind-eating black hole, and Ambush Bug.
4th Dec '17 9:23:25 PM DragonRanger
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* There's a clear split between the kinds of villains each show in the ''Franchise/{{Arrowverse}}'' has to deal with: ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' has criminal conspiracies, ''Series/TheFlash2014'' tackles all sorts of "weird science" concepts like superhumans and alternate dimensions, ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'' has time-travelers going against other time-travelers, and ''Series/Supergirl2015'' fights aliens. Lampshaded during the "Invasion!" crossover, where aliens arrive in the Flash's city and he recruits Supergirl's help specifically ''because'' this is her wheelhouse.
17th Nov '17 10:45:40 PM Nyte
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Averted by ComicBook/{{Firestorm}}. While his ArchEnemy Killer Frost represents the thematic conflict between fire and ice, he also has villains as diverse as self-cloning Multiplex, the mind-controlling Mindboggler, the werewolf-like Hyena, the rope assassin Slipknot, and the sand-manipulating Sand Demon.
2nd Aug '17 2:11:35 AM TheNerevarine
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Most of ComicBook/{{Vampirella}}'s villains tend to be supernatural ranging from other evil vampires (like {{Dracula}}), demonic entities ([[TheAntiGod Mad God Chaos]] and [[TheVamp the Red Queen]]), evil cultists ([[BiblicalBadGuy the Black Pope]]), twisted undead ([[DragonInChief Von Kreist]]) and other monsters. In fact, she was born and trained by her mother Lilith specifically to hunt down monsters that tormented mankind in order to atone for creating them in the first place.



[[folder: Film ]]

to:

[[folder: Film ]]Film]]
26th Jun '17 2:22:08 PM DemonDuckofDoom
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/KismetManOfFate'': As a member of the European Resistance in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Kismet usually fought ThoseWackyNazis.
* ''ComicBook/PatPatriotAmericasJoanOfArc'': Pat usually fought [[TheMole Nazi fifth columnists]] out to sabotage the American war effort.
* ''ComicBook/KBarKate'' usually fought corrupt ranchers out to squeeze in on her father's territory.
* ''ComicBook/{{Typhon}}'' fought many insane underwater rulers in his submarine adventures.
* ''ComicBook/SuperAmerican'' fought military commanders out to invade the United States, as befits his codename.
12th Jun '17 12:20:30 PM lillolillo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Given that virtually all the main Rogues use technological gimmicks (even Abra Kadabra), it may be more of a case of science vs. science. This has become less significant in recent comics, but in the Silver Age, each of the Rogues represented a scientific concept (heat, reflections, elements) so that Barry Allen used his superior understanding of the science involved to defeat them. Flash Fact!
*** The Flash villain theme is derived from their middle-American roots. "Central City" is an {{expy}} for St. Louis and the American midwest, which when The Flash first came out in 1959 was the center of American self-image and culture - the "American Dream". The vast majority of Flash villains are ''self-made men'', who ''achieved'' their abilities. As such they represent the Dark Side of the American Dream, those who achieve for their own selfish ends. Gorilla Grodd is both a renegade from his own culture and a violation of "natural law" (talking gorilla). As such he represents the dangers of the Radical Outsider (foreigners, Communists, subversive thinking, etc). The Flash Villains' Theme is the FabulousFifties!

to:

*** ** Given that virtually all the main Rogues use technological gimmicks (even Abra Kadabra), it may be more of a case of science vs. science. This has become less significant in recent comics, but in the Silver Age, each of the Rogues represented a scientific concept (heat, reflections, elements) so that Barry Allen used his superior understanding of the science involved to defeat them. Flash Fact!
*** ** The Flash villain theme is derived from their middle-American roots. "Central City" is an {{expy}} for St. Louis and the American midwest, which when The Flash first came out in 1959 was the center of American self-image and culture - the "American Dream". The vast majority of Flash villains are ''self-made men'', who ''achieved'' their abilities. As such they represent the Dark Side of the American Dream, those who achieve for their own selfish ends. Gorilla Grodd is both a renegade from his own culture and a violation of "natural law" (talking gorilla). As such he represents the dangers of the Radical Outsider (foreigners, Communists, subversive thinking, etc). The Flash Villains' Theme is the FabulousFifties!



* Most of Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}'s enemies are female and sci-fi related. Lesla-Lar and Blackstarr are mad scientists, Superwoman, Reign and the Worldkillers are genetically-engineered super soldiers, Kraken is an alien armed with weather-controlling gear, Reactron is a soldier clad in powered armor... plus several of her Rogues (Lesla-Lar, Black Flame, Shyla Kor-Onn, Lar-On...) are also Kryptonian.



* Most of [[Comicbook/{{Spawn}} Spawn's]] enemies are demons, angels or people from his past life.

to:

* Most of [[Comicbook/{{Spawn}} Spawn's]] Comicbook/{{Spawn}}'s enemies are demons, angels or people from his past life.



* Many of [[Comicbook/{{Starman}} Jack Knight's]] enemies were carnies like the Ragdoll, Bliss and his mook Crusher.

to:

* Many of [[Comicbook/{{Starman}} Jack Knight's]] Comicbook/{{Starman}}'s enemies were carnies like the Ragdoll, Bliss and his mook Crusher.



* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce'' episode "Super Hero":

to:

* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce'' episode "Super Hero":Hero". Master Shake explains how The Drizzle fights crime by controlling the rain:



-->--Master Shake Explaining how The Drizzle fights crime by controlling the rain.
11th Jun '17 3:36:25 AM Rabukurafuto
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Of course, pitting heroes against villains that generally outpower them can be a good way of spicing up an ongoing series. [[CrowningMomentofAwesome Crowning Moments of Awesome]] result when this is handled well, and the hero comes up with a creative way to beat the bad guy.

to:

Of course, pitting heroes against villains that generally outpower them can be a good way of spicing up an ongoing series. [[CrowningMomentofAwesome Crowning [[SugarWiki/MomentofAwesome Moments of Awesome]] result when this is handled well, and the hero comes up with a creative way to beat the bad guy.
25th May '17 3:48:05 PM JusticeReaper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Manga/RurouniKenshin'': As a Bakumatsu-era swordsman, Kenshin Himura tends to fight other swordsmen.

to:

* ''Manga/RurouniKenshin'': As a Bakumatsu-era swordsman, Kenshin Himura tends to fight other swordsmen. Many of these adversaries tend to be focused on some psychological aspect of that era that they just can't let go of (for example, Jin-E couldn't forsake his bloodthirsty tendencies despite the Meiji era being one of nominal peace, Aoshi was obsessed with having never gotten to prove the Oniwabanshu's combat strength, and the majority of the Six Comrades wanted revenge for having suffered various personal losses by Kenshin's hand during that period) or hate the current government for its disguised corruption and/or perceived BadassDecay and want to take it down (Shishio and the anime's version of Raijuta, for instance).
This list shows the last 10 events of 269. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ThematicRoguesGallery