History Main / TheSonsAndTheSpears

10th Jun '17 2:48:26 PM VicGeorge2011
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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Smurfs' Time Capsule", Papa Smurf has Hefty gather a bundle of sticks due to the riddle in the time capsule saying "A stick by itself is too weak; it's sticks in a bundle you seek". With the sticks, Papa Smurf has Hefty break one of the sticks, then try to break the whole bundle at once. When Hefty finds out that he can't, Papa Smurf discovers the meaning behind the riddle, that in the unity of the Smurfs there is strength to resist.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Smurfs' Time Capsule", Papa Smurf has Hefty gather a bundle of sticks due to the riddle in the time capsule saying "A stick by itself is too weak; it's sticks in a bundle you seek". With the sticks, Papa Smurf has Hefty break one of the sticks, then try him trying to break the whole bundle at once. When Hefty finds out that he can't, Papa Smurf discovers the meaning behind the riddle, that in the unity of the Smurfs there is strength to resist.
10th Jun '17 2:47:45 PM VicGeorge2011
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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Smurfs' Time Capsule", Papa Smurf has Hefty gather a bundle of sticks due to the riddle in the time capsule saying "A stick by itself is too weak; it's sticks in a bundle you seek". With the stick, Papa Smurf has Hefty break one of the sticks, then try to break the whole bundle at once. When Hefty finds out that he can't, Papa Smurf discovers the meaning behind the riddle, that in the unity of the Smurfs there is strength to resist.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Smurfs' Time Capsule", Papa Smurf has Hefty gather a bundle of sticks due to the riddle in the time capsule saying "A stick by itself is too weak; it's sticks in a bundle you seek". With the stick, sticks, Papa Smurf has Hefty break one of the sticks, then try to break the whole bundle at once. When Hefty finds out that he can't, Papa Smurf discovers the meaning behind the riddle, that in the unity of the Smurfs there is strength to resist.
10th Jun '17 2:47:04 PM VicGeorge2011
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Smurfs' Time Capsule", Papa Smurf has Hefty gather a bundle of sticks due to the riddle in the time capsule saying "A stick by itself is too weak; it's sticks in a bundle you seek". With the stick, Papa Smurf has Hefty break one of the sticks, then try to break the whole bundle at once. When Hefty finds out that he can't, Papa Smurf discovers the meaning behind the riddle, that in the unity of the Smurfs there is strength to resist.
27th Feb '17 8:50:58 PM Meltemi
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Added DiffLines:

* In the first ''VideoGame/GalaxyAngel'' game, Tact tries to use this metaphor with arrows in a scene with Ranpha, trying to explain why they fled from a battle hoping for reinforcements. Ranpha, however, is strong enough to [[SubvertedTrope break the bundle as well]], and she instead takes heart from the assurance that next time, she's strong enough to plow through the enemy and any of their reinforcements, no matter how many of them appear. Tact simply rolls with it.
28th Oct '16 10:09:21 AM Astaroth
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* Adam Susan in ''Comicbook/VForVendetta'' makes reference to this when mentally justifying the Fascist dictatorship he has forced upon the British - as one arrow will snap easily but a bundle will not, the survival of Britain as a whole must always come before the rights and freedoms of individual citizens.

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* Adam Susan in ''Comicbook/VForVendetta'' makes reference to the Roman version of this when mentally justifying trope (see Real Life below) during an internal monologue to justify the Fascist dictatorship he has forced upon the British - as one arrow will snap easily but a bundle will not, the survival of Britain as a whole must always come before the rights and freedoms of individual citizens.
28th Oct '16 10:05:14 AM Astaroth
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Added DiffLines:

* Adam Susan in ''Comicbook/VForVendetta'' makes reference to this when mentally justifying the Fascist dictatorship he has forced upon the British - as one arrow will snap easily but a bundle will not, the survival of Britain as a whole must always come before the rights and freedoms of individual citizens.
4th Sep '16 5:04:05 AM Morgenthaler
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* The Roman ''fasces'', a bundle of reeds, draws on the same symbolism (one reed breaks, a bundle doesn't). (The widely-known variant with the axe inside wasn't strictly required, and indeed the blade had to be removed in certain parts of Rome.) These ''fasces'' were carried by the Lictors, consular bodyguards. This had a peculiar impact later on: On one hand, the association of Rome with [[TheRomanRepublic republicanism]] and its embodiment of a republican principle (that the people together are stronger) led various modern Western republics (including France and the United States) to adopt the fasces as a symbol of republican (as opposed to monarchical) values; many of these symbols remain today (including the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_emblem_of_France French national emblem]], the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seal_of_the_United_States_Senate Seal of the US Senate]], and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mace_of_the_United_States_House_of_Representatives Mace of the US House of Representatives]].[[note]]It also shows up subtly in the Lincoln Memorial: look at the arms on Uncle Abe's chair.[[/note]] On the other hand, it is also the origin of the word 'fascism', an ideology that puts a lot of emphasis on enforced unity.

to:

* The Roman ''fasces'', a bundle of reeds, draws on the same symbolism (one reed breaks, a bundle doesn't). (The widely-known variant with the axe inside wasn't strictly required, and indeed the blade had to be removed in certain parts of Rome.) These ''fasces'' were carried by the Lictors, consular bodyguards. This had a peculiar impact later on: On one hand, the association of Rome with [[TheRomanRepublic [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic republicanism]] and its embodiment of a republican principle (that the people together are stronger) led various modern Western republics (including France and the United States) to adopt the fasces as a symbol of republican (as opposed to monarchical) values; many of these symbols remain today (including the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_emblem_of_France French national emblem]], the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seal_of_the_United_States_Senate Seal of the US Senate]], and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mace_of_the_United_States_House_of_Representatives Mace of the US House of Representatives]].[[note]]It also shows up subtly in the Lincoln Memorial: look at the arms on Uncle Abe's chair.[[/note]] On the other hand, it is also the origin of the word 'fascism', an ideology that puts a lot of emphasis on enforced unity.
6th Aug '16 4:01:57 AM eroock
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* ''Film/{{Together}}'' is set in a Stockholm commune where cooked porridge is served on a regular basis for economical reasons, much to the kids' dismay. Goeran tries to sugarcoat the meal to them by comparing the porridge to commune life:

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* ''Film/{{Together}}'' is set in a Stockholm commune where [[PovertyFood cooked porridge porridge]] is served on a regular basis for economical reasons, much to the kids' dismay. Goeran tries to sugarcoat the meal to them by comparing the porridge to commune life:
1st Jul '16 7:08:57 PM eroock
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This is, as said, an old story, and various versions exists. It is also one that is relatively often referenced in various media:

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This is, as said, an old story, and various versions exists. It is also one that is relatively often referenced in various media:media.

Compare ThickerThanWater.
1st Apr '16 6:08:21 PM FordPrefect
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* ''Film/{{Together}} is set in a Stockholm commune where cooked porridge is served on a regular basis for economical reasons, much to the kids' dismay. Goeran tries to sugarcoat the meal to them by comparing the porridge to commune life:

to:

* ''Film/{{Together}} ''Film/{{Together}}'' is set in a Stockholm commune where cooked porridge is served on a regular basis for economical reasons, much to the kids' dismay. Goeran tries to sugarcoat the meal to them by comparing the porridge to commune life:
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheSonsAndTheSpears