History Main / ThePromisedLand

5th Oct '17 11:14:05 PM Eievie
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The world in which the characters live in is [[CrapsackWorld less than pleasant,]] to say the least. [[GaiasLament The sky is choked with pollution, the crops won't grow,]] and [[EvilOverlord the evil dictator]] of the land brings nothing but despair and suffering to the people.

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The world in which the characters live in is [[CrapsackWorld less than pleasant,]] pleasant]], to say the least. [[GaiasLament The sky is choked with pollution, the crops won't grow,]] and [[EvilOverlord the evil dictator]] of the land brings nothing but despair and suffering to the people.



* In Creator/DrSeuss' story ''I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew'', the titular Solla Sollew is a Unreachable Promised Land, as a key-slapping slippard prevents the door from being unlocked.

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* In Creator/DrSeuss' story ''I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew'', ''Literature/IHadTroubleInGettingToSollaSollew'', the titular Solla Sollew is a Unreachable Promised Land, as a key-slapping slippard prevents the door from being unlocked.
24th Aug '17 6:38:53 AM WillBGood
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* Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the [[UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates USA]] for many immigrants from poorer European countries (and lately, non-European ones too as they allowed them to immigrate). North-western and central European countries are also this trope for many these days, as well as other developed countries like Taiwan and Japan. This trope falls under both the idealistic and cynical sides of this trope. For some immigrants, they find a golden land of opportunity, for others, they find themselves in dirty slums facing violent gangs and discrimination and distrust from the native population. For the Native Americans, it resulted in genocide, depopulation, and poverty and discrimination that continue to this day.

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* Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the [[UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates USA]] for many immigrants from poorer European countries (and lately, non-European ones too as they allowed them to immigrate). North-western and central European countries are also this trope for many these days, as well as other developed countries like Taiwan and Japan. This trope falls under both the idealistic and cynical sides of this trope. For some immigrants, they find a golden land of opportunity, for others, they find themselves in dirty slums facing violent gangs and discrimination and distrust from the native population. For the Native Americans, indigenous peoples, it resulted in genocide, depopulation, and poverty and discrimination that continue to this day.
24th Aug '17 6:32:13 AM WillBGood
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* In ''Film/TankGirl'', The Rippers have a belief in such a place, as related by Bugger.
-->'''Bugger:''' It's one of Johnny Prophet's dreams. See how the people are all free, and the water just comes down from the sky and it don't cost nothin'. With flowers and rainbows.

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* In ''Film/TankGirl'', The Rippers have a belief in such a place, as related by Bugger.
-->'''Bugger:'''
Booga.
-->'''Booga:'''
It's one of Johnny Prophet's dreams. See how the people are all free, and the water just comes down from the sky and it don't cost nothin'. With flowers and rainbows.
26th Jun '17 11:55:34 AM Shieldage
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* Indentured service in the 17th and 18th century was basically an Unreachable Promised Land. A poor man would basically sell himself as a slave to get to the Americas and work as a slave for several years at the plantation, factory or farm. Once the period of servitude was over, the indentured servant was free to live as an inhabitant of the land. Providing, of course, that he survived the harsh treatment, climate, work and diseases first.

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** Lots of people on the East Coast were sold 'agricultural' land in the West Coast that turned out to be horrible for farming when they finally reached it. Some of the luckier victims of this scam found that the clay soil hardpan that flooded and killed the wheatfields they'd been promised was actually excellent at growing rice...
* Indentured service in the lthe 17th and 18th century was basically an Unreachable Promised Land. A poor man would basically sell himself as a slave to get to the Americas and work as a slave for several years at the plantation, factory or farm. Once the period of servitude was over, the indentured servant was free to live as an inhabitant of the land. Providing, of course, that he survived the harsh treatment, climate, work and diseases first.
17th Jun '17 7:19:19 PM Theriocephalus
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* The song "Big Rock Candy Mountain" by [=Harry McClintock=] depicts a hobo's version of paradise, with cigarette trees, soft-boiled eggs, wooden-legged cops and rubber-toothed bulldogs, where the boxcars are empty and the "bulls" (railway police, whose job it was to protect railroad property and often booted hobos from trains) are blind. The [[https://casanders.net/music-history/the-true-story-of-the-big-rock-candy-mountain/ original version]] that [=McClintock=] wrote in 1898, however, is ''far'' more cynical than the regular version, meant to illustrate the dangers of hobo life, with a final verse omitted from the other versions that lays bare that it's all a lie:

to:

* The song "Big Rock Candy Mountain" by [=Harry McClintock=] depicts a hobo's version of paradise, with cigarette trees, hens that lay soft-boiled eggs, wooden-legged cops and rubber-toothed bulldogs, where the boxcars are empty and the "bulls" (railway police, whose job it was to protect railroad property and often booted hobos from trains) are blind. The [[https://casanders.net/music-history/the-true-story-of-the-big-rock-candy-mountain/ original version]] that [=McClintock=] wrote in 1898, however, is ''far'' more cynical than the regular version, meant to illustrate the dangers of hobo life, with a final verse omitted from the other versions that lays bare that it's all a lie:
10th Jun '17 2:56:09 PM nombretomado
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* The Swedish-American colony in Jerusalem, which sparked Selma Lagerlöf to write her novel ''Jerusalem'', founded in 1881. The colony was founded by religious extremists, who wanted to make a "permanent pilgrimage" to Jerusalem -- only to discover that the town, like any bustling city, suffered from the realities of urban planning, falling short of their ideal. Seeking to fulfill their vision of the Promised Land, the settlers founded the commune, which grew and eventually moved out of the city, where it served a variety of functions, including hosting refugees from WorldWarI. The colony eventually collapsed from internal strife, and a hotel now bears its name.

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* The Swedish-American colony in Jerusalem, which sparked Selma Lagerlöf to write her novel ''Jerusalem'', founded in 1881. The colony was founded by religious extremists, who wanted to make a "permanent pilgrimage" to Jerusalem -- only to discover that the town, like any bustling city, suffered from the realities of urban planning, falling short of their ideal. Seeking to fulfill their vision of the Promised Land, the settlers founded the commune, which grew and eventually moved out of the city, where it served a variety of functions, including hosting refugees from WorldWarI.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. The colony eventually collapsed from internal strife, and a hotel now bears its name.
25th May '17 8:39:44 AM Dravencour
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* '''Crappy Promised Land:''' The Promised Land is in disarray, either from everyone else who arrived there before the main characters using it up, or some other event. The once beautiful land is now dry and barren, with only vermin as its remaining native life, and ruins as its last structures. Worse, the Promised Land may even appear to be exactly as advertised, but turn out to be [[CrapsaccharineWorld just as bad as, if not worse than, the world that they know]]. This trope overlaps ''heavily'' with the Idealistic Promised Land.\\
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For both No Promised Land and Crappy Promised Land, the revelation of the truth of the Promised Land is usually the story's big [[TheReveal reveal]], and can usually be a [[BreakTheCutie breaking moment]] [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids for the characters,]] and at its worst, a DownerEnding. If they ''still'' make it, it is a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming. See also SafeZoneHopeSpot.

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* '''Crappy Promised Land:''' The Promised Land is in disarray, either from everyone else who arrived there before the main characters using it up, or some other event. The once beautiful land is now dry and barren, with only vermin as its remaining native life, and ruins as its last structures. Worse, the Promised Land may even appear to be exactly as advertised, but turn out to be [[CrapsaccharineWorld just as bad as, if not worse than, the world that they know]]. This trope overlaps ''heavily'' with the Idealistic Promised Land.\\
\\
For both No Promised Land and Crappy Promised Land, the revelation of the truth of the Promised Land is usually the story's big [[TheReveal reveal]], and can usually be a [[BreakTheCutie breaking moment]] [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids for the characters,]] and at its worst, a DownerEnding. If they ''still'' make it, it is a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming. See also SafeZoneHopeSpot.


Added DiffLines:

For both No Promised Land and Crappy Promised Land, the revelation of the truth of the Promised Land is usually the story's big [[TheReveal reveal]], and can usually be a [[BreakTheCutie breaking moment]] [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids for the characters,]] and at its worst, a DownerEnding. If they ''still'' make it, it is a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming. See also SafeZoneHopeSpot.
25th May '17 8:37:26 AM Dravencour
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This trope comes in two main flavors, the idealistic portrayal, and the cynical portrayal. The cynical portrayal can be broken down into separate flavors as well.

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This trope comes in two main flavors, the idealistic portrayal, and the cynical portrayal. The cynical portrayal can be broken down into separate flavors as well.
promise, so to speak, of the Promised Land lends itself very much to an idealistic flavor, but whether or not this promise is actually true depends very much on the tone and genre of the work it takes place in.
25th May '17 8:07:50 AM Dravencour
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* '''No Promised Land:''' The Promised Land never really existed, or if it did exist, it is nothing but a shell (or even less) of its former glory. Here, the Promised Land was just a myth, perhaps created to give people hope of a possible better life, or from a misunderstood or distorted legend of the past. Sometimes, even more cynically, the idea of the Promised Land is a lie, deliberately concocted in order to control people with a false promise of better times with the price of submitting under a cruel rule.

to:

* '''No Promised Land:''' The Promised Land never really existed, or if it did exist, it is nothing but a shell (or even less) of its former glory. Here, the Promised Land was just a myth, perhaps created to give people hope of a possible better life, or from a misunderstood or distorted legend of the past. Sometimes, even more cynically, the idea of the Promised Land is a lie, deliberately concocted in order to control people with a false promise of better times with the price of submitting under a cruel rule.rule, or to lure people into danger and death.
25th May '17 8:04:55 AM Dravencour
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* The song "Big Rock Candy Mountain" by [=Harry McClintock=] depicts a hobo's version of paradise, with cigarette trees, soft-boiled eggs, wooden-legged cops and rubber-toothed bulldogs, where the boxcars are empty and the "bulls" (railway police, whose job it was to protect railroad property and often booted hobos from trains) are blind. The [[https://casanders.net/music-history/the-true-story-of-the-big-rock-candy-mountain/ original version]] that [=McClintock=] wrote in 1898, however, is ''far'' more cynical than the regular version, meant to illustrate the dangers of hobo life, with a final stanza omitted from the other versions that lays bare that it's a Crappy Promised Land at best and No Promised Land at worst:

to:

* The song "Big Rock Candy Mountain" by [=Harry McClintock=] depicts a hobo's version of paradise, with cigarette trees, soft-boiled eggs, wooden-legged cops and rubber-toothed bulldogs, where the boxcars are empty and the "bulls" (railway police, whose job it was to protect railroad property and often booted hobos from trains) are blind. The [[https://casanders.net/music-history/the-true-story-of-the-big-rock-candy-mountain/ original version]] that [=McClintock=] wrote in 1898, however, is ''far'' more cynical than the regular version, meant to illustrate the dangers of hobo life, with a final stanza verse omitted from the other versions that lays bare that it's all a Crappy Promised Land at best and No Promised Land at worst:lie:
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ThePromisedLand