History Main / TheNeidermeyer

12th Aug '16 9:40:27 PM nombretomado
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Named after the infamous blowhard ROTC commander Doug Neidermeyer from the movie ''AnimalHouse''.

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Named after the infamous blowhard ROTC commander Doug Neidermeyer from the movie ''AnimalHouse''.''Film/AnimalHouse''.
29th Jun '16 11:34:42 AM igordebraga
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* Played for comedy in both videos by Twisted Sister: In "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WT1LXhgXPWs We're Not gonna Take It]]", the Neidermeyer is an irate dad; in "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRwrg0db_zY I Wanna Rock]]", the teacher is one. Either way, the guy ends up as the ButtMonkey. Both roles are played by [[AnimalHouse the original Neidermeyer]], Mark Metcalf. And the Neidermeyer father appears in one video by Lit.

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* Played for comedy in both videos by Twisted Sister: In two Film/TwistedSister videos, "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WT1LXhgXPWs We're Not gonna Gonna Take It]]", the Neidermeyer is an irate dad; in "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRwrg0db_zY I Wanna Rock]]", the teacher is one. Either way, the guy ends up as the ButtMonkey. Both roles are ButtMonkey and is played by [[AnimalHouse [[Film/AnimalHouse the original Neidermeyer]], Mark Metcalf. And Metcalf (helps the Neidermeyer father former song ends with Dee Snider mimicking the picture caption atop this page). Metcalf also appears in one video by Lit.
8th Jun '16 3:16:42 PM Prfnoff
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** Hitler has a long history of this kind of behavior: quite a few sources from World War I show him as being disliked by many of his fellow soldiers, who didn't take kindly to his political ranting and preaching. Despite this, most of them grudgingly respected him for his loyalty to Germany, even if he did have one of the safer positions as battalion messenger.
** "Safer" being relative. Frontline messengers, while not typically required to be on the firing line, made up for it in that they were often in exposed positions while moving between units, which is why important messages were often sent by multiple messengers to make sure at least one got to the destination alive. Hitler legitimately earned his Iron Crosses second and first class for bravery, which was a rather rare achievement for a private (Hitler did not rise above ''Gefreiter'', or Private First Class in the American parlance).
** Recent evidence, as well as numerous interviews with those who served with him, suggest that Hitler was actually a Regimental Messenger, a position several miles behind the front trenches. While still dangerous (primarily due to enemy artillery), it was much safer than the battalion messengers who also had to contend with sniper and machine gun fire. [[note]] This may have simply been an honest mistake as many early WW1 historians did not differentiate between battalion and regimental messengers. [[/note]]
14th May '16 4:22:17 PM AgProv
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Added DiffLines:

** Margaret Houlihan is this herself in the beginning. Insecure in herself because her father is a career officer who really wanted a son to follow in his footsteps, and aware opportunities for a female officer are limited, she is harsh on her nurses and feels alienated and alone. After the departure of Burns, she mellows out and passes on from her own Neidermeyer stage, becoming a competent and compassionate officer, learning from Potter, Hawkeye and BJ.
12th May '16 8:28:16 PM PaulA
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* Captain Fisher, a.k.a. "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Liar Billy Liar]]", in Creator/KimNewman's AlternateHistory novella ''Teddy Bear's Picnic''. His own troops frag him with a white phosphorus grenade, a practice known as "white saucing". For the record, white phosphorous burns at [[http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land/m15.htm 5000 degrees]] and sticks to the skin.

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* Captain Fisher, a.k.a. "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Liar Billy Liar]]", in Creator/KimNewman's AlternateHistory novella ''Teddy Bear's Picnic''.''Literature/TeddyBearsPicnic''. His own troops frag him with a white phosphorus grenade, a practice known as "white saucing". For the record, white phosphorous burns at [[http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land/m15.htm 5000 degrees]] and sticks to the skin.
23rd Apr '16 7:31:35 PM TheWanderer
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* ''Series/TheWire'': Lieutenant Charles Marimow is referred to as "The Unit Killer" and a man who "does not toss away talent lightly. He heaves it with great force." At a higher level, both Burress and Rawls are like this to the commanders beneath them, often using the COMSTAT meetings to berate and humiliate them for failing to win the drug war each month.

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* ''Series/TheWire'': Lieutenant Charles Marimow is referred to as "The Unit Killer" and a man who "does not toss away talent lightly. He heaves it with great force." At a higher level, both Burress Burrell and Rawls are like this to the commanders beneath them, often using the COMSTAT meetings to berate and humiliate them for failing to win the drug war each month.
13th Mar '16 4:00:21 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/StargateUniverse'':
** Colonel Telford is the Neidermeyer in his early appearances. He utterly ignores not only the very immediate and life-threatening problems facing the crew in favor of the rules, but also completely ignores the fact that his [[GrandTheftMe host body]] is in terrible shape the first time around. In the episode "Earth", he usurps Young's command (albeit on orders from higher up) and nearly gets the entire ship destroyed. To add insult to injury, he abandons ''Destiny'' while this happens ([[spoiler:which [[MagnificentBastard Dr. Rush]] had actually expected him to do and thus arranged the whole show just to make him look like an ass]]). Thankfully, this last one does not go unpunished; Young, having learned his lesson, never gives Telford the opportunity to try again, and burns him pretty good back on Earth for his actions.
** General George Hammond from ''Series/StargateSG1'' was originally intended to be such a character, as this was how most commanding officers/superiors were treated in other television shows at the time[[note]]except for DonaldPBellisario's ''Series/{{JAG}}''[[/note]]. After talking with a U.S. Air Force consultant -- who pointed out that a man who rose to Hammond's position wouldn't have got there if he had no respect for his inferiors, and vice versa -- he was rewritten to be the show's ReasonableAuthorityFigure. Multiple times he's shown bending the rules or outright breaking them to get the job done.

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* ''Series/StargateUniverse'':
**
''Series/StargateUniverse'': Colonel Telford is the Neidermeyer in his early appearances. He utterly ignores not only the very immediate and life-threatening problems facing the crew in favor of the rules, but also completely ignores the fact that his [[GrandTheftMe host body]] is in terrible shape the first time around. In the episode "Earth", he usurps Young's command (albeit on orders from higher up) and nearly gets the entire ship destroyed. To add insult to injury, he abandons ''Destiny'' while this happens ([[spoiler:which [[MagnificentBastard Dr. Rush]] had actually expected him to do and thus arranged the whole show just to make him look like an ass]]). Thankfully, this last one does not go unpunished; Young, having learned his lesson, never gives Telford the opportunity to try again, and burns him pretty good back on Earth for his actions.
** * General George Hammond from ''Series/StargateSG1'' was originally intended to be such a character, as this was how most commanding officers/superiors were treated in other television shows at the time[[note]]except for DonaldPBellisario's ''Series/{{JAG}}''[[/note]]. After talking with a U.S. Air Force consultant -- who pointed out that a man who rose to Hammond's position wouldn't have got there if he had no respect for his inferiors, and vice versa -- he was rewritten to be the show's ReasonableAuthorityFigure. Multiple times he's shown bending the rules or outright breaking them to get the job done.
13th Mar '16 3:59:44 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'': Captain Crais. Initially, it's indicated that this is the result of RevengeBeforeReason in his pursuit of Crichton for accidentally killing his brother. Flashbacks in "The Way We Weren't," however, reveal that he was always a whackjob and a jackass hated by all around him. When [[BigBad Scorpius]] steps up to take his command away from him at the end of Season 1, none of his officers so much as object, let alone side with him.

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* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'': ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
**
Captain Crais. Initially, it's indicated that this is the result of RevengeBeforeReason in his pursuit of Crichton for accidentally killing his brother. Flashbacks in "The Way We Weren't," however, reveal that he was always a whackjob and a jackass hated by all around him. When [[BigBad Scorpius]] steps up to take his command away from him at the end of Season 1, none of his officers so much as object, let alone side with him.



** FridgeBrilliance: By this point in the series, Burns' medical and military incompetence is well-known within the Army. At least three officers (Potter, Houlihan, Penobscott) have enough connections farther up the chain of command to ensure that, even if he remains in the Army, Burns never sees the inside of an operating room again. As a result Burns probably ended up in an administrative post with no actual hands-on medical duties...which, for a surgeon, is the equivalent of ReassignedToAntarctica (and probably the end of his military career as well). This explains the posting, but not the promotion. Neither does it explain why he didn't just get a Section 8.
*** If they gave Burns a Section 8, it would just give Klinger ideas.
*** This is in fact how US Army has often dealt with the Neidermeyers. For example, General Fredenhall, a real life general fitting this trope (see below), was promoted and placed in charge of training new recruits in Continental US after being largely responsible for the debacle at the Kasserine Pass.



*** In fairness, most of his abrasiveness in the first episode is likely due to stress on his part. Until the Stargate reactivated and proved that their were ''more'' hostile aliens out there, he was in charge of watching over a dusty old facility and waiting out until his retirement. He's just as much out of his depth as everyone else and most of Hammond's character arc over the first series is that he's having to quickly [[TookALevelInBadass step up and take charge]] of leading Earth's defence.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'':
** Captain Edward Jellico seems like this at the start, but subverts it by the end. Placed in temporary command of the ''Enterprise'', he systematically alienates most of the crew thanks to his hard and uncompromising command style, even having Data replace Riker as NumberOne after Riker keeps resisting his changes. After the first episode, the audience will assuredly hate him, and everything is set up to watch him fail in his mission while the primary Picard-is-captured plot yields the answer, showing him up. The second episode instead has him learn to loosen up just enough to recognize his flaws, and its his tactics that not only win the day, but save Picard in the process.
** ''And'' he makes Troi wear a real uniform instead of her bunny suit, an order Picard never rescinded.
*** To be fair, that may have been an order from Starfleet Command to the effect that all ship's counselors had to wear the standard uniform, and Jellico happened to be the one to break the news (although given his personality, he did so with less tact than one would expect). Neither officer would have the authority to rescind the order in that case.
*** Troi also is the one officer on the bridge crew who actually takes her concerns about unintended consequences of one of Jellico's decisions to Jellico in a polite and respectful manner; in return Jellico hears her out, agrees with her, and puts her in charge of implementing the solution to the problem. It is ironic that the entirely unmilitary Ship's Counselor, uniform and all, was the one person in this episode besides Jellico actually acting properly military.
*** It is also part of Troi's character development; at the beginning, she was a psychologist/social worker practicing on a starship, but after that point she was a Starfleet Officer whose specialty happened to be applied behavioral sciences. (It was shortly after that she takes the exam for promotion to full Commander, and is called "Commander Troi" quite as often as she is called "Counsellor Troi."
** It's worth noting that as a First Officer, it's Riker's job to follow the Captain's orders and not try to undermine their authority, simply because he doesn't like the orders or them personally. Jellico is ''completely'' right for relieving Riker of duty for his repeated insubordination and for unprofessional conduct as befitting an officer. Several episodes have shown that ''Picard'' doesn't stand for this either!

to:

*** In fairness, most of his abrasiveness in the first episode is likely due to stress on his part. Until the Stargate reactivated and proved that their were ''more'' hostile aliens out there, he was in charge of watching over a dusty old facility and waiting out until his retirement. He's just as much out of his depth as everyone else and most of Hammond's character arc over the first series is that he's having to quickly [[TookALevelInBadass step up and take charge]] of leading Earth's defence.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'':
**
''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'': Captain Edward Jellico seems like this at the start, but subverts it by the end. Placed in temporary command of the ''Enterprise'', he systematically alienates most of the crew thanks to his hard and uncompromising command style, even having Data replace Riker as NumberOne after Riker keeps resisting his changes. After the first episode, the audience will assuredly hate him, and everything is set up to watch him fail in his mission while the primary Picard-is-captured plot yields the answer, showing him up. The second episode instead has him learn to loosen up just enough to recognize his flaws, and its his tactics that not only win the day, but save Picard in the process.
** ''And'' he makes Troi wear a real uniform instead of her bunny suit, an order Picard never rescinded.
*** To be fair, that may have been an order from Starfleet Command to the effect that all ship's counselors had to wear the standard uniform, and Jellico happened to be the one to break the news (although given his personality, he did so with less tact than one would expect). Neither officer would have the authority to rescind the order in that case.
*** Troi also is the one officer on the bridge crew who actually takes her concerns about unintended consequences of one of Jellico's decisions to Jellico in a polite and respectful manner; in return Jellico hears her out, agrees with her, and puts her in charge of implementing the solution to the problem. It is ironic that the entirely unmilitary Ship's Counselor, uniform and all, was the one person in this episode besides Jellico actually acting properly military.
*** It is also part of Troi's character development; at the beginning, she was a psychologist/social worker practicing on a starship, but after that point she was a Starfleet Officer whose specialty happened to be applied behavioral sciences. (It was shortly after that she takes the exam for promotion to full Commander, and is called "Commander Troi" quite as often as she is called "Counsellor Troi."
** It's worth noting that as a First Officer, it's Riker's job to follow the Captain's orders and not try to undermine their authority, simply because he doesn't like the orders or them personally. Jellico is ''completely'' right for relieving Riker of duty for his repeated insubordination and for unprofessional conduct as befitting an officer. Several episodes have shown that ''Picard'' doesn't stand for this either!
process.



* ''{{Exalted}}'':

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* ''{{Exalted}}'':''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'':
7th Mar '16 10:02:21 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''TheWire'': Lieutenant Charles Marimow is referred to as "The Unit Killer" and a man who "does not toss away talent lightly. He heaves it with great force." At a higher level, both Burress and Rawls are like this to the commanders beneath them, often using the COMSTAT meetings to berate and humiliate them for failing to win the drug war each month.

to:

* ''TheWire'': ''Series/TheWire'': Lieutenant Charles Marimow is referred to as "The Unit Killer" and a man who "does not toss away talent lightly. He heaves it with great force." At a higher level, both Burress and Rawls are like this to the commanders beneath them, often using the COMSTAT meetings to berate and humiliate them for failing to win the drug war each month.
7th Mar '16 10:01:49 AM Morgenthaler
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-->'''Random Soldier''': [[CrowningMomentOfFunny You suck!]]

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-->'''Random Soldier''': [[CrowningMomentOfFunny You suck!]]
suck!
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