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History Main / TheLowMiddleAges

7th Feb '16 2:02:00 PM nombretomado
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Of course, ''even that will change'' with [[Main/TheCrusades our next]] [[Main/TheHighMiddleAges entries...]] [[/folder]]

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Of course, ''even that will change'' with [[Main/TheCrusades [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades our next]] [[Main/TheHighMiddleAges entries...]] [[/folder]]
20th Jan '16 5:56:13 PM Quag15
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* MedievalMorons: TruthInTelevision, but only to an extent. The literacy rate dropped precipitously, most of the empire's libraries dropped into disrepair, no one could remember how to make concrete or maintain the roads to their prior standards, and the one group actually hanging on to any academic knowledge (the Catholic Church) had a tendency to cherry pick parts that supported the religion and/or allowed a more comprehensive study of areas such as logic and philosophy[[note]]including natural philosophy, which was the term used for parts that today constitute part of what is called natural sciences[[/note]], and destroyed, distorted and/or censored the rest. How bad it got varied a lot with location and the specific time, but in general people on both sides of the time period would have considered their low middle ages counterparts tragically uneducated at best.

to:

* MedievalMorons: TruthInTelevision, but only to an extent. The literacy rate dropped precipitously, most of the empire's libraries dropped into disrepair, no one could remember how to make concrete or maintain the roads to their prior standards, and the one group actually hanging on to any academic knowledge (the Catholic Church) had a tendency to cherry pick parts that supported the religion and/or allowed a more comprehensive study of areas such as logic and philosophy[[note]]including natural philosophy, which was the term used for parts that today constitute part of what is called natural sciences[[/note]], and destroyed, distorted and/or censored the rest. How bad it got varied a lot with location and the specific time, but in general people on both sides of the time period would have considered their low middle ages counterparts tragically uneducated at best.
20th Jan '16 5:55:45 PM Quag15
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* MedievalMorons: TruthInTelevision, but only to an extent. The literacy rate dropped precipitously, most of the empire's libraries dropped into disrepair, no one could remember how to make concrete or maintain the roads to their prior standards, and the one group actually hanging on to any academic knowledge (the Catholic Church) had a tendency to cherry pick parts that supported the religion and/or allowed a more comprehensive study of areas such as logic and philosophy (including natural philosophy, which was the term used for parts that today constitute part of what is called natural sciences), and destroyed or censored the rest. How bad it got varied a lot with location and the specific time, but in general people on both sides of the time period would have considered their low middle ages counterparts tragically uneducated at best.

to:

* MedievalMorons: TruthInTelevision, but only to an extent. The literacy rate dropped precipitously, most of the empire's libraries dropped into disrepair, no one could remember how to make concrete or maintain the roads to their prior standards, and the one group actually hanging on to any academic knowledge (the Catholic Church) had a tendency to cherry pick parts that supported the religion and/or allowed a more comprehensive study of areas such as logic and philosophy (including philosophy[[note]]including natural philosophy, which was the term used for parts that today constitute part of what is called natural sciences), sciences[[/note]], and destroyed or destroyed, distorted and/or censored the rest. How bad it got varied a lot with location and the specific time, but in general people on both sides of the time period would have considered their low middle ages counterparts tragically uneducated at best.
20th Jan '16 5:54:55 PM Quag15
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* MedievalMorons: TruthInTelevision, but only to an extent. The literacy rate dropped precipitously, most of the empire's libraries dropped into disrepair, no one could remember how to make concrete or maintain the roads to their prior standards, and the one group actually hanging on to any academic knowledge (the Catholic Church) had a tendency to cherry pick parts that supported the religion and/or allowed a more comprehensive study of areas such as logic, natural philosophy and other areas, and destroyed or censored the rest. How bad it got varied a lot with location and the specific time, but in general people on both sides of the time period would have considered their low middle ages counterparts tragically uneducated at best.

to:

* MedievalMorons: TruthInTelevision, but only to an extent. The literacy rate dropped precipitously, most of the empire's libraries dropped into disrepair, no one could remember how to make concrete or maintain the roads to their prior standards, and the one group actually hanging on to any academic knowledge (the Catholic Church) had a tendency to cherry pick parts that supported the religion and/or allowed a more comprehensive study of areas such as logic, natural logic and philosophy and other areas, (including natural philosophy, which was the term used for parts that today constitute part of what is called natural sciences), and destroyed or censored the rest. How bad it got varied a lot with location and the specific time, but in general people on both sides of the time period would have considered their low middle ages counterparts tragically uneducated at best.
20th Jan '16 5:53:07 PM Quag15
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* MedievalMorons: TruthInTelevision, to an extent. The literacy rate dropped precipitously, most of the empire's libraries dropped into disrepair, no one could remember how to make concrete or maintain the roads to their prior standards, and the one group actually hanging on to any academic knowledge (the church) had a tendency to cherry pick a few bits that ostensibly supported the religion and aggressively destroy the rest. How bad it got varied a lot with location and the specific time, but in general people on both sides of the time period would have considered their low middle ages counterparts tragically uneducated at best.

to:

* MedievalMorons: TruthInTelevision, but only to an extent. The literacy rate dropped precipitously, most of the empire's libraries dropped into disrepair, no one could remember how to make concrete or maintain the roads to their prior standards, and the one group actually hanging on to any academic knowledge (the church) Catholic Church) had a tendency to cherry pick a few bits parts that ostensibly supported the religion and/or allowed a more comprehensive study of areas such as logic, natural philosophy and aggressively destroy other areas, and destroyed or censored the rest. How bad it got varied a lot with location and the specific time, but in general people on both sides of the time period would have considered their low middle ages counterparts tragically uneducated at best.
12th Jan '16 10:48:21 AM StFan
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* KingArthur
* KievanRus: its early period, including the pagan princes, Olga and Vladimir the Saint.
27th Dec '15 8:08:24 PM DoktorSoviet
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The Crisis had also been something of an EnemyCivilWar for enterprising barbarians who had remained unconquered. With TheRomanEmpire weakening, its enemies began to nibble away little by little. The Parthians (Later supplanted by the Sassanians, though both were Iranian/Persian) carved out their own large empire in Persia and parts of Mesopotamia. Germans[[note]]or, to be more precise, Goths, Visigoths, and other tribes[[/note]] would ever encroach on the borderlands of Roman territory.

Following the Crisis, Roman military power began to wane. The legions, at least in the West, were no longer the state funded, organized armies that had once led to Empire to great victories. Instead, the Western Roman Empire had grown ever reliant on mercenaries and auxiliaries, who were often cheaper. [[note]]If a soldier from Italy dies, that is one less man to collect taxes from and one less person outputting goods. If some barbaric German dies, it has no real financial impact on the Emperor[[/note]] This made the West increasingly vulnerable to other threats. This was ever noticed during the Gothic War, in which Goths, fleeing the migrating Huns, resettled on Roman territory, but they rebelled due to mistreatment. The Goths won a decisive battle against the Roman troops at the Battle of Adrianople, which exposed the weakness of the decaying Roman Empire.

The reasons for this rapid decline are too numerous to count, but a growing gap between the social classes (combined with severe rigidity, meaning it was nigh-impossible for people to rise in social class like they had done previously in the Empire), the rise of Christianity, a gradual reliance on local rulers, and a growing lack of cultural identity in the Empire as local culture began to exert influence once more, all led to the groundwork of the Early Middle Ages.

to:

The Crisis had also been something of an EnemyCivilWar for enterprising barbarians who had remained unconquered. With TheRomanEmpire weakening, its enemies began to nibble away little by little. The Parthians (Later supplanted by the Sassanians, though both were Iranian/Persian) carved out their own large empire in Persia and parts of Mesopotamia. Germans[[note]]or, to be more precise, Goths, Visigoths, and other tribes[[/note]] would ever encroach on the borderlands of Roman territory.

Following
territory. Their frequent raids on the Crisis, crippled Empire depopulated entire regions. The civil war drew away valuable border troops that kept raiders and bandits at bay. Gaul was said to be plagued by pirates in the absence of the Roman navy, and the withdrawal of the Legions to fight in Italy left entire towns vulnerable to large bands of criminals. Banditry was becoming a ever-aspiring prospect. The war also crippled the economy. Rome suffered intense inflation and taxes were raised to help pay for the military. This led to a myriad of internal issues. One was de-urbanization. The middle class became extinguished as few individuals had the money to purchase once thriving services. Stonemasons, carpenters, blacksmiths, artists, and tutors were finding themselves without jobs. This forced many to sell their homes in the city and turn to the tried-and-true business of agriculture. Meanwhile, poor farmers (many of whom were ex-legionaries or descendants of legionaries) found themselves unable to pay their taxes. They began to sell their farms and move to plantations that would later become manors, then estates, then finally known as counties or lordships. These plantations were owned by the wealthy patricians, the only class of people who could still afford comfortable living. The advantage for the poor farmers was tax exemption, as a lack of land-ownership and bondage to the plantation owners meant you couldn't be taxed, as you were no longer an independent earner. The advantage for the plantation owners was the ability to have vast farms that could make money by sheer quantity of output.

The other problem following the Crisis was that
Roman military power began to wane. The legions, at least in the West, were no longer the state funded, organized armies that had once led to Empire to great victories. Instead, the Western Roman Empire had grown ever reliant on mercenaries and auxiliaries, who were often cheaper. [[note]]If a soldier from Italy dies, that is one less man to collect taxes from and one less person outputting goods. If some barbaric German dies, it has no real financial impact on the Emperor[[/note]] This Emperor.[[/note]] More than a cost saving measure, it was also a political maneuver to try to tie the armies to the central government instead of the generals. The Legions tended to be tied more to their generals than to Rome, as the lands the generals led them to conquer would later be divided up into farms. However, the Roman government tried to subvert this to prevent another Crisis by creating mostly paid armies. The mercenaries would be loyal to the source of their pay, which was the Roman treasury and not their generals. Thus, this, in theory, insured that the Legions would not betray the central state again. However, the lack of discipline made the West increasingly vulnerable to other threats. This was ever noticed during the Gothic War, in which Goths, fleeing the migrating Huns, resettled on Roman territory, but they rebelled due to mistreatment. The Goths won a decisive battle against the Roman troops at the Battle of Adrianople, which exposed the weakness of the decaying Roman Empire.

Empire. And when the Romans did break down and become unable to pay these ''feodorati'', they often rebelled and attacked the Empire anyways.

The reasons for this rapid decline are too numerous to count, but a growing gap between the social classes (combined with severe rigidity, meaning it was nigh-impossible for people to rise in social class like they had done previously in the Empire), the rise of Christianity, a gradual reliance on local rulers, and a growing lack of cultural identity in the Empire as local culture began to exert influence once more, all led to laid the groundwork of the Early Middle Ages.



From the crossing of the Rhine in 406, the Western Roman Empire (or whatever shell of it remained) was effectively conquered by the Germans, who rapidly claimed many of Rome's former provinces. The Visigoths, a people originally from the area around Dacia, took Gaul [[note]]modern day France and Belgium[[/note]] and Hispania [[note]]Spain and Portugal[[/note]] for their own, while the Ostrogoths, who were of similar origin, took Italy. The Vandals set up a short-lived Germanic kingdom in North Africa. The Angles and eventually the Saxons settled in what is today England, where their culture was largely adopted by the native peoples. The Celtic peoples in what is today Wales remained independent and largely retained their own culture. While it used to be thought that the Angles and Saxons had ''displaced'' the native Britons, but the prevailing theory is that they simply took over as the dominant political class.

to:

From the crossing of the Rhine in 406, the Western Roman Empire (or whatever shell of it remained) was effectively conquered by the Germans, who rapidly claimed many of Rome's former provinces. The Visigoths, a people originally from the area around Dacia, took Gaul [[note]]modern day France and Belgium[[/note]] and Hispania [[note]]Spain and Portugal[[/note]] for their own, while the Ostrogoths, who were of similar origin, took Italy. The Vandals set up a short-lived Germanic kingdom in North Africa. The Angles and eventually the Saxons settled in what is today England, where their culture was largely adopted by the native peoples. The Celtic peoples in what is today Wales remained independent and largely retained their own culture. While it used to be thought that the Angles and Saxons had ''displaced'' the native Britons, but the prevailing theory is that they simply took over as the dominant political class. The Empire itself didn't entirely collapse, as some of its institutions survived and evolved. The power of the Emperor was largely preserved with the Papacy, as the Pope still held central authority over the kings of Europe. Although the secular kingdoms still fought each other and retained ''de facto'' independence, the Pope could still manipulate them and command them in some way, acting as an incredibly marginalized Emperor. Roman military positions gradually transformed as well. The new kingdoms recycled the Roman military organization, even using the title of ''comitatenses'' for the loyal troops who served the Germanic kings who first invaded the Empire. This was later shortened to ''comes'', which became ''count'' in modern English. These troops were rewarded for their fealty by the grant of land, and land meant social status. This was a holdover from the Roman system of granting land to the legionaries.



By 1066, The Norman Conquests marked the end of the Low Middle Ages. Although there was a serious lull in technological advancement, and indeed the medieval world was just a bit smaller than the Classical one, the Low Middle Ages were not as bad as they are often said to be. Our lack of first hand sources makes the time period seem dark and mysterious, but we know that only holds true for Western Europe (if at all), since the Muslim world was flourishing in a new age of prosperity.

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By 1066, The Norman Conquests marked the end of the Low Middle Ages. It was a transitory period for Europe, where kingdoms rose and fell in mere lifetimes and the social order shifted into a rigid class system. Although there was a serious lull in technological advancement, and indeed the medieval world was just a bit smaller than the Classical one, the Low Middle Ages were not as bad as they are often said to be. Our lack of first hand sources makes the time period seem dark and mysterious, but we know that only holds true for Western Europe (if at all), since the Muslim world was flourishing in a new age of prosperity.
21st Dec '15 7:17:18 PM StarSword
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* ''The Old Gods'', the pagan expansion DLC for ''VideoGame/CrusaderKings II'', pushes the start date of the game back to 867, allowing the player to take control of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Heathen_Army Great Heathen Army]] that invaded England right after their conquest of York.

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* ''The Old Gods'', the pagan expansion DLC for ''VideoGame/CrusaderKings II'', pushes the start date of the game back to 867, allowing the player to take control of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Heathen_Army Great Heathen Army]] that invaded England right after their conquest of York. The seventh expansion, ''Charlemagne'', offers an additional 769 start date.
3rd Dec '15 4:35:28 PM StFan
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[[AC:{{Anime}} and {{Manga}}]]

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[[AC:{{Anime}} and {{Manga}}]][[AC:Anime & Manga]]



[[AC:{{Film}}]]
* ''[[Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus Monty Python and the Holy Grail]]''
** Note that in the DVD commentary, the Pythons admit that AnachronismStew is at work: It is said to be set in Dark Ages Britain, but the costumes are based on fashions from the 1300s, not to mention the castles.
** For that matter, nearly ''all'' the many movie and literary versions of ''KingArthur''. The [[Film/KingArthur 2004 movie]] is a notable exception.

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[[AC:{{Film}}]]
[[AC:Comic Strips]]
* ''[[Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus Monty Python ''ComicStrip/HagarTheHorrible''
* Hal Foster's ''[[ComicStrip/PrinceValiant Prince Valiant in the Days of King Arthur]]'' (and the derivative movie and cartoon), which features both the good
and the Holy Grail]]''
**
bad kind of HornyVikings.

[[AC:Films -- Animation]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells''
* ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon''

[[AC:Films -- Live-Action]]
* ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail''.
Note that in the DVD commentary, the Pythons admit that AnachronismStew is at work: It is said to be set in Dark Ages Britain, but the costumes are based on fashions from the 1300s, not to mention the castles.
** * For that matter, nearly ''all'' the many movie and literary versions of ''KingArthur''.''Myth/KingArthur''. The [[Film/KingArthur 2004 movie]] is a notable exception.



[[AC:{{Literature}}]]

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[[AC:{{Literature}}]][[AC:Literature]]



* The KingArthur legend had its roots during this period, though the more familiar forms of it were written down during TheHighMiddleAges.

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* The KingArthur Myth/KingArthur legend had its roots during this period, though the more familiar forms of it were written down during TheHighMiddleAges.



[[AC:{{Live-Action TV}}]]

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[[AC:{{Live-Action TV}}]][[AC:Live-Action TV]]



[[AC:NewspaperComics]]
* ''HagarTheHorrible''
* Hal Foster's ''[[PrinceValiant Prince Valiant in the Days of King Arthur]]'' (and the derivative movie and cartoon), which features both the good and the bad kind of HornyVikings)

[[AC:{{Theatre}}]]

to:

[[AC:NewspaperComics]]
* ''HagarTheHorrible''
* Hal Foster's ''[[PrinceValiant Prince Valiant in the Days of King Arthur]]'' (and the derivative movie and cartoon), which features both the good and the bad kind of HornyVikings)

[[AC:{{Theatre}}]]
[[AC:Theatre]]



[[AC:{{WesternAnimation}}]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells''
* ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon''

[[AC:VideoGames]]

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[[AC:{{WesternAnimation}}]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells''
* ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon''

[[AC:VideoGames]]
[[AC:Video Games]]



28th Nov '15 4:44:40 PM nombretomado
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* ''TheSecretOfKells''

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* ''TheSecretOfKells''''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells''
This list shows the last 10 events of 43. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheLowMiddleAges