History Main / TheLowMiddleAges

23rd Sep '16 12:13:24 AM morane
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* BackFromTheBrink: The Byzantine Empire.



* TheEmpire: Western and Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empires. The Caliphate. The Sassanid Persian Empire.




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* VestigialEmpire: The Byzantine Empire.
23rd Sep '16 12:06:24 AM morane
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* AsskickingEqualsAuthority: The early feudalism was based on warlordism rather than legitimacy
* AuthorityEqualsAsskicking: Ditto.


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* UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire


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* TheRemnant: The Byzantine Empire.
23rd Sep '16 12:02:25 AM morane
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Around this time, we start to see the often exaggerated and mythical "dark ages" in which supposedly scientific advancement, social advancement, and learning came to a crushing halt. So what happened? Did people get stupider? Of course not. With the breakdown of the centralized Roman government in the West, trade and communication began grinding to a halt. The complex, urban metropolises once supported by Greco-Roman civilization would fall to pieces under the management of German administrators who had no concept of cities. Aqueducts fell into disrepair and were often deconstructed to be used as building materials, and famous Roman relics like the coliseum became the ruins they are today. But, contrary to popular belief, the Low Middle Ages was not a period of immense stupidity or total collapse of all that is good in the world. In fact, some things improved. Generally speaking, you were less likely to go to war and get killed in the Low Middle Ages than in Roman times (a lack of big civil wars certainly helps) and previous knowledge was still preserved by monks and scholars. Yes, things were certainly ''worse'' when compared to the Pax Romana, but it wasn't the abysmal time most history teachers love to paint it as. And from what sources we have, it appears very little actually changed between the Roman Empire's collapse and the conquest by the Germanic Kingdoms as far as living standards.

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Around this time, we start to see the often exaggerated and mythical "dark ages" in which supposedly scientific advancement, social advancement, and learning came to a crushing halt. So what happened? Did people get stupider? Of course not. With the breakdown of the centralized Roman government in the West, trade and communication began grinding to a halt. The complex, urban metropolises once supported by Greco-Roman civilization would fall to pieces under the management of German administrators who had no concept of cities. Aqueducts fell into disrepair and were often deconstructed to be used as building materials, and famous Roman relics like the coliseum Colosseum became the ruins they are today. But, contrary to popular belief, the Low Middle Ages was not a period of immense stupidity or total collapse of all that is good in the world. In fact, some things improved. Generally speaking, you were less likely to go to war and get killed in the Low Middle Ages than in Roman times (a lack of big civil wars certainly helps) and previous knowledge was still preserved by monks and scholars. The nutritional situation improved. Taxes were ''far'' lower than in the Roman age. The Roman chattel slavery gradually disappeared and was superceded by serfdom, which was a ''vast'' improvement. Yes, things were certainly ''worse'' when compared to the Pax Romana, but it wasn't the abysmal time most history teachers love to paint it as. And from what sources we have, it appears very little actually changed between the Roman Empire's collapse and the conquest by the Germanic Kingdoms as far as living standards.


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** Mostly because there was no writing medium. Paper had not yet been invented, papyrus has a tendency to disintegrate in the European climate, and parchment was ''horribly'' expensive. The notable exception were the Northern countries, where people used ''birch bark'' as writing medium. The Norsemen, which we often consider as "barbaric" were surprisingly literate compared to their enemies. Once paper became commonplace in the High Middle Ages, also literacy became common.
11th Sep '16 10:09:55 PM PaulA
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* ''Literature/{{Enchantment}}'' by OrsonScottCard

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* ''Literature/{{Enchantment}}'' by OrsonScottCardCreator/OrsonScottCard
9th Sep '16 10:11:20 AM Morgenthaler
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The Crisis had also been something of an EnemyCivilWar for enterprising barbarians who had remained unconquered. With TheRomanEmpire weakening, its enemies began to nibble away little by little. The Parthians (Later supplanted by the Sassanians, though both were Iranian/Persian) carved out their own large empire in Persia and parts of Mesopotamia. Germans[[note]]or, to be more precise, Goths, Visigoths, and other tribes[[/note]] would ever encroach on the borderlands of Roman territory. Their frequent raids on the crippled Empire depopulated entire regions. The civil war drew away valuable border troops that kept raiders and bandits at bay. Gaul was said to be plagued by pirates in the absence of the Roman navy, and the withdrawal of the Legions to fight in Italy left entire towns vulnerable to large bands of criminals. Banditry was becoming a ever-aspiring prospect. The war also crippled the economy. Rome suffered intense inflation and taxes were raised to help pay for the military. This led to a myriad of internal issues. One was de-urbanization. The middle class became extinguished as few individuals had the money to purchase once thriving services. Stonemasons, carpenters, blacksmiths, artists, and tutors were finding themselves without jobs. This forced many to sell their homes in the city and turn to the tried-and-true business of agriculture. Meanwhile, poor farmers (many of whom were ex-legionaries or descendants of legionaries) found themselves unable to pay their taxes. They began to sell their farms and move to plantations that would later become manors, then estates, then finally known as counties or lordships. These plantations were owned by the wealthy patricians, the only class of people who could still afford comfortable living. The advantage for the poor farmers was tax exemption, as a lack of land-ownership and bondage to the plantation owners meant you couldn't be taxed, as you were no longer an independent earner. The advantage for the plantation owners was the ability to have vast farms that could make money by sheer quantity of output.

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The Crisis had also been something of an EnemyCivilWar for enterprising barbarians who had remained unconquered. With TheRomanEmpire UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire weakening, its enemies began to nibble away little by little. The Parthians (Later supplanted by the Sassanians, though both were Iranian/Persian) carved out their own large empire in Persia and parts of Mesopotamia. Germans[[note]]or, to be more precise, Goths, Visigoths, and other tribes[[/note]] would ever encroach on the borderlands of Roman territory. Their frequent raids on the crippled Empire depopulated entire regions. The civil war drew away valuable border troops that kept raiders and bandits at bay. Gaul was said to be plagued by pirates in the absence of the Roman navy, and the withdrawal of the Legions to fight in Italy left entire towns vulnerable to large bands of criminals. Banditry was becoming a ever-aspiring prospect. The war also crippled the economy. Rome suffered intense inflation and taxes were raised to help pay for the military. This led to a myriad of internal issues. One was de-urbanization. The middle class became extinguished as few individuals had the money to purchase once thriving services. Stonemasons, carpenters, blacksmiths, artists, and tutors were finding themselves without jobs. This forced many to sell their homes in the city and turn to the tried-and-true business of agriculture. Meanwhile, poor farmers (many of whom were ex-legionaries or descendants of legionaries) found themselves unable to pay their taxes. They began to sell their farms and move to plantations that would later become manors, then estates, then finally known as counties or lordships. These plantations were owned by the wealthy patricians, the only class of people who could still afford comfortable living. The advantage for the poor farmers was tax exemption, as a lack of land-ownership and bondage to the plantation owners meant you couldn't be taxed, as you were no longer an independent earner. The advantage for the plantation owners was the ability to have vast farms that could make money by sheer quantity of output.
5th Sep '16 10:34:52 AM erforce
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* ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}'' and its derivatives, such as ''Beowulf and Grendel'' (2005) and ''Film/{{Beowulf}}'' (2007)

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* ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}'' and its derivatives, such as ''Beowulf and Grendel'' (2005) and ''Film/{{Beowulf}}'' ''Film/{{Beowulf|2007}}'' (2007)
4th Sep '16 9:59:52 PM GeorgeT-SLC
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* EnemyCivilWar: Was typically the reason more often then not for the fall of any kind of Empires or large kingdoms in Europe, especially with regards to the Roman Empire ([[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire all]] [[UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire three]] [[UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire iterations]]).

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* EnemyCivilWar: Was typically the reason more often then than not for the fall of any kind of Empires or large kingdoms in Europe, especially with regards to the Roman Empire ([[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire all]] [[UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire three]] [[UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire iterations]]).
3rd Sep '16 11:24:18 AM Morgenthaler
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* EnemyCivilWar: Was typically the reason more often then not for the fall of any kind of Empires or large kingdoms in Europe, especially with regards to the Roman Empire ([[TheRomanEmpire all]] [[ByzantineEmpire three]] [[HolyRomanEmpire iterations]]).

to:

* EnemyCivilWar: Was typically the reason more often then not for the fall of any kind of Empires or large kingdoms in Europe, especially with regards to the Roman Empire ([[TheRomanEmpire ([[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire all]] [[ByzantineEmpire [[UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire three]] [[HolyRomanEmpire [[UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire iterations]]).
12th Aug '16 12:45:29 PM freyalorelei
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* ''Literature/SisterFidelma'' Set in 7th century Ireland.

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* ''Literature/SisterFidelma'' Set is set in 7th century Ireland.
12th Aug '16 12:42:34 PM freyalorelei
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* ''Literature/SisterFidelma'' Set in 7th century Ireland.
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