History Main / TheLegendOfChekhov

11th Sep '16 10:09:27 PM PaulA
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* In OrsonScottCard's ''Literature/TheLostGate'' the Westillian Families are the basis of all Indo-European pantheons. It is inferred that other cultures deities, including the Abrahamic one have similar origins.

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* In OrsonScottCard's Creator/OrsonScottCard's ''Literature/TheLostGate'' the Westillian Families are the basis of all Indo-European pantheons. It is inferred that other cultures deities, including the Abrahamic one have similar origins.
9th Sep '16 11:18:26 AM CurledUpWithDakka
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* In OrsonScottCard's ''TheLostGate'' the Westillian Families are the basis of all Indo-European pantheons. It is inferred that other cultures deities, including the Abrahamic one have similar origins.

to:

* In OrsonScottCard's ''TheLostGate'' ''Literature/TheLostGate'' the Westillian Families are the basis of all Indo-European pantheons. It is inferred that other cultures deities, including the Abrahamic one have similar origins.
29th Jul '16 10:34:31 PM Landis
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Added DiffLines:

* The myths and stories of TheCosmere usually correspond to some facet of the magical or historical landscape, so to speak. The local [[PhysicalGod Shards]], for instance, are usually major players in the local mythology, and their stated aims and behavior are recognizably in-character. This is clearest when comparing the religious doctrine on Nalthis (of both major factions, no less, as disparate as they are in almost every other respect) to a character's memories of being returned from the dead, but the examples are too numerous to list here.
26th Jul '16 8:19:59 PM PaulA
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* In ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' the myth of human-dragon hybrids trapped in human form, mentioned at the beginning of ''Tehanu'', is proven true at the book's end and forms the basis for the plot of the next novel, ''The Other Wind''.

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* In ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' the myth of human-dragon hybrids trapped in human form, mentioned at the beginning of ''Tehanu'', ''Literature/{{Tehanu}}'', is proven true at the book's end and forms the basis for the plot of the next novel, ''The Other Wind''.''Literature/TheOtherWind''.
10th Jul '16 10:23:29 AM JimmyTMalice
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* In ''Literature/TheKingkillerChronicle'', every single story told in Kvothe's narration turns out to be relevant and mostly true sooner or later; for example, Hespe's story about the boy who loved the moon [[spoiler: is a more or less accurate representation of how the mortal world and the fae world ended up going to war.]]
9th Jul '16 1:15:53 PM nombretomado
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* ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'':

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\n* ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'':''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'':



16th May '16 7:33:58 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* Myths and superstitions in ''TalesOfTheQuestor'' tend to be problematic after a few too many generations. Some of them end up being accurate, but for each one that actually is, you've got a few dozen that are corrupted from translation issues or pure age, and hundreds that are plain false or started up from illogical premises. It's also a rule for the setting that no one can see the future, so prophecy tends to ''always'' be wrong.

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* Myths and superstitions in ''TalesOfTheQuestor'' ''Webcomic/TalesOfTheQuestor'' tend to be problematic after a few too many generations. Some of them end up being accurate, but for each one that actually is, you've got a few dozen that are corrupted from translation issues or pure age, and hundreds that are plain false or started up from illogical premises. It's also a rule for the setting that no one can see the future, so prophecy tends to ''always'' be wrong.
6th May '16 9:03:31 PM maddthesane
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* [[http://www.skindeepcomic.com/archive/ridiculous-creatures-1/ This]] short story from ''SkinDeep''. "How am I supposed to know what is actually fiction around here anymore?"

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* [[http://www.skindeepcomic.com/archive/ridiculous-creatures-1/ This]] short story from ''SkinDeep''.''WebComic/SkinDeep''. "How am I supposed to know what is actually fiction around here anymore?"
2nd Mar '16 8:14:57 PM Soldancer
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Note that this trope is about the characters within a story being told a myth, which turns out to be based on actual events within the story's universe. This is not about an author using real-world myths in a story (though the myth the heroes are being told may well be borrowed from a real-world source).

to:

Note that this trope is about the characters within a story being told a myth, which turns out to be based on actual events within the story's universe. This is not about an author using real-world myths in a story (though the myth the heroes are being told may well be borrowed from a real-world source).
source). Also compare InfallibleBabble, the video game equivalent for rumors and legends imparted through {{NPC}}s.
9th Jan '16 7:16:55 AM DannWoolf
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[[folder:Video Games]]

* The GameBoy game ''Final Fantasy Legend II'' (''VideoGame/{{SaGa 2}}'' in Japan) avoids this. One world your characters explore has a myth that turns out to be true and another myth that turns out to be false. [[spoiler:Also, there are actually 78 "MAGI", not just 77 as mentioned at the beginning of the game.]]
* In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'', Professor Frankly encounters conflicting theories on the nature of the treasure he's looking for.
** Eventually one of the theories turns out to be true: the treasure is an [[spoiler: ancient demon. But later it is revealed that the 'real' treasure was a Dried Shroom, the weakest healing item in the game.]]
** Which really isn't very surprising when you consider it was rotting for the past thousand years.
** In the same district of Rogueport that Frankly's house is located in, you can find a quirky storyteller who is glad to spin all sorts of old stories. But that tale about the horrible evil monster and the four heroes who fought it before being themselves sealed away couldn't be true, right? [[spoiler:Of course it is. The monster is a demon sleeping underneath Rogueport ''right now'' and Mario actually encounters each of the heroes in the form of talking cursed treasure chests. They're pretty nice.]]
* In the ''VideoGame/ShadowHearts'' series all myths are true, though very often in ridiculous, bizarre and over the top ways.
* In pretty much all the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games, if you talk to any random NPC who tells you about some legend, the legend is bound to be true. Hidden magical weapons? Yup. Super-powered monsters? Yup. Maze-like hidden cities? Yup.
* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', there are TheSevenMysteries of Twilight Town, urban legends which invariably turn out to be for real when Roxas investigates (and serve as clues to the nature of the world he's been living in). But when Roxas's friends come along to do the write-up, they assume each was just a misunderstanding of something mundane.
* Bungie's ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' series contains an interesting example. The second game has a ''single terminal'' midway through the game that references a S'pht creation myth where the god Yrro flung a chaotic being into the star that Lh'owon orbits. This terminal is never mentioned by any character for the remainder of the game. The myth then forms the ''entire plot'' of the third game, ''Marathon Infinity'' -- sure enough, the [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien Jjaro (or Yrro)]] trapped an EldritchAbomination [[SealedEvilInACan inside the system's star]]. Which the Pfhor destroyed in the finale of the second game.
* In ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', any myth or legend you hear about from an NPC is almost guaranteed to be a hint as to where to find a particular Legendary pokemon.
* A set of daily quests in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has you investigate myths about three maidens who will grant powerful swords if you do each a favor. Naturally, all three of them turn out to be true.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'', the person who sends you to kill Crawmerax the Invincible says that most people think he is a myth and doesn't really exist. Naturally, when you get to the designated spot, he shows up. Subverted in that the quest-giver is quite surprised that you actually managed to find and kill Crawmerax since [[spoiler:he made the whole thing up off the top of his head [[{{Troll}} just to mess with people]].]]
* Funny subversion in ''Videogame/LufiaCurseOfTheSinistrals'' remake. At one point you're sent to find the legendary sword, which the legends claim to have been forged by the gods and able to cut mountains in half. Just one line after that you're informed that all of that is just legend, and the sword itself is probably not even magical, but that you should get it just to boost the morale of the people. It turns our that the myth ''really wasn't'' true... but the sword is still good enough to be useful by the time you get to it.
* In ''Star Wars: VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', you can learn about the creations myths of the Selkath and the Tusken Raiders. It turns out that both are true and are references to the Rakata, the creators of the Star Maps.
* In the Human Noble Origin of ''[[VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins Dragon Age: Origins]]'', your old nanny, if prompted, will tell you the bedtime story of Hohaku, the Dog That Bit--a famous warhound that grows up arrogant and prideful, treating others like dirt and stealing their food, while striving to be chosen by its owner's son. When the owner's son chooses another hound instead, a furious Hohaku lunges for an attack and gets killed for his trouble. The correct moral Nan wants you to take away from the story is "Respect all equally". [[spoiler: Three guesses as to what [[Main/FalseFriend Arl Howe]] [[Main/DoomedHometown does to Bryce Cousland and his castle of Highever that evening]].]]
* In ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' Adventurer Mode, if someone talks to you about [[OurDragonsAreDifferent some dragon who razed his hometown long time ago]] or a forest where [[OurZombiesAreDifferent the dead are said to rise and stalk the living]], you can be absolutely sure he's telling the unvarnished truth. The only exception to this trope are centaurs, chimeras, and griffons, who sometimes appear on engravings but don't exist in the game world... yet. What's more, the stories will be told with impeccable detail. A thousand years on, everybody in the world still remembers which particular tooth was knocked out of the mouth of a random peasant by a marauding Bronze Colossus.
* In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'', the intro cut scene with the story of the hero of legend and the kingdom of Hyrule turns out to be entirely relevant to the storyline, and last part of the game mainly takes place in the now flooded kingdom. Similarly, all those rumours about the 'triumph forks' turn out to be about the Triforce of Courage that Link finds in the endgame.
* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' plays with this trope, in that the particulars of a certain historical event relevant to the main plot of the game are [[TheRashomon recounted differently by different parties]].
** Played with humorously in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' where Sheogorath asks you (or you ask yourself if you've become Sheogorath) to fulfil a prophecy a small village has about the end of the world that includes attacks by rats and ''FLAMING DOGS DROPPING FROM THE SKY''. The prophecy is used as little more than a prank.
* Some of the local legends recounted to the protagonists of ''VideoGame/ChronoCross'' are correct but... slightly skewed.
* The entire story/legend of the Zeekeeper in VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam. You see a ton of exhibits and signs talking about an ancient guardian of the kingdom that saved it from harm, and well, you should probably have figured out pretty quickly that said figure turns out to be a very important character in the storyline and that he helps you take down the BigBad.
* In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance]]'', the heroes learn that a medallion holds a [[SealedEvilInACan dark god]] who will bring TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt if freed, and it can be freed by MagicMusic or a huge war. The fact that certain people can become mindless berserkers by wielding the relic reinforces this belief. But in the sequel, ''Radiant Dawn'' it turns out to be a lie spread by the Dragon Laguz king in vain hopes that it'll prevent war between everyone in Tellius. In truth, endless war will actually awaken the goddess Ashera, who will see the wars as a sign that those living in Tellius are failures, and must be purged away to allow for a perfect world.
* In ''VideoGame/JaysJourney'', there's a subversion and a straight example. The opening crawl tells a story from the past that [[BaitAndSwitchCredits has nothing to do with the rest of the game]]. However, later in the game, Pixie tells the heroes about how the apparent BigBad, Antignarot, inadvertently got his powers from a demon named Xanabas. Xanabas later becomes a major villain and the FinalBoss.
* In ''VideoGame/KingdomOfParadise'', there is "The Forbidden Poem", which got its name because people feared that learning or reciting the poem would bring disaster. It is a beautiful poem. But the poem is about the existence of the Celestial Twins[[spoiler: and their role in opening the Toshintetsu and the gate to Seima.]]
[[/folder]]




[[folder:Video Games]]

* The GameBoy game ''Final Fantasy Legend II'' (''VideoGame/{{SaGa 2}}'' in Japan) avoids this. One world your characters explore has a myth that turns out to be true and another myth that turns out to be false. [[spoiler:Also, there are actually 78 "MAGI", not just 77 as mentioned at the beginning of the game.]]
* In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'', Professor Frankly encounters conflicting theories on the nature of the treasure he's looking for.
** Eventually one of the theories turns out to be true: the treasure is an [[spoiler: ancient demon. But later it is revealed that the 'real' treasure was a Dried Shroom, the weakest healing item in the game.]]
** Which really isn't very surprising when you consider it was rotting for the past thousand years.
** In the same district of Rogueport that Frankly's house is located in, you can find a quirky storyteller who is glad to spin all sorts of old stories. But that tale about the horrible evil monster and the four heroes who fought it before being themselves sealed away couldn't be true, right? [[spoiler:Of course it is. The monster is a demon sleeping underneath Rogueport ''right now'' and Mario actually encounters each of the heroes in the form of talking cursed treasure chests. They're pretty nice.]]
* In the ''VideoGame/ShadowHearts'' series all myths are true, though very often in ridiculous, bizarre and over the top ways.
* In pretty much all the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games, if you talk to any random NPC who tells you about some legend, the legend is bound to be true. Hidden magical weapons? Yup. Super-powered monsters? Yup. Maze-like hidden cities? Yup.
* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', there are TheSevenMysteries of Twilight Town, urban legends which invariably turn out to be for real when Roxas investigates (and serve as clues to the nature of the world he's been living in). But when Roxas's friends come along to do the write-up, they assume each was just a misunderstanding of something mundane.
* Bungie's ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' series contains an interesting example. The second game has a ''single terminal'' midway through the game that references a S'pht creation myth where the god Yrro flung a chaotic being into the star that Lh'owon orbits. This terminal is never mentioned by any character for the remainder of the game. The myth then forms the ''entire plot'' of the third game, ''Marathon Infinity'' -- sure enough, the [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien Jjaro (or Yrro)]] trapped an EldritchAbomination [[SealedEvilInACan inside the system's star]]. Which the Pfhor destroyed in the finale of the second game.
* In ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', any myth or legend you hear about from an NPC is almost guaranteed to be a hint as to where to find a particular Legendary pokemon.
* A set of daily quests in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has you investigate myths about three maidens who will grant powerful swords if you do each a favor. Naturally, all three of them turn out to be true.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'', the person who sends you to kill Crawmerax the Invincible says that most people think he is a myth and doesn't really exist. Naturally, when you get to the designated spot, he shows up. Subverted in that the quest-giver is quite surprised that you actually managed to find and kill Crawmerax since [[spoiler:he made the whole thing up off the top of his head [[{{Troll}} just to mess with people]].]]
* Funny subversion in ''Videogame/LufiaCurseOfTheSinistrals'' remake. At one point you're sent to find the legendary sword, which the legends claim to have been forged by the gods and able to cut mountains in half. Just one line after that you're informed that all of that is just legend, and the sword itself is probably not even magical, but that you should get it just to boost the morale of the people. It turns our that the myth ''really wasn't'' true... but the sword is still good enough to be useful by the time you get to it.
* In ''Star Wars: VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', you can learn about the creations myths of the Selkath and the Tusken Raiders. It turns out that both are true and are references to the Rakata, the creators of the Star Maps.
* In the Human Noble Origin of ''[[VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins Dragon Age: Origins]]'', your old nanny, if prompted, will tell you the bedtime story of Hohaku, the Dog That Bit--a famous warhound that grows up arrogant and prideful, treating others like dirt and stealing their food, while striving to be chosen by its owner's son. When the owner's son chooses another hound instead, a furious Hohaku lunges for an attack and gets killed for his trouble. The correct moral Nan wants you to take away from the story is "Respect all equally". [[spoiler: Three guesses as to what [[Main/FalseFriend Arl Howe]] [[Main/DoomedHometown does to Bryce Cousland and his castle of Highever that evening]].]]
* In ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' Adventurer Mode, if someone talks to you about [[OurDragonsAreDifferent some dragon who razed his hometown long time ago]] or a forest where [[OurZombiesAreDifferent the dead are said to rise and stalk the living]], you can be absolutely sure he's telling the unvarnished truth. The only exception to this trope are centaurs, chimeras, and griffons, who sometimes appear on engravings but don't exist in the game world... yet. What's more, the stories will be told with impeccable detail. A thousand years on, everybody in the world still remembers which particular tooth was knocked out of the mouth of a random peasant by a marauding Bronze Colossus.
* In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'', the intro cut scene with the story of the hero of legend and the kingdom of Hyrule turns out to be entirely relevant to the storyline, and last part of the game mainly takes place in the now flooded kingdom. Similarly, all those rumours about the 'triumph forks' turn out to be about the Triforce of Courage that Link finds in the endgame.
* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' plays with this trope, in that the particulars of a certain historical event relevant to the main plot of the game are [[TheRashomon recounted differently by different parties]].
** Played with humorously in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' where Sheogorath asks you (or you ask yourself if you've become Sheogorath) to fulfil a prophecy a small village has about the end of the world that includes attacks by rats and ''FLAMING DOGS DROPPING FROM THE SKY''. The prophecy is used as little more than a prank.
* Some of the local legends recounted to the protagonists of ''VideoGame/ChronoCross'' are correct but... slightly skewed.
* The entire story/legend of the Zeekeeper in VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam. You see a ton of exhibits and signs talking about an ancient guardian of the kingdom that saved it from harm, and well, you should probably have figured out pretty quickly that said figure turns out to be a very important character in the storyline and that he helps you take down the BigBad.
* In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance]]'', the heroes learn that a medallion holds a [[SealedEvilInACan dark god]] who will bring TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt if freed, and it can be freed by MagicMusic or a huge war. The fact that certain people can become mindless berserkers by wielding the relic reinforces this belief. But in the sequel, ''Radiant Dawn'' it turns out to be a lie spread by the Dragon Laguz king in vain hopes that it'll prevent war between everyone in Tellius. In truth, endless war will actually awaken the goddess Ashera, who will see the wars as a sign that those living in Tellius are failures, and must be purged away to allow for a perfect world.
* In ''VideoGame/JaysJourney'', there's a subversion and a straight example. The opening crawl tells a story from the past that [[BaitAndSwitchCredits has nothing to do with the rest of the game]]. However, later in the game, Pixie tells the heroes about how the apparent BigBad, Antignarot, inadvertently got his powers from a demon named Xanabas. Xanabas later becomes a major villain and the FinalBoss.
* In ''VideoGame/KingdomOfParadise'', there is "The Forbidden Poem", which got its name because people feared that learning or reciting the poem would bring disaster. It is a beautiful poem. But the poem is about the existence of the Celestial Twins[[spoiler: and their role in opening the Toshintetsu and the gate to Seima.]]
[[/folder]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheLegendOfChekhov