History Main / TheGreatPoliticsMessUp

18th Jun '16 11:02:51 PM rjd1922
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* The original arcade edition of ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII'' was released less than a year before the fall of the Soviet Union and had one of its fighters, namely Zangief, as a Soviet representative. His ending sequence even features Mikhail Gorbachev, who is helicoptered in to congratulate him on his victory, espousing the greatness of the "Soviet spirit". Despite subsequent editions of the game being released after the fall of the Soviet Union, Zangief's nationality and ending remained unchanged, although the SNES and Genesis ports attempted to somewhat fix that by having Zangief address Gorbachev as "Mr. Ex-President". This was [[JustifiedTrope justified]] in the [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Alpha]] series, which took place chronologically before Street Fighter II, but other games don't have this excuse. It wasn't until ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' that Zangief's nationality was officially changed to Russian. To make it even less consistent, ''Hyper Street Fighter II'', released in 2004, changed the flag of Hong Kong from its earlier British colonial flag to its current five petal design while keeping Zangief's Soviet nationality. And Hong Kong was under British control for the entire history of the Soviet Union!

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* The original arcade edition of ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII'' was released less than a year before the fall of the Soviet Union and had one of its fighters, namely Zangief, as a Soviet representative. His ending sequence even features Mikhail Gorbachev, who is helicoptered in to congratulate him on his victory, espousing the greatness of the "Soviet spirit". Despite subsequent editions of the game being released after the fall of the Soviet Union, Zangief's nationality and ending remained unchanged, although the SNES and Genesis ports attempted to somewhat fix that by having Zangief address Gorbachev as "Mr. Ex-President". This was [[JustifiedTrope justified]] in the [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Alpha]] series, which took place chronologically before Street ''Street Fighter II, II'', but other games don't have this excuse. It wasn't until ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' that Zangief's nationality was officially changed to Russian. To make it even less consistent, ''Hyper Street Fighter II'', released in 2004, changed the flag of Hong Kong from its earlier British colonial flag to its current five petal design while keeping Zangief's Soviet nationality. And Hong Kong was under British control for the entire history of the Soviet Union!



* In ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'', Rumble [=McSkirmish=], a character from a Videogame/StreetFighterII parody brought to the real world orders Dipper to take him to the Soviet Union, who responds how that's going to be difficult for a number of reasons.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'', Rumble [=McSkirmish=], a character from a Videogame/StreetFighterII ''Videogame/StreetFighterII'' parody brought to the real world orders Dipper to take him to the Soviet Union, who responds how that's going to be difficult for a number of reasons.



* UsefulNotes/{{Bonn}} was 'temporarily' [[UsefulNotes/TheBonnRepublic the capital city]] of UsefulNotes/WestGermany for 41 years. Not wanting to name somewhere bigger and admit that East Berlin was lost, West Germany became used to Bonn's "provisional" status. After German reunification, only a small majority of the [[PoliticalSystemOfGermany Bundestag (parliament)]] voted to move the seat of government back to Berlin.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Bonn}} was 'temporarily' [[UsefulNotes/TheBonnRepublic the capital city]] of UsefulNotes/WestGermany for 41 years. Not wanting to name somewhere bigger and admit that East Berlin was lost, West Germany became used to Bonn's "provisional" status. After German reunification, only a small majority of the [[PoliticalSystemOfGermany [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalSystemOfGermany Bundestag (parliament)]] voted to move the seat of government back to Berlin.



* When apartheid ended in South Africa, the attitude of western governments towards the ANC flipped rather abruptly. Perhaps the best way to underscore this is the fact that the U.S. government didn't get around to taking Nelson Mandela's name off of a terrorist watch list until 2008. Prior to that, he had to be granted a special waiver to visit the United States.

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* When apartheid ended in South Africa, UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica, the attitude of western governments towards the ANC flipped rather abruptly. Perhaps the best way to underscore this is the fact that the U.S. government didn't get around to taking Nelson Mandela's name off of a terrorist watch list until 2008. Prior to that, he had to be granted a special waiver to visit the United States.
11th Jun '16 7:15:21 AM galanx
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*In the 1965 novel "The Star Fox" by Poul Anderson, there's a reference to the Russian Republic, which is also noted as being 'amiably inept'. (Poul Anderson was a noted anti-communist).
26th Apr '16 12:34:19 AM TrollBrutal
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* ''Film/OHomemdaCapaPreta'': Brazilian politics from the time messed up all concepts of left and right. In the first half of the movie, the Getulists who plot to kill Tenório use an assassin which worked with them killing and probably torturing leftists during Estado Novo, because Tenório is a populist who hinders them from getting valuable land taken away from the local slum-folk, after Getúlio returns to power through popular election. Then the former Getulists become right-wing militarists, and Tenório, losing popularity to both elitist right-wing and radical left-wing politicians, aligns himself with the neo-Getulists, who are populist leftists which want to assert Brazilian economic independence. Tenório is then defeated by his former allies together with his former enemies.
25th Apr '16 8:59:16 PM nicolasvladimir
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Added DiffLines:

*''Film/OHomemdaCapaPreta'': Brazilian politics from the time messed up all concepts of left and right. In the first half of the movie, the Getulists who plot to kill Tenório use an assassin which worked with them killing and probably torturing leftists during Estado Novo, because Tenório is a populist who hinders them from getting valuable land taken away from the local slum-folk, after Getúlio returns to power through popular election. Then the former Getulists become right-wing militarists, and Tenório, losing popularity to both elitist right-wing and radical left-wing politicians, aligns himself with the neo-Getulists, who are populist leftists which want to assert Brazilian economic independence. Tenório is then defeated by his former allies together with his former enemies.
16th Mar '16 12:34:52 PM Jhonny
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** Ironically much of the "provisional" government buildings in Bonn ''were'' being replaced in the 1980s, after everybody had accepted that the partition of Germany would be forever and they just might as well build decent government buildings if they had to stay in Bonn. German unity was actually debated in a former water distribution plant while a new parliament was being built. Some ministers still have their official seat of office in Bonn and most of the others have an official secondary seat there. Some other former government buildings have been given to international organizations and still most of the "shiny new" buildings from the 1980s sit empty today.
5th Mar '16 9:57:32 AM Morgenthaler
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* The book ''2061'' not only has the Soviet Union still around, it has South African apartheid continue until the 2030s, when it is destroyed by a violent revolution that scatters the Afrikaners across the Earth and Solar System. They more or less become the new Jews.
* The ''2001'' series had a sort-of double mess-up. In the first book (and movie), though the USSR is still around, it and the US are cooperating and have friendly relations (as shown by Floyd chatting casually with Soviet citizens, who are also clearly friends, on the space station. They even inform each other that they're always welcome to come by to visit ''whenever they just happen to be in each other's countries''). When Clarke wrote ''2010'' (in 1982) it was obvious the real-world US and USSR were not quite being so friendly, so he decided that there should be conflict between the Soviet and American astronauts because of their respective countries' rivalry (though not as blatant as in the film, where the two countries are at the brink of war). Of course, fast forward to the ''real'' year 2001, where Soviet Union is gone, the US is supreme, and where, in fact, Russia and the US ''are building a joint space station'', though not one as big and fancy as the one in the book.


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* ''Literature/TheSpaceOdysseySeries'':
** The book ''2061'' not only has the Soviet Union still around, it has South African apartheid continue until the 2030s, when it is destroyed by a violent revolution that scatters the Afrikaners across the Earth and Solar System. They more or less become the new Jews.
** The ''2001'' series had a sort-of double mess-up. In the first book (and movie), though the USSR is still around, it and the US are cooperating and have friendly relations (as shown by Floyd chatting casually with Soviet citizens, who are also clearly friends, on the space station. They even inform each other that they're always welcome to come by to visit ''whenever they just happen to be in each other's countries''). When Clarke wrote ''2010'' (in 1982) it was obvious the real-world US and USSR were not quite being so friendly, so he decided that there should be conflict between the Soviet and American astronauts because of their respective countries' rivalry (though not as blatant as in the film, where the two countries are at the brink of war). Of course, fast forward to the ''real'' year 2001, where Soviet Union is gone, the US is supreme, and where, in fact, Russia and the US ''are building a joint space station'', though not one as big and fancy as the one in the book.
5th Mar '16 9:56:07 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/RoboCop1987'', set at some unclear future date after 1987, implies that the UsefulNotes/ColdWar is still going on, with references to SDI and the MX missile. The latter, which became the Peacekeeper, has now been scrapped.
** References are also made to the South African apartheid government which is not only still in power, but actively threatening to deploy a NeutronBomb against insurgents, thus promoting them from racist assholes to cartoonish supervillains (although, in RealLife, they did have nukes).

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* ''Film/RoboCop1987'', set at some unclear future date after 1987, implies that the UsefulNotes/ColdWar is still going on, with references to SDI and the MX missile. The latter, which became the Peacekeeper, has now been scrapped.
**
scrapped. References are also made to the South African apartheid government which is not only still in power, but actively threatening to deploy a NeutronBomb against insurgents, thus promoting them from racist assholes to cartoonish supervillains (although, in RealLife, they did have nukes).



** Note that even during the 1880s, the word "communism" was still obscure. "Socialism", "social democracy" and "populism" were the political boogeymen of the day.



* The second episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' featured the ''SS Tsiolkovsky'' whose dedication plaque reveals that it was built and launched in the USSR in 2363.
** Chekov mentioned Leningrad in two separate episodes of ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and, unlike the ''Trek'' example above in film, both are clearly references to the city. On the plus side, Chekov always referred to his homeland as "Russia", never uttering the words "Soviet Union" or "USSR". It's pretty clear that the writers imagined Russia would still be like the Soviet Union in the future (minus the Cold War, of course, since Earth is completely at peace in the twenty-third century), but the fact that they didn't actually call it that makes it easier to HandWave.
** In ''The Next Generation'' episode "The High Ground", Data casually mentions that a series of terrorist attacks lead to the reunification of Ireland into a single state in 2024. At the point the episode was released (1990), a peace treaty was seen as utterly ''inconceivable'', let alone that it would take effect by the end of that decade. Of course, reunification in full has still not happened, and probably won't for as long as the United Kingdom remains; even if such a decision were made, it is unlikely to occur prior to 2024. Incidentally, the reference to Ireland being reunited from terrorism led to this episode being banned on British television for years afterward.
* While not being explicit about it, the ''Series/DoctorWho'' story ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep Warriors of the Deep]]'' (set circa 2084) involves two superpowers armed with nuclear weapons that highly mistrust each other. The Doctor even comments that nothing has changed: "There are still two power blocs, fingers poised to annihilate each other." To make things vaguer, Ingrid Pitt's character has an Eastern European accent (she was born in Poland).

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* The second episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' featured the ''SS Tsiolkovsky'' whose dedication plaque reveals that it was built and launched in the USSR in 2363.
**
Chekov mentioned Leningrad in two separate episodes of ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and, unlike the ''Trek'' example above in film, both are clearly references to the city. On the plus side, Chekov always referred to his homeland as "Russia", never uttering the words "Soviet Union" or "USSR". It's pretty clear that the writers imagined Russia would still be like the Soviet Union in the future (minus the Cold War, of course, since Earth is completely at peace in the twenty-third century), but the fact that they didn't actually call it that makes it easier to HandWave.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'':
** The second episode featured the ''SS Tsiolkovsky'' whose dedication plaque reveals that it was built and launched in the USSR in 2363.
** In ''The Next Generation'' the episode "The High Ground", Data casually mentions that a series of terrorist attacks lead to the reunification of Ireland into a single state in 2024. At the point the episode was released (1990), a peace treaty was seen as utterly ''inconceivable'', let alone that it would take effect by the end of that decade. Of course, reunification in full has still not happened, and probably won't for as long as the United Kingdom remains; even if such a decision were made, it is unlikely to occur prior to 2024. Incidentally, the reference to Ireland being reunited from terrorism led to this episode being banned on British television for years afterward.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
**
While not being explicit about it, the ''Series/DoctorWho'' story ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep Warriors of the Deep]]'' (set circa 2084) involves two superpowers armed with nuclear weapons that highly mistrust each other. The Doctor even comments that nothing has changed: "There are still two power blocs, fingers poised to annihilate each other." To make things vaguer, Ingrid Pitt's character has an Eastern European accent (she was born in Poland).



*** The "end of the Cold War but still USSR" is not too far-fetched considering the gap between the collapse of Eastern European Communist regimes in 1989 and the Soviet Union's formal dissolution on Christmas 1991.
*** It's worth noting, however, that Earth politics in the Doctor Who universe do not coincide with the real world: a woman is prime minister by 1975, and a completely different president elect is featured in a story set in 2008.



* The made-for-TV movie ''Series/{{Amerika}}'' posits a U.S. that was taken over by the Soviet Union and was now Soviet-occupied territory. The reason given in the movie as to why this happens is "[[{{Anvilicious}} American apathy]]."
** To contrast, there is also a novel entitled ''USSA: United Soviet States of America'', which is a murder mystery set in American-occupied Russia.

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* The made-for-TV movie ''Series/{{Amerika}}'' posits a U.S. that was taken over by the Soviet Union and was now Soviet-occupied territory. The reason given in the movie as to why this happens is "[[{{Anvilicious}} American apathy]]."
**
" To contrast, there is also a novel entitled ''USSA: United Soviet States of America'', which is a murder mystery set in American-occupied Russia.
5th Mar '16 9:51:04 AM Morgenthaler
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-->-- ''Film/AustinPowers: International Man of Mystery''

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-->-- ''Film/AustinPowers: International Man of Mystery''
''Film/AustinPowersInternationalManOfMystery''



* Spoofed in ''Film/AustinPowers: International Man of Mystery''. The title character, after being frozen in 1967 and unfrozen in 1997, is shocked at the presence of a Russian intelligence officer. When he is told that the UsefulNotes/ColdWar ended, he initially assumes that the Communists won.

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* Spoofed in ''Film/AustinPowers: International Man of Mystery''.''Film/AustinPowersInternationalManOfMystery''. The title character, after being frozen in 1967 and unfrozen in 1997, is shocked at the presence of a Russian intelligence officer. When he is told that the UsefulNotes/ColdWar ended, he initially assumes that the Communists won.
5th Mar '16 9:49:50 AM Morgenthaler
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* [[Series/TheWestWing Josh Lyman]] gripes at one point after particularly bad political maneuvering, "God, how I miss the Cold War."
5th Mar '16 9:48:25 AM Morgenthaler
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* The made-for-TV movie ''Amerika'' posits a U.S. that was taken over by the Soviet Union and was now Soviet-occupied territory. The reason given in the movie as to why this happens is "[[{{Anvilicious}} American apathy]]."

to:

* The made-for-TV movie ''Amerika'' ''Series/{{Amerika}}'' posits a U.S. that was taken over by the Soviet Union and was now Soviet-occupied territory. The reason given in the movie as to why this happens is "[[{{Anvilicious}} American apathy]]."



* The first episode of ''[[{{Space1999}} Space: 1999]]'' (set in, er, [[CaptainObvious 1999]]) has a news report referring to Yugoslavia. ''Technically'', Serbia and Montenegro still called itself Yugoslavia until 2003 (although they had a hard time getting the rest of the world to do the same), but Yugoslavia as it was known in the 70s ceased to exist in 1992.

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* The first episode of ''[[{{Space1999}} Space: 1999]]'' ''Series/{{Space 1999}}'' (set in, er, [[CaptainObvious 1999]]) has a news report referring to Yugoslavia. ''Technically'', Serbia and Montenegro still called itself Yugoslavia until 2003 (although they had a hard time getting the rest of the world to do the same), but Yugoslavia as it was known in the 70s ceased to exist in 1992.
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