History Main / TheGreatPoliticsMessUp

9th Dec '17 5:15:22 AM ivfl
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** On the other hand he was completely right that the only way for it to happen is if the Soviet Union entered into a terminal collapse.He didn't predict reunification but the correctly assesed what would be needed for reunification to happen.
26th Oct '17 9:45:16 AM DebbieOppenheimer
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Prior to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, it was common to hear experts claiming that [[UsefulNotes/SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn the Soviet Union]] was about to fall in a matter of years. During the first five months of the Soviet-German War, German-Anglo-American experts claimed it would collapse within months, or even weeks! But from the winter of '41-2 onward, experts predicting the imminent demise of the USSR looked progressively sillier (Britain stopped making contingency plans for Soviet collapse in late 1942), and by the war's end the opposite mood had set in. Many claimed the Soviet Union would last forever, or long into the foreseeable future, and maybe even win the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. It was thus assumed that the end of the USSR could only come as part of the general [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt End Of Everything]] -- most likely as a result of [[WorldWarIII nuclear war]]. The (relatively) peaceful self-dismemberment and then suicide which actually took place at the dawn of TheNineties was very much unexpected and [[WhyWeAreBummedCommunismFell was even mourned]].

Ergo, it is rather funny to hear references to the Soviet Union, the Cold War, divided Berlin and divided Germany in SciFi shows set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture but written before 1989. Fortunately, the old habit of [[InsistentTerminology calling the USSR "Russia"]] - either [[OnlyKnownByTheirNickname due to ignorance or convenience]], or laziness, [[{{Troll}} or to annoy them]], [[DivideAndConquer or to emphasize the differences between USSR's ethnic groups and delegitimise the regime]] -- allowed much accidental retroactive averting of this trope. Well, partial aversion at least - most of the countries called "Russia" are still communist, long after our history's 1991.

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Prior to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, it was common to hear experts claiming that [[UsefulNotes/SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn the Soviet Union]] was about to fall in a matter of years. During the first five months of the Soviet-German War, German-Anglo-American experts claimed it would collapse within months, or even weeks! But from the winter of '41-2 onward, experts predicting the imminent demise of the USSR looked progressively sillier (Britain stopped making contingency plans for Soviet collapse in late 1942), and by the war's end the opposite mood had set in. Many claimed the Soviet Union would last forever, or long into the foreseeable future, and maybe even win the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. It was thus assumed that the end of the USSR could only come as part of the general [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt End Of Everything]] -- most likely as a result of [[WorldWarIII nuclear war]]. The (relatively) peaceful self-dismemberment and then suicide end which actually took place at the dawn of TheNineties was very much unexpected and [[WhyWeAreBummedCommunismFell was even mourned]].

Ergo, it is rather funny to hear references to the Soviet Union, the Cold War, divided Berlin and divided Germany in SciFi shows any genre of fiction set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture but written before 1989. Fortunately, the old habit of [[InsistentTerminology calling the USSR "Russia"]] - either [[OnlyKnownByTheirNickname due to ignorance or convenience]], or laziness, [[{{Troll}} or to annoy them]], [[DivideAndConquer or to emphasize the differences between USSR's ethnic groups and delegitimise the regime]] -- allowed much accidental retroactive averting of this trope. Well, partial aversion at least - most of the countries called "Russia" are still communist, long after our history's 1991.
18th Oct '17 3:47:41 PM Breakerchase
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* ''VideoGame/{{Harpoon}}'' was around ''before'' the Soviet Union collapsed. After it happened, there was a big scramble to create new scenarios that weren't obsolete. Of course, since it was a simulation the existing ones were still developed.
* ''VideoGame/{{Aerobiz}}'': The second entry in the series predicted supersonic airliners and 1000+ passenger super-jumbo jets in the 2000's, missing the large scale move from regular airliners to smaller, more fuel-efficient Regional Jets for most small and medium-sized routes. It also failed to portray a large number of very prominent cities that cropped up in the late 1990's & early 2000's, such as Dubai, and the terrible economic impact that the 2000's would have on airlines around the world.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Harpoon}}'' was around ''before'' released in 1989 and one expansion pack assumed that the Soviet Union collapsed. would still exist in 1996. After it happened, the USSR's collapse, there was a big scramble to create new scenarios that weren't obsolete. Of course, since it was a simulation the existing ones were still developed.
* ''VideoGame/{{Aerobiz}}'': The second entry in the series predicted supersonic airliners and 1000+ passenger super-jumbo jets in the 2000's, 2000s, missing the large scale move from regular airliners to smaller, more fuel-efficient Regional Jets for most small and medium-sized routes. It also failed to portray a large number of very prominent cities that cropped up in the late 1990's 1990s & early 2000's, 2000s, such as Dubai, and the terrible economic impact that the 2000's would have on airlines around the world.
6th Oct '17 1:59:06 PM Ma35tro
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* Played straight in ''Film/BladeRunner2049'' as a deliberate attempt to maintain the aesthetic of the first film.
19th Sep '17 11:10:57 PM bjex
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* The plot of ''Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact'' revolves around the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. Although not the book's, which is why a few lines about peace are tacked on to the message at the end of the film.
* ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' also had the Soviet Union around, obviously. Plus a USA-USSR pact opposing China, which is the opposite of what happened in real life, but was plausible in the 1960s when written due to border clashes between China and the Soviet Union (Creator/HunterSThompson was writing about the possibility as late as 1974, although that's partly because of his conviction that UsefulNotes/RichardNixon was the Devil).

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* The plot of ''Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact'' revolves around the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. Although not the book's, which is why a few lines about peace are tacked on to the message at the end of the film.
*
In ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' also had the Soviet Union was certainly around, obviously. Plus evidenced by Dr. Heywood Floyd's meeting with some fellow space scientists from the Soviet side on his way to the Moon. The book also detailed a USA-USSR pact opposing China, which is the opposite of what happened in real life, but was plausible in the 1960s when written due to border clashes between China and the Soviet Union (Creator/HunterSThompson was writing about the possibility as late as 1974, although that's partly because of his conviction that UsefulNotes/RichardNixon was the Devil).Devil).
** By contrast, the plot of ''Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact'' revolves almost entirely around UsefulNotes/ColdWar tensions between the Soviet astronauts piloting the Alexei Leonov and the Americans who need their help to reach [[spoiler: the wreck of the Discovery]]. Although not the book's, which is why a few lines about peace are tacked on to the message at the end of the film.
18th Sep '17 3:09:33 PM GusF
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* In ''{{Series/Moonbase Three}}'', the Soviet Union still exists in 2003. It operates Moonbase 2, one of five lunar outposts (the others being operated by the US, Europe, China and Brazil). Furthermore, in the fifth episode "Castor and Pollux", it is revealed that the Soviets are on the verge of sending a manned mission to Mars and that their long-term goal is to launch a manned orbital flight of Jupiter using Mars as a springboard.
14th Sep '17 8:33:43 PM PaulA
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* The Literature/PlioceneSaga by Creator/JulianMay takes place both in the 21st century and in the Pliocene. The [[UsefulNotes/SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn Soviet Union]] plays a prominent, but peaceful, role in psychic research. The author has had to dodge the Soviet issue in the sequels.

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* The Literature/PlioceneSaga ''Literature/SagaOfTheExiles'' by Creator/JulianMay takes place both in the 21st century and in the Pliocene. The [[UsefulNotes/SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn Soviet Union]] plays a prominent, but peaceful, role in psychic research. The author has had to dodge the Soviet issue in the sequels.
25th Aug '17 6:40:04 PM nombretomado
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** ''Literature/{{Idoru}}'', written in 1996, has Russia transform into a kind of criminal empire run by the TheMafiya, which was a fairly common speculation of Russia's future in the West during the [[TheNewRussia Yeltsin years]].

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** ''Literature/{{Idoru}}'', written in 1996, has Russia transform into a kind of criminal empire run by the TheMafiya, which was a fairly common speculation of Russia's future in the West during the [[TheNewRussia [[UsefulNotes/TheNewRussia Yeltsin years]].
16th Aug '17 1:38:06 AM AnotherDuck
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* UsefulNotes/{{Bonn}} was 'temporarily' [[UsefulNotes/TheBonnRepublic the capital city]] of UsefulNotes/WestGermany for 41 years. Not wanting to name somewhere bigger or admit that West Berlin was too vulnerable to be used, West Germany became used to Bonn's "provisional" status. After German reunification, only a small majority of the [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalSystemOfGermany Bundestag (parliament)]] voted to move the seat of government back to Berlin.
** Ironically much of the "provisional" government buildings in Bonn ''were'' being replaced in the 1980s, after everybody had accepted that the partition of Germany would be forever and they just might as well build decent government buildings if they had to stay in Bonn. German unity was actually debated in a former water distribution plant while a new parliament was being built. Some ministers still have their official seat of office in Bonn and most of the others have an official secondary seat there. Some other former government buildings have been given to international organizations and still most of the "shiny new" buildings from the 1980s sit empty today.
** Part of reticence to move the capital back to Berlin comes from Germans being utterly ''terrified'' of any association with the Nazis [[NeverLiveItDown For obvious reasons]], even if few outsiders seemed to mind.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Krikalyov Sergei Kirkalyov]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Alexandrovich_Volkov_(cosmonaut) Alexander Volkov]] earned the nickname of "the last Soviet citizens" because they served on the Mir space station while the Soviet Union collapsed, and returned three months later on 25 March 1992. The Mir itself continued to bear Soviet markings for the rest of its operational life, because repainting and remarking something so ultimately inconsequential would have been a waste of money for no real purpose, and the Russian Space Program had very little to spare as it is.
* [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predictions_of_the_dissolution_of_the_Soviet_Union gives us a list of predictions]] of the fall of the U.S.S.R. There were a decent number of predictions in the Cold War era; however, it didn't seem to have much of an effect on pop culture at the time (otherwise, this trope wouldn't have been in effect). And remember that just because someone predicted the U.S.S.R. would fall, that doesn't mean they were right. Many predictions described the Soviet Union ending in ways that were completely different from what eventually happened. Some of the predictions were mutually exclusive (if one was right, the other must have been wrong).
* When the Polish Defensive War of 1939 spun out of control into a [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII much wider conflict]] it instantly tagged 20 years worth of media that referred to The Great War or, even worse, The (singular) World War as being dated and naive. However, people that referred to WWI as the First World War soon after it started were not as prescient as they might seem. Because it was truly the first war that had a global scope, taking place over more than one continent, and involving a lot of different nations.
** World War One has also been referred to as "The War to End All Wars", which is a phrase [[BeamMeUpScotty frequently misattributed to Woodrow Wilson]] and used after World War 2 in an ironic sense to show the apparent naivety of world leaders at the time[[note]]The quote actually comes from an Creator/HGWells book titled ''The War that will End War'' consisting of a collection of newspaper articles he wrote about the war at its outbreak, arguing that the only way to end all wars would be to end German militaristic ambitions[[/note]]. The post-World War 2 usage ignores several historical facts. For starters, very few, if any, world leaders actually believed that this would be "the war to end all wars" (for instance, British staff officer and future viceroy of India Archibald Wavell famously quipped "After the 'war to end war', they seem to have been in Paris at making the 'Peace to end Peace'"), and the statement was ''immediately'' proven wrong. The Russian Civil War was concurrent with this one, and the consequences of the breakup of many of the large European empires started a whole slew of civil conflicts, wars of independence and invasions, such as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish%E2%80%93Soviet_War Polish-Soviet War]] of 1919-21, all of which happened nearly two decades before the next world war.
* For [[http://history1900s.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/soldiersurr.htm some]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_holdout Japanese soldiers]], WWII didn't end until the 1970s.
* In the Balkan countries, several thousand people continue to list their ethnic group as 'Yugoslav' in census forms.
* Ironically, the first line of the Soviet national anthem translates as "an unbreakable union of free republics." Unbreakable, except for that one time.
** Similarly, the Austro-Hungarian Empire's motto was ''Indivisibiliter ac Inseparabiliter'', meaning "Indivisibly and Inseparably". Come WWI, the Austro-Hungarian Empire proved to be quite divisible and separable.
* The Soviet Union had its own Internet domain (".su"), established in the last year of its existence. Yes, the Soviet Union lived just long enough to see the very beginnings of the Internet. After the Russian Federation was founded, ".ru" became its Internet domain. Plans to phase out ".su" have failed and it's now a haven for cybercriminals, due to the lack of regulation.
** Ironically the [[MisaimedFandom cachet of the .su domain]] allows it to be sold at a premium compared to the .ru domain. Lenin would be spinning in his tomb if it wasn't a huge tourist attraction.
** Other former Soviet-era national domains also existed to varying degrees, such as Czechoslovakia (.cs), East Germany (.dd), and Yugoslavia (.yu). These were successfully discontinued.
** The telephone country codes for East Germany (37) and Yugoslavia (38) were dropped, and codes in the range 370 through 389 assigned to newly independent states, as well as to Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, and the Vatican (which in practice remains phonewise a part of Rome). Czechoslovakia's code (42) was later split (420, 421 plus 423 for Liechtenstein).
* When apartheid ended in UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica, the attitude of western governments towards the ANC flipped rather abruptly. Perhaps the best way to underscore this is the fact that the U.S. government didn't get around to taking Nelson Mandela's name off of a terrorist watch list until 2008. Prior to that, he had to be granted a special waiver to visit the United States.

to:

* UsefulNotes/{{Bonn}} was 'temporarily' [[UsefulNotes/TheBonnRepublic the capital city]] of UsefulNotes/WestGermany for 41 years. Not wanting to name somewhere bigger or admit that West Berlin was too vulnerable to be used, West Germany became used to Bonn's "provisional" status. After German reunification, only a small majority of the [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalSystemOfGermany Bundestag (parliament)]] voted to move the seat of government back to Berlin.
** Ironically much
Much of the "provisional" government buildings in Bonn ''were'' were being replaced in the 1980s, after everybody had accepted that the partition of Germany would be forever and they just might as well build decent government buildings if they had to stay in Bonn. German unity was actually debated in a former water distribution plant while a new parliament was being built. Some ministers still have their official seat of office in Bonn and most of the others have an official secondary seat there. Some other former government buildings have been given to international organizations and still most of the "shiny new" buildings from the 1980s sit empty today.
** Part of reticence to move the capital back to Berlin comes from Germans being utterly ''terrified'' of any association with the Nazis [[NeverLiveItDown For obvious reasons]], even if few outsiders seemed to mind.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Krikalyov Sergei Kirkalyov]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Alexandrovich_Volkov_(cosmonaut) Alexander Volkov]] earned the nickname of "the last Soviet citizens" because they served on the Mir space station while the Soviet Union collapsed, and returned three months later on 25 March 1992. The Mir itself continued to bear Soviet markings for the rest of its operational life, because repainting and remarking something so ultimately inconsequential would have been a waste of money for no real purpose, and the Russian Space Program had very little to spare as it is.
* [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predictions_of_the_dissolution_of_the_Soviet_Union gives us a list of predictions]] of the fall of the U.S.S.R. There were a decent number of predictions in the Cold War era; however, it didn't seem to have much of an effect on pop culture at the time (otherwise, this trope wouldn't have been in effect). And remember that just because someone predicted the U.S.S.R. would fall, that doesn't mean they were right. Many predictions described the Soviet Union ending in ways that were completely different from what eventually happened. Some of the predictions were mutually exclusive (if one was right, the other must have been wrong).
* When the Polish Defensive War of 1939 spun out of control into a [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII much wider conflict]] it instantly tagged 20 years worth of media that referred to The Great War or, even worse, The (singular) World War as being dated and naive. However, people that referred to WWI as the First World War soon after it started were not as prescient as they might seem. Because it was truly the first war that had a global scope, taking place over more than one continent, and involving a lot of different nations.
** World War One has also been referred to as "The War to End All Wars", which is a phrase [[BeamMeUpScotty frequently misattributed to Woodrow Wilson]] and used after World War 2 in an ironic sense to show the apparent naivety of world leaders at the time[[note]]The quote actually comes from an Creator/HGWells book titled ''The War that will End War'' consisting of a collection of newspaper articles he wrote about the war at its outbreak, arguing that the only way to end all wars would be to end German militaristic ambitions[[/note]]. The post-World War 2 usage ignores several historical facts. For starters, very few, if any, world leaders actually believed that this would be "the war to end all wars" (for instance, British staff officer and future viceroy of India Archibald Wavell famously quipped "After the 'war to end war', they seem to have been in Paris at making the 'Peace to end Peace'"), and the statement was ''immediately'' proven wrong. The Russian Civil War was concurrent with this one, and the consequences of the breakup of many of the large European empires started a whole slew of civil conflicts, wars of independence and invasions, such as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish%E2%80%93Soviet_War Polish-Soviet War]] of 1919-21, all of which happened nearly two decades before the next world war.
* For [[http://history1900s.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/soldiersurr.htm some]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_holdout Japanese soldiers]], WWII didn't end until the 1970s.
* In the Balkan countries, several thousand people continue to list their ethnic group as 'Yugoslav' in census forms.
* Ironically, the first line of the Soviet national anthem translates as "an unbreakable union of free republics." Unbreakable, except for that one time.
** Similarly, the Austro-Hungarian Empire's motto was ''Indivisibiliter ac Inseparabiliter'', meaning "Indivisibly and Inseparably". Come WWI, the Austro-Hungarian Empire proved to be quite divisible and separable.
* The Soviet Union had its own Internet domain (".su"), established in the last year of its existence. Yes, the Soviet Union lived just long enough to see the very beginnings of the Internet. After the Russian Federation was founded, ".ru" became its Internet domain. Plans to phase out ".su" have failed and it's now a haven for cybercriminals, due to the lack of regulation.
** Ironically the [[MisaimedFandom cachet of the .su domain]] allows it to be sold at a premium compared to the .ru domain. Lenin would be spinning in his tomb if it wasn't a huge tourist attraction.
** Other former Soviet-era national domains also existed to varying degrees, such as Czechoslovakia (.cs), East Germany (.dd), and Yugoslavia (.yu). These were successfully discontinued.
** The telephone country codes for East Germany (37) and Yugoslavia (38) were dropped, and codes in the range 370 through 389 assigned to newly independent states, as well as to Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, and the Vatican (which in practice remains phonewise a part of Rome). Czechoslovakia's code (42) was later split (420, 421 plus 423 for Liechtenstein).
* When apartheid ended in UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica, the attitude of western governments towards the ANC flipped rather abruptly. Perhaps the best way to underscore this is the fact that the U.S. government didn't get around to taking Nelson Mandela's name off of a terrorist watch list until 2008. Prior to that, he had to be granted a special waiver to visit the United States.
today.
16th Aug '17 1:29:05 AM AnotherDuck
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* If you listen to enough political [[TalkShow talk radio]], you'll occasionally hear a caller talk about the dangers of the Soviet Union and Soviet communism in the present tense.
* This can be a weird one for schools with little to no funding. Often you'll walk in and see world maps with the USSR still there in all its timezone-consuming glory, textbooks and encyclopedias long out of date, and so on.
** This is especially weird in Eastern European countries, where according to textbooks and maps, the country you're in may not exist. However, some of the new Eastern European countries were ''very'' quick and eager to print school textbooks emphasizing their countries' glory and (sometimes fake) long and proud history.
** Artistic maps [[note]]As in those built into public spaces for decorative purposes.[[/note]] often feature countries that don't exist anymore because its harder to replace and update them. You ''could'' pry out USSR and add in all the countries it split into or you could just leave it alone and not spend thousands of dollars.



* Due to the frequent changes in political geographical properties worldwide, older maps would be rendered useless and "current" information in encyclopedias would be outdated alongside these maps. This would be an embarrassment for history teachers to remain consistent with current issues regarding their teachings.
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