History Main / SuperRegistrationAct

14th Dec '17 9:07:21 AM SeptimusHeap
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Any law that requires {{Super Hero}}es (or, really, [[DifferentlyPoweredIndividual anyone with superpowers]]) to be registered with the government in a national database (including the name and residence of each hero's SecretIdentity) or face penalties. This [[TropeCodifier was codified]] with the Creator/MarvelComics' ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' in the form of the "Mutant Registration Act", where it provided a [[FantasticRacism metaphor for discussing racial and/or communist themes]]. Since then, it has been used and re-used, often as a metaphor for UsefulNotes/AmericanGunPolitics; after all, ''villains'' don't have to register with a WeirdTradeUnion in order to start robbing banks or [[ChainedToARailway tying women to railroad tracks]], any more than a criminal needs a licensed weapon to commit a crime.

to:

Any law that requires {{Super Hero}}es (or, really, [[DifferentlyPoweredIndividual anyone with superpowers]]) to be registered with the government in a national database (including the name and residence of each hero's SecretIdentity) or face penalties. This [[TropeCodifier was codified]] with the Creator/MarvelComics' ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' ''ComicBook/XMen'' in the form of the "Mutant Registration Act", where it provided a [[FantasticRacism metaphor for discussing racial and/or communist themes]]. Since then, it has been used and re-used, often as a metaphor for UsefulNotes/AmericanGunPolitics; after all, ''villains'' don't have to register with a WeirdTradeUnion in order to start robbing banks or [[ChainedToARailway tying women to railroad tracks]], any more than a criminal needs a licensed weapon to commit a crime.



* The ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' have brought this up as a plot every few years. The terms of the act weren't always consistent but they dealt with the broad idea of mutants being free to use their powers clashing with the need for ordinary humans to be protected from [[PersonsOfMassDestruction dangerous]] and/or [[BadPowersBadPeople evil mutants]]. The debate was almost always [[DebateAndSwitch slanted by anti-mutant bigotry/giant-mutant-hunting robots]]; as in the words of Moira [=McTaggert=]:

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* The ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' ''ComicBook/XMen'' have brought this up as a plot every few years. The terms of the act weren't always consistent but they dealt with the broad idea of mutants being free to use their powers clashing with the need for ordinary humans to be protected from [[PersonsOfMassDestruction dangerous]] and/or [[BadPowersBadPeople evil mutants]]. The debate was almost always [[DebateAndSwitch slanted by anti-mutant bigotry/giant-mutant-hunting robots]]; as in the words of Moira [=McTaggert=]:
9th Dec '17 6:47:38 PM Zuxtron
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* Used as part of the setting of the anime/manga ''Manga/ZettaiKarenChildren''. Schools regularly scan students for psychic powers and give mandatory psychic power suppressing limiters to those who have them (which marks them as espers to the general populace, who often discriminate against them). For the people too powerful to be completely limited, it is illegal for them to attend school unless they're part of a military organization that guarantees that they're under control. Presumably this extends to adult society as well, although it's never shown. Unlike the other examples, registration is portrayed as a good thing, or at least as the best compromise that can be achieved when there's both humans and espers advocating genocide.
** Espers with future predicting powers have predicted that this will directly cause the downfall of humanity, by inciting a muggle vs esper civil war (which the espers will win, by destroying everything). A major ongoing plot is whether it can be averted via positive relationships between the main characters (the 3 strongest espers and their muggle "handler")
* The Super Registration Act has been implemented in the ''Anime/TigerAndBunny'' universe for at least several decades and generally works without a hitch. The Justice Bureau approves all heroes and allows them to sign up with a sponsor company and serve as private law enforcement/celebrities (technically, it's possible to be a free agent without a sponsor, but it's almost unheard of). While only NEXT have been shown to be active as heroes, presumably anyone without a criminal record has the opportunity to become one. Any hero under investigation for criminal behavior is suspended until they're cleared of all charges. Damages are handled either by the sponsor company or, if a judge rules that property damage was necessary in order for a hero to do their job properly, by the state.
** It appears more reasonable than others, but the execution is marred by [[spoiler: the very influential (the Mayor seems unwilling/unable to disagree with him) Maverick's collusion with Ouroborus to 'promote' [=NEXTs=] as superheroes, and the fact the [[HangingJudge judge]] that oversees hero-related cases is himself secretly a vigilante and [[SerialKillerKiller killer]].]]

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* Used as part of the setting of the anime/manga ''Manga/ZettaiKarenChildren''. Schools regularly scan students for psychic powers and give mandatory psychic power suppressing limiters to those who have them (which marks them as espers to the general populace, who often discriminate against them). For the people too powerful to be completely limited, it is illegal for them to attend school unless they're part of a military organization that guarantees that they're under control. Presumably this extends to adult society as well, although it's never shown. Unlike the other examples, registration is portrayed as a good thing, or at least as the best compromise that can be achieved when there's both humans and espers advocating genocide.
**
genocide. Espers with future predicting powers have predicted that this will directly cause the downfall of humanity, by inciting a muggle vs esper civil war (which the espers will win, by destroying everything). A major ongoing plot is whether it can be averted via positive relationships between the main characters (the 3 strongest espers and their muggle "handler")
* The Super Registration Act has been implemented in the ''Anime/TigerAndBunny'' universe for at least several decades and generally works without a hitch. The Justice Bureau approves all heroes and allows them to sign up with a sponsor company and serve as private law enforcement/celebrities (technically, it's possible to be a free agent without a sponsor, but it's almost unheard of). While only NEXT have been shown to be active as heroes, presumably anyone without a criminal record has the opportunity to become one. Any hero under investigation for criminal behavior is suspended until they're cleared of all charges. Damages are handled either by the sponsor company or, if a judge rules that property damage was necessary in order for a hero to do their job properly, by the state.
** It appears more reasonable than others, but
state. However, the execution is marred by [[spoiler: the very influential (the Mayor seems unwilling/unable to disagree with him) Maverick's collusion with Ouroborus to 'promote' [=NEXTs=] as superheroes, and the fact the [[HangingJudge judge]] that oversees hero-related cases is himself secretly a vigilante and [[SerialKillerKiller killer]].]]



* Subversion in ''Manga/OnePunchMan''. Supers are not ''required'' to register, but unregistered heroes are not taken seriously by the general public. The titular character starts out as a "hero for fun" who was blissfully unaware that registration was even a thing (somehow) and does not start receiving any form of public recognition for his acts of heroism until well after he has already prevented several potentially city-destroying incidents.
** The registration system in play is often shown to be ludicrously wrongheaded despite the good intentions of those in charge. Many registered supers are [[NominalHero Nominal Heroes]] at best; with the top ranking heroes including a MadScientist who is only interested in testing out his latest inventions (and who never appears in person, using remote-controlled robots to fight for him), a {{Bishounen}} actor/singer/model who would rather promote himself than save people, and countless others who are only looking to improve their rankings and will actively attempt to sabotage or defame others to get ahead.
* ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia'' Uses a fully functioning type-D. Incentives are offered to supers at every turn, and there are multiple [[SuperHeroSchool schools]] that train potential heroes to use their abilities to save people.
** Of course, [[EveryoneIsASuper when approximately 80% of the entire human race]] has some sort of super-power, it's no wonder this program works so smoothly.
** Furthermore, it's spin-off series (taking place years before the main one), ''Manga/VigilanteMyHeroAcademiaIllegals'', focuses on unregistered vigilantes. The main protagonist, Kouichi Haimawari, actually applied to the heroing school, but ended up unable to enter, ironically [[spoiler: because he was late for it because he was saving someone else's life.]] While he still does its best, it's clear that being unregistered has its downsides.
*** The big example is when he meets Tensei Iida, Tenya's older brother. The two hit off splendidly, with the latter helping the former better utilize his sliding Quirk and even offers him a card for a potential job at his organization. However, things change when he realizes Kouichi is a Vigiliante when he helps stop a villin. While Tensei is more than happy for the help and doesn't report him, he ends up asking for the card back since he can't endorse what is essentially a lawbreaker, much to Kouichi's dismay.

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* Subversion in ''Manga/OnePunchMan''. Supers are not ''required'' to register, but unregistered heroes are not taken seriously by the general public. The titular character starts out as a "hero for fun" who was blissfully unaware that registration was even a thing (somehow) and does not start receiving any form of public recognition for his acts of heroism until well after he has already prevented several potentially city-destroying incidents.
**
incidents. The registration system in play is often shown to be ludicrously wrongheaded despite the good intentions of those in charge. Many registered supers are [[NominalHero Nominal Heroes]] at best; with the top ranking heroes including a MadScientist who is only interested in testing out his latest inventions (and who never appears in person, using remote-controlled robots to fight for him), a {{Bishounen}} actor/singer/model who would rather promote himself than save people, and countless others who are only looking to improve their rankings and will actively attempt to sabotage or defame others to get ahead.
* ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia'' Uses ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia'':
** The series uses
a fully functioning type-D. Incentives are offered to supers at every turn, and there are multiple [[SuperHeroSchool schools]] that train potential heroes to use their abilities to save people.
**
people. Of course, [[EveryoneIsASuper when approximately 80% of the entire human race]] has some sort of super-power, it's no wonder this program works so smoothly.
** Furthermore, it's its spin-off series (taking place years before the main one), ''Manga/VigilanteMyHeroAcademiaIllegals'', focuses on unregistered vigilantes. The main protagonist, Kouichi Haimawari, actually applied to the heroing school, but ended up unable to enter, ironically [[spoiler: because he was late for it because he was saving someone else's life.]] While he still does its best, it's clear that being unregistered has its downsides. \n*** The big example is when he meets Tensei Iida, Tenya's older brother. The two hit off splendidly, with the latter helping the former better utilize his sliding Quirk and even offers him a card for a potential job at his organization. However, things change when he realizes Kouichi is a Vigiliante Vigilante when he helps stop a villin.villain. While Tensei is more than happy for the help and doesn't report him, he ends up asking for the card back since he can't endorse what is essentially a lawbreaker, much to Kouichi's dismay.



** Another big problem with ''ComicBook/CivilWar'', that again varied between writers, was the pro-reg side being led by people who actually had means to make normal law enforcement and military agencies less than near-helpless against metahuman criminals and de-facto private armies (never mind the diverse array of alien, extradimensional and time-travelling conquerors threatening the Earth), which meant not requiring dangerous experiments on people or production of notoriously difficult to control robots, [[ReedRichardsIsUseless but pointedly refusing to do so]].
*** The least strict interpretation was that you didn't have to register at all if you didn't plan on fighting crime or using your powers; otherwise, you had to register and possibly submit to some basic safety training (like gun safety training but for superpowers), but as mentioned, many other comics showed SHIELD agents bursting into people's homes at midnight and conscripting them by force. It also didn't help that writers couldn't even agree on the scope of the act's jurisdiction, as some issues showed SHIELD troops arresting Silverclaw, who, as she pointed out in the scene, was a Brazilian citizen, and also Black Panther, who's not only not an American but a head of state. He, at least, was able to invoke DiplomaticImpunity.

to:

** Another big problem with ''ComicBook/CivilWar'', that again varied between writers, was the pro-reg side being led by people who actually had means to make normal law enforcement and military agencies less than near-helpless against metahuman criminals and de-facto private armies (never mind the diverse array of alien, extradimensional and time-travelling conquerors threatening the Earth), which meant not requiring dangerous experiments on people or production of notoriously difficult to control robots, [[ReedRichardsIsUseless but pointedly refusing to do so]].
***
so]]. The least strict interpretation was that you didn't have to register at all if you didn't plan on fighting crime or using your powers; otherwise, you had to register and possibly submit to some basic safety training (like gun safety training but for superpowers), but as mentioned, many other comics showed SHIELD agents bursting into people's homes at midnight and conscripting them by force. It also didn't help that writers couldn't even agree on the scope of the act's jurisdiction, as some issues showed SHIELD troops arresting Silverclaw, who, as she pointed out in the scene, was a Brazilian citizen, and also Black Panther, who's not only not an American but a head of state. He, at least, was able to invoke DiplomaticImpunity.



* In the critically acclaimed series ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', the rise of costumed vigilantes in the '30s resulted in Congressional legislation authorizing superhero activities - which was repealed in TheSeventies after fed-up police went on strike nationwide and mass rioting ensued. After the "Keene Act" is passed, the only superheroes permitted to ply their trade legally are those who work full-time for the government, including the world's only genuine superhuman.
** The Minutemen also faced the House Un-American Activities Committee. They came up with a compromise to the request to identify themselves to the committee: Each member was to reveal their identity to ''one'' member of the Committee. That member was to put their name into the enormous stack of names they wanted the FBI to do a background check on without any flags reading 'this person is <Superhero name>'. Then they would speak to the committee as a whole in their costumed persona. As a result, the heroes were investigated in their true identities, while limiting the number of people who knew who they really were. The only member of the Minutemen to not accept this compromise, Hooded Justice, resigned. Unfortunately, it's implied that he was tracked down in his civilian identity and killed shortly thereafter (probably by the Comedian, due to a previous grudge between them).
* This is a central point in the comic series ''ComicBook/{{Powers}}''. The main characters are [[BuddyCopShow Buddy Cops]] who investigate crimes related to registered and unregistered superpowered heroes and villains. The registration is in effect from the start, and being caught unregistered has a lot of legal woes tied to it. In fact it's even illegal to own a COSTUME unless you're registered which must make fancy dress parties a nightmare in this world. [[spoiler:Things go further for awhile in some issues, when after the local version of Superman goes insane/senile and decides that he's God and tries to enforce morality on the world, the use of any powers becomes illegal]].
** It then lampshades this as of course the ONLY people who follow a law as ridiculous as that are the HEROES. The psychotic supervillains still run riot, the only difference is that now only badly underqualified humans are left to try (and fail) to stop them. In the end the heroes return, realizing that justice is a lot more important than "The Law".

to:

* In the critically acclaimed series ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', the rise of costumed vigilantes in the '30s resulted in Congressional legislation authorizing superhero activities - which was repealed in TheSeventies after fed-up police went on strike nationwide and mass rioting ensued. After the "Keene Act" is passed, the only superheroes permitted to ply their trade legally are those who work full-time for the government, including the world's only genuine superhuman.
**
superhuman. The Minutemen also faced the House Un-American Activities Committee. They came up with a compromise to the request to identify themselves to the committee: Each member was to reveal their identity to ''one'' member of the Committee. That member was to put their name into the enormous stack of names they wanted the FBI to do a background check on without any flags reading 'this person is <Superhero name>'. Then they would speak to the committee as a whole in their costumed persona. As a result, the heroes were investigated in their true identities, while limiting the number of people who knew who they really were. The only member of the Minutemen to not accept this compromise, Hooded Justice, resigned. Unfortunately, it's implied that he was tracked down in his civilian identity and killed shortly thereafter (probably by the Comedian, due to a previous grudge between them).
* This is a central point in the comic series ''ComicBook/{{Powers}}''. The main characters are [[BuddyCopShow Buddy Cops]] who investigate crimes related to registered and unregistered superpowered heroes and villains. The registration is in effect from the start, and being caught unregistered has a lot of legal woes tied to it. In fact it's even illegal to own a COSTUME unless you're registered which must make fancy dress parties a nightmare in this world. [[spoiler:Things go further for awhile in some issues, when after the local version of Superman goes insane/senile and decides that he's God and tries to enforce morality on the world, the use of any powers becomes illegal]].
**
illegal]]. It then lampshades this as of course the ONLY people who follow a law as ridiculous as that are the HEROES. The psychotic supervillains still run riot, the only difference is that now only badly underqualified humans are left to try (and fail) to stop them. In the end the heroes return, realizing that justice is a lot more important than "The Law".



* In ''Literature/{{Sanctioned}}'' all fifteen year olds in Scotland have their DNA tested. Those with the genetic markers that indicate they might become superpowered must undergo a Test Year to unlock and learn to control their powers, or leave the country forever. Anything else is treason, punishable by death.
** Shortly after superpowers first appeared, Glasgow was completely destroyed, with no survivors. More than 80 years later, what actually happened is still a mystery. Most people are happy to accept almost any measure to ensure there is not another Glasgow incident.

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* In ''Literature/{{Sanctioned}}'' all fifteen year olds in Scotland have their DNA tested. Those with the genetic markers that indicate they might become superpowered must undergo a Test Year to unlock and learn to control their powers, or leave the country forever. Anything else is treason, punishable by death. \n** Shortly This is because shortly after superpowers first appeared, Glasgow was completely destroyed, with no survivors. More than 80 years later, what actually happened is still a mystery. Most people are happy to accept almost any measure to ensure there is not another Glasgow incident.



* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', the Imperium of Man makes a point to hunt down psykers, humans with psychic powers. The majority are killed, while the remnants are 'sanctioned' after much conditioning to serve the Imperium in various fashions, or used to [[PoweredByAForsakenChild power their giant space beacon]]. ([[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that untrained psykers minds are open to the Warp, which [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity can make them dangerous]]).
** By "dangerous", we mean that rogue psykers tend to unwittingly summon or even create monstrous [[CosmicHorror Cosmic Horrors]] known as daemons wherever they go, as well as [[SuperPowerMeltdown other]] [[NegativeSpaceWedgie horrible]] [[SuperpoweredEvilSide things]]. A single rogue psyker can cause soul-eating daemons to overrun an ''entire planet'', forcing the Inquisition to come and deliver an EarthShatteringKaboom to the unfortunate world.
** And if the beacon were allowed to go out, the Imperium would collapse and humanity would be eaten by {{Eldritch Abomination}}s.

to:

* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', the Imperium of Man makes a point to hunt down psykers, humans with psychic powers. The majority are killed, while the remnants are 'sanctioned' after much conditioning to serve the Imperium in various fashions, or used to [[PoweredByAForsakenChild power their giant space beacon]]. ([[JustifiedTrope [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that untrained psykers minds are open to the Warp, which [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity can make cause them dangerous]]).
** By "dangerous", we mean that rogue psykers tend
to to unwittingly summon or even create monstrous [[CosmicHorror Cosmic Horrors]] known as daemons wherever they go, as well as [[SuperPowerMeltdown other]] [[NegativeSpaceWedgie horrible]] [[SuperpoweredEvilSide things]]. A single rogue psyker can cause soul-eating daemons to overrun an ''entire planet'', forcing the Inquisition to come and deliver an EarthShatteringKaboom to the unfortunate world.
**
world. And if the beacon were allowed to go out, the Imperium would collapse and humanity would be eaten by {{Eldritch Abomination}}s.



* White Wolf's ''TabletopGame/{{Aberrant}}'' had a rather underhanded variety. While there is no official law requiring Novas to register, their powers tend to be hard to control without specialized training and medical care. Both are available only from Project Utopia, so most of them end up there, policing their "unenlightened" brethren. In the process they're also [[spoiler:'''''unknowingly sterilized.''''' It should be no surprise that the setting concludes with every Nova on Earth discovering this fact and going on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge that pretty much [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt wrecks the entire world]] - after which the authorities [[WrittenByTheWinners destroy all records of their crimes]], claim that [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity all Novas inevitably go insane]], and systematically kill them from that point on.]]
** on a lighter note in the world of Aberrant there also exists image firms like Appellate Lexington, that will register a super identity and make up a costume for you [[spoiler: of course the next page has an anonymous Op Net user declaring the firms as a Utopia net to catch (identify/keep tabs) those Novas that evade Project Utopia's Rashoud Facilities]]

to:

* White Wolf's ''TabletopGame/{{Aberrant}}'' had a rather underhanded variety. While there is no official law requiring Novas to register, their powers tend to be hard to control without specialized training and medical care. Both are available only from Project Utopia, so most of them end up there, policing their "unenlightened" brethren. In the process they're also [[spoiler:'''''unknowingly sterilized.''''' It should be no surprise that the setting concludes with every Nova on Earth discovering this fact and going on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge that pretty much [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt wrecks the entire world]] - after which the authorities [[WrittenByTheWinners destroy all records of their crimes]], claim that [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity all Novas inevitably go insane]], and systematically kill them from that point on.]]
** on
]] On a lighter note note, in the world of Aberrant there also exists image firms like Appellate Lexington, that will register a super identity and make up a costume for you [[spoiler: of course the next page has an anonymous Op Net user declaring the firms as a Utopia net to catch (identify/keep tabs) those Novas that evade Project Utopia's Rashoud Facilities]]



* For ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline'', see Tabletop -> Champions above.



* In the third ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce'' game, it becomes impossible to [[TransformationSequence EM Wave Change]] without first joining up with the Satella Police and getting a "Transcode." As Geo demonstrates in the beginning of the game, trying to Wave Change without a Transcode locks up the Hunter-VG and makes it impossible to use.
** This is for protection, as the ''very first boss'' of the ''very first game'' is actually a normal human that became the host of one of the invading FM-ians, who made him [[FusionDance Wave Change]] in order to [[DemonicPossession take over his body]] and cause chaos, hiding inside his Transer to pass unnoticed. Actually, the same can be said of most of them -- ''including Sonia'' ([[FaceHeelTurn at first]]). Making the device lock up would make unwilling transformations impossible.
* Suprisingly even a kids online game, ''VideoGame/{{Poptropica}}'', has this in effect on Super Power Island.

to:

* In the third ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce'' game, it becomes impossible to [[TransformationSequence EM Wave Change]] without first joining up with the Satella Police and getting a "Transcode." As Geo demonstrates in the beginning of the game, trying to Wave Change without a Transcode locks up the Hunter-VG and makes it impossible to use.
**
use. This is for protection, as the ''very first boss'' of the ''very first game'' is actually a normal human that became the host of one of the invading FM-ians, who made him [[FusionDance Wave Change]] in order to [[DemonicPossession take over his body]] and cause chaos, hiding inside his Transer to pass unnoticed. Actually, the same can be said of most of them -- ''including Sonia'' ([[FaceHeelTurn at first]]). Making the device lock up would make unwilling transformations impossible.
* ZCE Suprisingly even a kids online game, ''VideoGame/{{Poptropica}}'', has this in effect on Super Power Island.



* As an adaptation of the ''Civil War'' story arc mentioned above, ''VideoGame/MarvelUltimateAlliance 2'' has the Superhuman Registration Act as the main source of conflict, although it does not come into play until about the third stage. And the ending is altered so that [[spoiler:a Nanite-controlled Nick Fury becomes TheStarscream and both teams have to work together to beat some sense into him.]]
** This is also a possible ending in the first game: if you fail to save Robert Kelly in Murderworld, he will break out on his own and lobby for a law for mutant registration, which gets passed and results in mutants being sent to "reeducation" camps.

to:

* As an adaptation of the ''Civil War'' story arc mentioned above, ''VideoGame/MarvelUltimateAlliance 2'' has the Superhuman Registration Act as the main source of conflict, although it does not come into play until about the third stage. And the ending is altered so that [[spoiler:a Nanite-controlled Nick Fury becomes TheStarscream and both teams have to work together to beat some sense into him.]]
**
]] This is also a possible ending in the first game: if you fail to save Robert Kelly in Murderworld, he will break out on his own and lobby for a law for mutant registration, which gets passed and results in mutants being sent to "reeducation" camps.
12th Nov '17 5:12:38 AM Tropemania
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* A key aspect in ''WebOriginal/TheColmatonUniverse'', is the Super Power Registry, which leads to occasional conflicts here and there between Registered and Unregistered Supers from time to time, especially early on.
28th Sep '17 12:23:25 AM PaulA
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* Imagers (basically mages) in Creator/LEModesittJR's Imager Portfolio are required to join the Collegium. This organization is run by and filled with Imagers, and occupies a venerable but somewhat precarious place in the local power structure. It trains imagers, keeps them out of trouble, and acts as something of a special ops/intelligence/research agency for the governmental council.

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* Imagers (basically mages) in Creator/LEModesittJR's Imager Portfolio ''Literature/ImagerPortfolio'' are required to join the Collegium. This organization is run by and filled with Imagers, and occupies a venerable but somewhat precarious place in the local power structure. It trains imagers, keeps them out of trouble, and acts as something of a special ops/intelligence/research agency for the governmental council.
11th Sep '17 11:15:15 PM Lanes17B
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* Both adaptations of ''ComicBook/TheTick'' show the D-category version of this trope. In [[Series/TheTick the first adaptation,]] there are no background checks, just filling out a simple form is enough to get a superhero license. In [[TheTick2016 the second adaptation,]] the 28th amendment was ratified to prevent the authorities from publicly releasing a hero's SecretIdentity, and the organization behind it, [=AEGIS=], is apparently suffering from budget cuts and cops often don't bother contacting [=AEGIS=] because of [[VastBureaucracy the red tape involved.]]
10th Sep '17 3:50:38 PM CosmicFerret
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* This happened when reality got changed so that Superman, Wonder Woman, and Batman never existed in the 2009 series ''Trinity''. The alternate [[TheFlash Flash]] delivers an epic WhatTheHellHero when he orders the solders trying to arrest him (in the middle of a battle against supervillains!) to do something useful and actually ''be'' heroes.

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* This happened when reality got changed so that Superman, Wonder Woman, and Batman never existed in the 2009 series ''Trinity''. The alternate [[TheFlash [[ComicBook/TheFlash Flash]] delivers an epic WhatTheHellHero when he orders the solders trying to arrest him (in the middle of a battle against supervillains!) to do something useful and actually ''be'' heroes.
10th Sep '17 3:46:51 PM CosmicFerret
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27th Aug '17 2:13:57 AM Hanz
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** It also explores the role of BadassNormal heroes since they wouldn't apply to the new rules. Knuckle Buster is a big strong dude remiscent of Marv from ''Sin City'', the Punisher and Batman. He's also a normal person who just fights with brass knuckles yet can go evenly with ''Eraserhead.'' In fact, once Eraserhead sees his Quirk-nullifying Quirk has no affect on Knuckle, he stops fighting him. Since Knucke Buster has no Quirk, he doesn't fall under the hero jurisdication of unregistered Quirk usage. Presumably, it would fall under older rules of vigilantism, but it shows that despite things changing, some stuff remains the same.

to:

** It also explores the role of BadassNormal heroes since they wouldn't apply to the new rules. Knuckle Buster Duster is a big strong dude remiscent reminiscent of Marv from ''Sin City'', the Punisher and Batman. He's also a normal person who just fights with brass knuckles yet can go evenly with ''Eraserhead.'' ''Eraserhead''. In fact, once Eraserhead sees his Quirk-nullifying Quirk has no affect on Knuckle, he stops fighting him. Since Knucke Buster Knuckle duster has no Quirk, he doesn't fall under the hero jurisdication jurisdiction of unregistered Quirk usage. Presumably, it would fall under older rules of vigilantism, but it shows that despite things changing, some stuff remains the same.
16th Aug '17 11:01:57 AM DVB
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** Furthermore, it's spin-off series, ''Illegals'', focuses on unregistered vigilantes. The main protagonist actually applied to the heroing school, but ended up unable to enter, ironically [[spoiler: because he was late for it because he was saving someone else's life.]] Furthermore, it also shows that the 20% of powerless human beings still play a part. Knuckle Buster is a big strong dude remiscent of Marv from ''Sin City'', the Punisher and Batman. He's also a normal person who just fights with brass knuckles yet can go evenly with ''Eraserhead.'' The latter even admits he's not sure what to do with Knuckle since the rules only apply to people with unregistered Quirks and not a BadassNormal like Knuckle.

to:

** Furthermore, it's spin-off series, ''Illegals'', series (taking place years before the main one), ''Manga/VigilanteMyHeroAcademiaIllegals'', focuses on unregistered vigilantes. The main protagonist protagonist, Kouichi Haimawari, actually applied to the heroing school, but ended up unable to enter, ironically [[spoiler: because he was late for it because he was saving someone else's life.]] Furthermore, it also shows that the 20% of powerless human beings While he still play does its best, it's clear that being unregistered has its downsides.
*** The big example is when he meets Tensei Iida, Tenya's older brother. The two hit off splendidly, with the latter helping the former better utilize his sliding Quirk and even offers him
a part.card for a potential job at his organization. However, things change when he realizes Kouichi is a Vigiliante when he helps stop a villin. While Tensei is more than happy for the help and doesn't report him, he ends up asking for the card back since he can't endorse what is essentially a lawbreaker, much to Kouichi's dismay.
** It also explores the role of BadassNormal heroes since they wouldn't apply to the new rules.
Knuckle Buster is a big strong dude remiscent of Marv from ''Sin City'', the Punisher and Batman. He's also a normal person who just fights with brass knuckles yet can go evenly with ''Eraserhead.'' The latter even admits he's not sure what to do with Knuckle since In fact, once Eraserhead sees his Quirk-nullifying Quirk has no affect on Knuckle, he stops fighting him. Since Knucke Buster has no Quirk, he doesn't fall under the rules only apply to people with hero jurisdication of unregistered Quirks and not a BadassNormal like Knuckle.Quirk usage. Presumably, it would fall under older rules of vigilantism, but it shows that despite things changing, some stuff remains the same.
16th Aug '17 10:50:51 AM DVB
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** Furthermore, it's spin-off series, ''Illegals'', focuses on unregistered vigilantes. The main protagonist actually applied to the heroing school, but ended up unable to enter, ironically [[spoiler: because he was late for it because he was saving someone else's life.]] Furthermore, it also shows that the 20% of powerless human beings still play a part. Knuckle Buster is a big strong dude remiscent of Marv from ''Sin City'', the Punisher and Batman. He's also a normal person who just fights with brass knuckles yet can go evenly with ''Eraserhead.'' The latter even admits he's not sure what to do with Knuckle since the rules only apply to people with unregistered Quirks and not a BadassNormal like Knuckle.
This list shows the last 10 events of 148. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SuperRegistrationAct