History Main / SlidingScaleOfCharacterAppreciation

29th May '16 1:14:07 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The {{Badass}}: {{Badass}} is an adjective used to describe a character who gets away with outright insane stunts (defusing a bomb with their teeth, [[DidYouJustScamCthulhu conning a mob boss]], [[OneManArmy getting into a firefight with the entire army]], etc.) that would be very hard to pull off in RealLife, or would get the person trying it killed several times over. A badass is a fantasy figure whom the audience roots for precisely because of how prone they are to [[MomentOfAwesome awesome moments]], to the point where they stretch or break the WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief. Of course, WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief may still be maintained depending on the mechanics of the universe.
3rd May '16 9:36:50 AM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The EscapistCharacter: So you just picked up this book about a character who's powerful, [[TheAce incredibly talented]], [[ChickMagnet irresistible to the opposite sex]], [[MosesInTheBullrushes long-lost]] {{royal|Blood}}ty, and FriendToAllLivingThings. Sounds like a horrible MarySue story, right? Except that you don't mind at all. Instead, you're seeing yourself in their shoes and enjoying it. After all, ''everyone'' likes to fantasize about being awesome once in a while. You can argue over whether or not they're a MarySue, but they're definitely an EscapistCharacter. While MarySue is generally defined as being a bad thing, some of the most widely loved characters in existence are {{Escapist Character}}s with any number of CommonMarySueTraits. While a badly written EscapistCharacter can come off as a MarySue, the key difference between the two is that a MarySue is ''[[AuthorAppeal the author's]]'' wish fulfillment fantasy, while the Escapist Character also functions as the ''{{audience|Surrogate}}'s'' wish fulfillment fantasy.

to:

* The EscapistCharacter: So you just picked up this book about a character who's powerful, [[TheAce incredibly talented]], [[ChickMagnet irresistible to the opposite sex]], [[MosesInTheBullrushes [[MosesInTheBulrushes long-lost]] {{royal|Blood}}ty, and FriendToAllLivingThings. Sounds like a horrible MarySue story, right? Except that you don't mind at all. Instead, you're seeing yourself in their shoes and enjoying it. After all, ''everyone'' likes to fantasize about being awesome once in a while. You can argue over whether or not they're a MarySue, but they're definitely an EscapistCharacter. While MarySue is generally defined as being a bad thing, some of the most widely loved characters in existence are {{Escapist Character}}s with any number of CommonMarySueTraits. While a badly written EscapistCharacter can come off as a MarySue, the key difference between the two is that a MarySue is ''[[AuthorAppeal the author's]]'' wish fulfillment fantasy, while the Escapist Character also functions as the ''{{audience|Surrogate}}'s'' wish fulfillment fantasy.
26th Feb '16 9:34:54 PM Hylarn
Is there an issue? Send a Message
2nd Nov '15 5:51:55 PM MarkLungo
Is there an issue? Send a Message
14th May '15 5:42:10 PM CyberTiger88
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** LethallyStupid
20th Mar '15 9:35:35 PM N1KF
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[/index]]

to:

[[/index]][[/index]]

----
18th Jan '15 12:56:44 PM azul120
Is there an issue? Send a Message


While having good characters doesn't make a good story, there are some characters who can make or break a series simply by walking onstage. On the one hand, you can have [[EnsembleDarkhorse a minor character]] from an obscure and poorly liked series who nonetheless inspires thousands of [[FanFic fanfics]]. On the other hand, some characters are [[TheScrappy so hated by fans]] that some feel the only way the show will ever be watchable again is to [[DroppedABridgeOnHim write the character out of existence]]. If the negative audience reaction is coming from outside the target demographic it is a PeripheryHatedom.

to:

While having good characters doesn't make a good story, there are some characters who can make or break a series simply by walking onstage. On the one hand, you can have [[EnsembleDarkhorse a minor character]] from an obscure and poorly liked series who nonetheless inspires thousands of [[FanFic fanfics]].{{fanfic}}s. On the other hand, some characters are [[TheScrappy so hated by fans]] that some feel the only way the show will ever be watchable again is to [[DroppedABridgeOnHim write the character out of existence]]. If the negative audience reaction is coming from outside the target demographic it is a PeripheryHatedom.



[[folder: Characters Who Impress Us Once]]

to:

[[folder: Characters [[folder:Characters Who Impress Us Once]]
Once]]






[[folder: Characters We Love To See, Even If Just Standing In The Background]]

to:

[[folder: Characters [[folder:Characters We Love To See, Even If Just Standing In The Background]]
Background]]



[[folder: Villains We Sympathize With]]

to:

[[folder: Villains [[folder:Villains We Sympathize With]]







* The MagnificentBastard: If there was ever a character that deserved to be called “Magnificent”, that character is the MagnificentBastard. The MagnificentBastard is what happens when you combine TheChessmaster, TheTrickster, and the ManipulativeBastard: bold, charismatic, independent, and audacious. Capturing the audience with his charisma, incredible intellect, mastery of manipulation, and boldness of action, this character is a show-stealer, demanding your reverence at every turn.

to:

\n* The MagnificentBastard: If there was ever a character that deserved to be called “Magnificent”, that character is the MagnificentBastard. The MagnificentBastard is what happens when you combine TheChessmaster, TheTrickster, and the ManipulativeBastard: bold, charismatic, independent, and audacious. Capturing the audience with his charisma, incredible intellect, mastery of manipulation, and boldness of action, this character is a show-stealer, demanding your reverence at every turn. \n







* The DracoInLeatherPants: When a fandom takes a controversial or downright villainous character and downplays his/her flaws, often turning him/her into an object of desire and/or a victim in the process. This can cause conflicts if the writers are not willing to {{retool}} the character to fit this demand. In fanfiction, they are frequently the love object of the local MarySue, who [[LoveRedeems uses the power of love to redeem the character]] or are part of a [[FixFic fix fic]] to save the character. In extreme cases, the affection these characters receive from fans can lead them to forget that ''[[MisaimedFandom they're actually still supposed to be villains]]''. Or, on the flip side, any crimes the character commits can be rationalized, while any insult from the hero towards the villain is cast as deplorably mean. Common reasons for this include the character being wicked in a [[WickedCultured classy]] or [[EvilIsCool cool]] way. A physically attractive character is much more likely to be subject to this trope than a physically ugly one or it can be the result from certain fans sympathizing greatly with the villain's backstory in which case it overlaps with UnintentionallySympathetic Villain or JerkassWoobie or WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds. Sometimes this is the result of the villain coming off as less evil than other villains in the story also (like the trope namer, who was a mere annoyance as opposed to [[BigBad Lord Voldemort]]).

to:

\n* The DracoInLeatherPants: When a fandom takes a controversial or downright villainous character and downplays his/her flaws, often turning him/her into an object of desire and/or a victim in the process. This can cause conflicts if the writers are not willing to {{retool}} the character to fit this demand. In fanfiction, they are frequently the love object of the local MarySue, who [[LoveRedeems uses the power of love to redeem the character]] or are part of a [[FixFic fix fic]] to save the character. In extreme cases, the affection these characters receive from fans can lead them to forget that ''[[MisaimedFandom they're actually still supposed to be villains]]''. Or, on the flip side, any crimes the character commits can be rationalized, while any insult from the hero towards the villain is cast as deplorably mean. Common reasons for this include the character being wicked in a [[WickedCultured classy]] or [[EvilIsCool cool]] way. A physically attractive character is much more likely to be subject to this trope than a physically ugly one or it can be the result from certain fans sympathizing greatly with the villain's backstory in which case it overlaps with UnintentionallySympathetic Villain or JerkassWoobie or WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds. Sometimes this is the result of the villain coming off as less evil than other villains in the story also (like the trope namer, who was a mere annoyance as opposed to [[BigBad Lord Voldemort]]). \n







[[folder: Characters We Love To See Suffer]]

to:

\n[[folder: Characters [[folder:Characters We Love To See Suffer]]




* TheChewToy: An odd sort of polar opposite to TheWoobie, The Chew Toy is a character the audience loves specifically ''because'' his or her misery amuses them so. The Chew Toy is roughed up or messed with on a constant basis... and is always, ''always'' [[PlayedForLaughs used for comic effect and treated with a light touch]], generally [[ComedicSociopathy glossing over the meaner undertones of the idea]]. Unlike Woobification, Chew Toys are generally designated as such in the series proper, and often have a tendency to bemoan their fate. If they're lucky, the writers will ThrowTheDogABone a time or two. If they're unlucky, they'll YankTheDogsChain. It can sometimes be a delicate balance. [[ThrowTheDogABone Throw]] too often and the character can be {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed into TheEeyore; {{Yank|TheDogsChain}} too much and the audience [[DesignatedMonkey may no longer find it funny]].

to:

\n* TheChewToy: An odd sort of polar opposite to TheWoobie, The Chew Toy is a character the audience loves specifically ''because'' his or her misery amuses them so. The Chew Toy is roughed up or messed with on a constant basis... and is always, ''always'' [[PlayedForLaughs used for comic effect and treated with a light touch]], generally [[ComedicSociopathy glossing over the meaner undertones of the idea]]. Unlike Woobification, Chew Toys are generally designated as such in the series proper, and often have a tendency to bemoan their fate. If they're lucky, the writers will ThrowTheDogABone a time or two. If they're unlucky, they'll YankTheDogsChain. It can sometimes be a delicate balance. [[ThrowTheDogABone Throw]] Throw too often and the character can be {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed into TheEeyore; {{Yank|TheDogsChain}} Yank too much and the audience [[DesignatedMonkey [[DudeNotFunny may no longer find it funny]].
funny]].









[[folder: Characters Who Allow Us To Live Vicariously]]

to:

[[folder: Characters [[folder:Characters Who Allow Us To Live Vicariously]]







* The EscapistCharacter: So you just picked up this book about a character who's powerful, [[TheAce incredibly talented]], [[ChickMagnet irresistible to the opposite sex]], [[MosesInTheBullrushes long-lost]] [[RoyalBlood royalty]], and FriendToAllLivingThings. Sounds like a horrible MarySue story, right? Except that you don't mind at all. Instead, you're seeing yourself in their shoes and enjoying it. After all, ''everyone'' likes to fantasize about being awesome once in a while. You can argue over whether or not they're a MarySue, but they're definitely an EscapistCharacter. While MarySue is generally defined as being a bad thing, some of the most widely loved characters in existence are {{Escapist Character}}s with any number of CommonMarySueTraits. While a badly written EscapistCharacter can come off as a MarySue, the key difference between the two is that a MarySue is ''[[AuthorAppeal the author's]]'' wish fulfillment fantasy, while the Escapist Character also functions as the ''[[AudienceSurrogate audience's]]'' wish fulfillment fantasy.

to:

\n* The EscapistCharacter: So you just picked up this book about a character who's powerful, [[TheAce incredibly talented]], [[ChickMagnet irresistible to the opposite sex]], [[MosesInTheBullrushes long-lost]] [[RoyalBlood royalty]], {{royal|Blood}}ty, and FriendToAllLivingThings. Sounds like a horrible MarySue story, right? Except that you don't mind at all. Instead, you're seeing yourself in their shoes and enjoying it. After all, ''everyone'' likes to fantasize about being awesome once in a while. You can argue over whether or not they're a MarySue, but they're definitely an EscapistCharacter. While MarySue is generally defined as being a bad thing, some of the most widely loved characters in existence are {{Escapist Character}}s with any number of CommonMarySueTraits. While a badly written EscapistCharacter can come off as a MarySue, the key difference between the two is that a MarySue is ''[[AuthorAppeal the author's]]'' wish fulfillment fantasy, while the Escapist Character also functions as the ''[[AudienceSurrogate audience's]]'' ''{{audience|Surrogate}}'s'' wish fulfillment fantasy.
fantasy.



[[folder: Villains We Love To Hate]]

to:

[[folder: Villains [[folder:Villains We Love To Hate]]
Hate]]




* The MagnificentBastard

to:

\n* The MagnificentBastard
ManipulativeBastard






[[folder: Heroes We Love To Root For]]

to:

[[folder: Heroes [[folder:Heroes We Love To Root For]]









[[folder: We Love To Watch Them Get Needlessly Killed]]

to:

[[folder: We [[folder:We Love To Watch Them Get Needlessly Killed]]
Killed]]






[[folder: We Love To See Them Semi-Naked]]

* [[MrFanservice Mr.]] and MsFanservice: The [[SpearCounterpart brother]] of [[MsFanservice his counterpart]], MrFanservice provides similar eye candy for women. It can be an effective way to bring in female viewers, even in a series [[PeripheryDemographic directed towards males]]. In order for a guy to qualify as MrFanservice, just being attractive isn't enough. He needs to sport a reasonably fit physique. In particular, he can have anything between muscular limbs, broad shoulders and/or sculpted abs (between six-packs and eight-packs). The muscles can be either lean or bulging; as long as you can see them, they count. He needs to be subjected to ''at least'' one ShirtlessScene, or he can take it a step further by deciding to [[WalkingShirtlessScene forgo a shirt entirely]]. Just like his aforementioned counterpart, he can wear tight clothing, which shows off his body without bearing skin. He can wear anything (or [[CensorSteam nothing]], that works too), as long as these clothes accentuate or reveal his muscles. He can also [[GenderFlipped gender flip]] the ReluctantFanserviceGirl, ShamelessFanserviceGirl and InnocentFanserviceGirl tropes.

to:

[[folder: We [[folder:We Love To See Them Semi-Naked]]

Semi-Naked]]
* [[MrFanservice Mr.]] {{Mr|Fanservice}}. and MsFanservice: The [[SpearCounterpart brother]] of [[MsFanservice his counterpart]], MrFanservice provides similar eye candy for women. It can be an effective way to bring in female viewers, even in a series [[PeripheryDemographic directed towards males]]. In order for a guy to qualify as MrFanservice, just being attractive isn't enough. He needs to sport a reasonably fit physique. In particular, he can have anything between muscular limbs, broad shoulders and/or sculpted abs (between six-packs and eight-packs). The muscles can be either lean or bulging; as long as you can see them, they count. He needs to be subjected to ''at least'' one ShirtlessScene, or he can take it a step further by deciding to [[WalkingShirtlessScene forgo a shirt entirely]]. Just like his aforementioned counterpart, he can wear tight clothing, which shows off his body without bearing skin. He can wear anything (or [[CensorSteam nothing]], that works too), as long as these clothes accentuate or reveal his muscles. He can also [[GenderFlipped gender flip]] the ReluctantFanserviceGirl, ShamelessFanserviceGirl and InnocentFanserviceGirl tropes.



[[folder: Characters We Hate To Watch]]

to:

[[folder: Characters [[folder:Characters We Hate To Watch]]
















* CreatorsPet: There are certain characters who receive [[TheScrappy a lot of hatred from the fanbase]] for one reason or another. Most often, when their creators pick up on the hate, they have a couple options. They can ignore it, [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap tweak the character into a more likable version]], or even [[TakeThatScrappy play it for laughs.]] Sometimes, however, the creator(s) have become so attached to this character for whatever reason, whether because they see something of themselves in the character or the character reminds them of someone they were close to or the character represents something they admire, that they decide to increasingly [[CharacterFocus focus on him]], magnifying the importance of his role, and having the other characters [[CharacterShilling talk about how awesome he is]], in painful ignorance of -- or sometimes in spite of -- the fans' obvious hatred.

* TheScrappy, and all subtropes thereof

to:

\n* CreatorsPet: There are certain characters who receive [[TheScrappy a lot of hatred from the fanbase]] for one reason or another. Most often, when their creators pick up on the hate, they have a couple options. They can ignore it, [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap tweak the character into a more likable version]], or even [[TakeThatScrappy play it for laughs.]] Sometimes, however, the creator(s) have become so attached to this character for whatever reason, whether because they see something of themselves in the character or the character reminds them of someone they were close to or the character represents something they admire, that they decide to increasingly [[CharacterFocus focus on him]], magnifying the importance of his role, and having the other characters [[CharacterShilling talk about how awesome he is]], in painful ignorance of -- or sometimes in spite of -- the fans' obvious hatred.

hatred.
* TheScrappy, and all subtropes thereof
thereof:












[[/index]]
----

to:

[[/index]]
----
[[/index]]
9th Dec '14 6:14:33 PM Dragon-Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:


* The HateSink
2nd Aug '14 6:58:58 PM iansimsjam
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Anyone who goes through CharacterDerailment. A character who evolves from a well-established character to a totally different character ([[ThePlotDemandedThisIndex without rhyme or reason]]) is a sign of a DorkAge. You'll be confused why he or she has changed so drastically [[MakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext even within the context of the story]].
23rd Jul '14 10:06:01 AM BibsDibs
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The DracoInLeatherPants: When a fandom takes a controversial or downright villainous character and downplays his/her flaws, often turning him/her into an object of desire and/or a victim in the process. This can cause conflicts if the writers are not willing to {{retool}} the character to fit this demand. In fanfiction, they are frequently the love object of the local MarySue, who [[LoveRedeems uses the power of love to redeem the character]] or are part of a [[FixFic fix fic]] to save the character. In extreme cases, the affection these characters receive from fans can lead them to forget that ''[[MisaimedFandom they're actually still supposed to be villains]]''. Or, on the flip side, any crimes the character commits can be rationalized, while any insult from the hero towards the villain is cast as deplorably mean. Common reasons for this include the character being wicked in a [[WickedCultured classy]] or [[EvilIsCool cool]] way. A physically attractive character is much more likely to be subject to this trope than a physically ugly one or it can be the result from certain fans sympathizing greatly with the villain's backstory in which case it overlaps with UnintentionallySympatheticVillain or JerkassWoobie or WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds. Sometimes this is the result of the villain coming off as less evil than other villains in the story also (like the trope namer, who was a mere annoyance as opposed to [[BigBad Lord Voldemort]]).

to:

* The DracoInLeatherPants: When a fandom takes a controversial or downright villainous character and downplays his/her flaws, often turning him/her into an object of desire and/or a victim in the process. This can cause conflicts if the writers are not willing to {{retool}} the character to fit this demand. In fanfiction, they are frequently the love object of the local MarySue, who [[LoveRedeems uses the power of love to redeem the character]] or are part of a [[FixFic fix fic]] to save the character. In extreme cases, the affection these characters receive from fans can lead them to forget that ''[[MisaimedFandom they're actually still supposed to be villains]]''. Or, on the flip side, any crimes the character commits can be rationalized, while any insult from the hero towards the villain is cast as deplorably mean. Common reasons for this include the character being wicked in a [[WickedCultured classy]] or [[EvilIsCool cool]] way. A physically attractive character is much more likely to be subject to this trope than a physically ugly one or it can be the result from certain fans sympathizing greatly with the villain's backstory in which case it overlaps with UnintentionallySympatheticVillain UnintentionallySympathetic Villain or JerkassWoobie or WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds. Sometimes this is the result of the villain coming off as less evil than other villains in the story also (like the trope namer, who was a mere annoyance as opposed to [[BigBad Lord Voldemort]]).
This list shows the last 10 events of 42. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SlidingScaleOfCharacterAppreciation