History Main / ShotToTheHeart

15th Aug '16 9:20:42 AM Gitman
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Shot to the Heart is when an injection of adrenaline is administered directly into a patient's heart, usually by a forceful stab. This can be done for a number of reasons, usually to restart a stopped heart or to restore or maintain consciousness. If the injured person is particularly {{badass}} or [[{{Determinator}} determined]], he may even do it to himself so he can stay conscious long enough to save the day.

The trope was made popular by 1994's ''Film/PulpFiction'', when hitman Vincent Vega does it to save the life of Mia Wallace, who has OD'd on heroin and also happens to be his boss's wife. Today it's right up there with a [[InstantDramaJustAddTracheotomy tracheotomy]] when you need some [[RuleOfDrama drama]], but in reality, this is a '''''very bad idea''''' and a good way to kill your patient. While epinephrine (adrenaline) is used to treat several ailments from anaphylactic shock to cardiac arrest, no doctor since about 1990 would ''ever'' treat a patient by stabbing them in the heart with a giant needle. In the past, an intra-cardiac injection ''was'' used very sparingly, but only by trained medical personnel, only if the heart was ''completely'' stopped and only if every other option was exhausted. In a modern hospital, if you need a drug to get to the heart quickly, it goes into a vein, with chest compressions used to move the blood in the event of cardiac arrest.

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Shot to the Heart is when an injection of adrenaline (clinically termed epinephrine) is administered directly into a patient's heart, usually by a forceful stab. This can be done for a number of reasons, usually to restart a stopped heart or to restore or maintain consciousness. If the injured person is particularly {{badass}} or [[{{Determinator}} determined]], he may even do it to himself so he can stay conscious long enough to save the day.

The trope was made popular by 1994's ''Film/PulpFiction'', when hitman Vincent Vega does it to save the life of Mia Wallace, who has OD'd on heroin and also happens to be his boss's wife. Today it's right up there with a [[InstantDramaJustAddTracheotomy tracheotomy]] when you need some [[RuleOfDrama drama]], but in reality, this is a '''''very bad idea''''' and a good way to kill your patient. While epinephrine (adrenaline) is used to treat several ailments from anaphylactic shock to cardiac arrest, no doctor since about 1990 would ''ever'' treat a patient by stabbing them in the heart with a giant needle. In the past, an intra-cardiac injection ''was'' used very sparingly, but only by trained medical personnel, only if the heart was ''completely'' stopped and only if every other option was exhausted. In a modern hospital, if you need a drug to get to the heart quickly, it goes into a vein, with chest compressions used to move the blood in the event of cardiac arrest.
20th Jun '16 10:56:43 PM gewunomox
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* The song "Kickstart My Heart" by MotleyCrue was supposedly inspired by Nikki Sixx being revived by an adrenaline shot to the heart after almost dying of a heroin overdose.

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* The song "Kickstart My Heart" by MotleyCrue Music/MotleyCrue was supposedly inspired by Nikki Sixx being revived by an adrenaline shot to the heart after almost dying of a heroin overdose.
24th Mar '16 10:09:35 AM IamGrif28
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[[folder:Web Original]]
* {{Conversed}} on a web page ''Two Evil Monks''. In their snarky yet affectionate {{MST}}-like commentary, they inform readers that records confirm that administering Adrenaline-in-the-Heart is becoming televised treatment of choice. It's a part of their picture spam recap of the ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' episode "Out of Gas" and the episode "The Enemy Walks In" from ''Series/{{Alias}}''. [[http://www.twoevilmonks.org/firefly/season1/ff107p03.htm See two screen grabs and the commentary at top of the page.]]
* ''Website/SFDebris'': {{Conversed}} by SF Debris while reviewing and {{MST}}ing ''Series/{{Firefly}}'''s "Out of Gas". Chuck says that you really shouldn't take medical advice from Creator/QuentinTarantino's movies, referencing the famous scene from ''Pulp Fiction''.


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[[folder:WebOriginal]]
* {{Conversed}} on a web page ''Two Evil Monks''. In their snarky yet affectionate {{MST}}-like commentary, they inform readers that records confirm that administering Adrenaline-in-the-Heart is becoming televised treatment of choice. It's a part of their picture spam recap of the ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' episode "Out of Gas" and the episode "The Enemy Walks In" from ''Series/{{Alias}}''. [[http://www.twoevilmonks.org/firefly/season1/ff107p03.htm See two screen grabs and the commentary at top of the page.]]
* ''Website/SFDebris'': {{Conversed}} by SF Debris while reviewing and {{MST}}ing ''Series/{{Firefly}}'''s "Out of Gas". Chuck says that you really shouldn't take medical advice from Creator/QuentinTarantino's movies, referencing the famous scene from ''Pulp Fiction''.
[[/folder]]
19th Mar '16 2:17:04 PM nombretomado
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* On ''TheBigBangTheory'', Sheldon tries to prank Howard with an ElectricJoyBuzzer, but Howard appears to collapse from a heart attack and is instructed to stab a syringe of adrenaline straight through his heart. It all turns out to be a counter-prank.

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* On ''TheBigBangTheory'', ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'', Sheldon tries to prank Howard with an ElectricJoyBuzzer, but Howard appears to collapse from a heart attack and is instructed to stab a syringe of adrenaline straight through his heart. It all turns out to be a counter-prank.



* Happens on ''DowntonAbbey'' - though it's 1912 and this is a new and relatively unusual treatment, and thus [[CoolOldLady Isobel]] has to go behind the stuffy, snobbish Dowager Countess's back to get the doctor to try it on a patient who would otherwise die.

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* Happens on ''DowntonAbbey'' ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' - though it's 1912 and this is a new and relatively unusual treatment, and thus [[CoolOldLady Isobel]] has to go behind the stuffy, snobbish Dowager Countess's back to get the doctor to try it on a patient who would otherwise die.



* In the case of Series/ChicagoFire where a patient is suffering from cardiac tamponade (blood/fluid collecting in the pericardium), Paramedic Dawson performs pericardiocentesis in the field, draining the fluid from the sac encasing the heart and saving the patient, but accidentally puncturing the heart muscle in the process. While this intervention and even the outcome is pretty realistic, no medic liking their job would attempt such a thing.

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* In the case of Series/ChicagoFire ''Series/ChicagoFire'' where a patient is suffering from cardiac tamponade (blood/fluid collecting in the pericardium), Paramedic Dawson performs pericardiocentesis in the field, draining the fluid from the sac encasing the heart and saving the patient, but accidentally puncturing the heart muscle in the process. While this intervention and even the outcome is pretty realistic, no medic liking their job would attempt such a thing.
19th Mar '16 2:04:53 AM Hossmeister
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24th Feb '16 2:07:46 PM laughingmanxx19
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[[folder:WesternAnimation]]
* In the ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' episode "Rixty Minutes", we see an alternate universe Jerry who never married Beth and became a super-famous actor (if the movies we see in this universe are any indication, TomHanks levels of famous actor). At one point, we see this Jerry on copious amounts of several substances, including a hypodermic needle sticking out of his chest (indicating this treatment was done to him off-screen).
30th Jan '16 5:21:47 PM FGHIK
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A subtrope of ArtisticLicenseMedicine. Compare HealingShiv. See also InstantDramaJustAddTracheotomy and MagicalDefibrillator for similar use of emergency medical procedures for drama.

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A subtrope of ArtisticLicenseMedicine. Compare HealingShiv. See also InstantDramaJustAddTracheotomy and MagicalDefibrillator for similar use of emergency medical procedures for drama. \n [[IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with]] shooting someone in the heart with a weapon.
28th Jan '16 10:44:18 AM Morgenthaler
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* Parodied in ''TimeGentlemenPlease'', with a scythe instead of a syringe, and a strong spanish beer for adrenaline.

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* Parodied in ''TimeGentlemenPlease'', ''Series/TimeGentlemenPlease'', with a scythe instead of a syringe, and a strong spanish beer for adrenaline.
24th Jan '16 5:15:24 AM mephistos
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* In the case of Series/ChicagoFire, where a patient is suffering from cardiac tamponade (blood/fluid collecting in the pericardium). Paramedic Dawson performs pericardiocentesis in the field, draining the fluid constricting the heart and saving the patient. While this intervention and even the outcome is pretty realistic, no medic liking their job would attempt such a thing.

to:

* In the case of Series/ChicagoFire, Series/ChicagoFire where a patient is suffering from cardiac tamponade (blood/fluid collecting in the pericardium). pericardium), Paramedic Dawson performs pericardiocentesis in the field, draining the fluid constricting from the sac encasing the heart and saving the patient.patient, but accidentally puncturing the heart muscle in the process. While this intervention and even the outcome is pretty realistic, no medic liking their job would attempt such a thing.
24th Jan '16 5:11:58 AM mephistos
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Added DiffLines:

* In the case of Series/ChicagoFire, where a patient is suffering from cardiac tamponade (blood/fluid collecting in the pericardium). Paramedic Dawson performs pericardiocentesis in the field, draining the fluid constricting the heart and saving the patient. While this intervention and even the outcome is pretty realistic, no medic liking their job would attempt such a thing.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ShotToTheHeart